Archive for ‘Uncategorized’

June 22, 2011

radiustrack

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Even though our work always gets covered up, we’re honored to share in our

customer’s pride in creating landmark buildings throughout the world.

Radius Track is the leading expert and your single source resource for curved, cold-formed steel framing. We offer consulting, 3D design and 3D modeling services, BIM (Building Information Modeling) integrated project delivery expertise, structural engineering calculations, bid and quote assistance, custom-curved framing components, engineered dome framing solutions, Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) solutions, parametric modeling and intelligent modeling services, construction documents, shop drawings and virtual design services. We also manufacturer Ready-Track®, Ready-Arch® and Ready-Angle® hand-formable products for curved steel-gauge framing and Radius Track Bender® and Radius Trim Bender® hand tools. Our curved framing solutions save you significant time and money because they install quickly and reliably for precise, accurate curved surfaces. Radius Track innovations simplify even complex projects like exterior domes, curved trusses. soffits and compound surfaces 
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http://www.radiustrack.com/index.php

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May 23, 2011

prefab concrete panel in facade | Carreño Sartori Arquitectos

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Courtesy of Carreño Sartori Arquitectos

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Cristóbal Palma

Section A Section A

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Cristóbal Palma

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Cristóbal Palma

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Cristóbal Palma

Site Plan Site Plan

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Cristóbal Palma

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Courtesy of Carreño Sartori Arquitectos

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Cristóbal Palma

Salamanca City Hall / Carreño Sartori Arquitectos © Cristóbal Palma

Architects: Carreño Sartori Arquitectos / Mario Carreño Zunino, Piera Sartori del Campo
Location: Salamanca, Chile
Collaborator: Pamela Jarpa Rosa
Client: Municipality of Salamanca
Construction: INCOBAL Construction
Structural Engineering: SyS. Mauricio Sarrazin A.
Electrical Engineering: ICG S.A.
Services: Roberto Pavéz
Project Area: 4400 sqm
Project Year: 2008-2010
Photographs: Cristóbal Palma

The city of Salamanca, is located in an inner valley at the base of the Choapa River, a minning and rural area. The surrounding landscape includes a long narrow agriculture strip surrounded by vertical arid slopes. This project introduces a new height for the present low construction city. This height does not mean a tower that can be seen from outside, but instead a five floor building understood as an interior in relation to the valley.

The site is adjacent to the city’s main square, Plaza de Armas de Salamanca. The first intuition was to start the building tour from enlarged public sidewalk, thinking the building as part of an urban situation.

The building contains a ramp system, which runs through an interior space opened to the landscape from ground level up to the terrace on the top floor, bringing together the various municipal services. To receive the ramps, two independent structures are based from the ground floor with a level mismatch. The ramps connect both volumes, complemented by two staircases -one at each end- which serves as shortcuts for work teams and the public.

This whole space where programmed complexity converges, receives a large number of people daily, consolidating the public nature of the building. This building proposes a meeting place for a tight community, as it is a town of no more than 12,000 inhabitants. All floor levels open to this main space, where worker teams receive the public in a relaxed atmosphere, brought inside the building by distant landscape views.

The physical attributes of the interior are activated to ventilate the place by convection, taking air in an underground yard and venting it in the top. It is naturally illuminating with a skylight at the top of the route and a  wall facing north. With an eave six meters wide, the building regulates the light in winter and summer, in the geometric relationship with the south hemisphere solar tour.

The journey upward from the urban ground to the fourth floor progresses from public to private with public programs in the lower levels, which are more open to the community, to more private programs in the upper levels.

In each level, departments are distributed perpendicularly along the length of the building. From the receipts of the ramps you go through a series of layers to reach the inner offices, where the river and northern slopes of the valley are seen.

The building process started with a seismic-proof  structure erected on site, and all other construction elements –like  panels, ramps and glasses- are prefabricated outside this isolated city and assembled to the main structure with flexible connections, that dissipate seismic movements.

http://www.archdaily.com/136262/salamanca-city-hall-carreno-sartori-arquitectos/

March 26, 2011

Antorcha Bicentenario | José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez

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The bicentennial torch, designed by  and , is inspired by the mural depicting the social struggle of Mexican independence by Jose Clemente Orozco in which the leader of the independence, Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, leading the insurrection by tightly grasping a flaming torch. The structure manifested from this image by the architect is a 45-meter tall element emphasizing the main entrance into , México.The monument consists of a 10-meter tall concrete volume, followed by a 35-meter steel structure made of one hundred rings, which is interspersed with one hundred voids and marked by two hundred scars. The shadow that will be projected on them will produce optical negatives. At night, the sculpture will be a great urban lamp, illuminating the environment through its presence and enlightening the city of its symbol. The scars mark the journey to independence.A light path is drawn from the bottom of the monument to the top, linking land, object and sky in producing a perpetual flame that stands for Mexican Independence and the country’s future projected to infinity.

The bicentennial torch is a tribute to the heroes who fought for independence and granted the people a homeland, illuminating the ideals of freedom and sovereignty. The torch begins at a base made of mud, stones and undergrowth and proceeds in a trajectory of man-made materials through toil and effort, making its way to the sky in an unending projection of the Mexican people’s desire for unity.

Architect:  
Location: , México.
Name of the project: “Antorcha Bicentenario” (“bicentennial torch”)
Architectonic and lightning design:  / Abdiel Miranda Rodríguez / Isaí Padilla Aguirre / Eduardo Muñoz de la Torre / Claudia Pérez Campos
Landscape Design: 
Project Leaders: 
Project Team: Abdiel Miranda Rodríguez / Gilberto Isaí Padilla Aguirre / Eduardo Muñoz de la Torre / Claudia Pérez Campos
Structural project: Jorge Lucio Lerma Carmona
Project year: 2010

 

March 6, 2011

AIA CHICAGO55th ANNUAL DESIGNIGHT 2010

Over 700 architects, designers, contractors, and their clients convened on October 29 to celebrate and recognize achievements in the following categories: Distinguished Building AwardDivine Detail AwardInterior Architecture AwardUnbuilt Design Award. Featured here are the 340 projectsentered in the annual competition.

 

Unbuilt Design

 

Distinguished Building

Divine Detail

Interior Architecture

 

http://www.aiachicago.org/special_features/2010DEA/index.asp

 

 

 

 

February 4, 2011

43 NERI OXMAN

Most Creative People 2009 | Fast Company

Noah Kalina

In the MIT Media Lab’s basement workshop sits a machine that can slice human bone instantly using a blast of water mixed with garnet dust. It’s Neri Oxman’s favorite. “The laser cutter is very feminine, elegant. The water-jet cutter is very masculine. It cuts anything. To be here at 2 a.m. all by myself — it’s really exciting!” This laughing, chic young woman in a flowing Helmut Lang jacket is an artist, architect, ecologist, computer scientist, and designer who is not just making new things but also coming up with new ways to make things.

http://www.fastcompany.com/100/2009/neri-oxman

January 26, 2011

Brixen Public Library, Italy | Aquilialberg

The Aquilialberg project of the Brixen Public Library in Italy has the aim to become a new gathering location for the city’s population. Following this line, the project is designed to assure wide spaces for socialization, both interior and exterior, to accommodate public manifestations and cultural encounters. It is a place to spread knowledge, in which citizen could feel at ease and spend  time constructively. A deep design study is conducted for the new volume; the starting point was the relationship with the existing volumes and geometries. Special attention is given to the orientation of the roofs’ slopes of the closest buildings, with the purpose to match it in the most elegant way with the new construction. The composition language, developed in the design of the new volume, came from the push of the existing roofs’ slopes towards the competition site – a void is generated and it worked as a hinge that matches the existing volumes with the new Library. The Hinge-Volume chosen material is glass to respect the relation between the historical past of the  context and the new presence of the Library.

 

http://www.evolo.us/architecture/brixen-public-library-italy-aquilialberg/

January 24, 2011

Esentai Tower Almaty, Kazakhstan SOM | LERA

Esentai Tower is a mixed-use office and hotel facility that is the centerpiece of the Esentai Park Master Plan, and the tallest building in central Asia. The beauty of the snow-capped peaks of the Tien Shan Mountain Range which borders the city of Almaty is a primary source of design inspiration for the building.

An elegant, crystalline building form and the icy transparency of the exterior skin, where a pattern of ceramic frit frosts the surface and reinforces its vertical proportions, establish the tower as a unique landmark on Al-Farabi Avenue.

Project Facts

Completion Year: 2008
Site Area: 16,500 m2
Project Area: 75,000 m2
Building Height: 168 m
Number of Stories: 36

http://www.som.com/content.cfm/esentai_tower

http://www.lera.com/projects/ofc/esentaitower.htm

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=504453&page=4

January 23, 2011

AIA New York Chapter announced the winners of the 2010 Design Awards

AIA New York Chapter announced the winners of the 2010 Design Awards. Four juries – architecture, interiors, unbuilt work, and urban design – reviewed 425 entries, selecting thirty-four winners. The Design Awards is a prestigious competition held annually by the AIANY to honor excellence in architectural design for projects in New York City and by New York City architects worldwide.

Architecture Honor Award Winners:

Steven Holl ArchitectsKnut Hamsun Center / Hamarøy, Norway
Steven Holl Architects / Vanke Center – Horizontal Skyscraper / Shenzen, China
Peter Gluck and Partners / East Harlem School / New York, NY
Marble Fairbanks / Toni Stabile Student Center / New York, NY
Thomas Phifer and Partners / Fishers Island House / Fishers Island, NY
Morphosis Architects 41 Cooper Square / New York, NY
Toshiko Mori Architect PLLC / The Eleanor and Wilson Greatbatch Pavilion / Buffalo, NY

Architecture Merit Award Winners:

STUDIOS Architecture / 200 Fifth Avenue / New York, NY
Handel Architects LLP / New Amsterdam Plein & Pavilion / New York, NY
SAA/Stan Allen Architect / Salim Publishing House / Paju Book City, Korea
Philip Wu Architect / 39 East 13th Street / New York, NY
Garrison Atchitects / Koby / Albion, MI
Rafael Viñoly Architects PC / Carrasco International Airport New Terminal / Montevideo, Uruguay

Interiors Honor Award Winners:

Peter Marino Architect / Chanel Robertson Blvd. / Los Angeles, CA
Butler Rogers Baskett / Trinity School – Johnson Chapel / New York, NY

Interiors Merit Award Winners:

Lyn Rice Architects / The New School Welcome Center / New York, NY
Garrison Architects / Slocum Hall / Syracuse, NY
STUDIOS Architecture / Dow Jones Offices / New York, NY
Shelton, Mindel & Associates / Manhattan Rooftop Duplex / New York, NY

Unbuilt Work Merit Award Winners:

Della Valle Bernheimer / R-House / Syracuse, NY
Ginseng Chicken Architecture P.C. / Open Paradox / Seoul, South Korea
EASTON+COMBS / Lux Nova / Queens, NY
OBRA Architects / Korean Cultural Center New York / New York, NY
Pelli Clarke Pelli ArchitectsTransbay Transit Center / San Francisco, CA
H Associates / Chungnam Government Complex / Hongsung, South Korea
Konyk Architecture PC / Urban Aeration / Dallas, TX
Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC / Tianjin Hang Lung / Plazaianjin, China
Architecture Research Office / On the Water: Palisade Bay / New York – New Jersey Upper Bay
OBRA Architects / The Great Hall at Grace Farms / New Canaan, CT
Audrey Matlock Architect / Medeu Sports Center / Medeu, Kazakhstan

Urban Design Honor Award Winner:

James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + RenfroThe High Line / New York, NY

Urban Design Merit Award Winners:

Architectural Research Office / Five Principles for Greenwich South / New York, NY
Rogers Marvel Architects, PLLC and di Domenico + Partners, LLP / MTA Flood Mitigation Streetscape Design / New York, NY
dlandstudio llc / BQE Trench: Reconnection Strategies for Brooklyn / Brooklyn, NY

http://www.archnow.com/2010/04/aia-new-york-2010-design-award-winners/

 

January 23, 2011

Urban Market by KPF

Architect: Kohn Pederson Fox
Team Leaders: Paul Katz, FAIA  HKIA, James Von Klemperer, FAIA   Jeffrey A. Kenoff, AIA, Gary  Stluka, AIA, Bernard Chang, Audrey Choi
Awards: AIA New York City Chapter Design Award (2010), MIPIM Architectural Review Future Projects Award (2007)
Location: Tianjin, China
Estimated Completion: 2014
Size: 1.6 million GSF / 153,000 GSM
Client: Hang Lung Properties

The 2010 AIA New York winners were recently announced (we’ll share the full over view this weekend with you), and this project by Kohn Pedersen Fox received a design award in the Unbuilt category.   Just like the other winning projects, the design showcases New York talent and was chosen for its “design quality, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness and technique.”  The project, entitled Urban Market, is for Tianjin, China.  The urban center is a way to reinvigorate the river banks through new uses, such as cultural institutions.  The hope it that the center will grow to establish “a new identity for the city that links its culture to its historic place of commerce.”Clad in transparent materials, the building allows the interior program to engage the surrounding streets.   The structure curves dramatically upward from the riverside and converges with the opposing six story south facade.The building’s form engages the disconnected edges of the site and unites them within a single carapace.  Two major interior boulevards allow pedestrians to flow from the east to west side of the site, and gather at a large central plaza.  This porous circulation allows passersby to filter through the building at different entry points.   This frequent flow of people turns the building into a modern version of a “traditional bustling merchant setting.”

http://www.archnow.com/2010/04/urban-market-by-kohn-pederson-fox/

January 23, 2011

WTC 3 | Richard Rogers classic industrial

175 Greenwich Street – Proposed WTC Tower # 3 – by Richard Rogers

Images thanks to STR on Wired New York forum.

The X elements on the facade of WTC3 wil be lit up at night by LED lamps- with changing colors.Designs for the former World Trade Center site were unveiled at a press conference in New York by developer Larry Silverstein and officials from the Port Authority. Richard Rogers Partnership’s design for 175 Greenwich Street – identified as ‘Tower 3’ in Studio Daniel Libeskind’s Masterplan for the redevelopment of the former WTC site – is located on a site bounded by Greenwich Street to the west, Church Street to the east, Dey Street to the north and Courtlandt Street to the south. RRP’s tower is at the core of the various buildings around the proposed WTC Memorial and Cultural Center. The design of the tower addresses this central position and accentuates the building’s verticality relative to the Memorial site.The tower will be 1,155 ft, with 71 storeys above street level and four below. The total gross area of 2.8 million sq ft will include two levels of retail space, five levels of trading space and 54 levels of office space. It is envisaged that the tower will consist of a central concrete core (steel encased in reinforced concrete) and an external structural steel frame which will be clad in stainless steel.

 

http://www.richardrogers.co.uk/render.aspx?siteID=1&navIDs=1,6,12,1239

http://nyc-architecture.com/?p=1751