Archive for ‘Top Engineering Firm’

January 23, 2012

Four Seasons Centre for Performing Arts, Toronto | Diamond and Schmitt Architects

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

The Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts was designed with the overriding principles of creating an exceptional auditory and theatrical experience for patrons as well as a democratic, open and engaging space within the city. The opera house is designed to make accessible an art form that has long been considered elitist.  By revealing the procession and activity associated with attending a performance, a new audience is cultivated and a new relationship formed between the patron and the city.

The Four Seasons Centre is a building in harmony with its context and innovative in design.  It has excelled in providing audience interest and comfort, has created operational efficiencies and achieved an acoustic and theatrical experience among the very best in the world.

http://www.dsai.ca/projects/four-seasons-centre-for-the-performing-arts-canadian-opera-company

and from Halcrow website:

The floating glass staircase

Believed to be the longest span for a glass stair in the world

Architects: Diamond and Schmitt Architects

Role: Full structural engineering services, building envelope consulting services

The $102 million Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts is the new home for the Canadian Opera Company (COC) and a new performance venue for the National Ballet of Canada.

Halcrow Yolles provided full structural engineering and building envelope consulting services for the fast-tracked construction of this 15,000m² world-class opera house.

Standing in the opera’s entrance lobby known as the City Room, theatre goers are surrounded by a transparent, five storey glass wall façade. The Grand Staircase, a feature in the City Room, rises three storeys from the Orchestra to the Grand Ring level and is a focal point upon entering the Four Seasons Centre. Innovatively designed and engineered, the floating glass staircase is believed to be the longest span for a glass stair in the world. The box office, retail space, Henry N.R. Jackman Lounge and the glass-walled Aerial Amphitheatre – a small rehearsal hall – are located on this main lobby level.

From the outset of the project the design team was focused on creating an intimate space within the hall, providing excellent acoustics and isolating the performance spaces from external sources of noise and vibration. The hall plan was based on the horseshoe shape, modeled after the great opera houses of Europe.

Known as the R. Fraser Elliott Hall, the 2,000 seat horseshoe-shaped auditorium is ringed by four tiers of balconies. The 28.5m wide auditorium is comprised of five levels: the orchestra, box level, and first and second balconies. The horseshoe configuration is a fundamental design component of the room, as it maximises sightlines and achieves the best possible acoustics for all theatre goers at all levels. In the Four Seasons Centre, 73 per cent of all seats are within a 30.5m cylinder of centre stage, with the farthest seat only 40m from the stage.

The deep, 6.1m wide orchestra pit can accommodate up to 100 musicians. The main stage is served by a 33m fly tower, stage rigging and lighting equipment. A full side stage and rear stage allow for three productions in repertory. The back-of-house areas include administration space, dressing rooms and the rehearsal room, located adjacent to the stage.

The auditorium, stage and rehearsal hall are designed as an entirely separate and isolated structure from the rest of the building. This separation of the outer building eliminates outside noises and achieves the goal of an N-1 sound isolation rating.

The facility also includes below-grade parking for 200 cars and a direct connection to the subway.

http://www.halcrow.com/Our-projects/Project-details/Four-Seasons-Centre-for-Performing-Arts-Canada/

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December 27, 2011

shenzhen international airport under construction | massimiliano + doriana fuksas


‘shenzhen bao’an international airport’ by massimiliano + doriana fuksas, shenzhen, china
image © designboom

designboom recently visited the construction site for the terminal 3 extension at the ‘shenzhen bao’an international airport’
by italian architects massimiliano and doriana fuksas. won by competition in 2008, the 400,000 square meter addition
will make the airport the fourth largest in china following beijing, shanghai and guangzhou.

the undulating and fluid exterior is generated with a triple layer structural system to support the clear spans of the interior’s
80 meter width. a deep space frame connects to the outer honeycomb skin and inner box frame trusses which undulate independently of
external form, producing one supporting unit. extensive computer analysis was needed to generate the custom measurements for
each hexagonal metal panel and operable glass window on the 300,000 square meter surface area. the steel framework is attached
to a series of supercolumns, diverting heavy loads into the concrete substructure and foundations.


designboom was given a tour through the construction site, led by tian fang, project manager and a few shenzhen-based members of the fuksas team
image © designboom

sectioned into three levels, the ground floor will accommodate passenger arrivals and the first floor will be reserved for departures.
the upper platform will facilitate public services for transient visitors. the project’s expected completion date is in 2015.


exterior of the terminal
image © designboom


terminating edge of the concourse
image © designboom


workers installing the roof
image © designboom


outward view from the terminal
image © designboom


interior steel structural layer undulates independently of the exterior form creating a deeper section for additional space frame
image © designboom


arched box frame trusses span the 80 meter wide concourse
image © designboom


arched box frame trusses span the 80 meter wide concourse
image © designboom


third level of main concourse will contain public services
image © designboom


upper level services floor
image © designboom


upper level services floor
image © designboom


horizontal outrigger secures to concrete substructure
image © designboom


interior layer of steel structure undulates in a varied form creating a deeper structural cross section
image © designboom


space frame structure secures the skin of the curtain wall
image © designboom


outward view through the facade
image © designboom


construction workers installing the facade
image © designboom


structural system connects to a series of supercolumns in the future check-in area
image © designboom


structural system connecting to supercolumn
image © designboom


top of the supercolumn
image © designboom


scaffolding to install skin
image © designboom


aerial view of the terminal
image © designboom


structural system at the roof
image © designboom


installation of skin framework and panels on the roof
image © designboom


view of wing extending from main concourse
image © designboom


view of wing extending from main concourse
image © designboom


installation of skylight
image © designboom


extensive steel structure is secured to a series of supercolumns
image © designboom


steel space frame holds outer skin into place
image © designboom


uniquely sized glass panels
image © designboom


the fuksas team leading the group through the building
image © designboom


image courtesy studio fuksas


image courtesy studio fuksas


image courtesy studio fuksas


image courtesy studio fuksas


image courtesy studio fuksas


image courtesy studio fuksas


image courtesy studio fuksas

project info:

object: shenzhen bao’an international airport-expansion t3
project: massimiliano and doriana fuksas
structural + facade engineering: knippers helbig – advanced engineering, stuttgart – new york
date: 2008-2012 (first phase)
client: shenzhen airport (group) co., ltd
area: 400.000 mq in phase 3
type: on going project
interior design: fuksas design
general contractor: china state construction engineering corporation, beijing
architect of record: biad (beijing institute of architectural design), beijing
lighting consulting: speirs & major associates, edinburgh, london


the 2011 SZHK biennale

in shenzhen, china runs from december 8th through december 11th 2011.
the scale of certain projects is such that the architect becomes not only a designer of buildings but also city planner and landscape
architect and the shenzhen & hong kong bi-city biennale of urbanism \ architecture reflects this in its theme:
architecture creates cities – cities create architecture.
the SZHK biennale is the first to focus on urbanism as an ongoing theme to explore issues of the city as an active agent in contemporary culture.
the program included more than 30 exhibitions, symposiums, panel discussions and performances.
terence riley has been appointed chief curator (he is the first international curator for the event).
the hong kong edition will work to complement the shenzhen biennale in an integrative way and is curated by gene king and
anderson lee currently under preparation and due to open in february 2012.
designboom is the principal international media partner of the SZHK biennale.

‘shenzhen builds’
designboom was given the opportunity to visit the construction site of the terminal extension, as part of the program ‘shenzhen builds’.
the buildings being built in shenzhen today are setting international standards for most of the building types:
the ‘shenzhen builds’ exhibition, curated by terence riley, focuses on 5 new and upcoming buildings in the city by coop himmelb(l)au / wolf prix,
massimiliano and doriana fuksas, OMA / rem koolhaas, urbanus, and atelier FCJZ / yung ho chang.
on show are models, animations and drawings, including other developmental materials to demonstrate how these projects were conceived.
designboom will cover this exhibition in upcoming articles, please stay tuned for more to come.

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/18065/massimiliano-doriana-fuksas-shenzhen-international-airport-under-construction.html

November 20, 2011

Metropol Parasol | J. Mayer H. Architects + Arup

The destruction of the Mercado de la Encarnacion in  left a huge void in the urban character of the city center which remained unfilled for over thirty years.  The market enriched the city with life, and with its absence, the vitality of the Plaza de la Encarnacion was soon challenged by the negative implications of economic downturn. In April of 2011,  Jürgen Mayer H and  teamed to complete their solution for Seville’s central square – an architecture that brings a contemporary spirit to such a historical and traditional space.  Entitled Metropol Parasol, the massive timber structure (which is one of the largest timber structures built in the world)  draws residents and visitors back to the city center as its striking aesthetic provides a variety of markets and restaurants bounded by the dynamic shape of the parasols.  We enjoyed the video as it illustrates the impact architecture can bring economically and socially to enrich even one of the most established city centers in the world. The ability for the design team to look toward the future allows Seville to preserve its historic cultural prowress while not limiting itself for future greatness.  Special thanks to Marina from Arup for sharing the video with us!

http://www.archdaily.com/201961/metropol-parasol-j-mayer-h-arup/

Spring 2011 marks the opening of “Metropol Parasol”, the Redevelopment of Plaza de la Encarnación in , designed by J. MAYER H. Architects. After finishing the concrete works in 2008, the parasols are under construction now. Visiting the site at the moment gives an impressive imagination of the final dimension and appearance.

The project becomes the new icon for Sevilla, – a place of identification and to articulate Sevillas role as one of Spains most fascinating cultural destinations. “Metropol Parasol” explores the potential of the Plaza de la Encarnacion to become the new contemporary urban centre. Its role as a unique urban space within the dense fabric of the medieval inner city of Sevilla allows for a great variety of activities such as memory, leisure and commerce. A highly developed infrastructure helps to activate the square, making it an attractive destination for tourists and locals alike.

The “Metropol Parasol” scheme with its large structures offers an archeological site, a farmers market, an elevated plaza, multiple bars and restaurants underneath and inside the parasols, as well as a panorama terrace on the very top of the parasols. Realized as an innovative timber-construction with a polyurethan coating, the parasols grow out of the archeological excavation site into a contemporary landmark. The columns become prominent points of access to the museum below as well as to the plaza and panorama deck above, defining a unique relationship between the historical and the contemporary city. “Metropol Parasols” mixused character initiates a dynamic development for culture and commerce in the heart of Sevilla.

Project Team: Juergen Mayer H., Andre Santer, Marta Ramírez Iglesias, Jan-Christoph Stockebrand, Marcus Blum, Ana Alonso de la Varga, Paul Angelier, Hans Schneider, Thorsten Blatter, Wilko Hoffmann, Claudia Marcinowski, Sebastian Finckh, Alessandra Raponi, Olivier Jacques, Nai Huei Wang
Competition Team: Juergen Mayer H, Dominik Schwarzer, Wilko Hoffmann, Ingmar Schmidt, Jan-Christoph Stockebrand, Julia Neitzel, Klaus Küppers, Georg Schmidthals, Daria Trovato

International Competition: 1. Prize, 2004
Project: 2005-2010
Completion: Spring 2011
Client: Ayuntamiento de Sevilla and SACYR

Management Consultant: Dirk Blomeyer
Technical Consultant for Competition 2nd phase only and Multidisciplinary Engineers for Realization: ARUP GmbH
Technical Support for Plants – Competition 2nd Phase only: Coqui-Malachowska-Coqui with Thomas Waldau
Translation competition text: Carmen Diez

Plexi-Model: Werk 5
Photographer: Uwe Walter
Timber-Model: Finnforest Merk
Construction-Site Photos: J. MAYER H. Architects

http://www.archdaily.com/97661/update-metropol-parasol-j-mayer-h-architects/

Designed by , this project becomes the new icon for Seville, – a place of identification and to articulate Seville’s role as one of the world´s most fascinating cultural destinations. “Metropol Parasol” explores the potential of the Plaza de la Encarnacion to become the new contemporary urban centre. Its role as a unique urban space within the dense fabric of the medieval inner city of Seville allows for a great variety of activities such as memory, leisure and commerce. A highly developed infrastructure helps to activate the square, making it an attractive destination for tourists and locals alike.

The “Metropol Parasol” scheme with its impressive timber structures offers an archaeological museum, a farmers market, an elevated plaza, multiple bars and restaurants underneath and inside the parasols, as well as a panorama terrace on the very top of the parasols. Realized as one of the largest and most innovative bonded timber-constructions with a polyurethane coating, the parasols grow out of the archaeological excavation site into a contemporary landmark, defining a unique relationship between the historical and the contemporary city. “Metropol Parasols” mix-used character initiates a dynamic development for culture and commerce in the heart of Seville and beyond.

http://www.archdaily.com/122621/j-mayer-h-architects-metropol-parasol-opening-this-sunday/

October 1, 2011

Dundee House | Reiach and Hall Architects

Architects: Reiach and Hall Architects
Location: Dundee, 
Structural Engineer: Buro Happold
Main Contractor: Bovis Lend Lease
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 12,500 sqm (Gross Internal Floor Area)
Photographs: Dave Morris, Paul Zane, 

This is not an ordinary office building. It is Dundee City Councils headquarters and is the primary location where the citizens of Dundee will meet their council officers. As well as containing the councils spatial needs the building has an important civic role to play re-using and reinvigorating a protected derelict industrial building, which is located in a slightly forgotten part of the city the new building has begun the process of revitalising this area.

The function of the building is to enable the provision of the council’s office services. The building will contain approximately 900 staff and has a floor area of 12,500 sqm. A component of the brief is to stimulate departmental interactions, so all communal facilities are co-located outside the departments.

The functional requirements, when considered with the civic nature of the proposals informed the external expression. The historic building is retained. The new offices are placed to the west, rising above their neighbours in three towers, signalling the Council to the city, a linear core is placed between the old and new, working with the existing linear site emphasis and providing intuitive navigation of the large floor plates. The existing building is re-roofed with a contemporary attic.

The building adopts highly sustainable principles with natural ventilation and exposed thermal mass and was BREEAM assessed as excellent.

http://www.archdaily.com/172594/dundee-house-reiach-and-hall-architects/

 

September 25, 2011

Timber Wave, London | Arup and Amanda Levete Architects

Arup and Amanda Levete Architects present timber artwork at London Design Week

September 2011 marks the fourth year of Arup’s support for the London Design Festival. The festival, renowned for its innovative projects, this year features two installations as part of its Landmark Projects initiative, both designed in collaboration with Arup – the Timber Wave with Amanda Levete Architects and Two Lines with David Chipperfield Architects.

Visitors to the festival’s hub, the Victoria and Albert Museum, will pass through a stunning three dimensional latticework spiral, built from oil-treated American Red Oak and entitled ‘Timber Wave’.

Designed by Amanda Levete Architects (AL_A) in collaboration with Arup, and supported by the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC), the oak used in the temporary self-supporting 12m diameter arch is more traditionally used in furniture making. The temporary frame to the entrance of the V & A will remain in place until 15th October.

Arup Director Ed Clark said: “Participating in these experimental installations at the London Design Festival is hugely valuable to us. They provide a great chance to evolve new modelling, analysis, design and construction techniques. The two projects this year are very different to each other but share a sculptural elegance which will make an instant impression on festival visitors and passers-by.

“Design is central to the work that we do as engineers and these installations provide an excellent opportunity to demonstrate the interplay of artistic creativity and technical expertise that is inherent in all design.”

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17592

August 17, 2011

Apple Reveals Plans for Fifth Avenue Cube | Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

newnewapplecube0811 Rendering of the new cube © Apple

Apple Reveals Plans for Fifth Avenue Cube Courtesy of MacRumors

When the iconic Apple glass cube on Fifth Avenue was shroud in barriers in preparation for renovation in June, the future of the flagship Apple store was unclear.  It was only revealed that Apple would be removing the glass cube and working on drainage, pavers, and bollards on the plaza, but just what changes were to be made to the cube itself remained elusive.

Apple has now revealed that the glass panels as we have known them will be replaced with larger panels to create a seamless appearance.  A sign now states, “We’re simplifying the Fifth Avenue cube. By using larger, seamless pieces of glass, we’re using just 15 panes instead of 90.”  There will be three panels per side of the cube, running the full length.  During the day the store is faintly recognizable as a glass encasing for an underground world; at night the store glows from the inside out.  With this new structural detailing, the building will likely appear even more subtle during the day and more brilliant at night.

This original design is an innovation by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and structural engineersEckersley O’Callahan.  The glass cube and subterranean glass staircase were trademarked in 2010, associating the vision of the architecture with Apple’s own innovations.

We recently reported that according to documents released by the city of Cupertino, Foster + Partners will be the architects of the new Apple Campus in Cupertino, California. Steve Jobs shared the following, “We’ve used our experience making retail buildings all over the world now, and we know how to make the biggest pieces of glass in the world for architectural use.”

http://www.archdaily.com/160138/apple-reveals-plans-for-fifth-avenue-cube/

  

 

        

pple’s second Manhattan retail store opened May 19th in New York City. Located at 767 Fifth Avenue between 58th and 59th Streets, the prominent site near FAO Schwarz and Bergdorf Goodman provides views of Central Park.”We opened our first New York store in SoHo in 2002, and it has been successful beyond our dreams. Now we’re thrilled to open our second New York store on Fifth Avenue,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “With outstanding service and an amazing location open 24 hours a day, we think the Apple Store Fifth Avenue is going to be a favorite destination for New Yorkers and people around the world.”The store occupies the underground retail concourse of the General Motors Building, with entry from the plaza level above. “The new plaza in front of the General Motors building on Fifth Avenue at 59th Street is a triumph of urban design.” said James Gardner in the New York Sun. “Suddenly, as if out of nowhere, New York has a new public space that will prove to be a source of civic pride and aesthetic delight.”

Designers Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and structural engineers Eckersly O’Callahan (glass elements) in collaboration with Apple used Apple Stores’ signature structural glass vertical circulation to entice plaza level passersby down to the store’s underground main level. The 32-foot structural glass cube marking the store’s entrance makes a bold architectural statement. Housing a transparent glass elevator wrapped by a circular glass stair, the transparent cube beckons potential customers down to the retail level below. By day it is a skylight bringing natural light underground, while at night the lighted cube is a sign. “It was in Apple’s DNA to try to make something that no one else had the vision to create,” said Ron Johnson, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Retail.

Visitors descend the glass stair or travel in the all-glass elevator, entering a carefully tailored stainless steel and stone environment where Apple’s products take center stage. Custom-designed wooden store fixtures, stainless steel ceiling and wall panels and an Italian stone floor make an elegant, yet restrained backdrop.

Awards

2008 Honor Award
AIA Pennsylvania
2007 Award of Excellence for Design
AIA New York State
2007 Excellence in Architecture
AIA San Francisco
2007 American Architecture Award
Chicago Athenaeum
2007 Honorable Mention, Best Retail Space
Travel + Leisure Magazine Awards
2006 Design Award
Business Week/Architectural Record Awards
August 13, 2011

Fabrikstrasse 15,Basel | Gehry Partners

Fabrikstrasse 15

Sunlight penetrates the protective glazing of Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 — even through the photovoltaic-cell panels of the roof — filling the interior with light. A skylight integrated into the campus grounds (center) brings daylight light down into the lower-level auditorium above the stage.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Completed in 2009, Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 is an icon on the growing Novartis Basel campus. In the evening its brilliant sculptural form is underscored by layers of light — all on the interior — that gently wash the facade, illuminate the workstations, and glow from within its core.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A central atrium brings daylight to interior Gehry-designed workstations and glass-enclosed “private rooms” at the heart of the office floors. Adjustable metal-halide up and downlights illuminate this space when necessary and reflect off overhead white lamellas (a radiator-like array that also diffuses sunlight from the glass roof and provides radiant cooling).
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Photovoltaic cells are integrated in the glass roof surfaces to generate renewable energy for the electrical lighting and to provide an effective sunscreen against solar gain in upper levels of the building.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Below grade, a 600-seat auditorium can be divided into two sections. It features: a wood-lined acoustical wall perforated with a subtle graphic pattern by the New York–based graphic design firm 2×4; a flexible glass-ceiling system that evenly distributes the light of cool, daylight-quality linear fluorescent lamps; and amber LEDs that create an atmospheric glow into the room from under the seats.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Employees sitting at workstations designed by Frank Gehry are protected from the sun’s glare by a sophisticated system of saillike shades, controlled by daylight sensors. Artemide Tolomeo desk lights provide additional task lighting for a more personal, intimate environment.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

L’Observatoire installed cool white fluorescent lamps above the auditorium’s glass ceiling that blend imperceptibly with the daylight coming into the space from a skylight above the stage that Gehry incorporated into the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A large trapezoidal skylight in the floor of the first office level brings light into the center of the ground floor café below it, as well as through a second skylight that continues the flow of light into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Light from a central skylight in the café of Fabrikstrasse 15 penetrates into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby, as well as into interior classroom windows.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

LED-backed-veneer media columns feature directional graphics and signage in the public lobby, lower levels, and ground floor dining areas.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Multi-directional chandeliers above conference tables designed by Gehry Partners cast ambient fluorescent light up towards the ceiling and more directional beams from halogen lamps down onto the table.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

The giant floating “Mama Cloud” light fixture designed designed by Frank Gehry floats above a long table at the entrance to the café from the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Fabrikstrasse 15

1. plaza-level lobby restaurant and café
2. office floors
3. atrium
4. auditorium
5. IT learning classrooms
6. skylight
7. campus green
Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Photo © Thomas Mayer & Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Breaking the bounds of of Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani’s master plan, Fabrikstrasse 15 by Frank Gehry stands in a surprising juxtaposition to the serene array of rectilinear buildings that dominate the Novartis campus. It is located at the geographic heart of the campus, in full view of the company’s renovated 1939 Forum 1 International Headquarters building, and across the street from a refined stretch of porticoed offices and labs by Adolf Krischanitz, Rafael Moneo, Lampugnani, and Yoshio Taniguchi. The highly visible, independent site gave the architect freedom to exploit his expansive, free-spirited style.

Relieved from many of the constraints binding the other architects, Gehry and his team created a voluminous 209,896-square-foot building that manifests the Novartis commitment to an open and environmentally responsible workplace in its crystalline transparency and intricate sustainable strategies.

Anchored to a load-bearing reinforced-concrete skeleton that sits on a rigid 56-foot-deep basement box, the building’s structural steel shell supports an active triple-glazed envelope that is tied to its natural ventilation and lighting systems through a centralized building facility-management system. Like a finely tuned machine, the building performs unobtrusively to provide comfortable surroundings for its occupants. Sliding glass doors on the ground floor and operable windows discharge excess solar yields and facilitate the flow of outside air, aided by a mechanical fresh-air system around the perimeters of the upper levels.

Home to the human resources (HR) department, as well as to a top-floor campus reading room, a 600-seat multiuse auditorium and IT learning center (both below grade), and a ground-floor restaurant and café that spill out onto the campus green, Fabrikstrasse 15 is a hub of activity. The warm, wood-lined interiors feature whimsical LED-backed-veneer media-columns and modular Gehry-designed furnishings and workstations.

In accordance with Novartis chairman Daniel Vasella’s versatile “multi-space” office concept, the architects arranged the HR floors on the five upper levels with flexible, open-plan work spaces and glass-enclosed “private rooms,” bisecting them with a central atrium and serpentine stainless steel stair to bring light down through the core of the volume. A series of skylights strategically inserted into the floor and grounds around the building carry daylight to the café, the lower-level learning center, and the auditorium stage.

According to Gehry Partners project architect Kamran Ardalan, daylight is harvested and managed in several ways: The low-E glazing is articulated with ceramic frits on the facade to reduce direct solar gain; an orchestrated series of low-E-coated, saillike interior shades operate on sensors to minimize glare and additional heat; and sound-absorbing lamellas under the roof diffuse sunlight and further compensate for the thermal load by serving as cooling radiators filled with slightly chilled water. In addition, photovoltaic cells integrated into the glass roof panels not only generate enough power for the building’s electric lighting, they supply an additional layer of solar shading.

“The amount of daylight inside the building is consistently monitored,” says Ardalan. Electric lighting is used only when there isn’t enough daylight, he adds — and to illuminate the building at night.

Looking frosted and icy-white on a bright afternoon, the building assumes a brilliant clarity as the sun sets, revealing its inner workings like a child’s “visible engine” kit. This effect stems from a perceptive, energy-efficient electric lighting scheme by the New York–based L’Observatoire that balances program and architecture.

It was a challenge, says principal Hervé Descottes: “It’s such a transparent building that you could lose its sculptural aspects.” To achieve a soft, lanternlike glow, Descottes and his team layered the structure with light from within.

Initially, they created a layer by washing the mullions of the facade with metal-halide uplights installed inside the perimeter of the first level. Then they added a second layer of ambient and task lighting on the office floors, using compact fluorescent lamps. Here the lighting team kept the general light levels lower than usual to emphasize the glow of the fixtures at each desk, a tactic used to establish an intimate ambience for employees.

Next they installed linear fluorescent fixtures to wash the wood walls on all the levels, and inserted cool T5s above awninglike glass ceiling panels in the auditorium that create a seamless transition with the sunlight penetrating the skylight.

Last, they lined the atrium with adjustable metal-halide fixtures from the ground floor up to the roof, directing them up and down, and reflecting light off the white lamellas. This move, perhaps the most important, brightens the center of the building and underscores its voluptuous form.

During a recent visit on a warm and sunny summer morning, the offices were bursting with light — without a hint of glare — and wonderfully temperate minus the chill of air conditioning. A holistic tour de force, Fabrikstrasse 15 is illuminating in its transparency and ability to harness the aura and power of light — both generated and from the sun. Such a building defines the spirit of Novartis as an enlightened workplace.

Owner: Novartis Pharma AG

Completion Date: June 2009

Gross square footage: 19´500 m2

Total construction cost: Confidential

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

People

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

Personnel in architect’s firm who should receive special credit:
Frank Gehry – Partner In Charge
Edwin Chan – Design Partner
Terry Bell – Project Partner
Kamran Ardalan & Herwig Baumgartner – Project Manager / Architects

Principal Project Team:
Sven Newmann
Patricia Eva Schneider
Ron Tannenbaum
Narineh Mirzaeian
Manoucher Eslami
Vartan Chalikian

Schematic Design Project Team:
Joshua Morey
Yoram Lepair
Timothy Paulson
Frank Mahan
Earle Briggs
David Dorn
Andrew Fastman
Frank Weeks
Manuel Blanco-lonqueria
Lukas Raeber
Jeffery Garrett
Randolph D’amico

Architect of record
Local architects, general management, realization planning and site management:
Planergemeinschaft Arcoplan / Nissen& Wentzlaff, Basel
Project management: Daniel Wentzlaff, Thomas Oetiker, Timothy O.Nissen

Project Team:
René Keuter
Hendrik Johannsen
Karl Reiter
Paul Luternauer
Michael Sauer
Silvia Barben
Christiane Bouhraoua
Raymond Gaëtan
Soran Jester
Stephan Schweizer
Stefan Herrmann
Michael Geiger
Thomas Ligibel
Bettina Fritsche
Senad Catovic
Heiko Müller
Hans Münchhalfen
Wulf Oschwald
Ueli Raeber
Karl Sowa
Silke Techen
Daniel Hofer
Daniel Reinhardt
Ulli Blümmert
Andreas Schön
Isabel Frey
Lionel Combebias
Christian Hafenmayer
Martin Schlegel
Moritz Rusch

Interior designer
 Gehry Partners, LLP

Engineer(s)
Building services planning: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Lucerne, Switzerland: Gregor De Martin, Walter Wüthrich, Bruno Wigger, and Ralf Haebig
Building automation: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Basel, Switzerland: Urs Winkler
Building physics: Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland: Martin Beyerler
Structural engineer: Schlaich Bergermann und Partner, Stuttgart, Germany: Jörg Schlaich, Hans Schober, Michael Werwigk, Kai Kürschner

Consultant(s)
Acoustical: McKay Conant Brook, David Conant/ Dr. Markus Ringger, Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland
Audio-Video planning: Virtually Audio GmbH, Suhr, Switzerland: Daniel Zurwerra, Thomas Rüetschi
Catering planning: Planbar, Zurich, Switzerland: Walter Widmer
Graphics, signage: 2×4 Inc. New York, U.S.A: Michael Rock, Lee Moreau, Yoonjai Choi, Albert Lee
Electrical planning: Scherler AG, Basel, Switzerland: Thomas Roth
Energy concept: Transsolar Energietechnik GmbH, Munich, Germany: Matthias Schuler, Wolfgang Kessling, Christian Oberdorf
Fire prevention concept: Mario Fontana, Zürich, Switzerland: Alfred Spinelli, A+F Brandschutz, Pratteln, Switzerland
Façade planning: Emmer Pfenninger Partner AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland: Hans Emmer, Kurt Pfenninger, Martin Friedli, Steffi Neubert, Jeanette Leu
Landscape: Vogt Landschaftsarchitekten, Zurich, Switzerland: Günter Vogt, Ralf Günter Voss, Uta Gehrhardt
Lighting: L´Observatoire International, New York, Hervé Descottes, Socorro Sperati, Beatrice Witzgall

CAD system, project management, or other software used
 2d Drawings in Auto CAD and 3d Modeling in Digital Project/Catia

Products

Structural system
Steel-Structure Facade: Müller Offenburg GmbH: Offenburg, Germany in collaboration with Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. Christian Gäßler, Wolfgang Mayr, Ladislaus Balint, Sebastian Utz and Torsten Nörr.
Concrete Structure: Implenia AG, Switzerland

Exterior cladding

Metal/glass curtain wall: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany.

Glazing

Glass:Curtain Wall: Glass by BGT Bischoff Glastechnik: Bretten, Germany, Curtian wall engineering and installed by Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. 
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg, Switzerland
Exterior Balustrades: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Ground Floor Interior Glazing: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Interior Glass Balustrades: glass manufactured by Blaser, Basel, Switzerland, installed by Imbau AG, Pratteln, Switzerland
Conference Room Glazing: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Meeting / Interview Rooms: Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen, Switzerland
Interior Windows (wood framing):  Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Design Stairs Mainbuilding: Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany

Skylights: 
Exterior Auditorium Skylight: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Interior Skylights: MTV Metallbau – Technik Villmergen AG: Villmergen, Switzerland

Doors

Entrances: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Metal doors: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Wood doors: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland & Dreier AG, Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Sliding doors: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Fire-control doors, security grilles: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland / Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland / Dreier AG Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Revolving Door: Blasi GmbH, Mahlberg, Germany

Hardware

Locksets: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy
Closer &, Panic Hardware: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Exit devices: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Pulls: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy / Glutz AG, Switzerland

Interior finishes

Acoustical ceilings: Two prodcuts used:
BASWAphon Acoustical Finish – BASWA Switzerland & STOSilentPanel – STO Switzerland

Suspension grid:
Auditorium Operable/Acoustic Partitions:  Industrial Acoustics Company (IAC): New York, U.S.A; Craig D’ Anna
Cabinetwork and custom woodwork: Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Paints and stains: manufacturer: Dold AG: Wallisellen, Switzerland
Wall coverings: Vertical Grain Douglas fir interior Wall claddings/Windows- Jos. Berchtold AG, Switzerland / Meeting-interview room- Röthlisberger Innenausbau: Gümlingen, Switzerland
Bathroom Stainless Steel Partitions: BTS – Partition System: Munich, Germany
Bathroom Tiles: Villeroy & Boch
Auditorium Leather Paneling: Leather provided by Poltrona Frau, Italy, Fabricated and Installed by Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Auditorium) Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Main Building) Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Plastic laminate:
Wood Surfaces: Vertical Grain Douglas fir veneered wood paneling – Central Wood Supplier: Sauter Paul AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland
Special surfacing: Cooling Ceilings/Walls: MWH Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Floor and wall tile (cite where used): Wood Floor – Senn Parkett, Dussnang, Switzerland
Resilient flooring: Dispoxid 472, Caparol Farben AG, Nänikon, Switzerland
Carpet: manufacturer: Shaw, U.S.A.
Raised flooring: Type FLOOR and more N 30 x L/A, AGB Bautechnik AG, Switzerland

Furnishings

Office furniture: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Reception furniture: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland
Fixed seating: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich Switzerland / Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen Switzerland
Workstation Task Chairs: Meda Pro by Vitra International
Conference/Meeting/Interview room Chairs: Eames Aluminum Group by Vitra
Workstation Tables: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Upholstery: leather covered auditorium fixed seatings: Poltrona Frau, Italy: Fulvio Giustiniani
Custom Furniture: Conference rooms tables, meeting & interview rooms tables, reception desks, shelving, banquets, etc. – Designed by Gehry Partners, manufactured by various contractors.

Lighting   
Manufacturer: Erco, Neuco, Regent, Schmitz, Reggianni, Philips, Regiolux, Zumtobel

Pendant Lighting: Restaurant – Mama Cloud designed by Frank O. Gehry; Manufactured by Belux.
Custom Lighting: Conference Rooms – Designed by Gehry Partners, LLP: Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland
Task lighting: Tolome by Artemide
Dimming System or other lighting controls: various manufacturers

Conveyance

Elevators/Escalators: Schindler AG, Switzerland
Accessibility provision (lifts, ramping, etc.):
(Auditorium) Gilgen Logistics AG, Oberwangen Switzerland

Energy
Energy management or building automation system:Neuberger Gebäudeautomation AG, Rothenburg, Germany
Photovoltaic system: Schüco International KG, Bielefeld, Germany

Other unique products that contribute to sustainability:

Façade Components:

  1. Highly selective triple glazing (low U-Values) with double fritting.
  2. Internally movable shading made of low-e –coated textile fabric.
  3. Façade openings in the upper and lower area of the façade for back ventilation of the façade (air circulation between the façade and shading).
  4. Internal Cooled/Acoustic lamellas under the roof of the central atrium – MWH Barcol-Air AG, Switzerland.

Air-conditioning Technology:

  1. Acoustic/Cooled ceilings in office areas.
  2. Floor Heating/Cooling
  3. Heating/Cooling panels along floor slabs in the façade areas.
  4. Decentralized Heating/Cooling convectors (under the floors).
  5. Source ventilation with fully air-conditioned fresh air.
  6. Air outlet of the re-circulating air for convection cooling of the façade areas.

Project awaiting Minergie Certification.
Minergie is a sustainability brand for new and refurbished buildings. It is mutually supported by the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Cantons along with Trade and Industry and is registered in Switzerland and around the world and defended firmly against unlicensed use.

Additional building components or special equipment that made a significant contribution to this project:
Shading System Contractor – Clauss Markisen GmbH: Bissingen, Germany: Klaus Westenberger, Klauss Vogg
Shading Fabric – Ferrari (SOLTIS 86) Stamoid AG, Eglisau, Schweiz
Interior Design Stairs – Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany
Cooling Lamellas – Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg Switzerland
Auditorium Projection Screens – Stewart Filmscreen Corporation, Torrance, California
Cafeteria Buffets – Buob Kühlmöbel AG, Rorschach, Switzerland
LED Column – LED elements by Tweaklab AG, Basel, Switzerland; Installed by Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Cafeteria LED signage – Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland

By Linda C. Lentz

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/lighting/2011/08/fabrikstrasse-15.asp

August 9, 2011

Skywalk Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna | Solid Architecture

Project Details:
Location: Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna, Austria
Architects: Solid Architecture – www.solid.ac
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Built up Area: 54 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Completion: May 2009
Photos: Günter Kresser

 SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna.

The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture
In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.
Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.
If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.
The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge
The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.
The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.
There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.
Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge
From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge,
the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.
The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.
In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge. In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination
The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

http://architecturelab.net/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-viennaaustria-by-solid-architecture-18890/

SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna. The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture

In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.

Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.

If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.

The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge

The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.

The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.

There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.

Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge

From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge, the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.

The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.

In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge.  In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination

The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

+ Project credits / data

ProjectSkywalk Rennweg 44 – 46
Location: Skywalk, Rennweg 44 – 46, 1030 Vienna
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46

ArchitectureSOLID architecture ZT GmbH | http://www.solid.ac/
Project Management: Arch. DI Christoph Hinterreitner
Collaborators: Arch DI Christine Horner
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Structural Engineering: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Building Physics: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Construction Supervision: CF SER/IM/BPM der Österreichischen Lotterien

Contractors
Builder: SAN AS BAU
Steel / Glass Construction: Stahlbau Kamper GmbH
Plumber: Ing. Ledermüller GmbH
Electrician: Fleck Elektroinstallationen GmbH
Fire Protection Gate: Peneder Feuerschutz GmbH
Photographer of the Project: Günter Kresser
Holder of the Copyright: SOLID architecture ZT GmbH

Planning Data
Direct Commission: no, 1stprize in invited competition
Project Status: Project completed
Competition: July / September 2008
Start of Planning: October 2008
Start of Construction: April 2009
Completion: May 2009

Project Data
Gross Area: 54 m²
Built up Area: 54 m²
Useable Surface: 44 m²
Building Volume: 189 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Construction: Stahlkonstruktion, Seitenwände verglast
Spatial Program: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge

Awards, Prizes: Exhibition “Gebaut 2009“, Architektonische Begutachtungen der MA 19

+ All images and drawings courtesy SOLID architecture

http://plusmood.com/2011/07/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-solid-architecture/

http://www.e-architect.co.uk/vienna/skywalk_rennweg.htm

http://www.solid.ac/_framesets/frameset_projects/english/ProjectFrameSet_en.html

http://www.rwt-plus.at/english/projects/national/national-2008-2009/bruecke-rennweg.html

August 3, 2011

Kingdom Tower, Jeddah | AS+GG

At over 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) and a total construction area of
530,000 square meters (5.7 million square feet), Kingdom Tower will
be the centerpiece and fi rst construction phase of the $20 billion
Kingdom City development in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, near the Red
Sea.

World's Tallest Building (7) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (2) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (5) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Expected to cost $1.2 billion to construct, Kingdom Tower will be a mixed-use building featuring a luxury hotel, offi ce
space, serviced apartments, luxury condominiums and the world’s highest observatory. Kingdom Tower’s height will
be at least 173 meters (568 feet) taller than Burj Khalifa, which was designed by Adrian Smith while at Skidmore,
Owings & Merrill.
AS+GG’s design for Kingdom Tower is both highly technological and distinctly organic. With its slender, subtly
asymmetrical massing, the tower evokes a bundle of leaves shooting up from the ground—a burst of new life that
heralds more growth all around it. This symbolizes the tower as a catalyst for increased development around it.
The sleek, streamlined form of the tower was inspired by the folded fronds of young desert plant growth. The way
the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an
analogy of new growth fused with technology. While the design is contextual to Saudi Arabia, it also represents an
evolution and a refi nement of an architectural continuum of skyscraper design. The three-petal footprint is ideal for
residential units, and the tapering wings produce an aerodynamic shape that helps reduce structural loading due to
wind vortex shedding. The Kingdom Tower design embraces its architectural pedigree, taking full advantage of the
proven design strategies and technological strategies of its lineage, refi ning and advancing them to achieve new
heights.
The result is an elegant, cost-effi cient and highly constructible design that is at once grounded in built tradition and
aggressively forward-looking, taking advantage of new and innovative thinking about technology, building materials,
life-cycle considerations and energy conservation. For example, the project will feature a high-performance exterior
wall system that will minimize energy consumption by reducing thermal loads. In addition, each of Kingdom Tower’s
three sides features a series of notches that create pockets of shadow that shield areas of the building from the sun
and provide outdoor terraces with stunning views of Jeddah and the Red Sea.
The great height of Kingdom Tower necessitates one of the world’s most sophisticated elevator systems. The
Kingdom Tower complex will contain 59 elevators, including 54 single-deck and fi ve double-deck elevators, along
with 12 escalators. Elevators serving the observatory will travel at a rate of 10 meters per second in both directions.
Another unique feature of the design is a sky terrace, roughly 30 meters (98 feet) in diameter, at level 157. It is an
outdoor amenity space intended for use by the penthouse fl oor.
The area surrounding Kingdom Tower is known as the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District. Designed by AS+GG,
the 23-hectare Waterfront District provides a cohesive and pedestrian-friendly setting for the magnifi cent
Kingdom Tower while creating a pleasant neighborhood experience nestled along the Kingdom City lakefront. The
Kingdom Tower Waterfront District encompasses a high-end shopping mall and additional development parcels
that accommodate commercial and high-density residential uses, offi ces, two luxury hotels and high-quality open
spaces, including the central Tower Plaza. A serene waterfront promenade connects Kingdom Tower, the various
development parcels, the open space areas and the mall together. The result is an exciting mixed-use area that
offers a concentrated and comprehensive experience including vibrant shopping, entertainment and open-space
amenities. The Waterfront District also provides an array of connections to other areas within Kingdom City’s overall
master plan, designed by HOK Architects.
The Waterfront District is subdivided into 13 development parcels, the largest of which are the Kingdom Tower
parcel of about 90,000 square meters and the mall parcel of about 65,000 sm. Smaller mixed-use parcels of between
5,000 sm and 10,000 sm are arranged in two development precincts, North and South, each with its own unifying
palette of materials. The parcel sizes vary depending on the density of each site; the larger sites are farther away
from Kingdom Tower, with the smaller sites stepping closer to the tower, creating the effect of an architectural
amphitheater around the structure. Views of Kingdom Tower from throughout the District—including the sensitively
designed 20- to 60-story buildings around the tower—are spectacular. The buildings closest to the tower are of lower
heights, ensuring that the outer buildings also have access to views of Kingdom Tower.

World's Tallest Building (10) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (1) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (3) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (4) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (6) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (8) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (9) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

http://smithgill.com/#/work/kingdom_tower

http://www.archdaily.com/155788/worlds-tallest-building/

Prince Alwaleed Signs SR4.6Billion Contract for World’s Tallest 1,000 meters Tower
2/8/2011

Chairman of Kingdom Holding Company, HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud, who initiated and has been the driving force behind the decision to build the world’s tallest building in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, is pleased to announce on 2nd August 2011, that the contract for construction has been signed and Kingdom Tower, with a height of over 1,000 meters, will begin construction imminently in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Kingdom Tower will be the centerpiece and the first construction phase of Kingdom City, Jeddah Economic Company’s (JEC) new urban development of more than 5.3 million square meters of land in the north of Jeddah overlooking the Red Sea and Obhur Creek.

Prince Alwaleed commented: “This project will provide sustainable profits to Kingdom Holding shareholders.”

“The vision of constructing the tallest tower in the world in Jeddah belongs to HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal, who was closely involved in the selection of the scheme currently under design,” said Mr. Talal Al Maiman, Executive Director, Development and Domestic Investments, a board member of Kingdom Holding Company and a board member of Jeddah Economic Company, which was formed in 2009 to develop Kingdom City in Jeddah. “Prince Alwaleed, Mr. Bakhsh, Mr. Sharbatly and I were impressed by the boldness and simplicity of the AS+GG design. Kingdom Tower’s height is remarkable, obviously, but the building’s iconic status will not depend solely on that aspect. Its form is brilliantly sculpted, making it quite simply the most beautiful building in the world of any height.” Mr. Al Maiman added: “The decision of the partners to build the world’s tallest building further demonstrates their belief in investing in this nation.”
Five contractors were invited to offer proposals for the Kingdom Tower and a short list of three firms submitted final offers for the tower construction. The Saudi Bin Laden Group (SBG) whose offer was the most attractive in terms of price, quality and schedule was chosen for the project.
With a total construction area of over 500,000 square meters, the soaring Kingdom Tower will be a mixed-use building featuring a Four Seasons hotel, Four Seasons serviced apartments, first class office space, luxury condominiums and an observatory that will be higher than the world’s current highest observation deck. The overall construction cost of the tower is SR4.6 billion ($1.2 billion) and the overall estimated cost of the entire Kingdom City project is anticipated to be SR75 billion ($20 billion).

“We intend Kingdom Tower to become both an economic engine and a proud symbol of the Kingdom’s economic and cultural stature in the world community,” said Mr. Al Maiman, “Kingdom Tower will be a landmark structure that will greatly increase the value of the hundreds of other properties around it in Kingdom City and indeed throughout North Jeddah.”
The partners of JEC are Kingdom Holding Company, Mr. Samaual Bakhsh, Abraar, International Holding Company, prominent Jeddah businessmen Mr. Abdulrahman Hassan Sharbatly and Saudi Bin Laden Group (SBG). The capital of JEC is made up of SR8.8 billion in land value, assets that are SR7.3 billion, plus SR1.5 billion in cash contributed by SBG that further demonstrates their confidence in this extensive project.
“We are confident that upon completion, Kingdom Tower will become one of the world’s great tourist destinations as well as one of the most attractive places to live and work in the region,” Mr. Sharbatly and Mr. Bakhsh expressed in a joint statement. “In the meantime, it will create thousands of jobs, spurring the local economy.”
In addition to its status as an architectural landmark and economic symbol, Kingdom Tower will enjoy great cultural significance. “We envision Kingdom Tower as a new iconic marker of Jeddah’s historic importance as the traditional gateway to the holy city of Mecca,” Mr. Al Maiman said. He noted that the southeast leg of Kingdom Tower’s tripedal base is on a direct line with the Ka’ba in Mecca, Islam’s holiest site.

An interdisciplinary team led by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG), based in Chicago, created the design of the Kingdom Tower. The team also included building services engineering consultants, Environmental Systems Design and structural engineering consultants, Thornton Tomasetti, engineer of three of the world’s top 10 tallest buildings. Jeddah Economic Company selected the AS+GG scheme after a lengthy competition process in which SOM, Pickard Chilton, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Pelli Clarke Pelli and Foster + Partners also participated.
The AS+GG team’s design for Kingdom Tower has been in process since May 2009. Schematic design is complete and design development is under way. Foundation drawings are complete and the piling for the tower is currently being tendered. AS+GG also designed the master plan for the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District, which surrounds the tower and which will include residential and commercial buildings, a shopping mall, high-quality outdoor spaces and other amenities. The overall Kingdom City master plan is being designed by HOK Architects.
“This tower symbolizes the Kingdom as an important global business and cultural leader, and demonstrates the strength and creative vision of its people,” said Mr. Smith, whose experience in super-tall tower design includes Burj Khalifa, Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai, Zifeng Tower at Nanjing Greenland Financial Center in Nanjing, the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago and Pearl River Tower, now in the late stages of construction in Guangzhou, China. “Our vision for Kingdom Tower is one that represents the spirit of Saudi Arabia. It also represents new growth and high-performance technology fused into one powerful iconic form.”
The Kingdom Tower design is both highly technological and distinctly organic. With its slender, subtly asymmetrical massing, the tower evokes a bundle of leaves shooting up from the ground—a burst of new life that heralds more growth all around it.. The tower becomes a catalyst for increased development around it.

The sleek, streamlined form of the tower was inspired by the folded fronds of young desert plant growth, Mr. Gill explained. “The way the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an analogy of new growth fused with technology,” he said. “We’re thrilled to be working with His Highness, Jeddah Economic Company and Emaar to help define this path for the Kingdom.”
While AS+GG’s design is contextual to Saudi Arabia, it also represents an evolution and a refinement of an architectural continuum of skyscraper design. The three-petal footprint is ideal for residential units, and the tapering wings produce an aerodynamic shape that helps reduce structural loading due to wind vortex shedding. The Kingdom Tower design embraces its architectural pedigree, taking full advantage of the proven design strategies and technological advances of its lineage and extends those advances to the cutting edge.
The result is an elegant, cost-efficient and highly constructible design that is both grounded in built tradition and aggressively forward-looking, taking advantage of new and innovative thinking about technology, building materials and energy conservation. For example, the project will feature a high-performance exterior wall system that will minimize energy consumption by reducing thermal loads. In addition, each of Kingdom Tower’s three sides features a series of notches that create pockets of shadow that shield areas of the building from the sun and provide outdoor terraces with stunning views of Jeddah and the Red Sea.
The great height of Kingdom Tower necessitates one of the world’s most sophisticated elevator systems. The Kingdom Tower complex will contain 59 elevators, including 54 single-deck and five double-deck elevators, along with 12 escalators. Elevators serving the observatory will travel at a rate of 10 meters per second in both directions.

Notes:
About the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District
The area in the immediate vicinity of Kingdom Tower is known as the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District. Designed by AS+GG, the 23-hectare Waterfront District provides a cohesive and pedestrian-friendly setting for Kingdom Tower while creating a pleasant neighborhood experience along the Kingdom City lakefront.
The Kingdom Tower Waterfront District encompasses a high-end shopping mall and additional development parcels that accommodate commercial and high-density residential uses, offices, two luxury hotels and high-quality open spaces, including the central Tower Plaza. A serene waterfront promenade connects Kingdom Tower, the various development parcels, the open space areas and the mall together. The result is an exciting mixed-use area that offers a concentrated and comprehensive experience including vibrant shopping, entertainment and open-space amenities. The Waterfront District also provides an array of connections to other areas within Kingdom City’s overall master plan, designed by HOK Architects.
About Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture
Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture is dedicated to the design of high-performance, aesthetically striking architecture in a wide range of typology and scale, from low- and mid-rise residential, commercial and cultural buildings to mixed-use super tall towers. The office uses a holistic, integrated design approach that explores symbiotic relationships with the natural environment. AS+GG is currently working on projects in the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, China, India, South Korea, Malaysia, Canada and the United States. The firm was founded in 2006 by partners Adrian Smith, Gordon Gill and Robert Forest. For more information, please visit http://www.smithgill.com. AS+GG also recently launched a related energy and engineering consulting firm, PositivEnergy Practice; for more information, please visit http://www.pepractice.com.
About Thornton Tomasetti
Thornton Tomasetti provides engineering services to clients worldwide on projects of all sizes and complexity, with practices in building structure, building skin and building performance. Thornton Tomasetti is responsible for the structural design of some of the world’s tallest buildings, including the Petronas Towers, Taipei 101, Ping An International Finance Center (now under construction as the tallest building in China) and Federation Tower (under construction as the tallest in Russia). The firm is committed to creating the best solutions through technical ingenuity, pursuit of excellence, and responsiveness to client needs. Thornton Tomasetti is an award-winning 550-person organization of engineers and architects collaborating from offices across the United States and in Asia, Europe and the Middle East. For more information, please visit http://www.ThorntonTomasetti.com.
About Environmental Systems Design, Inc.
Environmental Systems Design, Inc. (ESD) has provided engineering design solutions for thousands of buildings in the United States and throughout the world. With over 220 engineering and design professionals, ESD is one of the largest consulting engineering firms in the Midwest. ESD offers consulting engineering design services in mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, LEED, sustainable design, commissioning, and technology. ESD supports a diverse range of markets including commercial, health and science, education, mission critical, residential, assembly, cultural, theaters, energy plants, transportation and international. For more information, please visit http://www.esdesign.com.

http://www.kingdom.com.sa/en/MC_PR_NewsDetails.asp?p=3&ID=826

After months of rumour and suspicion, AS+GG confirms it is designing a $1.2bn, 1000+m tower in Jeddah

As WAN has suggested over the past few months, supertall building experts Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill are to complete the design for a stunning new tower to anchor the proposed $20bn Kingdom City masterplanning project in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The firm carefully quashed internet rumours that they were working on a ‘mile-high’ tower, yet did not deny involvement in the Kingdom Tower scheme. This morning His Royal Highness Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud, nephew of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah and chairman of Kingdom Holding Company officially announced AS+GG as design architects of the project to awaiting media.

Reassuringly elegant for a tower of such epic proportions – the completed Kingdom Tower will soar at over 1000m (at least 173m taller than the Burj Khalifa which currently holds the title of the world’s tallest building) with a total construction area of 530,000 sq m – the structure is being touted as a new marker of Jeddah’s importance as a gateway to the city of Mecca and has been directly inspired by the folded fronds of a young desert plant. Adrian Smith details: “With its slender, subtly asymmetrical massing, the tower evokes a bundle of leaves shooting up from the ground – a burst of new life that heralds more growth all around it.”

Smith’s partner Gordon Gill continues: “The way the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an analogy of the new growth fused with technology.” The graceful needle is also designed to symbolise the city of Jeddah as an economic power and cultural leader, with a focus on the ‘strength and creative vision of its people’.

Aside from the initial ‘wow-factor’ of the building’s statistics, AS+GG have been applauded for their sensitive design aesthetic. Talal Al Maiman, Executive Director, Development and Domestic Investments, a Board member of Kingdom Holding Company and a board member of JEC commented: “Prince Alwaleed, Mr. Bakhsh, Mr. Sharbatly and I were impressed by the boldness and simplicity of the AS+GG design. Kingdom Tower’s height is remarkable, obviously, but the building’s iconic status will not depend solely on that aspect. Its form is brilliantly sculpted, making it quite simply one of the most beautiful buildings in the world of any height.”

Encased in the new spire’s glimmering façade will be a Four Seasons hotel, Four Seasons serviced apartments, Class A office Space, luxury condominiums and the world’s highest observatory. 59 elevators using the world’s most high-tech systems will be installed to provide ease of access, with 54 single-deck and 5 double-deck systems. The residential aspect has influenced the three-petal footprint of the design with tapering wings introducing an aerodynamic shape to reduce structural loading due to wind vortex shedding. All three sides of the Kingdom Tower sport a series of notches which form specifically engineered areas of shadow designed to fall on the outdoor terraces facing the city and Red Sea.

AS+GG is leading an interdisciplinary design team that also includes building services engineering consultants Environmental Systems Design, Inc. (ESD) and structural engineering consultants Thornton Tomasetti. The developer of Kingdom City, Jeddah Economic Company (JEC), selected the AS+GG scheme after a lengthy competition process in which SOM, Pickard Chilton, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Pelli Clarke Pelli and Foster + Partners also participated.

Sian Disson
News Editor

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17218

Saudi Arabia Reveals Plans For Tallest Tower, With Terrace On 157th Floor

The design, by Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, pairs radical developments in skyscraper technology with a sleek, tapered aesthetic inspired by the folded fronts of young desert plant growth.

Saudi Arabia is set to shatter the record for the tallest building in the world, with a slender, asymmetrical spire that’ll rise at least 3,280 feet in the air. That’s more than twice the size of the Willis Tower, the tallest building in the United States, and 568 feet taller than theBurj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world.

The $1.2 billion Kingdom Tower will be built in north Jeddah, the major urban center of western Saudi and an historic gateway to Mecca just off the shores of the Red Sea. The building, by Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (Smith also designed the Burj Khalifa while at SOM), pairs new developments in skyscraper technology with a sleek, “three-petal” form inspired by the folded fronts of young desert plant growth. “The way the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an analogy of new growth fused with technology,” Gill says.

The tower’s got a slick, aerodynamic shape with tapering wings that’ll help slash structural loading caused by wind. A high-performance facade is expected to drastically reduce energy consumption, and notches in each of the skyscraper’s three “petals” will create pockets of shade, shielding occupants from the harsh desert sun and providing outdoor terraces with views of Jeddah and the Red Sea. Kingdom Tower will include a Four Seasons hotel and apartments, luxury condominiums, and Class A offices spread over roughly 3.5-million square feet. It’ll also have a sky terrace on the 157th floor (the 157th floor!) and the highest observatory in the world.

Kingdom Tower is the linchpin of a larger, $20 billion waterfront development venture for Jeddah — part of the Saudi monarchy’s ambitious efforts to diversify its economy beyond crude oil. (Financing for the Kingdom Tower results from a deal between the investment firm of Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal and theSaudi Binladin Group, a construction conglomerate founded by the father of you know who.) The proposed Kingdom Tower Waterfront District — the master plan of which is also designed by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill — will include residential and commercial buildings, a shopping mall, outdoor spaces, and other amenities.

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1664659/saudi-arabia-to-build-mega-huge-tower-worlds-tallest

July 3, 2011

Bay Adelaide Centre, Toronto | WZMH Architects

The Bay Adelaide Centre is a signature 51-storey tower in downtown Toronto. It is distinguished by its elemental, modernist form – a refined rectangular plan with notched corners – and a prism-like skin of clear vision and fritted glass that make it one of the downtown core’s most transparent towers.

At the top of the tower, the extension of the glass skin beyond the rooftop becomes a series of ‘sails’ that gives the building profile a distinctive identity. The highly transparent tower base seamlessly incorporates the historic façade of the National Building on Bay Street (Chapman and Oxley, 1926) and the lobby features a major integrated public art project by the world-renowned artist James Turrell.

The project is the first phase of a three tower complex featuring a half-acre landscaped urban plaza with Gingko trees and ornamental grasses framing benches and open seating area. This contributes a much-needed public open space to the central business district. The lobby floors and the plaza are clad in a ‘carpet’ of Brazilian Ipanema granite expressing a modernist sensibility for spatial continuity from inside to out.

Certified to a LEED Gold standard, the project is among Canada’s largest sustainable buildings and is estimated to have an energy cost savings of 47% as compared to and existing model building within the Canadian MNECB rating system. The tower contains over 100,840 sq m of rentable class-AAA office space, as well as over 3,700 sq m of below-grade retail space linked to the extensive underground concourse network.

Location Toronto, Ontario Client Brookfield Properties Completion 2010 Structural Halcrow Yolles Mechanical The Mitchell Partnership Inc. Electrical Mulvey & Banani International Inc. Landscape Dillon Consulting Limited.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17020