Archive for ‘Why COLOR matters’

March 7, 2011

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library and Cultural Centre | Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

Arthur Rimbaud Media Library And Cultural Centre / Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects © Hervé Abbadie

first floor plan first floor plan

second floor plan second floor plan

location plan location plan

Architects: Dacbert Cochet Chapellier Architects – Antoine Dacbert, Silvia Maciel
Location: 
Engineering: Engineering OTE
Design of signs: Fabrice Cochet
General contractor: SRC
Project area: 832 sqm
Project year: 2008 – 2010
Photographs: Hervé Abbadie

The Arthur Rimbaud Media Library and Cultural centre was constructed in the context of the city of Anthony’s urban renewal program. The city launched a public competition for the construction of a media library at Place des Baconnets with the aim of opening up the secluded Noyer Doré neighbourhood as well as offering cultural activities to the residents of this disadvantaged neighbourhood by promoting social interaction. The construction of the media library would be a symbol of the revival of the neighborhood.

Our response is a formally simplistic and easily identifiable building which contrasts, in both architecture and ambiance, with the surrounding buildings (the strict, sober and neutral forms of the surrounding residential buildings and the loud, playful architecture of the adjacent shopping centre).

We proposed a simple and bright architectural style designed to clearly convey the nature of the media library as a contemporary public facility, and a space of cultural circulation and recreation with its amenities open to the public. The building might have otherwise appeared as a closed space, reserved for an initiated elite, demanding a commitment to regular attendance and as such, intimidating to the public. Our building expresses the ambitions of an attractive and vibrant media library, offering a variety of activities and events, a place where the public can stroll amongst the bookshelves and disc gondolas as well as see exhibitions or simply read books.

There has always been a steady flow of pedestrians at the site due to the central and strategic location of the land, with its proximity to the RER train station and the shopping centre, and this would naturally promote the use of the facilities, but the small size of the site was restrictive. In order to ensure maximum floor space, we designed a slight cantilever to the first floor, using transparent facades of coloured glass in various sizes creating a dynamic appearance, making the building seem aerial and bright, straightforwardly presenting the contents of the building to passers-by, all this creating an important symbol for the neighbourhood. The facade of the first floor is mostly glass on three sides, and boasts a panoramic view of the Massy valley. In contrast, the ground floor is well-anchored to the ground, like basement, but with some areas of glass to clearly expose the contents of the media centre.

The north-facing facade of the media library is the largest, making its aspect ideal. The entry of natural light is controlled by each façade: the south facade is completely blind, the north, west and east facades are treated as double façades on the first floor. The double skin acts as a buffer to control the natural evacuation of heat and reducing solar exposure to the interior glass walls. This also ensures excellent acoustics relative to external noise, which was a major consideration for the project mainly due to the noise of traffic at the intersection as well as that of passing trains.

We gave much attention to the roof of the media library which was treated as a fifth facade, considering its position and situation relative to the 14-floor existing residential building and the many direct views from this building on the roof of the media library. The option of a green roof was therefore ideal, making the roof a sort of “terrasse jardin”, rather than making it an afterthought simply attached to the adjacent building, while also providing benefits in terms of the environment, energy conservation and reduced maintenance.

The organisation of the library is simple and easy to understand. The separation of the public and private areas is well defined. From the ground floor entrance, we find the reception desk on the left, multi-media and news media for adults on the right, while at the end of the hall a multi-purpose meeting room closes off the public area. The private, administrative area is located behind this public area, with the two spaces separated by the large central concrete wall. The stairway leads up to the first floor and its large two-story wall of vivid colour beckons the public upstairs and links the two floors using natural overhead lighting. This relationship between the two levels of the media library improves the organisational clarity of the public space. The first floor was designed as a large open area with a minimum of supporting walls allowing for the complete flexibility of the media library’s reading areas and enabling the immediate understanding of the organisation of the first floor, which is reinforced with signs installed in the ceiling.

http://www.archdaily.com/116112/arthur-rimbaud-media-library-and-cultural-centre-dacbert-cochet-chapellier-architects/

March 7, 2011

Sports and Leisure Center in Saint-Cloud | KOZ Architectes

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

plan 01 plan 01

plan 02 plan 02

plan 03 plan 03

plan 04 plan 04

 

Architect: KOZ Architectes / Christophe Ouhayoun – Nicolas Ziesel
Location: Saint-Cloud, 
Project team: Ambrus Evva, François Kharatt
Structural Engineers: EVP Ingénierie
Contractor: Delta Fluides
Acoustic Consultant: Delphi Acoustique
Budget: $3.8M Euro
Project Area: 1,600 sqm
Project year: 2007-2009
Photographs: © Stephan Lucas

on Conformist and Bold

This building is not lacking in self-confdence. As proof, you only have to take the second left along the Avenue de Longchamps from the Les Côteaux tramway Station in Saint-Cloud. No sooner have you left behind a quiet row of smart private houses in the traditional millstone grit Parisian style with front steps and plane trees than you come face to face with an odd-looking building, imposing but also childishly simple, more cubist than cube-shaped, decidedly “fashy”, evoking happy memories of a child’s toy.

An appealing, totemic building that you sense is designed for festive celebrations and young people, and that you might expect to fnd in Rotterdam rather than the uber bourgeaois St Cloud neighbourhoods. Even if it is only 300 meters away from OMA’s Villa Dalll’Ava.

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/6832470″>Sports and Leisure Center in Saint-Cloud / KOZ Architectes</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/archdaily”>ArchDaily</a&gt; on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

With its cheerfulness and nonconformism, the building contrasts strongly with the urban development zone in which it’s located, behind a new block of private apartments and next to neo-Haussmannian offces and a day-nursery in a similar style. It is with the facing 1930s infant school that it empathises, extending the metaphor of the balcony courtyard, the passageways, the brick colour and the forecourt. As for the 1970s infant school next door, it maintains an obvious affnity with it in terms of shapes, only to dynamite the whole lot.

All in all it’s an odd little castle and cubist mountain, that owes its existence to the boldness of the Saint-Cloud Town Council, which has thereby acquired facilities that have revitalised its image and opened it to the most contemporary and positive architectural thinking.

Superimposed but not Separated

This brief provided a real headache: how to accommodate two autonomous programs on a narrow plot of land. KOZ chose to:

– Extrude the available area to the maximum height and hollow it out as with canyons that bring a clear and massive outdoor light deep inside the block.

– Superimpose the two programs without isolating them, by creating visual links between activities and applying the same principles on all facades and in all spaces.

The spaces are superimposed without being separated. They communicate via visual glimpses: you see each other on all sides, you ‘feel’ each other, you can easily fnd your bearings in a building with a spatially fuid but unfamiliar layout. Nevertheless, the functional and administrative autonomy of the two activities (separate entrances and different operational timetables) is respected.

A Pure Colour Scheme

The building uses colour very openly and assertively, with a wide palette ranging from red to green, by way of yellow, pink and orange. These colours cover the façade in wide stripes. Inside, the same colours are systematically repeated, like stepping in an oversized graffti.

A colour coding that helps you locate from the outside the areas created on the inside. A means of spatial orientation for young children. An echo to street culture codes for those who crawl on what is dubbed the coolest indoor climbing wall in ,or practice on the pop fencing rows below!

Spaces to be Filled

Over and above the pure functionality of the activities identified in the project, the architects placed great hope on the imagination and inventiveness of the occupants. That’s why all corridors, access ramps and passageways, are wide and spacious, up to 3 times the regulation size. The ramp leading to the outdoor games and training area has been designed along the same lines. Due to its exceptional width, it provides an “additional” space and safely contributes to the strong physical and visual continuity between the Leisure Centre’s internal and external areas. Indeed, it was designed with the aim of making it useable for activities ranging from just running up and down to becoming a small sized outdoor theatre . With no steps and surrounded by a 1.80m railing, it is a secure and private area where children can go alone in complete safety.

Ribbon

The building is a vertical pilling of activity spaces (gymnasium, climbing walls, leisure centre, outdoor area) wrapped in a ribbon of  providing unity to the whole .  was the natural choice as it highlights the building’s sculptural appearance while satisfying the requirements of:

– Superimposing of large rooms atop the gymnasium with little load bearing possibilities

– Acoustic insulation between the two components of the project.

The project is broadly made up of prefabricated  load-bearing panels.The moulded and tinted reinforced  contrasts with the coloured surfaces of the laminated panels.

Coloured Façades

The main facade is made of tinted  with a colour gradient from red to green. The other 3 facades are more homogeneous, albeit coloured too.

A Sustainable Project

KOZ is part of the “environmentally aware” generation. The openings in the roofs and the facades bring maximum natural lighting everywhere to limit electrical consumption.

was chosen for the reasons mentioned above but the preference was for prefabricated, generating less waste and spill.

The tinted  facades provide good protection against setting sun and long-lasting colour. And of course all hot water is solar heated.

http://www.archdaily.com/36552/sports-and-leisure-center-in-saint-cloud-koz-architectes/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 6, 2011

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata | Abin Design Studio

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

IMI International Management Institute Kolkata / Abin Design Studio © Pradip Sen

location plan location plan

ground floor plan ground floor plan

second floor plan second floor plan

third floor plan third floor plan

sections sections

model model

first floor plan first floor plan

Architects: Abin Design Studio
Location: Kolkata, West 
Architect in charge: Abin Chaudhuri
Design team: Abin Chaudhuri, Jui Mallik, Koushik Majumder
Project area: 11,000 sqm
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Pradip Sen
Nature in its various forms has always been a constant source of inspiration to man. The sky with its various states and ever changing colors is one of the most dynamic elements of nature and is what has inspired the built form façade. The colored laminate with Vanceva PVB glass on the façade follows no repetitive pattern and is symbolic of the unpredictable nature of the sky. It also represents the vibrancy of today’s youth.

The client brief required a management institute of international standards. Provisions for state of the art facilities and smart classrooms have been made for. The latest technological provisions in the institute allow for worldwide exchange of knowledge, through conventions and seminars. The architectural language of the built form is a representation of this. The colored façade gives it a unique identity and is the first of its kind to be built in .

The site was a huge constraint and dictated linear planning. Special efforts were made to ensure create non-monotonous spaces which did not follow expected linear pattern. Circulations spaces and spill out zones have been created along the curved glass façade giving them a more interesting and dynamic feel. Emphasis was given to interaction points not just for students but also for the faculty encouraging exchange of knowledge and ideas at all levels.

An integrated plaza with a water body has been designed. The water body receives no direct sunlight and creates a comfortable micro-climate. Wherever possible shading trees have been planted on the hard landscape and soft landscape has been introduced.

It is an institute that has achieved international standards not only by providing state of art facilities but also by having an architectural expression which represents that.

http://www.archdaily.com/115983/imi-international-management-institute-kolkata-abin-design-studio/

March 4, 2011

Miele Gallery | Gonzalo Mardones Viviani

elevation 03 elevation 03

elevation 01 elevation 01

elevation 02 elevation 02

section 01 section 01

elevation 04 elevation 04

section 02 section 02

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

ground floor plan ground floor plan

second floor plan second floor plan

first basement plan first basement plan

second basement plan second basement plan

terrace floor plan terrace floor plan

terrace floor plan terrace floor plan

roof plan roof plan

elevation 01 elevation 01

elevation 02 elevation 02

elevation 03 elevation 03

elevation 04 elevation 04

section 01 section 01

section 02 section 02

Miele Gallery - Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nicolas Saieh

http://www.archdaily.com/116560/miele-gallery-gonzalo-mardones-viviani/

March 4, 2011

Training Center of Town Hall in Sevilla | sol89

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Architects: sol89 / María González y Juanjo López de la Cruz
Location: Barriada de Palmete, 
Project area: 1,451 sqm
Project year: 2006 – 2009
Photographs: Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando AldaTraining Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

Training Center Of Town Hall In Sevilla / sol89 © Fernando Alda

plan plan

location plan location plan

sections 01 sections 01

plan plan

location plan location plansections 01 sections 01

sections 01 sections 01

sections 02 sections 02

model 01 model 01

model 02 model 02

We could see the suburban blocks that originate in the neighborhoodwhere the Training Center is located as if they were a single constructive fact. We would discover then a labyrinth of unexpected and surprising spaces that have been adhering to one another in a hazardous way over time. Setbacks that blur the line between the public and the private, linked patios hollowing out the block, intermediate floor plans, spontaneous gardens, ambiguous places between the exterior and the interior, winding paths, condensed urban events on the built mass that have arisen from the unplanned accumulation.

In our case, the existing gap and the obligation to adapt to the morphology of the block allow us to explore this resource where the floor plan notion is diluted by a continuous path that links the different theoretical spaces, related to façade, with the perched workshops around the interior void. As if we could plot the possible section that the picture of the House of Mirrors at Clarence Schmidt at Woodstock hides or the path that Monsieur Hulot describes walking around his house in Mon Oncle from Jacques Tati, broken sections appear where each space is where it must be beyond structural efficiencies or regulatory limits.

The Training Centre offers a labyrinth of spaces that face each other joined by a continuous path, diagonal views, places that involve other places,diluting the relationship between the interior and the exterior, situations of density, which like in the unplanned plot, accumulate spatial events and mix uses.

http://www.archdaily.com/114018/training-center-of-town-hall-in-sevilla-sol89/