Archive for ‘Facade Consultant’

August 20, 2011

China Diamond Exchange Center | Goettsch Partners

Architect: Goettsch Partners
Location: Shanghai, 
Project Year: 2005-2009
Photographs: 1st Image

The China Diamond Exchange Center is a 535,500 square foot office complex designed by Goettsch Partners of Chicago, Illinois.  Located within Shanghai’s sea of massive and often overstated high-rises, this modest-by-comparison structure is brilliantly detailed, appropriately scaled, and aesthetically beautiful.  The complex was completed in 2009 with the help of associate architects Zhong-fu Architects.  The Diamond Exchange Center is sited within Shanghai’s Pudong district, an international financial and commercial hub and houses both the Exchange and additional relative tenants.

In addition to office space on the upper levels, the building includes retail on the ground floor and a second floor that features the elevator lobby, exhibition space and a restaurant.  According to the architect description, the building was conceived as two rectangular office slabs joined by a skylit atrium.  One of the two office slabs is dedicated to the members of the China Diamond Exchange, while the other tower houses the remainder of the complex’s tenants.  The separation of tenants allows for secure transport for Diamond Exchange members within their own tower, thereby eliminating any potential security breaches for the high-profile office functions.  While distinct with regards to program,  both towers are clad with exterior  and contrast the transparency of the atrium.

The atrium is the undeniable focal point of the building, featuring a 66×230 foot cable-supported curtain wall.  The immense scale of the atrium is an impressive entrance to visitors and employees and provide access to the elevators that serve as the complex’s primary vertical circulation arteries.  Not only is the atrium an impressive architectural statement, it is also integral to the daylighting scheme of the complex and brings natural light to the relatively narrow 20m wide floor plate of its abutting towers.  The primary tenants’ core business inspired the design, with  diamond-shaped elements featured throughout the scheme — these elements includes the atrium’s glass skylight, the geometry of the entry canopy, and the main lobby floor pattern.

http://www.archdaily.com/157675/china-diamond-exchange-center-goettsch-partners/

read it here from: http://trendsideas.com/Article13947/UnitedStates/OfficeDesign

Credit List
Location : China Diamond Exchange Center (Shanghai)
Architect : Goettsch Partners
Interior design, public spaces :Goettsch Partners
Construction company : Shanghai No 2 Construction
Associate architect : Shanghai Zhong-fu Architects
Structural engineer : Shanghai Tong-qing Technologic Development
Civil, mechanical and electrical engineer : Shanghai Zhong-fu Architects
Quantity surveyor : Shanghai Sunking Construction Project Management
Landscaping : ADI
Fire consultant : Shanghai Zhong-fu Architects
Cladding : Aluminium
Roof : Glass and aluminium skylight by Shanghai MeiTe Curtain Wall System Co
Facade : Glass from China Southern Glass Glazing
System : Curtain wall by Shanghai MeiTe Curtain Wall System Co
Hardware : Dorma
Flooring : White Carrara marble
Wallcoverings : Water-white glass with specialty frit from China Southern Glass
Lighting : Shanghai Hai New Century Co
Heating/air conditioning : Toshiba
Lift and escalator services :ThyssenKrupp

Story by Charles Moxham
Photography by 1st-image

Even in a substantial Grade A office tower, the potential reallocation of spaces can be a major design consideration. Together with clean, contemporary architecture, generous floor plates, and ergonomic pedestrian flows, there should be the option to repurpose the spaces as business needs evolve.
The China Diamond Exchange Center, designed by Goettsch Partners and commissioned by Shanghai Lujiazui Development Co, stands tall on Century Avenue – the main boulevard in Shanghai’s Pudong district and the city’s financial and commercial hub.
The 15-storey, nearly 50,000m2 building provides space for the China Diamond Exchange, which currently occupies one side of the building, as well as other related tenancies. In addition to office space on the upper levels, the building includes ground-floor retail facilities, with the elevator lobby, exhibition space and a restaurant on the floor above.
Partner at Goettsch, James Zheng says the building was conceived as two large rectangular structures connected by a central glass atrium, which looks like a giant sparkling diamond sandwiched between great slabs of coal.
“The core business of the major tenants inspired the design in other ways, too,” says Zheng. “Diamond-shaped elements can be seen in the atrium’s glass skylight, the structural geometry of the entry canopy, and the lobby floor.”
Essentially, the architecture of the China Diamond Exchange Center is a tribute to its stock in trade – an aesthetic that also helps it stand out from other, in many cases taller, structures nearby.
A colour palette of black, grey and red dominates the building. The two office blocks are fronted in black, which provides hard-to-read surfaces that disguise the intakes and exhausts of the mechanical systems. All building systems were pushed to the outer areas of the building in the pursuit of large, uncluttered floorplates that are both attractive to tenants and practical in terms of reconfiguring offices as required.
Exposed metal elevator cabs, stainless steel cables and other, more reflective surfaces lend a subtle contrast in grey. In addition, there are several splashes of red within the decor. With many positive connotations in Chinese culture, this colour brings a sense of warmth to the minimalist spaces.
“The translucent glass atrium and open elevator towers are the central focus of the building,” says Zheng. “Besides evoking the strength and sparkle of diamonds, the atrium creates a sense of business transparency. At the front and rear of the building, 20m x 70m net walls supported by cables admit maximum light into the cavernous central space.”
The three elevators, in the middle of the atrium, climb to sky bridges on all levels that lead to both towers. The activity of the elevators is not only visible from the lobby but also from outside, through the gleaming net wall. Similarly, activity on the street can be seen from within the atrium, further animating the ground-level spaces.
The architect and developer had far-sighted plans for this tower and the elevator banks are a clue to the ongoing viability of the building.
“With diamonds being such a valuable commodity, staff working in that tower enter through a screening room and then travel up to their floor on separate, secure elevators away from the public eye,” says Zheng. “So, while the central elevators appear to service both sides, in reality they currently only take people up to the multi-use tower.”
It is envisaged that in the future, the China Diamond Exchange will occupy both sides of the building, and at that time all levels and both towers will be accessed, via security, by the central elevators.
“We could have built separate elevator shafts for both towers, but the long-term view dictated that we build the central, feature elevators that could eventually be utilised by all,” Zheng says.
Topping the towers – and adding to their adaptive use – are upscale penthouse spaces that are likely to evolve into executive offices or exhibition areas.
“Everything about the China Diamond Exchange Center was designed with an eye on the future.”

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August 13, 2011

Fabrikstrasse 15,Basel | Gehry Partners

Fabrikstrasse 15

Sunlight penetrates the protective glazing of Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 — even through the photovoltaic-cell panels of the roof — filling the interior with light. A skylight integrated into the campus grounds (center) brings daylight light down into the lower-level auditorium above the stage.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Completed in 2009, Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 is an icon on the growing Novartis Basel campus. In the evening its brilliant sculptural form is underscored by layers of light — all on the interior — that gently wash the facade, illuminate the workstations, and glow from within its core.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A central atrium brings daylight to interior Gehry-designed workstations and glass-enclosed “private rooms” at the heart of the office floors. Adjustable metal-halide up and downlights illuminate this space when necessary and reflect off overhead white lamellas (a radiator-like array that also diffuses sunlight from the glass roof and provides radiant cooling).
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Photovoltaic cells are integrated in the glass roof surfaces to generate renewable energy for the electrical lighting and to provide an effective sunscreen against solar gain in upper levels of the building.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Below grade, a 600-seat auditorium can be divided into two sections. It features: a wood-lined acoustical wall perforated with a subtle graphic pattern by the New York–based graphic design firm 2×4; a flexible glass-ceiling system that evenly distributes the light of cool, daylight-quality linear fluorescent lamps; and amber LEDs that create an atmospheric glow into the room from under the seats.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Employees sitting at workstations designed by Frank Gehry are protected from the sun’s glare by a sophisticated system of saillike shades, controlled by daylight sensors. Artemide Tolomeo desk lights provide additional task lighting for a more personal, intimate environment.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

L’Observatoire installed cool white fluorescent lamps above the auditorium’s glass ceiling that blend imperceptibly with the daylight coming into the space from a skylight above the stage that Gehry incorporated into the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A large trapezoidal skylight in the floor of the first office level brings light into the center of the ground floor café below it, as well as through a second skylight that continues the flow of light into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Light from a central skylight in the café of Fabrikstrasse 15 penetrates into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby, as well as into interior classroom windows.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

LED-backed-veneer media columns feature directional graphics and signage in the public lobby, lower levels, and ground floor dining areas.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Multi-directional chandeliers above conference tables designed by Gehry Partners cast ambient fluorescent light up towards the ceiling and more directional beams from halogen lamps down onto the table.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

The giant floating “Mama Cloud” light fixture designed designed by Frank Gehry floats above a long table at the entrance to the café from the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Fabrikstrasse 15

1. plaza-level lobby restaurant and café
2. office floors
3. atrium
4. auditorium
5. IT learning classrooms
6. skylight
7. campus green
Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Photo © Thomas Mayer & Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Breaking the bounds of of Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani’s master plan, Fabrikstrasse 15 by Frank Gehry stands in a surprising juxtaposition to the serene array of rectilinear buildings that dominate the Novartis campus. It is located at the geographic heart of the campus, in full view of the company’s renovated 1939 Forum 1 International Headquarters building, and across the street from a refined stretch of porticoed offices and labs by Adolf Krischanitz, Rafael Moneo, Lampugnani, and Yoshio Taniguchi. The highly visible, independent site gave the architect freedom to exploit his expansive, free-spirited style.

Relieved from many of the constraints binding the other architects, Gehry and his team created a voluminous 209,896-square-foot building that manifests the Novartis commitment to an open and environmentally responsible workplace in its crystalline transparency and intricate sustainable strategies.

Anchored to a load-bearing reinforced-concrete skeleton that sits on a rigid 56-foot-deep basement box, the building’s structural steel shell supports an active triple-glazed envelope that is tied to its natural ventilation and lighting systems through a centralized building facility-management system. Like a finely tuned machine, the building performs unobtrusively to provide comfortable surroundings for its occupants. Sliding glass doors on the ground floor and operable windows discharge excess solar yields and facilitate the flow of outside air, aided by a mechanical fresh-air system around the perimeters of the upper levels.

Home to the human resources (HR) department, as well as to a top-floor campus reading room, a 600-seat multiuse auditorium and IT learning center (both below grade), and a ground-floor restaurant and café that spill out onto the campus green, Fabrikstrasse 15 is a hub of activity. The warm, wood-lined interiors feature whimsical LED-backed-veneer media-columns and modular Gehry-designed furnishings and workstations.

In accordance with Novartis chairman Daniel Vasella’s versatile “multi-space” office concept, the architects arranged the HR floors on the five upper levels with flexible, open-plan work spaces and glass-enclosed “private rooms,” bisecting them with a central atrium and serpentine stainless steel stair to bring light down through the core of the volume. A series of skylights strategically inserted into the floor and grounds around the building carry daylight to the café, the lower-level learning center, and the auditorium stage.

According to Gehry Partners project architect Kamran Ardalan, daylight is harvested and managed in several ways: The low-E glazing is articulated with ceramic frits on the facade to reduce direct solar gain; an orchestrated series of low-E-coated, saillike interior shades operate on sensors to minimize glare and additional heat; and sound-absorbing lamellas under the roof diffuse sunlight and further compensate for the thermal load by serving as cooling radiators filled with slightly chilled water. In addition, photovoltaic cells integrated into the glass roof panels not only generate enough power for the building’s electric lighting, they supply an additional layer of solar shading.

“The amount of daylight inside the building is consistently monitored,” says Ardalan. Electric lighting is used only when there isn’t enough daylight, he adds — and to illuminate the building at night.

Looking frosted and icy-white on a bright afternoon, the building assumes a brilliant clarity as the sun sets, revealing its inner workings like a child’s “visible engine” kit. This effect stems from a perceptive, energy-efficient electric lighting scheme by the New York–based L’Observatoire that balances program and architecture.

It was a challenge, says principal Hervé Descottes: “It’s such a transparent building that you could lose its sculptural aspects.” To achieve a soft, lanternlike glow, Descottes and his team layered the structure with light from within.

Initially, they created a layer by washing the mullions of the facade with metal-halide uplights installed inside the perimeter of the first level. Then they added a second layer of ambient and task lighting on the office floors, using compact fluorescent lamps. Here the lighting team kept the general light levels lower than usual to emphasize the glow of the fixtures at each desk, a tactic used to establish an intimate ambience for employees.

Next they installed linear fluorescent fixtures to wash the wood walls on all the levels, and inserted cool T5s above awninglike glass ceiling panels in the auditorium that create a seamless transition with the sunlight penetrating the skylight.

Last, they lined the atrium with adjustable metal-halide fixtures from the ground floor up to the roof, directing them up and down, and reflecting light off the white lamellas. This move, perhaps the most important, brightens the center of the building and underscores its voluptuous form.

During a recent visit on a warm and sunny summer morning, the offices were bursting with light — without a hint of glare — and wonderfully temperate minus the chill of air conditioning. A holistic tour de force, Fabrikstrasse 15 is illuminating in its transparency and ability to harness the aura and power of light — both generated and from the sun. Such a building defines the spirit of Novartis as an enlightened workplace.

Owner: Novartis Pharma AG

Completion Date: June 2009

Gross square footage: 19´500 m2

Total construction cost: Confidential

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

People

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

Personnel in architect’s firm who should receive special credit:
Frank Gehry – Partner In Charge
Edwin Chan – Design Partner
Terry Bell – Project Partner
Kamran Ardalan & Herwig Baumgartner – Project Manager / Architects

Principal Project Team:
Sven Newmann
Patricia Eva Schneider
Ron Tannenbaum
Narineh Mirzaeian
Manoucher Eslami
Vartan Chalikian

Schematic Design Project Team:
Joshua Morey
Yoram Lepair
Timothy Paulson
Frank Mahan
Earle Briggs
David Dorn
Andrew Fastman
Frank Weeks
Manuel Blanco-lonqueria
Lukas Raeber
Jeffery Garrett
Randolph D’amico

Architect of record
Local architects, general management, realization planning and site management:
Planergemeinschaft Arcoplan / Nissen& Wentzlaff, Basel
Project management: Daniel Wentzlaff, Thomas Oetiker, Timothy O.Nissen

Project Team:
René Keuter
Hendrik Johannsen
Karl Reiter
Paul Luternauer
Michael Sauer
Silvia Barben
Christiane Bouhraoua
Raymond Gaëtan
Soran Jester
Stephan Schweizer
Stefan Herrmann
Michael Geiger
Thomas Ligibel
Bettina Fritsche
Senad Catovic
Heiko Müller
Hans Münchhalfen
Wulf Oschwald
Ueli Raeber
Karl Sowa
Silke Techen
Daniel Hofer
Daniel Reinhardt
Ulli Blümmert
Andreas Schön
Isabel Frey
Lionel Combebias
Christian Hafenmayer
Martin Schlegel
Moritz Rusch

Interior designer
 Gehry Partners, LLP

Engineer(s)
Building services planning: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Lucerne, Switzerland: Gregor De Martin, Walter Wüthrich, Bruno Wigger, and Ralf Haebig
Building automation: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Basel, Switzerland: Urs Winkler
Building physics: Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland: Martin Beyerler
Structural engineer: Schlaich Bergermann und Partner, Stuttgart, Germany: Jörg Schlaich, Hans Schober, Michael Werwigk, Kai Kürschner

Consultant(s)
Acoustical: McKay Conant Brook, David Conant/ Dr. Markus Ringger, Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland
Audio-Video planning: Virtually Audio GmbH, Suhr, Switzerland: Daniel Zurwerra, Thomas Rüetschi
Catering planning: Planbar, Zurich, Switzerland: Walter Widmer
Graphics, signage: 2×4 Inc. New York, U.S.A: Michael Rock, Lee Moreau, Yoonjai Choi, Albert Lee
Electrical planning: Scherler AG, Basel, Switzerland: Thomas Roth
Energy concept: Transsolar Energietechnik GmbH, Munich, Germany: Matthias Schuler, Wolfgang Kessling, Christian Oberdorf
Fire prevention concept: Mario Fontana, Zürich, Switzerland: Alfred Spinelli, A+F Brandschutz, Pratteln, Switzerland
Façade planning: Emmer Pfenninger Partner AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland: Hans Emmer, Kurt Pfenninger, Martin Friedli, Steffi Neubert, Jeanette Leu
Landscape: Vogt Landschaftsarchitekten, Zurich, Switzerland: Günter Vogt, Ralf Günter Voss, Uta Gehrhardt
Lighting: L´Observatoire International, New York, Hervé Descottes, Socorro Sperati, Beatrice Witzgall

CAD system, project management, or other software used
 2d Drawings in Auto CAD and 3d Modeling in Digital Project/Catia

Products

Structural system
Steel-Structure Facade: Müller Offenburg GmbH: Offenburg, Germany in collaboration with Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. Christian Gäßler, Wolfgang Mayr, Ladislaus Balint, Sebastian Utz and Torsten Nörr.
Concrete Structure: Implenia AG, Switzerland

Exterior cladding

Metal/glass curtain wall: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany.

Glazing

Glass:Curtain Wall: Glass by BGT Bischoff Glastechnik: Bretten, Germany, Curtian wall engineering and installed by Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. 
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg, Switzerland
Exterior Balustrades: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Ground Floor Interior Glazing: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Interior Glass Balustrades: glass manufactured by Blaser, Basel, Switzerland, installed by Imbau AG, Pratteln, Switzerland
Conference Room Glazing: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Meeting / Interview Rooms: Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen, Switzerland
Interior Windows (wood framing):  Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Design Stairs Mainbuilding: Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany

Skylights: 
Exterior Auditorium Skylight: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Interior Skylights: MTV Metallbau – Technik Villmergen AG: Villmergen, Switzerland

Doors

Entrances: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Metal doors: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Wood doors: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland & Dreier AG, Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Sliding doors: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Fire-control doors, security grilles: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland / Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland / Dreier AG Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Revolving Door: Blasi GmbH, Mahlberg, Germany

Hardware

Locksets: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy
Closer &, Panic Hardware: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Exit devices: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Pulls: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy / Glutz AG, Switzerland

Interior finishes

Acoustical ceilings: Two prodcuts used:
BASWAphon Acoustical Finish – BASWA Switzerland & STOSilentPanel – STO Switzerland

Suspension grid:
Auditorium Operable/Acoustic Partitions:  Industrial Acoustics Company (IAC): New York, U.S.A; Craig D’ Anna
Cabinetwork and custom woodwork: Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Paints and stains: manufacturer: Dold AG: Wallisellen, Switzerland
Wall coverings: Vertical Grain Douglas fir interior Wall claddings/Windows- Jos. Berchtold AG, Switzerland / Meeting-interview room- Röthlisberger Innenausbau: Gümlingen, Switzerland
Bathroom Stainless Steel Partitions: BTS – Partition System: Munich, Germany
Bathroom Tiles: Villeroy & Boch
Auditorium Leather Paneling: Leather provided by Poltrona Frau, Italy, Fabricated and Installed by Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Auditorium) Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Main Building) Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Plastic laminate:
Wood Surfaces: Vertical Grain Douglas fir veneered wood paneling – Central Wood Supplier: Sauter Paul AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland
Special surfacing: Cooling Ceilings/Walls: MWH Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Floor and wall tile (cite where used): Wood Floor – Senn Parkett, Dussnang, Switzerland
Resilient flooring: Dispoxid 472, Caparol Farben AG, Nänikon, Switzerland
Carpet: manufacturer: Shaw, U.S.A.
Raised flooring: Type FLOOR and more N 30 x L/A, AGB Bautechnik AG, Switzerland

Furnishings

Office furniture: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Reception furniture: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland
Fixed seating: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich Switzerland / Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen Switzerland
Workstation Task Chairs: Meda Pro by Vitra International
Conference/Meeting/Interview room Chairs: Eames Aluminum Group by Vitra
Workstation Tables: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Upholstery: leather covered auditorium fixed seatings: Poltrona Frau, Italy: Fulvio Giustiniani
Custom Furniture: Conference rooms tables, meeting & interview rooms tables, reception desks, shelving, banquets, etc. – Designed by Gehry Partners, manufactured by various contractors.

Lighting   
Manufacturer: Erco, Neuco, Regent, Schmitz, Reggianni, Philips, Regiolux, Zumtobel

Pendant Lighting: Restaurant – Mama Cloud designed by Frank O. Gehry; Manufactured by Belux.
Custom Lighting: Conference Rooms – Designed by Gehry Partners, LLP: Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland
Task lighting: Tolome by Artemide
Dimming System or other lighting controls: various manufacturers

Conveyance

Elevators/Escalators: Schindler AG, Switzerland
Accessibility provision (lifts, ramping, etc.):
(Auditorium) Gilgen Logistics AG, Oberwangen Switzerland

Energy
Energy management or building automation system:Neuberger Gebäudeautomation AG, Rothenburg, Germany
Photovoltaic system: Schüco International KG, Bielefeld, Germany

Other unique products that contribute to sustainability:

Façade Components:

  1. Highly selective triple glazing (low U-Values) with double fritting.
  2. Internally movable shading made of low-e –coated textile fabric.
  3. Façade openings in the upper and lower area of the façade for back ventilation of the façade (air circulation between the façade and shading).
  4. Internal Cooled/Acoustic lamellas under the roof of the central atrium – MWH Barcol-Air AG, Switzerland.

Air-conditioning Technology:

  1. Acoustic/Cooled ceilings in office areas.
  2. Floor Heating/Cooling
  3. Heating/Cooling panels along floor slabs in the façade areas.
  4. Decentralized Heating/Cooling convectors (under the floors).
  5. Source ventilation with fully air-conditioned fresh air.
  6. Air outlet of the re-circulating air for convection cooling of the façade areas.

Project awaiting Minergie Certification.
Minergie is a sustainability brand for new and refurbished buildings. It is mutually supported by the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Cantons along with Trade and Industry and is registered in Switzerland and around the world and defended firmly against unlicensed use.

Additional building components or special equipment that made a significant contribution to this project:
Shading System Contractor – Clauss Markisen GmbH: Bissingen, Germany: Klaus Westenberger, Klauss Vogg
Shading Fabric – Ferrari (SOLTIS 86) Stamoid AG, Eglisau, Schweiz
Interior Design Stairs – Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany
Cooling Lamellas – Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg Switzerland
Auditorium Projection Screens – Stewart Filmscreen Corporation, Torrance, California
Cafeteria Buffets – Buob Kühlmöbel AG, Rorschach, Switzerland
LED Column – LED elements by Tweaklab AG, Basel, Switzerland; Installed by Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Cafeteria LED signage – Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland

By Linda C. Lentz

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/lighting/2011/08/fabrikstrasse-15.asp

August 9, 2011

Skywalk Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna | Solid Architecture

Project Details:
Location: Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna, Austria
Architects: Solid Architecture – www.solid.ac
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Built up Area: 54 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Completion: May 2009
Photos: Günter Kresser

 SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna.

The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture
In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.
Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.
If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.
The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge
The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.
The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.
There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.
Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge
From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge,
the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.
The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.
In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge. In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination
The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

http://architecturelab.net/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-viennaaustria-by-solid-architecture-18890/

SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna. The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture

In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.

Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.

If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.

The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge

The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.

The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.

There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.

Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge

From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge, the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.

The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.

In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge.  In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination

The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

+ Project credits / data

ProjectSkywalk Rennweg 44 – 46
Location: Skywalk, Rennweg 44 – 46, 1030 Vienna
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46

ArchitectureSOLID architecture ZT GmbH | http://www.solid.ac/
Project Management: Arch. DI Christoph Hinterreitner
Collaborators: Arch DI Christine Horner
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Structural Engineering: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Building Physics: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Construction Supervision: CF SER/IM/BPM der Österreichischen Lotterien

Contractors
Builder: SAN AS BAU
Steel / Glass Construction: Stahlbau Kamper GmbH
Plumber: Ing. Ledermüller GmbH
Electrician: Fleck Elektroinstallationen GmbH
Fire Protection Gate: Peneder Feuerschutz GmbH
Photographer of the Project: Günter Kresser
Holder of the Copyright: SOLID architecture ZT GmbH

Planning Data
Direct Commission: no, 1stprize in invited competition
Project Status: Project completed
Competition: July / September 2008
Start of Planning: October 2008
Start of Construction: April 2009
Completion: May 2009

Project Data
Gross Area: 54 m²
Built up Area: 54 m²
Useable Surface: 44 m²
Building Volume: 189 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Construction: Stahlkonstruktion, Seitenwände verglast
Spatial Program: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge

Awards, Prizes: Exhibition “Gebaut 2009“, Architektonische Begutachtungen der MA 19

+ All images and drawings courtesy SOLID architecture

http://plusmood.com/2011/07/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-solid-architecture/

http://www.e-architect.co.uk/vienna/skywalk_rennweg.htm

http://www.solid.ac/_framesets/frameset_projects/english/ProjectFrameSet_en.html

http://www.rwt-plus.at/english/projects/national/national-2008-2009/bruecke-rennweg.html

July 13, 2011

Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre by REX | OMA

2599_2_20 Wyly Exterior © Iwan Baan

321_2_Wyly - night view © Tim Hursley

2370_2_Wyly - view from terrace © Tim Hursley

2371_2_Wyly - lobby © Tim Hursley

2372_2_Wyly © Tim Hursley

2373_2_Wyly - dusk view with sign © Tim Hursley

2594_2_19 Wyly Exterior © Iwan Baan

2595_2_27 Wyly - Performance Hall © Iwan Baan

2598_2_18 Wyly Exterior © Iwan Baan

2601_2_24 Wyly - Stair to Performance Hall © Iwan Baan

2602_2_25 Wyly - Performance Hall © Iwan Baan

2603_2_26 Wyly - Performance Hall © Iwan Baan

2604_2_28 Wyly - Conference Room © Iwan Baan

2605_2_30 Wyly - Rooftop Terrace © Iwan Baan

Level 01 THRUST thrust floor plan © REX

Level 01 PROSCENIUM proscenium floor plan © REX

Level 01 FLAT FLOOR flat floor plan © REX

Level 08 eight floor plan © REX

Concept_Diagram-02-SUPERFLY_credit-REX concept diagram © REX

Architects: REX | OMA
Location: Dallas, USA
Key Personnel: Joshua Prince-Ramus (Partner-in-Charge) and Rem Koolhaas, with Erez Ella, Vincent Bandy, Vanessa Kassabian, Tim Archambault
Executive Architect: Kendall/Heaton Associates
Client: The AT&T Performing Arts Center
Consultants: Cosentini, DHV, Donnell, Front, HKA, Magnusson Klemencic, McCarthy, McGuire, Pielow Fair, Plus Group, Quinze & Milan, Theatre Projects, Tillotson Design, Transsolar, 2×4
MEP/FP Design Engineer: Transsolar Energietechnik, Germany
MEP/FP Engineer of Record: Cosentini Associates, 
Structural Engineer of Record: Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Seattle
Theatre Design: Theatre Projects Consultants, Connecticut
Acoustics: Dorsserblesgraaf, Netherlands
ADA: McGuire Associates, Massachusetts
Construction Management: McCarthy Construction
Cost: Donnell Consultants, Florida
Facades: Front, 
Furniture: Quinze & Milan, Kortrijk Belgium
Graphics/Wayfinding: 2 x 4, 
Life Safety: Pielow Fair, Seattle
Lighting: Tillotson Design Associates, 
Vertical Transport: HKA, California
Project Area: 7,700 sqm
Project year: 2006-2009
Photographs: Iwan BaanTim Hursley, Jeffrey Buehner

The Dallas Theater Center (DTC) is known for its innovative work, the result of its leadership’s constant experimentation and the provisional nature of its long-time home. DTC was housed in the Arts District Theater, a dilapidated metal shed that freed its resident companies from the limitations imposed by a fixed-stage configuration and the need to avoid harming expensive interior finishes. The directors who worked there constantly challenged the traditional conventions of theater and often reconfigured the form of the stage to fit their artistic visions. As a result, the Arts District Theater was renowned as the most flexible theater in America. The costs of constantly reconfiguring its stage, however, became a financial burden and eventually DTC permanently fixed its stage into a “thrust-cenium.”

Imagining a replacement for DTC’s old house raised several distinct challenges. First, the new theater needed to engender the same freedoms created by the makeshift nature of its previous home. Second, the new venue needed to be flexible and multi-form while requiring minimal operational costs.

The Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre overcomes these challenges by overturning conventional theater design. Instead of circling front-of-house and back-of-house functions around the auditorium and fly tower, the Wyly Theatre stacks these facilities below-house and above-house. This strategy transforms the building into one big “theater machine.” At the push of a button, the theater can be transformed into a wide array of configurations—including proscenium, thrust, and flat floor—freeing directors and scenic designers to choose the stage-audience configuration that fulfills their artistic desires. Moreover, the performance chamber is intentionally made of materials that are not precious in order to encourage alterations; the stage and auditorium surfaces can be cut, drilled, painted, welded, sawed, nailed, glued and stitched at limited cost.

Stacking the Wyly Theatre’s ancillary facilities above- and below-house also liberates the performance chamber’s entire perimeter, allowing fantasy and reality to mix when and where desired. Directors can incorporate the Dallas skyline and streetscape into performances at will, as the auditorium is enclosed by an acoustic glass façade with hidden black-out blinds that can be opened or closed. Panels of the façade can also be opened to allow patrons or performers to enter into the auditorium or stage directly from outside, bypassing the downstairs lobby.

By investing in infrastructure that allows ready transformation and liberating the performance chamber’s perimeter, the Wyly Theatre grants its artistic directors freedom to determine the entire theater experience, from audience arrival to performance configuration to departure. On consecutive days, the Wyly Theatre can produce Shakespeare on a proscenium stage or Beckett in a flat-floor configuration silhouetted against the Dallas cityscape. Both learning from, and improving upon, DTC’s original Arts District Theater, the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre will restore Dallas as the home of the most flexible theater in America, if not the world.

http://www.archdaily.com/37736/dee-and-charles-wyly-theatre-rex-oma/

June 30, 2011

300 North LaSalle | Pickard Chilton

300 North | LaSalle Pickard Chilton | Chicago, Illinois

“The test of a great building is in the marketplace. The Marketplace recognizes the value of quality architecture and endorses it in the sales price it is able to achieve.” — Jon Pickard, Principal, Pickard Chilton

By Beth Broome

Building high in the Windy City is not a charge to be taken lightly. New Haven–based Pickard Chilton has risen to the challenge with this 1.3 million-square-foot, 60-story tower on the north bank of the Chicago River that emphatically states its presence.

In devising the scheme, the architects worked closely with Chicago developer Hines and anticipated anchor tenant, the international law firm of Kirkland & Ellis (K&E), which previously occupied Edward Durell Stone and Perkins and Will’s Aon Center. With a new home for K&E, the team hoped to create a visible identity as well as a high-performance transparent building that connected with the waterfront, attracted talent, and enabled K&E to use less square footage more efficiently while maximizing perimeter offices.

“The design of 300 North LaSalle was instrumental in securing the anchor tenant K&E,” says Hines vice president Jim Walsh. “The building needed to create an image of quality. Pickard Chilton’s selection of materials, from the curtain wall’s stainless steel to material choices in the lobby and the public plazas, as well as their detail in the overall design, achieved that goal.” This and flexible, efficient floor plans were also instrumental in attracting tenants for the 25,000-square-foot rentable floor plates. “In many cases,” points out Walsh, “these tenants will be paying more per square foot but taking less square footage.”

To maximize daylighting and views, the team raised the ceilings to about 10 feet and employed floor-to-ceiling low-E glass (with stainless steel shade fins). And to achieve LEED Gold CS certification and an Energy Star rating, they diverted 98 percent of demolition and construction waste and specified a green roof and condenser water supplied by the river, among other things.

“The building opened 90 percent leased in a tough leasing market and quickly leased to over 96 percent,” says Walsh. As a further testament to the building’s success, Hines sold it in 2010 for a record $655 million — at $503 per square foot, the highest price ever paid for a downtown Chicago office building, claim the architects. “You can achieve your business objectives by simply doing a box,” says Pickard Chilton principal Jon Pickard. “However, 300 North LaSalle transcends that. It contributes to the city at many levels — it has a dignity that goes beyond a bottom-line commercial focus and a refinement that is consistent with the history of Chicago.”

Architect: Pickard Chilton
980 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT 06510 
203.786.8600 T / 203.786.8610 F

Completion Date: May 2009

Total construction cost: $480 million

Gross square footage: 1.3 million sq.ft.

People

Owner: KBS Real Estate Investment Trust, Newport Beach, California

Developer: Hines, Chicago, Illinois

Architect:               
Pickard Chilton
980 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510
203.786.8600 T / 203.786.8610 F

Personnel in architect’s firm who should receive special credit: 
Principals:
Jon Pickard FAIA, RIBA; William D Chilton FAIA, RIBA; Anthony Markese AIA, RIBA, LEED AP

Design Team:
Benjamin Simmons, David Brown, Charisse Bennett, Christopher Lee, Deborah Lukan AIA, Jonathan Stitelman, William Traill, Maxwell Worrell

Architect of Record:
Kendall/Heaton Associates Inc.
3050 Post Oak Blvd, Suite 1000
Houston TX 77056

Engineer(s):                                          
Structural Engineer :                               
Magnusson Klemencic Associates
1301 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3200
Seattle, WA 98101-2699

MEP Engineer:                                        
Alvine Engineering
1102 Douglas on the Mall
Omaha, NE  68102

Civil Engineer:                                         
Epstein
600 W Fulton St # 7
Chicago, IL 60661-1259

Consultant(s):

Landscape:                                              
Wolff Landscape Architecture, Inc.
307 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 601
Chicago, IL 60601

Lighting:
Quentin Thomas Associates, Inc.
Two Hillcrest Avenue
Douglaston, NY 11363

Acoustical:                                               
Cerami & Associates
404 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10018

Sustainability:                                           
BVM Engineering
834 Inman Village Parkway NE, Suite 230
Atlanta, GA 30307

Building Automation:                                
HMA Consulting
5177 Richmond Avenue, Suite 640
Houston, TX  77056

Vertical Transportation:                           
Persohn/Hahn Associates
908 Town and Country Blvd., Suite 120
Houston, TX  77024

Code/Life Safety:                                     
Hollingsworth Architects LLC
740 South Federal Street, Suite 1209
Chicago, IL 60605

Curtain Wall Consultant:                          
CDC, Inc.
8070 Park Lane, Suite 400
Dallas, TX 75231

General contractor:              
Clark Construction Group LLC
Bethesda, Maryland

Photographer(s):
Alan Karchmer
3400 Patterson Street NW
Washington, DC  20015
202.244.7511

Peter Aaron/Esto
222 Valley Place
Mamaroneck, NY 10543
914.698.4060

Scott McDonald
Hedrich-Blessing Photographers
400 North Peoria
Chicago,Il 60622
312.491.1101

CAD system, project management, or other software used:  AutoCAD (Base design/modeling and production software); 3D Studio Max (Rendering software); Primavera (File/Submittal management software); Adobe CS (Illustrator, Photoshop,InDesign).

Products

Structural system
Steel Frame w/ Concrete Core

Exterior cladding
Metal Panels: Formawall (Penthouse Walls) Permasteelisa (Curtain Wall Metal Panels)

Metal/glass curtain wall: Permasteelisa

Precast concrete: Gate Precast Company

Roofing
Built-up roofing: American Hydrotech

Glazing
Glass: Viracon

Doors
Entrances: Kawneer

Wood doors: Lambton Door Co.

Fire-control doors, security grilles: Cornell (Insulated Coiling Doors)

Special doors): Hydrarol (High Speed Roll Up Doors)

Hardware
Locksets: Sargent

Closers: Norton

Exit devices: Sargent

Interior finishes
Acoustical ceilings: Armstrong (Public Areas & Back of House) & USG (Parking Garage)

Suspension grid: Armstrong (Public Areas & Back of House) & USG (Parking Garage)

Cabinetwork and custom woodwork: MARC Woodworking, Inc.

Paints and stains: Sherwin Williams

Floor and wall tile: American Olean

Resilient flooring: Armstrong

Carpet: Durkan

Lighting
Interior ambient lighting: Columbia

Downlights: Lite Frame

Exterior: Hubbell

Conveyance
Elevators/Escalators: Kone

300 North LaSalle

The team created a pedestrian connection to the building by dedicating a half-acre of the 1.2-acre site to two public plazas bridged by a stair.
Photo © Alan Karchmer
300 North LaSalle
An articulated steel crown defines 300 North LaSalle on its prominent site. To maximize the southern exposure of the garden and limit solar gain on the east and west facades, the team placed the tower on the plot’s northern limit.
Photo © Peter Aaron/Esto
300 North LaSalle
he building’s grand, three-story public lobby continues a long Chicago tradition.
Photo © Peter Aaron/Esto
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle at dusk
Photo © Alan Karchmer
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, east-facing elevation
Photo © Peter Aaron/Esto
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, view from the bridge
Photo © Alan Karchme
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, the tower at dusk
Photo © Alan Karchmer
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, tower
Photo © Pickard Chilton
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, riverfront
Photo © Peter Aaron/Esto
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, conference level
Photo © Peter Aaron/Esto
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, entrance
Photo © Alan Karchmer
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, lobby
Photo © Alan Karchmer
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, plan – level 6
Image courtesy Pickard Chilton
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, plan – lobby
Image courtesy Pickard Chilton
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, floor plan
Image courtesy Pickard Chilton
300 North LaSalle
300 North LaSalle, section
Image courtesy Pickard Chilton
300 North LaSalle

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

300 North LaSalle / Pickard Chilton © Alan Karchmer

plan 01 plan 01

plan 02 plan 02

section section

site plan 01 site plan 01

site plan 02 site plan 02

Architects: Pickard Chilton
Location: 
Civil engineer: Epstein
Developer: Hines
Acoustics: Cerami & Associates
Lightning: Quentin Thomas Associates, Inc.
Landscaping: Wolff Landscape Architecture, Inc.
Structural engineer: Magnusson Klemencic Associates
Project year: 2009
Photographs: Alan Karchmer

Located on the north bank of the  River, the project respects and enhances the tradition of inspiring skyscrapers in the city of  – the birthplace of the skyscraper. The 60-story, 1.3 million gsf project is comprised of office, retail, restaurant, amenity and public spaces as well as below-grade parking. The project is also the new world class home for an international law firm that has been a prominent citizen in  since 1908. At over 783 feet, the project is among the tallest skyscrapers in .

Reestablishing a pedestrian connection to the city, the project features a half acre waterfront public garden with direct access to the river and views of the city. The thoughtful placement of the tower’s rectangular form on the northern limit of its site maximizes the southern exposure of the public garden while it minimizes solar gain on the narrower east and west facades. An asset for this area of , this public space enhances the streetscape at the base of the LaSalle Street Bridge and cascades to the river with a fine dining restaurant, landscaped terraces seating and a waterfront café.

The tower’s design accommodates efficiency and flexibility in interior planning and its floor-to-ceiling glass provides abundant natural light and dramatic views. The transparency and luminosity of its façade create a lighter, delicate silhouette. The tenant’s desire for a modern image anchored in the past informed the design that recalls the  Miesian tradition as well as art deco stepped skyscrapers. The elegant, three-story lobby features a decorative screen of cherry wood and ornamental stainless steel, set off by a floor of golden limestone. The tower culminates with a luminous, articulated stainless steel crown which acts as a beacon along the  River.

http://www.archdaily.com/146450/300-north-lasalle-pickard-chilton/

 

 

 

June 22, 2011

The Big Pull | Kauffman Center for Performing Arts

The Big Pull

You may not have noticed, but the entire steel structure of the Kauffman Center moved in the past month. Well, it only moved a couple of inches, but that it moved at all is remarkable. This is part of the “tensioning process” that is critical to the stability of the Kauffman Center design. It also enables the luxurious ceiling and walls made of glass to sweep so graciously, but securely, over patrons below.

“The pull,” as the construction team refers to the process that moved the steel structure, was done by crews from the subcontractor BSC using sophisticated measurements, precise technology and large hydraulic jacks. The precise engineering process takes place slowly over a month period, focusing on one portion of the steel grid at a time. An understated Matt Jansen, project manager with JE Dunn Construction Company, admits, “It’s a gigantic engineering feat.”

Engineering Feat

The Kauffman Center architectural design calls for a steel infrastructure and a cable supported system, something not common to most buildings. This requires the construction team to first build a typical steel structure. Then they tension cable support between that steel framework and the concrete anchor wall separating the building from the garage.

The glass lobby, a signature aspect of the Kauffman Center design, was engineered by Novum Structures. They are supported in their work by two local subcontractors: BSC, that focuses on the steel aspects of the lobby construction (including the pull) and Bratton that installs the glass.

Twenty-seven steel columns, gently angled like tent poles, are attached by cables to the existing steel infrastructure of the halls and to the concrete anchor wall near the parking garage below. The anchor wall is 50 feet high, four feet thick and 360 feet long.

Bolts weighing 20 pounds are used temporarily in the tensioning process. If weather cooperates, glass will begin to be installed in April, 2010 in some areas of the lobby roof and walls, even though the tensioning process may continue in other sections.

Additional complexity in this stage of construction arises from the need for guttering, lighting and heaters near where the roof meets the south wall.

In addition, another large engineering feat will take place when four cables are installed east to west across the roof’s edge to create a snow fence that catches and keeps snow in place until melted.

Steel Tensioning

Cable Renderings

http://www.kauffmancenter.org/2010/03/01/the-big-pull/

2809 E 85th Street
Kansas City, MO 64132-2535
First Exterior Glass Panels Installed At Kauffman Center For The Performing Arts

China Glass NetworkConstruction of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts this week entered an important phase with the installation of the first of nearly 1,400 exterior glass panels.

The glass will form the dramatic transparent canopy enclosing the southern face of the arts center and what will be its four-story-tall grand lobby.

Each glass panel, fabricated in China, is affixed to a complex, intricately engineered network of masts and cables.

The glass installation is expected to be completed this fall, said Kyle McQuiston, vice president and project manager for J.E. Dunn Construction Co., the general contractor.

“It represents a big milestone for enclosing the building,” McQuiston said, “as work proceeds inside the two halls.”

The $400 million project, including an 1,800-seat theater, a 1,600-seat concert hall, and a 1,000-space parking garage, is on track to open in fall 2011.

http://www.glassinchina.com/news/newsDisplay_9615.html

Stainless steel cladding by ZAHNER:

The Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is already having a dramatic and transformative impact on Kansas City, changing both the city’s skyline as well as the experience of artists and audiences throughout the region. Designed by acclaimed Canadian architect, Moshe Safdie, the project is set for completion in 2011, and is the most highly anticipated structure in the bi-state region.

The center itself is a nearly 285,000-square-foot facility with two performance venues: the 1,800-seat Muriel Kauffman Theatre and the 1,600-seat Helzberg Hall. It is sure to become the singular architectural icon for Kansas City and be counted among the finest performing arts centers. Once completed, it will become home to the Kansas City Symphony, the Lyric Opera of Kansas City, and the Kansas City Ballet.

Above is a photograph of the architect’s model, by John Horner.

The internationally recognized design team that has been assembled includes Moshe Safdie & Associates, Theatre Projects Consultants, and Nagata Acoustics. Their design incorporates the very latest in architectural innovation and technology to create virtually perfect acoustics and optimal sightlines in both performance halls.

Zahner is working closely with both the design team, as well as the construction management team at JE Dunn to bring the final surface to fruition. The entire roof and metal wall-surface is clad in Zahner GB-60™ Stainless Steel, a product well known for its muted reflectivity as well as it’s resilience to nature’s wear.

The first GB-60™ Stainless panels were installed at Kauffman Center last week (Week of August 2nd, 2010). Below are the photographs of these first panels, giving a sneak peak of the surface which will eventually wrap the majority of the building.

http://www.azahner.com/portfolio/kauffman-center

June 18, 2011

Glass Dome | Murphy/Jahn

Mansueto at dusk

Inside Mansueto dome with view of ceramic frit

The Joe and Rika Mansueto Library’s elliptical glass dome preserves the open space environment of the west lawn of the Joseph Regenstein Library. The lower portion of the dome is transparent to provide unobstructed visibility between inside and outside. The axis of the dome is slightly angled as a gesture toward the nearby landmark Henry Moore monument.

High performance Low E fritted glass provides shading from solar heat gain.  At the upper area of the dome, the glass incorporates 57% shading with a ceramic frit dot pattern applied to the interior of the external surface of the insulated glass. The high performance glass reject 73% of the solar heat while admitting 50% of the visible light and 98% of the UV light. As a result, the Grand Reading Room is flooded with daylight that is appropriately shaded to create a comfortable work environment.

The glass dome is supported by a light steel grid shell made up of 6-inch diameter high strength structural steel tubes parallel to the ellipse axis and spaced at approximately 6 feet in each direction. The steel grid is anchored to the concrete ring beam. The dome glass will be supported above the steel tube grid at each intersection.

The dome was constructed in six phases.

  1. Dome pieces, including steel, aluminum, and glass components, were manufactured by Seele in Germany; the structural steel frame was assembled into sections in Germany for testing purposes and then disassembled.  Components were shipped gradually to Chicago.
  2. Scaffolding was built over the ground floor to facilitate construction. It wsa elliptical in shape and rose in tiers, like a wedding cake.
  3. Structural steel frame was installed.
  4. Aluminum frame to support the glass was installed.
  5. Glass was installed.
  6. Sealant and dome completion
 Photos by Jason Smith
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
March 7, 2011

enclos

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We specialize in innovative architecture and challenging building projects. No project is too large, no building site too difficult for our seasoned operations teams.

Our work experience includes many projects with specialized materials, complex geometry, novel structural and mechanical system designs. Enclos curtainwall, facade and skylight systems combine innovative design with state-of-the-art materials and performance.

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Architect
The most comprehensive design-assist services in the industry have created a committed client base of leading architects that call on us early in the concept development phase of new projects.

General Contractor
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Developer
A long history of providing facade solutions combining top quality and performance with competitive economy has created allies of many leading developers.

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Technology

1.Custom Curtainwall Systems

Enclos offers the most innovative curtainwall systems in the marketplace, combining aesthetic, performance and economic considerations into optimum solutions to our client’s needs. Our inventive unitized systems have evolved through their application on numerous major building projects to represent the state-of-the-art in curtainwall technology and performance. Sophisticated system design features and installation methods have paralleled this evolution, resulting in improved economy as well as superior performance.

What Is Curtainwall

What Is Curtainwall?

Curtainwall is a term applied to a widely used facade technology for cladding large buildings. Curtainwall systems do not carry any dead loads imposed from the building structure. They are designed to support their self-weight and to transfer horizontal loads (wind) incident upon them to the primary building structure.Curtainwall systems are typically “hung” from the building structure — from whence derives the “curtain” reference — and typically attached to the floor slabs. The primary functions of the curtainwall are to resist air and water infiltration and to provide a thermal barrier between inside and out. Curtainwall systems are also designed to accommodate the complexities of deflections, thermal expansion and contraction, building sway and relative movements between floors as caused by wind or seismic loads acting globally or locally on the structure.Special design considerations can include daylighting, thermal, acoustical, security and blast-resistant performance. Curtainwall designs for large buildings are almost always customized to individual project requirements.The craftsmanship required for AESS is a rare competency. We have developed a network of qualified AESS steel fabrication vendors, a network built over time and upon the experience of many successfully completed projects. Enclos is able to manage the delivery process in a manner that best assures predictability of outcome, thus mitigating the risk of budget overruns and schedule delays. Enclos’ QA programs fully incorporate AESS requirements.

Cladding

Cladding

Glass is the most common infill material used in curtainwall systems, but other cladding materials include metal panels, natural stone and terracotta. The curtainwall systems typically span across the floor slabs, creating a need for opaque cladding material over and in the vicinity of the floor slab to conceal the slab edge, fire-safing and any between-floor mechanical systems. A spandrel panel is often located between vision glass panels to conceal this area. To achieve opacity, spandrel glass is treated with a ceramic coating (called a frit), a film, or is incorporated into an assembly called a shadow box.Glass is used extensively as a curtainwall cladding material because of its transparency and ability to provide daylight and view. Solar gain in such applications can present challenges with respect to energy performance, thermal and visual comfort, and represent important design considerations in the development of an appropriate curtainwall facade. Ongoing research and development has positioned the Enclos team to provide optimum solutions to these challenges, and has worked with leading architects in the development of high performance glass facades on many buildings pursuing LEED certification by the US Green Building Council.Enclos has designed curtainwall systems for many LEED certified buildings

Anchorage

Anchorage

It is an exciting time for the development of advanced facade technology. At the same time, the fundamentals of sound curtainwall design have lost none of their critical import.One of the basic considerations that impacts every building project without exception is the means by which the curtainwall is anchored to the building. Anchor design can affect many things beyond the immediate curtainwall design, including the work of other trades and the design of the building interior. As with so many other aspects of the building skin, Enclos continues to lead the way with anchor design. Enclos anchor designs can be positioned on the face, top or bottom of slab, or recessed in any of these positions. The Enclos anchoring method is highly efficient, speeds field installation of the curtainwall and provides optimum economy to the building developer.Curtainwall anchors are set prior to the commencement of unit installation. If the anchors are to be recessed, they are sometimes set prior to the concrete floor slabs being poured, or provision is made for a cavity in the slab into which the anchor assembly will be installed.Our inventive unitized systems have evolved through their application on numerous major building projects to represent the state-of-the-art in curtainwall technology and performance. Sophisticated system design features and installation methods have paralleled this evolution, resulting in improved economy as well as superior performance.

Framing

Framing

Curtainwall is typically designed as cladding materials that are framed and fixed in place by extruded aluminum components. There are two basic types of systems:

  • Stick systems are built from long vertical extrusions (mullion) attached to the building structure, with shorter horizontal extrusions spanning between the vertical mullions to create the frames. Cladding materials are then installed into the frames. Extrusions may be fabricated in the shop, but all assembly, installation and glazing takes place in the field.
  • Unitized systems are a newer adaptation of curtainwall technology that has rapidly grown in use in recent years. The vertical and horizontal framing members are figuratively split, allowing independently framed “units” to be assembled and glazed in the factory. The units can be designed to span multiple floors or multiple horizontal modules, and can incorporate multiple cladding elements including operable vents and windows. The completed units are shipped to the site and simply hung on the building. Unitized systems concentrate fabrication and assembly under controlled factory rather than in the field. The selection between them is dependent upon project specific variables.

Enclos technical personnel can assist you in determining which system type is best for your particular project.

Facade Integration

Facade Integration

In addressing the challenges discussed above, and in meeting the generally escalating performance demands on the building skin, curtainwall designs have become increasingly complex. Facade system requirements now frequently include daylight harvesting, daylight and glare control, artificial lighting, and even power generation. Techniques for addressing these considerations are being integrated into the curtainwall system, providing advanced functionality to the building facade. Photovoltaic systems, shade fins, light shelves, louvers, operable blinds, sensors and multiple skins are among the things being integrated into the curtainwall system.The building community has recognized the facade as a primary means to improve energy performance and occupant comfort, and even as a potential power source.

Installation

Installation

Installation strategy is highly sensitive to specific site, schedule and coordination requirements. All Enclos operations are driven by the requirements of the building site.Unitized curtainwall systems provide optimum flexibility in this regard. Materials can be fabricated, assembled and stored offsite, and be delivered on a just-in-time basis as required to support installation crews, thus minimizing on-site storage and staging requirements on highly congested building sites. Assembled units are delivered to the site on open flatbed trailers. The units can be lifted by crane from the trailer and directly set in place on the building facade. Alternately, units can be designed to be installed from inside the building. Installation crews working from a floor above use a small jib crane to lower the units to a setting crew below. Other techniques are possible depending upon specific project requirements.Installation strategy, site logistics and operations are among the greatest strengths of Enclos, and represent the capability most valued by our general contracting clients.

2.Structural Glass Facades

A new facade technology has gradually emerged in recent decades, driven largely by the pursuit of transparency in the building facade among leading international building designers. This new technology has evolved in long-span applications, and can be categorized by the various structural systems employed as support. New glazing systems are also a part of this technology, with the various point-fixed systems finding most frequent use.

Structural Systems

Structural glass facades are most easily categorized by the structure types that support them.

1.Strongback Systems

Strongback systems comprise a remarkably diverse range of novel structural solutions in facade applications. The structural systems are built up from structural sections capable of accommodating the required span. These systems can include both vertical and horizontal structural components. Sometimes verticals are used with no horizontals. Conversely, an interesting variation of this system type eliminates the vertical mullion, with horizontal components suspended from overhead cables and fixed to anchoring building structure at their ends. Strongback systems also include hierarchical structural frames and braced frames.

Cathedral of Christ the Light
LAUSD Central LA Area High School #9
Orange County Performing Arts Center

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2.Truss Systems

Truss systems employ a planar truss design, often in a hierarchical system that may combine other element types including tension components. Truss designs vary widely, with an emphasis on fine detailing and craftsmanship. They often involve complex steel fabrications, frequently manufactured to Architecturally Exposed Structural Steel (AESS) standards. Rod or cable elements may be incorporated into the truss design, and lateral tensile systems are often used to stabilize the facade structure. Simple truss elements are often bordered by one or two cable trusses in a repeating pattern as a means to lighten the structural profile of the facade.

LA Live Tower & Residences: Podium
Eskind Biomedical Library
San Diego Convention Center
Washington Convention Center

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3.Cable Trusses

One type of truss system utilizes a minimalist structural form called a cable truss. While cable trusses can vary widely in both truss design and configuration with vertical, overhead, vaulted and domed forms easily achieved, the trusses themselves are most often characterized by spreader strut elements representing the only compression members in the structural system. As with cable nets, these systems rely on the pre-tensioning of truss elements to provide stability, and thus benefit significantly from the early involvement of the facade design/build team.

Suvarnabhumi Airport Bangkok
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse
San Jose Civic Center

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4.Grid Shells

Grid shell structural systems are another means to minimize the visual mass of structure. Configurations can be vaulted, domed and double-curved. Systems can be welded, bolt-up, or some combination of each. Grid shell structures with integrated cable bracing can produce a highly efficient structure with a refined aesthetic. Cable prestress is required on such systems. Grid shells can be used in vertical and overhead applications, as well as to form complete building enclosures.

Boston Courthouse
Cerner Corporate Headquarters
Desert Bloom Porte Cochere: Casino Morongo

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5.Cable Nets

Frei Otto developed and popularized cable nets as a structural system in the 1960s and 70s. Architect Helmut Jahn with engineering firm Schlaich Bergermann applied the technology in a most innovative manner in 1992 as a flat cable net supported glass facade for the Kempinski Hotel in Munich, fueling widespread interest in this structural form in glass facade applications.

Cable nets represent the ultimate in elegant minimalist structural systems and can provide optimum transparency when the effect of a sheer glass membrane is desired. The glass is supported by a net geometry of pre-tensioned cables. Designs can be flat, or the net can be pulled into double-curvature. A clamping component locks the cables together at their vertices and fixes the glass to the net. Large pre-stress loads in the net structures require the early involvement of the facade design/ build team with the building engineer.

Newseum
Richard J Klarchek Information Commons

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6.Glass Fin Systems

This is the earliest form of structural glass facade dating back to the 1950s and the French Hahn system used at the Maison de la Radio in Paris in 1953. Here 2-story glass plates were suspended and laterally stiffened by the use of glass fins set perpendicular to the plates at the vertical joints between them. This technology was popularized by the Willis Faber & Dumas Building, Ipswich, England circa 1972. In this curved facade designed by Foster Associates, multiple plates of reflective glass are suspended to provide one of the first examples of an entire building facade being skinned by frameless glass. This project inspired a diffusion of glass fin technology in numerous applications throughout Europe and America starting in the 1970s and continuing today. Glass fin-supported facades still represent one of the most transparent forms of structural glass facades and an economical solution (especially at lower spans).

Belmont Police Department and City Hall
River East Center
Shure Corporate Headquarters

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7.Glass Structures

Glass is increasingly being explored as a structural element. Glass stair treads and landings have become commonplace, and the material has even seen limited use in column and beam applications. Apple stores have explored this capacity to spectacular effect.

One of the hottest areas of glass development is in glass beams. These typically take the form of multi-ply laminates of heat-treated glass, and special structural laminates are sometimes used. The analysis and connection detailing of these components requires particular expertise. Enclos completed what is believed to be the largest single application of structural glass with the Howard Hughes Medical Center, which included the extensive use of glass beams.

Howard Hughes Medical Center
Ventura Canopy

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3.High-Performance Facade Systems

High-Performance Facade Systems

Enclos is the leader in high-performance facade systems. We were the first to design and proof a blast resistant facade system through destructive testing performed at White Sands Missile Base. We have developed and tested impact-resistant facade systems that have been approved by Miami-Dade County for use in hurricane zones. Our projects have often required the development of curtainwall systems with enhanced thermal and/or acoustical properties.

4.Art Glass Facades

Art Glass Facades

Enclos has provided art glass solutions on many high-profile building projects, often working with glass artists and architects in developing innovative designs. Our talented design team has an expertise with glass materials and processes that greatly facilitates the development of novel design solutions. Coupled with our fabrication and site operations, you cannot find a stronger, more capable team for providing art glass solutions.

see a select list of art glass projects

Glazing Systems

Framed Systems

Framed systems support the glass continuously along two or four sides. There are many variations of framed systems, most of which fall into two general categories. Conventional unitized curtain wall systems are seldom used with structural glass facades.

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Veneer

Truss systems can be designed with an outer chord of square or rectangular tubing, and may include transom components of similar material, presenting a uniform flat grid installed to high tolerances. Such a system can provide continuous support to the simplest and most minimal off-the-shelf glazing system, thus combining relatively high transparency with excellent economy. A veneer glazing system is essentially a stick-built curtainwall system designed for continuous support and representing a higher level of system integration with resulting efficiencies. Variations can include 4-sided capture, 2-sided capture, structurally glazed and unitized systems.

Orange County Performing Arts Center
Eskind Biomedical Library

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Frameless Systems

Frameless systems utilize glass panes that are fixed to a structural system at discrete points, usually near the corners of the glass panel (point-fixed). The glass is directly supported without the use of perimeter framing elements. The glass used in point-fixed applications is typically heat-treated.

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Point-fixed Clamped

Point-fixed clamped systems accomplish the point fixing without the requirement for perforations in the glass. In the case of a spider type fitting, the spider is rotated 45 degrees from the bolted position so that its arms align with the glass seams. A thin blade penetrates through the seam between adjacent pieces of glass. An exterior plate attaches to the blade and clamps the glass in place. The bolted systems present an uninterrupted glass surface, while the clamped systems expose the small exterior clamp plate. Some facade designers prefer the exposed hardware aesthetic. While the clamped systems have the potential for greater economy by eliminating the need for glass perforations, the cost of the clamping hardware may offset at least some of this savings depending upon the efficiency of the design.

51 Louisiana
LA Live Tower & Residences: Podium
Richard J Klarchek Information Commons
Shure Corporate Headquarters

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Stick

Stick-built glass facades are a method of curtainwall construction where much of the fabrication and assembly takes place in the field. Mullions of extruded aluminum may be prefabricated, but are delivered as unassembled “sticks” to the building site. The mullions are then installed onto the building face to create a frame for the glass, which is installed subsequently. Economical off-the-shelf stick curtain wall products are available from various manufacturers that may be suitable for application in structural glass facades, primarily on truss systems.

LAUSD Central LA Area High School #9
San Diego Convention Center
Washington Convention Center

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Panel/Cassette

Panel systems are typically constructed of a framed glass lite. The framed panel can then be point-supported by a supporting structural system, while the glass remains continuously supported on two or four sides. This also allows the panel to be stepped away from the support system — a practice that tends to visually lighten the facade. Panel systems can be prefabricated, benefiting from assembly under factory-controlled conditions.

Cassette systems combine properties of stick, veneer and panel systems. While variations exist, the predominant makeup of a cassette system is comprised of a primary structural mullion system, which is stick built. These provide the support and facilitate the attachment of the glass panels. The glass lites are factory assembled into minimal frames, which form an integral connection with the primary mullion system. A cassette system can be designed to be fully shop-glazed, requiring no application of sealant during field installation.

Cerner Corporate Headquarters

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Point-fixed Bolted

The most popular glass system — and frequently the most expensive — for application with structural glass facades is the bolted version. The glass panel requires perforations to accommodate specialized bolting hardware. Specially designed off-the-shelf hardware systems are readily available, or custom components can be designed. Cast stainless steel spider fittings are most commonly used to tie the glass to the supporting structure, although custom fittings are often developed for larger facade projects. The glass must be designed to accommodate bending loads and deflections resulting from the fixing method. An insulated-laminated glass panel as required for overhead applications will require the fabrication of 12 holes per panel, which can represent a cost constraint on some projects.

Cathedral of Christ the Light
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse
Newseum
San Jose Civic Center
Suvarnabhumi Airport Bangkok

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Weather Seal

The weather seal in most structural glass facade systems is provided by a field applied butt-glazed silicone joint. This technique provides a reliable and durable weather seal if simple procedures are followed during installation. An advantage of this sealing strategy is that any leaks, usually caused by installation errors, are easily detected and repaired. The joint design is critical, and is largely a function of the glass makeup and thickness. Compatibility between the field-applied silicone and the interlayer, if using laminated glass, or the edge seal in the case of an IGU, must be confirmed with the silicone material provider. The provider should also be consulted about the joint design. Craftsmanship is critical for the field application of the sealant to assure a visually satisfactory result.

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Other Considerations

1.Cables, Rods, Castings, and Machined Components

In addition to the glass and structural systems that comprise structural glass facade technology are the components that in turn comprise these systems — components quite unlike those typically used in exterior wall systems. The use of tensile elements in the form of steel cables and rods is a primary design strategy to dematerialize the structure and enhance the transparency of a facade design. Compression elements are frequently minimized or eliminated, and where present are crafted from cast and machined components in an elegant expression of exposed structure. The fittings and components that tie these structural members together are similarly crafted.

Here an entirely different set of material and process considerations come into play.
The Enclos design team has mastered these materials and processes as a necessary prerequisite to their appropriate application in component design. We can develop and provide custom designs of remarkable diversity in response to your particular project needs. Where appropriate, we can also source off-the-shelf components from a variety of suppliers, all carefully qualified to Enclos Corp standards and subject to our uncompromising quality assurance program. All this, from concept design through installation, as part of a single-source package from the largest national specialist in structural glass facade technology.

Cables

Bridge builder and engineer John A. Roebling first manufactured wire rope in America in the 1840’s. These materials ultimately found their way into the vernacular of architecture through such stunning works as Mathew Nowicki’s Dorton Arena of 1952 and the Ingalls Rink at Yale University of 1958 designed by Eero Saarinen. Structural glass facade technology has embraced these tensile materials as a means to minimize the structural profile of the support system. Wire rope composition, material type, finish, and end terminations are all important considerations in specifying these materials, which are available from a relatively limited number of manufacturers and specialty fabricators. Enclos Corp has put many of these manufacturers through its rigorous qualification process, resulting in several exceptional vendor/partners that have successfully provided materials on various structural glass facade projects that we have completed in recent years.

Rods

The use of steel rods as a substitute for cable in the design of structural glass facades was a practice borrowed from the yacht racing industry, and popularized in the Louvre Pyramid designed by IM Pei. The rods are most commonly fabricated from ASTM A316 stainless steel because of the material’s combination of strength and corrosion resistance. In high load applications or when super thin profiles are desired, there are other higher strength stainless options. The rod terminations are often custom designed and can be quite refined, with the intent of minimizing or eliminating any exposed threads, turnbuckle or other tensioning mechanism. Rod fabrication typically involves slipping the end fittings over the rod and upsetting the rod ends through a process called cold-heading. Alternately, equally elegant threaded fittings have also been developed. Depending upon the design of the structure, cable systems can have significant advantages over rod systems, particularly with respect to cost. However, some feel that the refined appearance of a rod system is worth a premium cost.

Casting

Casting is an ancient process with a longtime role in the construction industry, including the naming of a “cast-iron architecture” during the industrial revolution resulting from a dramatic increase in the availability of low cost cast materials. Castings were much later used to spectacular affect in the gerberettes and other components for the Center Pompidou by architects Rogers and Piano. The casting of structural components however demands a high level expertise in both the design and fabrication process. Cast nodes for the space frame structure on the Javits Convention Center in New York were famously discovered during construction to contain cracks, requiring the disassembly of nearly half the structure and a project delay of nearly two years. An intimate knowledge of the materials and processes of casting is critical to the development and implementation of a custom cast structural component. Among components appropriate for casting are spiders and glass-fixing devices, spacer struts and anchor assemblies. Various options for material and finish must be considered depending upon component design application.

Machined Components

In many respects, structural glass facade technology is more closely akin to the automotive industry than it is to conventional construction. Spider fittings are about as far from the brick as a building component can be. Structural glass facades are highly engineered structures built to very high tolerances. There is also an important visual aspect to the components because of their use in exposed structural systems. Despite a widespread pursuit of facade transparency, many designers choose to express this exposed structure in dramatic fashion, sometimes even at the expense of ultimate transparency. These factors and considerations make the use of machined components a frequent and effective choice. We design custom components or specify off-the-shelf parts as appropriate, and source both from our network of vendor/partners.

2.Architecturally Exposed Structural Steel (AESS)

The art of steel. Structural glass facades are not simply about transparency. Often the designer seeks to express the structural system supporting the facade, sometimes even at the expense of transparency. What is necessarily required here is a level of craftsmanship that extends far beyond what is found in conventional structural steel.The AISC specification for Architecturally Exposed Structural Steel (AESS) is often applied to structural glass facade designs. These designs frequently include exposed structural systems in high profile public areas, such as building lobbies and atria, and as long-span facade systems in airports, museums, and government buildings.The AESS spec is intended to provide the designer a means to control the visual quality of structural steel used in such applications. However, this specification is no panacea to the problem of communicating the requirements for visual quality such that the same expectations are shared by all relevant parties. An AESS Supplement published by Modern Steel Construction states, “Unfortunately, existing codes and standards — even AISC’s Code of Standard Practice — do not fully address the unique level of detail needed to successfully design, detail, fabricate and erect Architecturally Exposed Structural Steel (AESS).”Enclos has designed and provided many AESS structures as part of its custom facade work. We understand the demanding design, fabrication, assembly and installation requirements involved in the successful implementation of this specification, and we can bring this valuable capability to your team.

Exposed Structural Systems

The use of transparency and exposed structural systems in architectural design go hand-in-hand. While structural glass facade systems make frequent use of cables, rods, and machined fittings, they also often include fabricated steel assemblies ranging from exposed anchor components to custom truss systems.The craftsmanship required for AESS is a rare competency. We have developed a network of qualified AESS steel fabrication vendors, a network built over time and upon the experience of many successfully completed projects. Enclos is able to manage the delivery process in a manner that best assures predictability of outcome, thus mitigating the risk of budget overruns and schedule delays.

Weld Quality and Workmanship

An important consideration with exposed structural steel is the treatment of welds. Designers often want welds to be ground flush and smooth, sometimes even polished. However, primary consideration must be given to the structural integrity of the weld. Accommodating both the structural performance requirements and the desired appearance starts as a critical design issue; welds must be designed such that both criteria can be satisfied in the fabrication and finishing processes. We are practiced at controlling this process from concept design through completed fabrication. The fit-up requirements for bolted connections can be an equally important consideration.

Finishes

Red iron rusts. Of the many great attributes of steel, this is not one of them. Exposed structural steel must be protected, and most often the finish requirements are meant to augment the appearance of the structure and not merely to protect the steel.The term “automotive finish” is frequently heard yet seldom achieved. Hot-dipped galvanizing can provide superior protection with a top color coat for appearance. Most steel fabrications are too large for this process however, and there are environmental concerns regarding its use. The application of paint over a galvanized surface can be tricky as well. Various other paint systems exist, most involving the application of a primer coat over a carefully prepared surface, followed by one or two color top coats. Metallic finishes are available and have been used successfully in a number of applications. A key decision is whether to apply the final coat in the field or in the shop. Shop application is invariably superior, but almost certainly subject to damage during shipping, assembly and erection even when extensive precautions are taken to protect the finish. A field touchup specification is as important as the basic finish specification in the case of factory applied finish.

Budgeting

The AESS Supplement comments, “…because AESS costs more to fabricate than standard structural steel, it is critical that these designs are properly budgeted. The repercussion of not properly budgeting AESS is often the need for redesign, project delays, and ultimately even higher project costs.” The budget for AESS is affected by subtle decisions regarding material, surface quality, weld quality and finish.Whether the concern is for welds, finishes, budgeting or any other aspect of AESS, Enclos can act as an expert guide through the maze of decision making to best assure the development of an appropriate AESS specification and its effective implementation.

http://www.enclos.com/service-technology/technology/


January 31, 2011

Pola Ginza Building by Nikken Sekkei + Yasuda Atelier and The Adaptive Building Initiative and Hoberman Associates

Architect:
Nikken Sekkei + Yasuda Atelier

The Adaptive Building Initiative and Hoberman Associates were commissioned by POLA, a Japanese cosmetics manufacturer, to develop an adaptive shading system for its new showroom building in Tokyo’s Ginza district. This system has been developed in collaboration with design architect Yasuda Atelier and executive architect Nikken Sekkei.

The 14-story building, which opened in October 2009, has 185 shutter mechanisms that are housed within the double glazing of the façade. Each shutter has dimensions of approximately one by three meters, and is made of an acrylic sheet that has been formed into a curved surface.

  • Adaptive Shading Coverage: 3,000 sq. meters
  • Number of operable units: 185
  • Material: Acrylic

http://www.adaptivebuildings.com/pola-ginza.html

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CONCEPT

Pola is one of the highest quality cosmetic companies in Japan.
Placing the great deal of importance on the quality of life, Pola employs the notion of the three beauties- esthetics, fine arts, and gourmet- as the theme for this project.
Following this concept, we took in the key words of “water`, “light`, and “time` for designing the building. “Water` and “light` is the essential element for the shiny fresh skin and “time` leads to the varying image of life.

Pola Ginza Building is a multifunctional building with quite small foot print.
As Ginza is the area of the highest land price in Tokyo, we tried to make most of the space by designing the structure and the other mechanical fixture comprehensively and efficiently.
In addition to the office of the Pola’s head quarter on the middle floors, the Pola’s flagship shop “Pola the Beauty` is on the ground floor that is transmitting the new branding image of Pola toward people walking on the main street of Ginza. On the basement floor is an esthetic salon, the third floor is a free gallery (the annex of the Pola Museum that is well known for its precious private collection of impressionism), and the strictly examined select shops and restaurants on th

e other floors, where people can enjoy esthetics, fine arts and gourmet.

SITE

The site is in the Ginza area where the accumulation of international super brands is engaging people’s hearts and minds. Pola Ginza Building is the leading project in the district where many new developments will take place in the near future.

DOUBLE GLAZING

To give the “varying` and “moving` image to the static structure of “building`, the kinetic polycarbonate panels are adopted between the double grazing along with the LED lighting fixture that can provide any color we want.
The kinetic panels, having variety of scaled patterns that remind us of an image of the cells of life, change their appearance like a breathing life by the mechanical and luminous movement.
They are operated in maximum 14 panels a group by the automatic hinges placed on their tops and the horizontal shaft with rollers that push the panels along their curved profile. Panels and the shaft are not connect directly each other but related indirectly so that the panels move in a deferent timing gradually and escape from the different movement caused by the possible severe earthquake.
The intentionally sparse RGB dots of the LED lighting fixture and the patters of the moving panels are admiring the beauty of life like the dot painting by the impressionist at night time in Ginza.

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

This double glazing façade with kinetic panels has not only the attractive effect toward the Ginza street but also the ecological effect to decrease the thermal disturbance for the building itself.
In summer, kinetic panels receive the sunlight and heated air is discharged from the top by its chimney effect. They improve the effect of sun cut and minimize the interior thermal disturbance. For this purpose, we put windows at the top and openings at the bottom. The window of the top opens and closes automatically in accordance with the temperature inside the double grazing. In winter, the warmed air inside the double glazing works as insulation by closing the top windows. Natural fresh air can be taken in the middle floor by opening the inner sash in spring and autumn. It actualizes comfortable work space without using HVAC equipment. The calculation shows this double glazing system reduces its annual consumption of HVAC energy by 30% compared with the single curtain wall system. The kinetic panels also defuse the sunlight to bring in light deeper inside. By installing the daylight sensor, energy for the artificial lighting is automatically cut back.

http://www.openbuildings.com/buildings/pola-ginza-building-profile-5357.html

 

January 31, 2011

YKKap FACADE with Offices in Tokyo | Singapore | Hong Kong

Green Technology for Sustainability

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Architectural design must practice green building as a necessary element in a sustainable society, and the green building of curtain walls must manage environmental performance and material recycling. Through our experience in Japan’s harsh environmental and climatic conditions, we have earned an edge in environmental technologies. We share that edge, and our understanding of the needs of architectural design, as we collaborate closely with architects. We realize their concepts with curtain wall engineering solutions that encompass all elements of design, procurement, manufacturing, construction, and maintenance, while taking us closer to a sustainable society.

Expertise:

Environmental facades

Recent Building facades are expected to provide interior comfort, a feeling of openness, and in addition to saving energy. YKK AP is developing environmental facades, as a technology able to save energy, while delivering comfort by optimizing the interior environment, and cutting consumption.

In the development process towards a facade design integrated with the building, it is essential to consider how the shading and insulation performance of the openings impacts energy saving and comfort. We will now present four types of environmental facade.

Categories of environmental facades

Low-E glass and internal blinds
  • Blinds are located on the interior side
  • The heat from solar gain is absorbed, reflected by blinds on the interior side, and is radiated from the room.
  • Solar shading property is low.
  • Thermal Insulative property is equal to the glazing.
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.30~0.55 η=approx.
Thermal transmittance
U=1.5 2.4 W/m2 K U=approx.
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind
External blinds type
  • Blinds are located on the exterior side
  • The heat from solar gain is absorbed, reflected by blinds on the interior side, and is radiated from the room.
  • Solar shading property is high.
  • Thermal Insulative property is equal to the glazing.
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.05~0.10 η=approx.
Thermal transmittance
U=1.5 2.4 W/m2 K U=approx.
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind
Mechanically ventilated type
  • This type uses double-pane glass with blinds between the panes, and pass air from the room interior through the cavity by mechanical ventilation.
  • The solar heat absorbed by blinds is removed by mechanical ventilation.
  • Solar shading property is high.
  • Thermal Insulative property is higher than double-pane glass, due to the airflow in the cavity between the panes. (Varies with the air flow rate)
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.15~0.25 η=approx.
(when mechanical ventilation is on.)
Thermal transmittance
U=0.5~1.0(W/m2・K) U=approx.
(when mechanical ventilation is on.)
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind and air flow rate
Naturally ventilated type
  • This type uses double-pane glass with blinds between the panes, and pass air from outside through the cavity by stack effect.
  • The solar heat absorbed by blinds is removed by ventilation.
  • Solar shading property is high.
  • Thermal Insulative property is higher than inner glazing.
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.10~0.20 η=approx.
Thermal transmittance
U=1.5~3.5(W/m2・K) U=approx.
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind

Thermal property of facade and thermal load of perimeter zone

The relation between solar shading/ thermal insulation property of facade and thermal load of perimeter zone can be described as below.

  • Solar shading property is high = Low cooling load and high heating load[Figure 1-(A)]
  • Thermal insulative property is high = High cooling load and low heating load[Figure 2-(C)]

In a warm area such as Tokyo, cooling loads account for the bulk of heating and cooling loads, the superior solar shading property of the facade is effective in reducing thermal loads all year round. It is vital to select the right facade system, with careful consideration of the balance between solar shading property and thermal insulation property, taking the region and orientation into account.

Thermal property of facade and interior comfort

For occupants of the building interior, comfort is important, not just energy saving. To secure comfort in the perimeter zone close to the facade, the temperature of the interior surface of the facade must be maintained at an appropriate level.

<Summer and intermediate season>
When the solar heat raise the temperature of the interior surface. → Room is maintained at an appropriate level but occupants around window feel hot.

<Winter>
When nighttime and cloudy weather fall the temperature of the interior surface. → Room is maintained at an appropriate level but occupants around window feel cold.

*A facade with superior solar shading and thermal insulation property mitigates the impact of the changing exterior environment, reducing changing in the interior surface temperature of the facade to maintain comfort in the interior. Selection of the right facade system is also important for interior comfort as an assessment indicator.

Structural analysis

Besides a esthetic design and functionality as cladding, the curtain walls which form building facades require verification of structural performance values as the exterior walls of structure.

From the basic structure stage, we work through structural analysis simulations to realize the specifics of the facade design image, which is based on the architect’s design, and the performance requirements.

This process is a comprehensive verification of the form, strength and durability of the entire facade to the original components are conducted by our staff teams of design, manufacturing and construction sharing a common understanding.

 

Thermal analysis

Progress in construction and structural analysis techniques in recent years has dramatically expanded the range of expressive techniques available in the surface design of buildings, typified by all-glass facade design. With that progress, it has become important to take action to reduce CO2, against climate change, and reduce running costs at the facility maintenance stage, besides the obvious need to control the indoor thermal environment.
Optimize the indoor environment while minimizing energy consumption – YKK AP is pursuing the technical development of environment-conscious facades as a way to reconcile these conflicting demands.
Alongside design and construction, we also use high-precision thermal environment simulations to verify the development of insolation control, ventilation and other technologies.

Thermal performance from the development of Double-skin facade System, environment-friendly facades, and implementation of basic experiments.

Indoor environment measurement using actual-size mock-up and indoor temperature measurement by thermal images
Environmental measurements for room interiors using actual-size mockups. Measurement of interior surface temperatures using thermal imaging.

In developing double skin systems, we have pursued system optimization through thermal analysis, fluid analysis, actual-size trials and performance assessment.

The building of simulation technology

Heat and fluid flow simulation
Heat and fluid flow simulation
Experiment by outdoor environment examination room
Trial in outdoor environment laboratory
The indoor comfortable evaluation by PMV measurement
Indoor comfort evaluation using PMV

Performance assessment of double-skin systems introduce thermodynamics and fluid mechanics.
The flow of air inside the central air layer, which varies with environmental and physical conditions are analyzed to find the temperature and heat flow of each component, and to predict and assess performance. This is a technology to predict results closer to reality, built through cross-referencing for consistency with data from the basic experimental research.

Development of peripheral technologies

Nagaot measurement in environment・就nemometry in the middle air layer
Flowing sound measurement of the environment / Wind velocity measurement of inner / middle air layer

The double skin system holds a large isobaric space, extending to the outside, so its behavior against weather differs from a normal window system.
The way the wind pressure is divided and borne by the internal and external glass panes when the window is exposed to wind is a major design issue which must be solved.
Beyond thermal performance, experiments on technical developments such as wind pressure and water resistance are also required to develop peripheral technologies.

see the cataloge here:

http://www.ykkapfacade.com/publications/

http://www.ykkapfacade.com/index.html