Archive for ‘Facade’

January 2, 2012

National Automobile m\Museum Turin | Zucchi & Partners


‘national automobile museum, turin’ by cino zucchi architetti with recchi engineering and proger, turin, italy
image © filippo poli

photographer filippo poli has sent us images of the recently completed ‘national automobile museum’ in turin, italy.
looking to become a driving force in the urban renewal of the city’s southeast side, the building, designed by
cino zucchi architetti with recchi engineering and proger, sees the expansion and renovation of the existing
amedeo albertini-designed museum, originally constructed in 1960. at once respecting history, place and modernity,
the redesign seamlessly and delicately bridges the significant components together, creating a new museum that is in
line with some of europe’s most successful contemporary structures.


view from street
image © filippo poli

expressed as an unraveling and fluid form, the building features a glass and steel skin that enwraps and redefines the brutal
volumes and hard symmetry of the existing facility. a new wing on the west side of the complex is articulated to respond to
both the users and the encompassing community. reflective and modern, the design lends a sense of depth and interest
to an area once seen as one of the most important areas of contemporary turin.


new side elevation
image © filippo poli

underlining the existing horizontal lines, the new ground floor has a number of relational spaces that accommodate a series of
exhibition halls, conference and educational facilities and binary functions. symbolic of the original circular exhibition zones,
the new lobby – once an outdoor courtyard – is conceived as an irregularly shaped dominant core, contoured and expansive,
and clad in panels of perforated steel. located at the heart of the structure, the lobby and exhibition hall connects the new museum
with the old, becoming a tool for orientation and way-finding.


detail of perforated exterior cladding
image © filippo poli


the new lobby which was once a courtyard
image © filippo poli


lobby and exhibition hall
image © filippo poli


panels of contoured steel enclose the lobby
image © filippo poli


night view of back side
image © filippo poli


aerial view at night
image © filippo poli


site plan
image courtesy of cino zucchi architetti 


floor plan / level 0
image courtesy of cino zucchi architetti 


floor plan / level 1
image courtesy of cino zucchi architetti


elevation
image courtesy of cino zucchi architetti 


facade detail
image courtesy of cino zucchi architetti 

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/15024/zucchi-partners-national-automobile-museum-turin.html

January 1, 2012

M3A2 Cultural and Community Tower | Antonini + Darmon Architectes

Architects: Antonini + Darmon Architectes
Location: 6 Rue Marguerita Duras, Paris, 
Area: 550 sqm SHON
Cost: 2,5 M euros HT
Finished: November 2011
Photographs: Luc Boegly

The buildings of the cultural and community premises of Paris Diderot University fit into the undeveloped, southwest area of the Flour Market which was recently converted by Nicolas Michelin and Associates Agency. A break between the Flour Market and the new building is preserved. It respects the existing building and accentuates the slenderness of the tower. The two, independent buildings coexist completely. The signal-like extension stands out of its context by means of its evolving shape. It is a sensitive, delicate object, treated simply to avoid rivalry with the strong presence of the Flour Market. On the contrary it acts as a light, gravitational counterpoint. An architectural dialectic and emulation come into play much like a castle and its keep, both intrinsically inseparable.

December 3, 2011

Two Financial Towers | MA2

The design of the Two Towers, by MA2 in collaboration with CZ Visual Architecture, is a series of manipulated manifolds that construct a dual vertical lattice with angled surfaces. The towers radiate vertically deriving from a multi-sided body, diamond shaped, molded, intended for diversity, complexity, and robustness in form. Elongated diamond bodies functions as a poly-operational structure that addresses flows of energy, circulation, dynamic composites, both aesthetically and material make up.

It is important to have an array of projecting elements within the design aesthetic and logic to generate sensuous formal manipulations that give a dynamic presence to the surrounding environment. In order to meet the desired effect of constructing a set of towers that are an image of elegance, design robustness, and economic valiancy, the two towers are in a state of motion and vibrant play of parts – volumes which generate synergized architecture. Economic towers are elements which give identity to financial sectors and districts, so in order retain confidence, the towers are composed so they are not competing agents but are complementary tectonics and a have dynamic interplay of bodies.

Ground level interaction is an important part of the design proposal because it serves as a face in which the public flow around the building and circulate inside. These are the points of departure which govern the varied sensibilities, logic, and tectonic intensities that give the towers vigor as an image of economic resiliency.

http://www.archdaily.com/184484/two-financial-towers-ma2/

December 3, 2011

Federal Office Building | Krueck+Sexton Architects

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Krueck + Sexton Architects have been selected by the GSA Design Excellence Program for the firm’s design of the Federal Office Building in Miramar,  just outside of Miami.  The 375,000 square foot building is designed with three goals in mind: reduce energy, resources and consumption, incorporate high performance buildings materials and systems and harvest renewable energy sources available on the site.  Currently out to bid, the project is scheduled for completion in mid-2014.

The Federal Office Building is designed as two 60′ narrow bars running East to West along the site.  The strategy is to reduce heat gain by orienting the side with the least surface area toward the rising and setting sun.  The bars are six and seven stories and are connected at their midpoints, creating two enclosed exterior courtyards.  The architects have also provided outdoor areas that are comfortably shaded in areas adjacent to the site, such as near the parking garage and service annex.

A curtain-wall system with high performance glass maximizes daylight access while reducing heat gain.  This, in addition to perforated sun screens, provide the building and its inhabitants with shade and daylight when desired.  The building will reduce water use by 95% by using several systems such as rainwater capture, well water, and municipal reclaimed water. Photovoltaics on the roof of the Annex and parking garage will accumulate solar energy.

As part of the building initiatives for sustainable design, the wetlands adjacent to the site will be restored.  These make up the majority of the site and is an effort by the architects to bring back the natural state of the site while also invigorating the native ecosystem and local community through a physical connection of nature.

The design team consists of Atelier ten (environmental), WSP Flack + Kurtz (MEP), Curtis + Rogers (landscape), Miller Legg (civil), Thornton Tomasetti(structural) and Shepphird Associates (envelope engineers).

via Krueck+Sexton Architects

http://www.archdaily.com/185010/federal-office-building-kruecksexton-architects/

November 28, 2011

Hilton Pattaya | Department of Architecture

Architects: Department of Architecture
Location: , Thailand
Principals: Amata Luphaiboon, Twitee Vajrabhaya Teparkum
Design Team: Picha Thadaniti, Wipavee Kueasirikul, Sutah Schonrungroj, Atirojt Rojratanawalee, Worawut Oer-Areemitr, Kanin Manthanachart
Lightning Designer: Dazzle Design
Project area: 1,650 sqm
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Wison Tungthunya

 is responsible for interior design of various common areas for Hilton Pattaya Hotel which includes the First Floor Lobby, the Main Lobby on the 17th floor, the Bar, and various common area and linkage spaces within the building. The hotel is part of a larger multi-used complex located in the heart of Pattaya, overlooking the Pattaya beach.

Lobby & Bar

The space for the hotel lobby and bar occupies the 17th floor, high above the bustle of Pattaya beach below. Upon entering the space from one end, as elevator doors open, one would enter a spacious lobby area. The architectural intervention to the entire ceiling plane, with its dynamic wave lines, leads the movement of the visitors towards the seafront beyond. The fabric installation on the ceiling becomes a main feature in the space while simple elements on the ground provide a tranquil atmosphere.

At night, strip lighting accents from above the fabric linear pattern. The whole ceiling volume becomes a gentle luminous source of light giving a fine ambient to the overall space.
At the end of the lobby space, the bar area is arranged linearly along the building edge parallel to the sea with maximum opening to the ocean view. Backdrop of the bar area lies a wooden wall with alcoves where the daybeds partially tuck themselves into the wall. Oversized and soft furniture provides comfortable and relaxing seating for guests to sink into. A full-wall mirror at the end of the long space doubles the visual length of the bar area.
Further in front of the indoor bar area is an outdoor lounge space with a large reflecting pond catching the reflection of both the sky and the droplet daybeds and lamps scattered around. From this area the space is opened up to the panoramic ocean vista and gentle sea breeze.
October 10, 2011

Administration Building No. 5 – Roche Diagnostics Inc., Rotkreuz, Switzerland | Burckhardt+Partner AG

An energy-efficient high rise building in the tradition of the puristic corporate architecture of Roche

The Roche office tower in Rotkreuz, Switzerland, was the winning entry of a competition in 2008. The brief required an energy-efficient high rise building which stands in the tradition of the puristic corporate architecture of Roche. The 68m high, all around glazed building is the landmark of the Roche site. It is vertically separated in 3 parts: a 6m high lobby, 13 office floors and a double height space containing auditorium and sky lobby as a visual top of the building.

Public and private spaces are distinguished by the use of different materials; elegant red marble in the lobby, brown carpet and oak spiral stairs the office floors and oak parquet in the sky lobby. All spaces are visually connected by the free standing fair faced concrete core. The office floors are connected by 12 spiral stairs, surrounding the core three times from bottom to top. The structural system of the high rise is characterised by rhombus shaped, 4 floors high façade columns.

The brand new ‘closed cavity façade’ is an integral part of the energy efficiency of the building. Generic principle of the two layer façade is a completely sealed cavity containing the sunshading of each façade element. The core of the energy supply is a combination of heat pump and chiller. The ventilation of the building is covered by local façade ventilation units.

Through half of the year the building can be cooled with fresh air from outside without extra cooling energy. The concrete floor slabs are thermally activated. Additionally, absorbing strips have been embedded in the concrete soffit to maintain the required acoustic quality. The first time use of a high pressure fog system in a building instead of a common sprinker system is rounding up the technical features.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17609

and from the architect’s website:

The Roche Diagnostics AG Rotkreuz is located next to the Rütihof highway off-ramp. The site for the new administrative building, where the new structure will be erected, is at the southern end of the transverse axis of the terrain. The structure, 68 m tall, will line up with the existing neighboring buildings, which thus defines its exact location.

The outer shell of the office tower is in the form of a curtain wall façade which, light conditions permitting, offers a more or less clear view of the inner support structure of the V-posts.

The architectural design proposes a nearly square footprint with two load-bearing cores constituting the central zone. The work areas are arranged in circular fashion around this core zone. Since the building supports are located at the perimeter, i.e. façade, it allows for a ground plan without pillars and with maximum flexibility on all levels.

The ground floor of the administrative building, with its raised foyer, relates to the new site while at the same time featuring an open concept in all directions. Located above this stylish foyer are two IT levels and eleven additional office levels accommodating 625 employees. Internal traffic is facilitated via spiral stairways each of which connects two levels. The conference rooms and individual offices are transparent compartments integrated into the large office space. The Convention Center, extending on the garret level above two stories below, includes a large raised auditorium and associated conference rooms

http://www.burckhardtpartner.ch/en/projekte/projektliste/roche-administration-building/ancProject_view?cat=verwaltung

September 2, 2011

Gateway Center Station | EDGE Studio, Pfaffmann & Associates

Architect: EDGE StudioPfaffmann & Associates
Location: Pittsburgh, 
 Design Team: Gary Carlough AIA, Jonathan Golli, Matt Fineout AIA, Stephen Mrdjenovich
Pfaffmann & Associates Design Team: Rob Pfaffmann AIA, Carl Bergamini RA, Erik Hokanson
Completion Date: 2011
Photography: Carl Bergamini, Pfaffmann & Associates

In 2003, EDGE studio and Pfaffmann & Associates collaborated and won a competition to design the Port Authority’s new Gateway LRT Station. The station is located along one side of an under-utilized triangular parcel of land in the heart of Pittsburgh’s famed “Golden Triangle”. It is currently under construction, scheduled for completion in 2011.

For transit stations to be successful in the 21st Century, they must become part of the urban fabric of the city. To achieve this integration, stations must serve as more than just stops for passengers to board and depart transit vehicles. They must become part of the overall experience of the city.

Pittsburgh is known for its world renowned view of the city experienced by travelers exiting the Fort Pitt Tunnels and crossing the Fort Pitt Bridge. The new Gateway Station is situated to serve as the terminus to this famous procession of views into Pittsburgh’s city center. Considering the importance if its location, The Port Authority along with its consultants saw the opportunity for the station to serve as the catalyst for development of the entire triangular site, which had previously been undeveloped property.

The designers developed a concept referencing this “Gateway Experience”. Using this term to describe the experience of entering Pittsburgh via the Fort Pitt Tunnels and Bridge, they sought to develop a similar experience when entering the City via the proposed under river transit tunnel of the North Shore Connector Project. A sloped plaza was designed adjacent to the station in the triangular parcel of property allows the underground track level wall of the station to be opened up to permit views out of the station into the city for arriving LRT passengers.

This Gateway Plaza serves as a view shed through which transit passengers enjoy their first views of the city. Conversely, the station platform serves as a stage for people enjoying the plaza who are able to watch people and trains arriving at and departing Gateway Station.

A number of techniques were used to achieve these goals. Working with lead project engineer, AECOM, the designers utilized conventional drawing, model building and Building information Modeling (BIM) to establish track alignments in relation to street level arrangements, and to assist in defining the extent and configuration of the station box, the headhouse and proposed civic plaza.

Using the principles defined in the RFP documents and interview process, the proposal evolved into a design solution that responds to both the needs of the Port Authority and the community at large:

• GATEWAY EXPERIENCE: Early on in the design process it was clear to us that establishing the “gateway experience” for passengers arriving at Gateway Station to celebrate their arrival to downtown Pittsburgh, should rival the motorist’s experience having traveled through the Fort Pitt tunnel, over the bridge and arriving in the city.

• SENSE OF PLACE: The Gateway station site is positioned at a critical intersection in the city’s urban fabric.

• DAYLIGHTING & VENTILATION: The station box was opened on its western side to introduce daylight to the platform.

• PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION: The station headhouse provides clear visual cues to the open-ended structure. As an added benefit the public open space provides additional pedestrian capacity during large events.

• TRANSPARENCY: We developed a strategy to minimize visual impact of station “headhouse” on surrounding context through use of transparent materials and innovative geometries of the structural system.

http://www.archdaily.com/165471/in-progress-gateway-center-station-edge-studio-pfaffmann-associates/

August 20, 2011

China Diamond Exchange Center | Goettsch Partners

Architect: Goettsch Partners
Location: Shanghai, 
Project Year: 2005-2009
Photographs: 1st Image

The China Diamond Exchange Center is a 535,500 square foot office complex designed by Goettsch Partners of Chicago, Illinois.  Located within Shanghai’s sea of massive and often overstated high-rises, this modest-by-comparison structure is brilliantly detailed, appropriately scaled, and aesthetically beautiful.  The complex was completed in 2009 with the help of associate architects Zhong-fu Architects.  The Diamond Exchange Center is sited within Shanghai’s Pudong district, an international financial and commercial hub and houses both the Exchange and additional relative tenants.

In addition to office space on the upper levels, the building includes retail on the ground floor and a second floor that features the elevator lobby, exhibition space and a restaurant.  According to the architect description, the building was conceived as two rectangular office slabs joined by a skylit atrium.  One of the two office slabs is dedicated to the members of the China Diamond Exchange, while the other tower houses the remainder of the complex’s tenants.  The separation of tenants allows for secure transport for Diamond Exchange members within their own tower, thereby eliminating any potential security breaches for the high-profile office functions.  While distinct with regards to program,  both towers are clad with exterior  and contrast the transparency of the atrium.

The atrium is the undeniable focal point of the building, featuring a 66×230 foot cable-supported curtain wall.  The immense scale of the atrium is an impressive entrance to visitors and employees and provide access to the elevators that serve as the complex’s primary vertical circulation arteries.  Not only is the atrium an impressive architectural statement, it is also integral to the daylighting scheme of the complex and brings natural light to the relatively narrow 20m wide floor plate of its abutting towers.  The primary tenants’ core business inspired the design, with  diamond-shaped elements featured throughout the scheme — these elements includes the atrium’s glass skylight, the geometry of the entry canopy, and the main lobby floor pattern.

http://www.archdaily.com/157675/china-diamond-exchange-center-goettsch-partners/

read it here from: http://trendsideas.com/Article13947/UnitedStates/OfficeDesign

Credit List
Location : China Diamond Exchange Center (Shanghai)
Architect : Goettsch Partners
Interior design, public spaces :Goettsch Partners
Construction company : Shanghai No 2 Construction
Associate architect : Shanghai Zhong-fu Architects
Structural engineer : Shanghai Tong-qing Technologic Development
Civil, mechanical and electrical engineer : Shanghai Zhong-fu Architects
Quantity surveyor : Shanghai Sunking Construction Project Management
Landscaping : ADI
Fire consultant : Shanghai Zhong-fu Architects
Cladding : Aluminium
Roof : Glass and aluminium skylight by Shanghai MeiTe Curtain Wall System Co
Facade : Glass from China Southern Glass Glazing
System : Curtain wall by Shanghai MeiTe Curtain Wall System Co
Hardware : Dorma
Flooring : White Carrara marble
Wallcoverings : Water-white glass with specialty frit from China Southern Glass
Lighting : Shanghai Hai New Century Co
Heating/air conditioning : Toshiba
Lift and escalator services :ThyssenKrupp

Story by Charles Moxham
Photography by 1st-image

Even in a substantial Grade A office tower, the potential reallocation of spaces can be a major design consideration. Together with clean, contemporary architecture, generous floor plates, and ergonomic pedestrian flows, there should be the option to repurpose the spaces as business needs evolve.
The China Diamond Exchange Center, designed by Goettsch Partners and commissioned by Shanghai Lujiazui Development Co, stands tall on Century Avenue – the main boulevard in Shanghai’s Pudong district and the city’s financial and commercial hub.
The 15-storey, nearly 50,000m2 building provides space for the China Diamond Exchange, which currently occupies one side of the building, as well as other related tenancies. In addition to office space on the upper levels, the building includes ground-floor retail facilities, with the elevator lobby, exhibition space and a restaurant on the floor above.
Partner at Goettsch, James Zheng says the building was conceived as two large rectangular structures connected by a central glass atrium, which looks like a giant sparkling diamond sandwiched between great slabs of coal.
“The core business of the major tenants inspired the design in other ways, too,” says Zheng. “Diamond-shaped elements can be seen in the atrium’s glass skylight, the structural geometry of the entry canopy, and the lobby floor.”
Essentially, the architecture of the China Diamond Exchange Center is a tribute to its stock in trade – an aesthetic that also helps it stand out from other, in many cases taller, structures nearby.
A colour palette of black, grey and red dominates the building. The two office blocks are fronted in black, which provides hard-to-read surfaces that disguise the intakes and exhausts of the mechanical systems. All building systems were pushed to the outer areas of the building in the pursuit of large, uncluttered floorplates that are both attractive to tenants and practical in terms of reconfiguring offices as required.
Exposed metal elevator cabs, stainless steel cables and other, more reflective surfaces lend a subtle contrast in grey. In addition, there are several splashes of red within the decor. With many positive connotations in Chinese culture, this colour brings a sense of warmth to the minimalist spaces.
“The translucent glass atrium and open elevator towers are the central focus of the building,” says Zheng. “Besides evoking the strength and sparkle of diamonds, the atrium creates a sense of business transparency. At the front and rear of the building, 20m x 70m net walls supported by cables admit maximum light into the cavernous central space.”
The three elevators, in the middle of the atrium, climb to sky bridges on all levels that lead to both towers. The activity of the elevators is not only visible from the lobby but also from outside, through the gleaming net wall. Similarly, activity on the street can be seen from within the atrium, further animating the ground-level spaces.
The architect and developer had far-sighted plans for this tower and the elevator banks are a clue to the ongoing viability of the building.
“With diamonds being such a valuable commodity, staff working in that tower enter through a screening room and then travel up to their floor on separate, secure elevators away from the public eye,” says Zheng. “So, while the central elevators appear to service both sides, in reality they currently only take people up to the multi-use tower.”
It is envisaged that in the future, the China Diamond Exchange will occupy both sides of the building, and at that time all levels and both towers will be accessed, via security, by the central elevators.
“We could have built separate elevator shafts for both towers, but the long-term view dictated that we build the central, feature elevators that could eventually be utilised by all,” Zheng says.
Topping the towers – and adding to their adaptive use – are upscale penthouse spaces that are likely to evolve into executive offices or exhibition areas.
“Everything about the China Diamond Exchange Center was designed with an eye on the future.”

August 13, 2011

Fabrikstrasse 15,Basel | Gehry Partners

Fabrikstrasse 15

Sunlight penetrates the protective glazing of Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 — even through the photovoltaic-cell panels of the roof — filling the interior with light. A skylight integrated into the campus grounds (center) brings daylight light down into the lower-level auditorium above the stage.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Completed in 2009, Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 is an icon on the growing Novartis Basel campus. In the evening its brilliant sculptural form is underscored by layers of light — all on the interior — that gently wash the facade, illuminate the workstations, and glow from within its core.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A central atrium brings daylight to interior Gehry-designed workstations and glass-enclosed “private rooms” at the heart of the office floors. Adjustable metal-halide up and downlights illuminate this space when necessary and reflect off overhead white lamellas (a radiator-like array that also diffuses sunlight from the glass roof and provides radiant cooling).
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Photovoltaic cells are integrated in the glass roof surfaces to generate renewable energy for the electrical lighting and to provide an effective sunscreen against solar gain in upper levels of the building.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Below grade, a 600-seat auditorium can be divided into two sections. It features: a wood-lined acoustical wall perforated with a subtle graphic pattern by the New York–based graphic design firm 2×4; a flexible glass-ceiling system that evenly distributes the light of cool, daylight-quality linear fluorescent lamps; and amber LEDs that create an atmospheric glow into the room from under the seats.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Employees sitting at workstations designed by Frank Gehry are protected from the sun’s glare by a sophisticated system of saillike shades, controlled by daylight sensors. Artemide Tolomeo desk lights provide additional task lighting for a more personal, intimate environment.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

L’Observatoire installed cool white fluorescent lamps above the auditorium’s glass ceiling that blend imperceptibly with the daylight coming into the space from a skylight above the stage that Gehry incorporated into the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A large trapezoidal skylight in the floor of the first office level brings light into the center of the ground floor café below it, as well as through a second skylight that continues the flow of light into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Light from a central skylight in the café of Fabrikstrasse 15 penetrates into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby, as well as into interior classroom windows.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

LED-backed-veneer media columns feature directional graphics and signage in the public lobby, lower levels, and ground floor dining areas.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Multi-directional chandeliers above conference tables designed by Gehry Partners cast ambient fluorescent light up towards the ceiling and more directional beams from halogen lamps down onto the table.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

The giant floating “Mama Cloud” light fixture designed designed by Frank Gehry floats above a long table at the entrance to the café from the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Fabrikstrasse 15

1. plaza-level lobby restaurant and café
2. office floors
3. atrium
4. auditorium
5. IT learning classrooms
6. skylight
7. campus green
Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Photo © Thomas Mayer & Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Breaking the bounds of of Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani’s master plan, Fabrikstrasse 15 by Frank Gehry stands in a surprising juxtaposition to the serene array of rectilinear buildings that dominate the Novartis campus. It is located at the geographic heart of the campus, in full view of the company’s renovated 1939 Forum 1 International Headquarters building, and across the street from a refined stretch of porticoed offices and labs by Adolf Krischanitz, Rafael Moneo, Lampugnani, and Yoshio Taniguchi. The highly visible, independent site gave the architect freedom to exploit his expansive, free-spirited style.

Relieved from many of the constraints binding the other architects, Gehry and his team created a voluminous 209,896-square-foot building that manifests the Novartis commitment to an open and environmentally responsible workplace in its crystalline transparency and intricate sustainable strategies.

Anchored to a load-bearing reinforced-concrete skeleton that sits on a rigid 56-foot-deep basement box, the building’s structural steel shell supports an active triple-glazed envelope that is tied to its natural ventilation and lighting systems through a centralized building facility-management system. Like a finely tuned machine, the building performs unobtrusively to provide comfortable surroundings for its occupants. Sliding glass doors on the ground floor and operable windows discharge excess solar yields and facilitate the flow of outside air, aided by a mechanical fresh-air system around the perimeters of the upper levels.

Home to the human resources (HR) department, as well as to a top-floor campus reading room, a 600-seat multiuse auditorium and IT learning center (both below grade), and a ground-floor restaurant and café that spill out onto the campus green, Fabrikstrasse 15 is a hub of activity. The warm, wood-lined interiors feature whimsical LED-backed-veneer media-columns and modular Gehry-designed furnishings and workstations.

In accordance with Novartis chairman Daniel Vasella’s versatile “multi-space” office concept, the architects arranged the HR floors on the five upper levels with flexible, open-plan work spaces and glass-enclosed “private rooms,” bisecting them with a central atrium and serpentine stainless steel stair to bring light down through the core of the volume. A series of skylights strategically inserted into the floor and grounds around the building carry daylight to the café, the lower-level learning center, and the auditorium stage.

According to Gehry Partners project architect Kamran Ardalan, daylight is harvested and managed in several ways: The low-E glazing is articulated with ceramic frits on the facade to reduce direct solar gain; an orchestrated series of low-E-coated, saillike interior shades operate on sensors to minimize glare and additional heat; and sound-absorbing lamellas under the roof diffuse sunlight and further compensate for the thermal load by serving as cooling radiators filled with slightly chilled water. In addition, photovoltaic cells integrated into the glass roof panels not only generate enough power for the building’s electric lighting, they supply an additional layer of solar shading.

“The amount of daylight inside the building is consistently monitored,” says Ardalan. Electric lighting is used only when there isn’t enough daylight, he adds — and to illuminate the building at night.

Looking frosted and icy-white on a bright afternoon, the building assumes a brilliant clarity as the sun sets, revealing its inner workings like a child’s “visible engine” kit. This effect stems from a perceptive, energy-efficient electric lighting scheme by the New York–based L’Observatoire that balances program and architecture.

It was a challenge, says principal Hervé Descottes: “It’s such a transparent building that you could lose its sculptural aspects.” To achieve a soft, lanternlike glow, Descottes and his team layered the structure with light from within.

Initially, they created a layer by washing the mullions of the facade with metal-halide uplights installed inside the perimeter of the first level. Then they added a second layer of ambient and task lighting on the office floors, using compact fluorescent lamps. Here the lighting team kept the general light levels lower than usual to emphasize the glow of the fixtures at each desk, a tactic used to establish an intimate ambience for employees.

Next they installed linear fluorescent fixtures to wash the wood walls on all the levels, and inserted cool T5s above awninglike glass ceiling panels in the auditorium that create a seamless transition with the sunlight penetrating the skylight.

Last, they lined the atrium with adjustable metal-halide fixtures from the ground floor up to the roof, directing them up and down, and reflecting light off the white lamellas. This move, perhaps the most important, brightens the center of the building and underscores its voluptuous form.

During a recent visit on a warm and sunny summer morning, the offices were bursting with light — without a hint of glare — and wonderfully temperate minus the chill of air conditioning. A holistic tour de force, Fabrikstrasse 15 is illuminating in its transparency and ability to harness the aura and power of light — both generated and from the sun. Such a building defines the spirit of Novartis as an enlightened workplace.

Owner: Novartis Pharma AG

Completion Date: June 2009

Gross square footage: 19´500 m2

Total construction cost: Confidential

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

People

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

Personnel in architect’s firm who should receive special credit:
Frank Gehry – Partner In Charge
Edwin Chan – Design Partner
Terry Bell – Project Partner
Kamran Ardalan & Herwig Baumgartner – Project Manager / Architects

Principal Project Team:
Sven Newmann
Patricia Eva Schneider
Ron Tannenbaum
Narineh Mirzaeian
Manoucher Eslami
Vartan Chalikian

Schematic Design Project Team:
Joshua Morey
Yoram Lepair
Timothy Paulson
Frank Mahan
Earle Briggs
David Dorn
Andrew Fastman
Frank Weeks
Manuel Blanco-lonqueria
Lukas Raeber
Jeffery Garrett
Randolph D’amico

Architect of record
Local architects, general management, realization planning and site management:
Planergemeinschaft Arcoplan / Nissen& Wentzlaff, Basel
Project management: Daniel Wentzlaff, Thomas Oetiker, Timothy O.Nissen

Project Team:
René Keuter
Hendrik Johannsen
Karl Reiter
Paul Luternauer
Michael Sauer
Silvia Barben
Christiane Bouhraoua
Raymond Gaëtan
Soran Jester
Stephan Schweizer
Stefan Herrmann
Michael Geiger
Thomas Ligibel
Bettina Fritsche
Senad Catovic
Heiko Müller
Hans Münchhalfen
Wulf Oschwald
Ueli Raeber
Karl Sowa
Silke Techen
Daniel Hofer
Daniel Reinhardt
Ulli Blümmert
Andreas Schön
Isabel Frey
Lionel Combebias
Christian Hafenmayer
Martin Schlegel
Moritz Rusch

Interior designer
 Gehry Partners, LLP

Engineer(s)
Building services planning: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Lucerne, Switzerland: Gregor De Martin, Walter Wüthrich, Bruno Wigger, and Ralf Haebig
Building automation: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Basel, Switzerland: Urs Winkler
Building physics: Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland: Martin Beyerler
Structural engineer: Schlaich Bergermann und Partner, Stuttgart, Germany: Jörg Schlaich, Hans Schober, Michael Werwigk, Kai Kürschner

Consultant(s)
Acoustical: McKay Conant Brook, David Conant/ Dr. Markus Ringger, Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland
Audio-Video planning: Virtually Audio GmbH, Suhr, Switzerland: Daniel Zurwerra, Thomas Rüetschi
Catering planning: Planbar, Zurich, Switzerland: Walter Widmer
Graphics, signage: 2×4 Inc. New York, U.S.A: Michael Rock, Lee Moreau, Yoonjai Choi, Albert Lee
Electrical planning: Scherler AG, Basel, Switzerland: Thomas Roth
Energy concept: Transsolar Energietechnik GmbH, Munich, Germany: Matthias Schuler, Wolfgang Kessling, Christian Oberdorf
Fire prevention concept: Mario Fontana, Zürich, Switzerland: Alfred Spinelli, A+F Brandschutz, Pratteln, Switzerland
Façade planning: Emmer Pfenninger Partner AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland: Hans Emmer, Kurt Pfenninger, Martin Friedli, Steffi Neubert, Jeanette Leu
Landscape: Vogt Landschaftsarchitekten, Zurich, Switzerland: Günter Vogt, Ralf Günter Voss, Uta Gehrhardt
Lighting: L´Observatoire International, New York, Hervé Descottes, Socorro Sperati, Beatrice Witzgall

CAD system, project management, or other software used
 2d Drawings in Auto CAD and 3d Modeling in Digital Project/Catia

Products

Structural system
Steel-Structure Facade: Müller Offenburg GmbH: Offenburg, Germany in collaboration with Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. Christian Gäßler, Wolfgang Mayr, Ladislaus Balint, Sebastian Utz and Torsten Nörr.
Concrete Structure: Implenia AG, Switzerland

Exterior cladding

Metal/glass curtain wall: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany.

Glazing

Glass:Curtain Wall: Glass by BGT Bischoff Glastechnik: Bretten, Germany, Curtian wall engineering and installed by Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. 
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg, Switzerland
Exterior Balustrades: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Ground Floor Interior Glazing: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Interior Glass Balustrades: glass manufactured by Blaser, Basel, Switzerland, installed by Imbau AG, Pratteln, Switzerland
Conference Room Glazing: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Meeting / Interview Rooms: Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen, Switzerland
Interior Windows (wood framing):  Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Design Stairs Mainbuilding: Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany

Skylights: 
Exterior Auditorium Skylight: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Interior Skylights: MTV Metallbau – Technik Villmergen AG: Villmergen, Switzerland

Doors

Entrances: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Metal doors: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Wood doors: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland & Dreier AG, Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Sliding doors: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Fire-control doors, security grilles: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland / Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland / Dreier AG Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Revolving Door: Blasi GmbH, Mahlberg, Germany

Hardware

Locksets: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy
Closer &, Panic Hardware: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Exit devices: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Pulls: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy / Glutz AG, Switzerland

Interior finishes

Acoustical ceilings: Two prodcuts used:
BASWAphon Acoustical Finish – BASWA Switzerland & STOSilentPanel – STO Switzerland

Suspension grid:
Auditorium Operable/Acoustic Partitions:  Industrial Acoustics Company (IAC): New York, U.S.A; Craig D’ Anna
Cabinetwork and custom woodwork: Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Paints and stains: manufacturer: Dold AG: Wallisellen, Switzerland
Wall coverings: Vertical Grain Douglas fir interior Wall claddings/Windows- Jos. Berchtold AG, Switzerland / Meeting-interview room- Röthlisberger Innenausbau: Gümlingen, Switzerland
Bathroom Stainless Steel Partitions: BTS – Partition System: Munich, Germany
Bathroom Tiles: Villeroy & Boch
Auditorium Leather Paneling: Leather provided by Poltrona Frau, Italy, Fabricated and Installed by Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Auditorium) Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Main Building) Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Plastic laminate:
Wood Surfaces: Vertical Grain Douglas fir veneered wood paneling – Central Wood Supplier: Sauter Paul AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland
Special surfacing: Cooling Ceilings/Walls: MWH Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Floor and wall tile (cite where used): Wood Floor – Senn Parkett, Dussnang, Switzerland
Resilient flooring: Dispoxid 472, Caparol Farben AG, Nänikon, Switzerland
Carpet: manufacturer: Shaw, U.S.A.
Raised flooring: Type FLOOR and more N 30 x L/A, AGB Bautechnik AG, Switzerland

Furnishings

Office furniture: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Reception furniture: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland
Fixed seating: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich Switzerland / Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen Switzerland
Workstation Task Chairs: Meda Pro by Vitra International
Conference/Meeting/Interview room Chairs: Eames Aluminum Group by Vitra
Workstation Tables: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Upholstery: leather covered auditorium fixed seatings: Poltrona Frau, Italy: Fulvio Giustiniani
Custom Furniture: Conference rooms tables, meeting & interview rooms tables, reception desks, shelving, banquets, etc. – Designed by Gehry Partners, manufactured by various contractors.

Lighting   
Manufacturer: Erco, Neuco, Regent, Schmitz, Reggianni, Philips, Regiolux, Zumtobel

Pendant Lighting: Restaurant – Mama Cloud designed by Frank O. Gehry; Manufactured by Belux.
Custom Lighting: Conference Rooms – Designed by Gehry Partners, LLP: Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland
Task lighting: Tolome by Artemide
Dimming System or other lighting controls: various manufacturers

Conveyance

Elevators/Escalators: Schindler AG, Switzerland
Accessibility provision (lifts, ramping, etc.):
(Auditorium) Gilgen Logistics AG, Oberwangen Switzerland

Energy
Energy management or building automation system:Neuberger Gebäudeautomation AG, Rothenburg, Germany
Photovoltaic system: Schüco International KG, Bielefeld, Germany

Other unique products that contribute to sustainability:

Façade Components:

  1. Highly selective triple glazing (low U-Values) with double fritting.
  2. Internally movable shading made of low-e –coated textile fabric.
  3. Façade openings in the upper and lower area of the façade for back ventilation of the façade (air circulation between the façade and shading).
  4. Internal Cooled/Acoustic lamellas under the roof of the central atrium – MWH Barcol-Air AG, Switzerland.

Air-conditioning Technology:

  1. Acoustic/Cooled ceilings in office areas.
  2. Floor Heating/Cooling
  3. Heating/Cooling panels along floor slabs in the façade areas.
  4. Decentralized Heating/Cooling convectors (under the floors).
  5. Source ventilation with fully air-conditioned fresh air.
  6. Air outlet of the re-circulating air for convection cooling of the façade areas.

Project awaiting Minergie Certification.
Minergie is a sustainability brand for new and refurbished buildings. It is mutually supported by the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Cantons along with Trade and Industry and is registered in Switzerland and around the world and defended firmly against unlicensed use.

Additional building components or special equipment that made a significant contribution to this project:
Shading System Contractor – Clauss Markisen GmbH: Bissingen, Germany: Klaus Westenberger, Klauss Vogg
Shading Fabric – Ferrari (SOLTIS 86) Stamoid AG, Eglisau, Schweiz
Interior Design Stairs – Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany
Cooling Lamellas – Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg Switzerland
Auditorium Projection Screens – Stewart Filmscreen Corporation, Torrance, California
Cafeteria Buffets – Buob Kühlmöbel AG, Rorschach, Switzerland
LED Column – LED elements by Tweaklab AG, Basel, Switzerland; Installed by Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Cafeteria LED signage – Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland

By Linda C. Lentz

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/lighting/2011/08/fabrikstrasse-15.asp

August 9, 2011

Skywalk Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna | Solid Architecture

Project Details:
Location: Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna, Austria
Architects: Solid Architecture – www.solid.ac
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Built up Area: 54 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Completion: May 2009
Photos: Günter Kresser

 SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna.

The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture
In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.
Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.
If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.
The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge
The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.
The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.
There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.
Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge
From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge,
the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.
The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.
In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge. In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination
The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

http://architecturelab.net/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-viennaaustria-by-solid-architecture-18890/

SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna. The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture

In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.

Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.

If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.

The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge

The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.

The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.

There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.

Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge

From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge, the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.

The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.

In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge.  In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination

The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

+ Project credits / data

ProjectSkywalk Rennweg 44 – 46
Location: Skywalk, Rennweg 44 – 46, 1030 Vienna
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46

ArchitectureSOLID architecture ZT GmbH | http://www.solid.ac/
Project Management: Arch. DI Christoph Hinterreitner
Collaborators: Arch DI Christine Horner
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Structural Engineering: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Building Physics: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Construction Supervision: CF SER/IM/BPM der Österreichischen Lotterien

Contractors
Builder: SAN AS BAU
Steel / Glass Construction: Stahlbau Kamper GmbH
Plumber: Ing. Ledermüller GmbH
Electrician: Fleck Elektroinstallationen GmbH
Fire Protection Gate: Peneder Feuerschutz GmbH
Photographer of the Project: Günter Kresser
Holder of the Copyright: SOLID architecture ZT GmbH

Planning Data
Direct Commission: no, 1stprize in invited competition
Project Status: Project completed
Competition: July / September 2008
Start of Planning: October 2008
Start of Construction: April 2009
Completion: May 2009

Project Data
Gross Area: 54 m²
Built up Area: 54 m²
Useable Surface: 44 m²
Building Volume: 189 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Construction: Stahlkonstruktion, Seitenwände verglast
Spatial Program: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge

Awards, Prizes: Exhibition “Gebaut 2009“, Architektonische Begutachtungen der MA 19

+ All images and drawings courtesy SOLID architecture

http://plusmood.com/2011/07/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-solid-architecture/

http://www.e-architect.co.uk/vienna/skywalk_rennweg.htm

http://www.solid.ac/_framesets/frameset_projects/english/ProjectFrameSet_en.html

http://www.rwt-plus.at/english/projects/national/national-2008-2009/bruecke-rennweg.html