Archive for ‘sport facilities’

August 20, 2011

Architects: Zaha Hadid Architects
Location: , England
Client: Olympic Delivery Authority
Main Contractor: Balfour Beatty
Project Team: Alex Bilton, Alex Marcoulides, Barbara Bochnak, Carlos Garijo, Clay Shorthall, Ertu Erbay, George King, Giorgia Cannici, Hannes Schafelner, Hee Seung Lee, Kasia Townend, Nannette Jackowski, Nicolas Gdalewitch, Seth Handley, Thomas Soo, Tom Locke, Torsten Broeder, Tristan Job, Yamac Korfali, Yeena Yoon
Project Area: 15,950 sqm (Legacy), 21,897 sqm (Olympic)
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Hélène BinetHufton + Crow

Design Concept

The architectural concept of the London Aquatic Centre is inspired by the fluid geometries of water in motion, creating spaces and a surrounding environment that reflect the riverside landscapes of the Olympic Park. An undulating roof sweeps up from the ground as a wave – enclosing the pools of the Centre with a unifying gesture of fluidity, while also describing the volume of the swimming and diving pools.

The Aquatics Centre is designed with an inherent flexibility to accommodate 17,500 spectators for the London 2012 Games in ‘Olympic’ mode while also providing the optimum spectator capacity of 2000 for use in ‘Legacy’ mode after the Games.

Site Context

The Aquatics Centre is within the Olympic Park Masterplan. Positioned on the south eastern edge of the Olympic Park with direct proximity to Stratford, a new pedestrian access to the Olympic Park via the east-west bridge (called the Stratford City Bridge) passes directly over the Centre as a primary gateway to the Park. Several smaller pedestrian bridges will also connect the site to the Olympic Park over the existing canal.

The Aquatic Centre addresses the main public spaces implicit within the Olympic Park and Stratford City planning strategies: the east-west connection of the Stratford City Bridge and the continuation of the Olympic Park along the canal.

Layout

The Aquatics Centre is planned on an orthogonal axis that is perpendicular to the Stratford City Bridge. All three pools are aligned on this axis. The training pool is located under the bridge with the competition and diving pools located within the large pool hall enclosed by the roof. The overall strategy is to frame the base of the pool hall as a podium connected to the Stratford City Bridge.This podium element contains of a variety of differentiated and cellular programmes within a single architectural volume which is seen to be completely assimilated with the bridge. The podium emerges from the bridge to cascade around the pool hall to the lower level of the canal.The pool hall is expressed above the podium by a large roof which arches along the same axis as the pools. Its form is generated by the sightlines of the 17,500 spectators in its Olympic mode. Double-curvature geometry has been used to generate a parabolic arch structure that creates the unique characteristics of the roof. The roof undulates to differentiate between the volumes of competition pool and the diving pool. Projecting beyond the pool hall envelope, the roof extends to the external areas and to the main entrance on the bridge that will be the primary access in Legacy mode. Structurally, the roof is grounded at 3 primary positions with the opening between the roof and podium used for the additional spectator seating in Olympic mode, then in-filled with a glass façade in Legacy mode.

http://www.archdaily.com/161116/london-aquatics-centre-for-2012-summer-olympics-zaha-hadid-architects/

 

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August 1, 2011

College Sports Hall | archi5

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

Section Section

Ground Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan First Floor Plan

Axonometry Axonometry

College Sports Hall / archi5 © Fabien Terreaux

Architect: archi5
Location: Villetaneuse, 
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 4,192 sqm
Photographs: Fabien Terreaux

This project is the first element of the urban visual identity of the campus’s east side. It’s mixed use by students and city’s sports associations symbolizes new relationship between Villetaneuse and Paris XIII college. The base of the project was an existing and aging sports hall. The program required a refurbishment and an extension of this building. We added a new and bigger hall, a martial sports dojo, a climbing wall tower and a new multipurpose hall.

The reconstruction with bunk volumes allows different elements of the program, existing or new to integrate into a coherent overall composition. It also gives a new and modern image of this building. From a close point of view, rhythm is given to the frontage by transparency and reflections on the stainless steel. This material is perforated face up the windows to let natural light to penetrate into the building. The using of this steel allows us to answer to the program requirements: simplicity of implementation, improvement of the visual and thermic comfort, safety of the building, sustainability.

If you look at the project from more distant view, the emerging boxes with poplar clad balance the building and give it subtle color variation. The entrance hall is luminous and spacious, providing a nice place for meetings between teachers and students. Each area in the sports hall is dedicated to the user’s comfort, creating a good atmosphere in the interiors spaces.

http://www.archdaily.com/154226/college-sports-hall-archi5/

June 19, 2011

Gymnase du Lycee Louis Bleriot | Christophe Gulizzi Architecte

Project Details:
Location: Marignane, France
Type: Sports – Public – Educational
Architect(s): Christophe Gulizzi Architecte –www.gulizzi.com
Program: Gymnasium, dance room, weight room, moving a boiler, creating a plateau of athletics and tea combined sports.
Site Area: 2978 sq ft outdoor space
Built-up-Area: 1538 sq ft
Budget: 2 620 000.00 € ht
Photos: Philippe Ruault – Vincent Fillon

Call it a proposal extended
A project that is not limited solely to the question of image,
Staging,
The evocation of the game,
The excitement of the effort,
fun,

To begin,
Show a visible and immediate reality;
As a “playground” the playground of the gym has become “screened”
This clarity of intention translates into a clear
See and be seen.

North and south facades are fully glazed
It is a macro-wire mesh
A square mesh of 2.62 m side,
44 meters long, 8 feet high,
148 glazed tiles of 2.42 m sides,
115 tons of steel, sliding bearings, GBE recessed …

But also
Breathe more secret and unseen reality;
That exudes elegance and mystery
Fear and eroticism intimately connected,
That draws its inspiration from the desire
The suggestion
Fantasy,
Brutalist archaic and it is a metaphorical interpretation,
A sense of playfulness,
A dreamlike feeling,
A disorder of the concept,
One form of uncertainty of reason,

Finally,
The auxiliary elements of the program,
Left side of the gymnasium,
Two abutments mineral depict the “stage”
The sublime
Strengthen the urban space,
Uncompromising aesthetic

It is a project prepaid
Without plastic reference immediate
Not a container functions,
Shapes or materials in fashion
But performance technology for aesthetics,
Tactical dialogue between architect and engineer,
A four, four, two, operating.

In this configuration of the space devoted
Guarantor of an attitude design signifying
Is the establishment of a separate device,
From a process
This composition is not a substitute for truth,
Just away from the current academic,

Between reality and appearances …

SITE:
Protected site, because of its proximity to the Chapelle St-Nicolas, draft submitted to the opinion of the Architect of the buildings in France.
Occupied site, near the high school workshops.

CONSTRUCTIVE SYSTEM CRANE:
Amounts in rectangular hollow inclined at 45 ° to 150 x 200 mm section form a “big grid”.
A series of beams PRS coverage of variable section. The link between these beams and uprights is provided on each facade, with a purlin enhanced by a parapet.
The facades are constructed on sliding bearings and to avoid uncomfortable withdrawal.
Moreover, these supports are crossed by downspouts integrated posts.
50% of the amounts are low profile one piece from top to bottom. They will resume the local buckling alone. Other amounts are welded 2m which work only compression.

RAINWATER:
The EP will have the following path:
The gutters on Eaves Beam level.
Five weirs by frontage located between beams
Conducted to measure for the circumvention of the purlin, which led to problems in the hollow of amounts 150 x 200.
Elbows embedded in the foundation sill.

THE GLASS FACADE OF GYM:
The glasses are made of safety glass type STADIP.
The frames are all equipped with a single glazed laminated safety type SATDIP 55.2.
Dimensions: 242 x 242

http://architecturelab.net/gymnase-du-lycee-louis-bleriot-marignanefrance-by-christophe-gulizzi-architecte-17596/

April 9, 2011

Indoor Swimming Pool in Toro | Vier Arquitectos

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

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ground floor plan ground floor plan

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elevation elevation

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Architects: Vier Arquitectos SLP – Antonio Raya, Cristóbal Crespo, Santiago Sánchez, Enrique Antelo
Location: , Zamora, 
Project area: 2,441 sqm
Project year: 2004 – 2010
Photographs: Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

The building comes out as a result of the proposal submitted to a public competition called in 2004 by the City of .

This building tries to incorporate a new piece in the city, assuming the representative image the building must show according to its public nature, being able to fit in with dignity and, far as possible, becoming a part of the architectural legacy of the town. Not in a position of prominence, but assuming the suggestions of an environment enriched with history and tradition.

By this way, the municipal swimming pool wants to be an austere building that, without abandoning the contemporary architectural language, knows how to give expressive continuity to the ´s patrimonial bequest.

The special design of the pool lies in the special role that the use of rammed earth acquires in its construction, developing its representative image.

Through the definition of bearing walls and exterior cladding to be built in rammed earth, the pool is conceived as a closed space to the outside, focusing on the texture of the walls, its form and composition that enhances the expressive conditions we consider suitable for solving the required image and program in the urban environment where it is located.

The pool protects itself from external climatology and from non-desirable views, thanks to that rammed earth perimeter wall. Over this wall, the roofs of the changing rooms’ emerge, suggesting the vegetation of inner courtyards. The scale and layout of the building, the texture of the walls and their colour, even freed from ornamental elements, follow compositive guidelines, present in the monumental architecture of .

The closed and severe look of the building contrasts with the image that appears as soon as we trespass the threshold. The different areas in which the program is divided receive natural light and ventilation through a series of interior courtyards that also allow the visual control of the buildings, making them transparent or opaque, as suitable. Moreover, they facilitate the passive support to the heat regulation, allowing the natural ventilation from shade areas. The main volume, which contains the swimming pool basin, must possess a strict control of its climate conditions. For this reason, the exchange with other areas is reduced to the maximum and treated as an autonomous volume regarding the rest of the complex.

http://www.archdaily.com/124418/indoor-swimming-pool-in-toro-vier-arquitectos/

 

 

March 9, 2011

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre | Perkins + Will

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

floor plan floor plan

context plan context plan

explained sections explained sections

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Architects: Perkins + Will
Location: 
Project area: 80,000 sq. ft.
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Tom Arban Photography

Trent University’s newly expanded athletics centre was designed to enhance the visibility and scope of their athletics program, as well as upgrade their aging existing facility to meet sustainable goals. The concept carefully integrates a series of newly constructed and renovated spaces to achieve a total regeneration of their facility. This has resulted in significant growth in participation and membership rates and has fostered new alliances with outside sporting organizations seeking high caliber facilities.

The project is situated at the south end of the Symons Campus along the west side of the Otonabee River. Conceived as part of Trent’s overall master plan, the facility enhances visibility of the Athletics Complex, unifies indoor and outdoor recreational programs and creates a focal point for student life, as part of a new gateway zone to the Campus.

The building responds to Trent’s strong commitment to environmental stewardship, through an integrated approach to water, energy and resource conservation that targets LEED Silver certification. The building seamlessly integrates with its striking context utilizing natural and recycled materials that harmonize with the strong character of the campus, including copper, wood, polished architectural  block and black anodized aluminum. An emphasis on re-use and conservation was employed in the construction and siting of the building through the use of indigenous plant species and preservation of existing landscape and building features. Emphasis on healthy and comfortable environments was also a key focus, demonstrated through the use of energy efficient demand control ventilation and non-toxic materials, and more generally through the facility’s role in promoting healthier lifestyles and wellness.

A unique feature of the Athletics Complex is the addition of an innovative indoor rowing tank, which was designed in close collaboration with the University’s rowing club, a local yacht designer, and stainless  pool manufacturer. This tank, which allows a full rowing team to simulate actual conditions and to effectively train indoors, was recently approved as an officially sanctioned Olympic training venue.

http://www.archdaily.com/117443/trent-community-sport-and-recreation-centre-perkins-will/

March 7, 2011

Sports and Leisure Center in Saint-Cloud | KOZ Architectes

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

KOZ © Stephan Lucas

plan 01 plan 01

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plan 03 plan 03

plan 04 plan 04

 

Architect: KOZ Architectes / Christophe Ouhayoun – Nicolas Ziesel
Location: Saint-Cloud, 
Project team: Ambrus Evva, François Kharatt
Structural Engineers: EVP Ingénierie
Contractor: Delta Fluides
Acoustic Consultant: Delphi Acoustique
Budget: $3.8M Euro
Project Area: 1,600 sqm
Project year: 2007-2009
Photographs: © Stephan Lucas

on Conformist and Bold

This building is not lacking in self-confdence. As proof, you only have to take the second left along the Avenue de Longchamps from the Les Côteaux tramway Station in Saint-Cloud. No sooner have you left behind a quiet row of smart private houses in the traditional millstone grit Parisian style with front steps and plane trees than you come face to face with an odd-looking building, imposing but also childishly simple, more cubist than cube-shaped, decidedly “fashy”, evoking happy memories of a child’s toy.

An appealing, totemic building that you sense is designed for festive celebrations and young people, and that you might expect to fnd in Rotterdam rather than the uber bourgeaois St Cloud neighbourhoods. Even if it is only 300 meters away from OMA’s Villa Dalll’Ava.

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/6832470″>Sports and Leisure Center in Saint-Cloud / KOZ Architectes</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/archdaily”>ArchDaily</a&gt; on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

With its cheerfulness and nonconformism, the building contrasts strongly with the urban development zone in which it’s located, behind a new block of private apartments and next to neo-Haussmannian offces and a day-nursery in a similar style. It is with the facing 1930s infant school that it empathises, extending the metaphor of the balcony courtyard, the passageways, the brick colour and the forecourt. As for the 1970s infant school next door, it maintains an obvious affnity with it in terms of shapes, only to dynamite the whole lot.

All in all it’s an odd little castle and cubist mountain, that owes its existence to the boldness of the Saint-Cloud Town Council, which has thereby acquired facilities that have revitalised its image and opened it to the most contemporary and positive architectural thinking.

Superimposed but not Separated

This brief provided a real headache: how to accommodate two autonomous programs on a narrow plot of land. KOZ chose to:

– Extrude the available area to the maximum height and hollow it out as with canyons that bring a clear and massive outdoor light deep inside the block.

– Superimpose the two programs without isolating them, by creating visual links between activities and applying the same principles on all facades and in all spaces.

The spaces are superimposed without being separated. They communicate via visual glimpses: you see each other on all sides, you ‘feel’ each other, you can easily fnd your bearings in a building with a spatially fuid but unfamiliar layout. Nevertheless, the functional and administrative autonomy of the two activities (separate entrances and different operational timetables) is respected.

A Pure Colour Scheme

The building uses colour very openly and assertively, with a wide palette ranging from red to green, by way of yellow, pink and orange. These colours cover the façade in wide stripes. Inside, the same colours are systematically repeated, like stepping in an oversized graffti.

A colour coding that helps you locate from the outside the areas created on the inside. A means of spatial orientation for young children. An echo to street culture codes for those who crawl on what is dubbed the coolest indoor climbing wall in ,or practice on the pop fencing rows below!

Spaces to be Filled

Over and above the pure functionality of the activities identified in the project, the architects placed great hope on the imagination and inventiveness of the occupants. That’s why all corridors, access ramps and passageways, are wide and spacious, up to 3 times the regulation size. The ramp leading to the outdoor games and training area has been designed along the same lines. Due to its exceptional width, it provides an “additional” space and safely contributes to the strong physical and visual continuity between the Leisure Centre’s internal and external areas. Indeed, it was designed with the aim of making it useable for activities ranging from just running up and down to becoming a small sized outdoor theatre . With no steps and surrounded by a 1.80m railing, it is a secure and private area where children can go alone in complete safety.

Ribbon

The building is a vertical pilling of activity spaces (gymnasium, climbing walls, leisure centre, outdoor area) wrapped in a ribbon of  providing unity to the whole .  was the natural choice as it highlights the building’s sculptural appearance while satisfying the requirements of:

– Superimposing of large rooms atop the gymnasium with little load bearing possibilities

– Acoustic insulation between the two components of the project.

The project is broadly made up of prefabricated  load-bearing panels.The moulded and tinted reinforced  contrasts with the coloured surfaces of the laminated panels.

Coloured Façades

The main facade is made of tinted  with a colour gradient from red to green. The other 3 facades are more homogeneous, albeit coloured too.

A Sustainable Project

KOZ is part of the “environmentally aware” generation. The openings in the roofs and the facades bring maximum natural lighting everywhere to limit electrical consumption.

was chosen for the reasons mentioned above but the preference was for prefabricated, generating less waste and spill.

The tinted  facades provide good protection against setting sun and long-lasting colour. And of course all hot water is solar heated.

http://www.archdaily.com/36552/sports-and-leisure-center-in-saint-cloud-koz-architectes/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 27, 2011

Olympic VeloPark London 2012 | Hopkins Architects

Project Details:
Location: London, UK
Architects: Hopkins Architects – www.hopkins.co.uk
Client: Olympic Delivery Authority

One of the four permanent venues on the Olympic Park, the Velodrome provides a venue for the indoor track cycling events at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The building seeks to form an elegant response to the brief using simple materials in an efficient manner to meet the client’s aspirations within the available budget.

Cycling inspired the concept for the Velodrome. The bike is an ingenious ergonomic object, honed to unrivalled efficiency; we wanted the same application of design creativity and engineering rigour that goes into the design and manufacture of the bike to manifest itself in the building. Not as a mimicry of the bicycle but as a three dimensional response to the functional requirements of the venue whose distinctive form has emerged from an integrated design team approach which focused on the performance and efficiency of every aspect of the building.

The Velodrome contains 6,000 seats in both Olympic and Legacy modes and responds to both contexts in an appropriate manner with minimal transformation. The upper and lower seating tiers are split by the main public circulation concourse which forms the main point of entry into the arena and allows spectators to maintain contact with the action on the track as they circulate around the building. The concourse is fully glazed to allow views both into and out of the building. It also helps to visually separate the Western Red Cedar clad upper bowl from the ground floor back of house accommodation which is largely hidden behind the landscaped earth berms that form a visual plinth at the East and West ends of the building.

The Olympic Delivery Authority set a number of sustainability and material targets; through careful consideration and integration of the architecture, structure and building services the design has met or exceeded these requirements.

Work on the competition scheme began in May 2007 with announcement of the results made in August 2007. Work started on site on 23rd February 2009 and was completed ahead of programme and on budget on 13th January 2011.

The London 2012 VeloPark was a collaboration with Expedition Engineering, BDSP and Grant Associates.

http://architecturelab.net/02/olympic-velopark-london-2012-by-hopkins-architects/

 

 

 

February 15, 2011

Centre des Sports Belair | Auer+Weber+Assoziierte

Luxembourg
Project Centre des Sports Belair, Luxembourg
Completion 04 / 2010
Gross area 7.270 sqm
Cubature 45.500 cbm
Costs € 25,0 Mio.
Photography Roland Halbe, Stuttgart

Description The new buildings integrate into the terrain´s slope, cleverly benefitting from the topography. They are clearly shaped volumes over a connecting base, which allows access to both parts of the building and provides a generously landscaped terrace.

The upper floors are transparent and fitted with vertically structured, fix sunshades made of aluminium and equipped with an additional antiglare device. This layer allows for efficient shading and glare protection as well as solar gains during winter. Perspectives and views, the connection to the exterior are maintained.
The roofs of the dug-in basement floors are intensively overgrown, at some exact points skylights shed daylight into certain areas.

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Longitudinal Section

http://www.german-architects.com/auer-weber-assoziierte-stuttgart?lang=en-gb

February 13, 2011

The new Holmenkollen Ski Jump | JDS Architects

A perfomative project

The Holmenkollen site has been the cradle of evolution in ski-jumping for more than 100 years. As the city of Oslo will host the 2011 world championships, the facilities required a renovation beyond what the existing structure could manage.

JDS Architects’ submission won the international open competition held in 2007 against 104 proposals to redesign the jumping tower and the 30,000 seats arena. Beyond fulfilling the discipline’s requirements for many years to come, and providing 100% recyclable materials in a sustainable construction, our project proposes two aspects we believe have led to its completion;

Symbiotic relationship between architecture and experience: the design aims at unifying the various elements present in a ski-jump into one single structure, expression, shape and action. Rather than having a series of dispersed pavilions on site, we’ve managed to combine them into one organism. The judges’ booths, the commentators, the trainers, the royal family, the VIPs, the wind screens, the circulations, the lobby, the lounge for the skiers, the shop of souvenirs, the access to the existing museum, the viewing public square at the very top, EVERYTHING, is contained into the shape of the jump in a symbiosis of programmes and experiences giving the jump a harmonic contextual relationship to the surrounding landscape.

The resulting simplicity of the solution improves the experience of the spectators and the focus of the skiers. There’s an impressive feeling of intimacy at Holmenkollen: both audience and jumpers are enclosed in the arms of the ski-jump in a form of an architectural embrace.

Iconographic dialogue between structure and city; there is a crucial aspect to this iconographic issue that our project emphasizes: from its strategic position, at the highest peak over the city, the structure offers the most breathtaking views of Oslo, the fjord and the region beyond. We have designed a public square, on top of the jump, literally a plaza, to let visitors experience Oslo from this exceptional vantage point. It’s a new form of public space, using an unlikely architectural form as its host – allowing for a dialogue between the city and its inhabitants.

We believe sustainability requires the social realm to be addressed: a project needs to be socially desired and active to be maintained. With this new injection of social space, the ski jump has become a truly vibrant and integrated part of Oslo.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=15839