Archive for ‘Retail’

January 22, 2012

The Avenue | Sheppard Robson

Architect: Sheppard Robson 
Location: , UK
Project Manager: Gardiner & Theobald
Structural Engineer: Capita Symonds
M&E Engineer: Grontmij
Quantity Surveyor: Mooney Kelly
Main Contractor: Lend Lease
Client: Allied London Properties
Project Area: 5,000 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Hufton+Crow

Marking the start of the pedestrian journey through the new Spinningfields quarter, the award- winning 1 The Avenue is pivotal in form and location, tying Manchester’s retail and business district with its civic core. The building was designed in response to its urban context and as a flagship mixed-use building. Armani occupies the ground and first floors, with a nightclub in the basement and boutique offices and a roof terrace above.

The scissor geometry of the building’s form responds to a duality of desire lines and is immediately apparent in the dramatic cantilever on to Deansgate. The angled upper storeys realign the east-west axis towards Hardman Square at the heart of Spinningfields, and the lower levels direct pedestrians towards the new entrance to the John Rylands Library. The trapezoidal form of the building’s plan is echoed in the vibrant glazing which animates the elevations and creates a unique experience inside the building. 1 The Avenue received a BREEAM Excellent rating and the building’s regulated energy consumption is just 78KWhr/m²/yr.

http://www.archdaily.com/196816/the-avenue-sheppard-robson/

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November 27, 2011

TRANSITLAGER DREISPITZ | BIG

BIG wins an invited competition to renovate and extend an existing 1960′s concrete warehouse situated in a  industrial district which is being transformed into an alternative Arts District.

Located in Basel’s upcoming Dreispitz neighborhood, which is envisioned as an attractive and inviting urban quarter in Herzog de Meuron’s master plan from 2003, the existing 18.000 m2 ”Transitlager” built in the late 1960s is to be renovated and extended by up to 7.000 m2 for residential and commercial purposes. The development is undertaken by St. Gallen -based real estate development company Nüesch Development for the landlord, the Christoph Merian Foundation and investor the UBS (CH) Property Fund – Swiss Mixed ‘Sima’. The winning entry which included engineers Bollinger Grohmann and HL Technik was chosen among proposals from Harry Gugger Studio and Lacaton Vassal among others.

The Transitlager’s surrounding industrial area is characterized by the geometries of infrastructures – the intersecting railways, loading docks and turning radiuses that weave through the city and create a puzzle of linear buildings with pointy corners and staggered façade lines into an untraditional and adventurous urban area consisting of galleries, restaurants and creative businesses. The iconic character of the existing Transitlager, its generous surrounding public spaces, and connection to the city’s botanical garden makes the building a natural focal point of the Arts District. By re-programming and extending the former warehouse into a multifunctional series of floors for various uses, BIG proposes a cross breed of art, commerce, working and living. Two distinct buildings on top of each other form a mixed-use hybrid with activity and life 24 hours a day.

“We propose a transformation of the Transitlager that builds on the industrial logic of the existing building and of the surrounding area. The extension doubles the size of the Transitlager and becomes an opposite twin – based on the same structure, but with a different geometry. The combined building becomes a spectrum of optimal conditions: From open and flexible plans to tailor made units, public programs to private residences, vibrant urban space to peaceful green gardens and from cool industrial to warm and refined. ” Andreas Klok Pedersen, Partner, BIG.

The wide dimensions of the former warehouse, the mix of programs, the structural limits and the sun orientation creates a typology that is neither point house nor slab – a folded geometry adapted to the specifics of the existing structure and optimized for daylight and views. The staggered edge and pointy ends echoes the geometries of the industrial buildings of the neighborhood, creating a surprising familiarity with the heterogeneous surroundings.

“The stacking of two complimentary structures – one on top of the other – has generated a new take on the typology of the communal courtyard. Where the typical residential courtyard finds itself incarcerated by walls of program, the roofyards of the Transitlager combine the tranquility and communal space of the courtyard with the sunlight and panoramic views of the penthouse. A penthouse for the people.” Bjarke Ingels, Partner and Founder, BIG.

Stripped from existing interior walls, the 60’s era structure offers flexible open plans and an exceptional high quality of concrete work. BIG proposes an extension that with a minimum of intervention, creates a maximum of programmatic diversity and feasibility. By keeping the interior finishing sparse, and installations simple we propose a building tailored for creative businesses, ateliers and workshops. We propose a building with a simple and economical material palette optimized for both artistic work and classy luxury.

Architect: BIG
Location: Basel, Switzerland
Partner in Charge: Bjarke Ingels, Andreas Klok Pedersen
Project Leader: Jakob Henke
Team: Gul Ertekin, Ioannis Gio, Ricardo Palma, Alexandra Gustafson, Bara Srpkova, Marcelina Kolasinska, Ryohei Koike
Client: Nuesch Development RG, UBS Fund Management, Christoph Merian Stiftung
Collaborators: Bollinger+Grohmann, HL- Technik
Size: 30,000 sqm
Status: 1st Prize (Completion 2015)
Images: Courtesy of BIG

http://www.archdaily.com/179469/big-transforms-transitlager-in-switzerland/

November 27, 2011

kind of italian gelato: Ferrari Factory Store | Iosa Ghini Associates

Architects: Iosa Ghini Associates
Location: , Italy
Project Area: 370 sqm
Photographs: Gianluca Grassano

Ferrari Factory Store of Serravalle Scrivia, entirely designed by , is located outside McArthur Glen Outlet in Serravalle Scrivia. For the first time in the history of Ferrari Stores an entire building has been designed to accommodate the store. The building enjoys a privileged position as one of the first structures of the Outlet visible from the main parking area and access roads, for this reason it was designed with an exterior that immediately identifies it at ‘Ferrari space”

The building of approximately 370 sqm is characterized by a large glass gallery that recalls the image and feel of Formula One box, immediately projecting visitors in the Ferrari world.

From a technical point of view the glass gallery is highly innovative with a curved face without mounting posts and bars that permit total visibility inward and outward. The curved glass panels are assembled using a frameless anchor system, i.e. without mounting supports but with ultra light and clips that guarantees the perception of material continuity between the plate glasses and provides lightness to the whole system.

Climate control of the glass gallery is effected by a system of air circulation that takes advantage of the motion of air convection, allowing for the passive cooling by natural induction. This natural system is supported by a forced air system that may be activated when climate conditions require it. In addition, the exterior glass envelope is treated with special UV protection films as well as a screen prints that reduces sun rays for energy savings as required by national standards for the sector.

Beyond the glass gallery there is the commercial space. As in all Ferrari Stores the merchandise areas are: the zone for Ferrari fans is designed with aluminium slats of high flexibility, in the luxury zone the display windows use soft materials, brushed leather and polished lacquer, in the children’s zone both systems are integrated : slats and display windows finished in yellow lacquer. A shaped false ceiling outlines the design of the ensemble and follows the path of visitors. The design of the areas is tightly connected to the design and graphic project specific to each Ferrari Store.

The graphic style is integral part of the project, in a personal vision of Iosa Ghini Associates of the architectural space, where the three dimensions meet to obtain an encompassing area able to capture all senses, to transmit an engaging idea through a physical and iconographic interpretation.

Text provided by Iosa Ghini Associates

http://www.archdaily.com/178388/ferrari-factory-store-iosa-ghini-associates/

November 19, 2011

Euralille Youth Centre | JDS Architects

JDS Architects have just shared with us their first French project in the city of Lille. The Euralille Youth Centre is a 6,000 sqm project that includes a youth hostel, offices and a kindergarten.

Over the past twenty years Lille has become a European hub; a destination for business and congress, a great place to study and live and also a tourist destination. It is a city with a turbulent history of conquest and reconquest, a heritage as an important medieval city and later the industrial capital. It is this history, the unique and striking presence of remnants of ramparts of the citadel, which the project seeks to mention.

Our project emerges from the idea of creating an urban catalyst, accommodating three distinct programmes on a triangular site. By placing a program in each point of the triangle we offer maximum privacy while allowing them a closeness and continuity of space, organized around a garden, like a cloister of calm in the center of the city. The lifting of the mass of the programme at the corners illuminates and activates the adjacent public spaces and creates a continuity from outside to inside the building.

Architects: JDS Architects
Location: Lille, 
Project Team: Antoine Allard, Renaud Pereira, Sandra Fleischmann, Weronica Wojcik, Felix Luong, Kamile Malinauskaite, Lea Fournier, Adrien Mans
Competition Team: Julien De Smedt, Barbara Wolff, Henning Stüben, Renaud Pereira, Heechan Park, Francisco Villeda, Wouter Dons, Felix Luong, David Dominguez, Leonora Daly, Priscilla Girelli, Marion Julien, Edna Lueddecke
Client: SAEM Euralille
Collaborators: Agence Franck Boutté Consultants, EGIS, SL2EC
Budget: 11,400,000 EUR
Size: 6,000 sqm
Status: Construction starts 2012
Images: Courtesy of JDS Architects

http://www.archdaily.com/183069/euralille-youth-centre-jds-architects/

November 19, 2011

Vershina Trade and Entertainment Center | Erick van Egeraat

Architects: Erick van Egeraat
Location: Surgut, 
Project Year: 2010
Project Area: 37,050 sqm
Photographs: Alexey Naroditskiy

The “Vershina” Trade and Entertainment Centre is the first five-star international shopping center in Surgut and offers space for retail, extreme sports areas, dance studios, restaurants, bars and an underground night-club. On a total gross floor area of 35,000 sqm spread over eight stories, the building provides around the clock activities for all visitors, young and old.

The concept for the building is based on a dialectical play between dark and light, solid and transparent, open and closed. The building is equipped with an extensive exterior lighting scheme and its glass facade forms a screen onto which moving advertisements are projected. The primary cuts in the facade divide this basic mass into “sharp volumes” that allow daylight in, and radiate artificial light out at night.

These cuts are accompanied by secondary cuts in the facades, the so-called “lines of light”. The primary and secondary cuts in the building skin will allow for the building to become a beacon of light during the nine dark winter months in Surgut.

http://www.archdaily.com/182782/vershina-trade-and-entertainment-center-erick-van-egeraat/

October 10, 2011

Trollwall Restaurant, Trollveggen, Møre og Romsdal, Norway | Reiulf Ramstad Architects

Tallest cliff face in Europe is backdrop for stunningly elegant restaurant complex

Reiulf Ramstad Architects has completed a breathtaking restaurant and information centre at the base of the Troll Wall – Europe’s tallest vertical, overhanging rock face – in The Romsdal Valley, Norway. Rising 3,600ft in a sheer mountainous peak, the raw landscape that surrounds the Trollwall Restuarant is subtly reflected in the building’s highly mirrored glass facades.

Also echoing the peaks and troughs on the horizon is the sharply undulating roof, which rises and falls in two acute arches, arching gracefully against the stunning backdrop. The wall panels that aren’t glass are formed of plastered chipboard and a concrete floor provides a simple if basic setting for the restaurant amenities.

Besides the restaurant facilities – which provide both three course dining and fast food opportunities – the complex offers a gift shop and film theatre, showing a short informative video on the history of the neighbouring Troll Wall. The Trollwall Restaurant is open June to September during the areas busiest season and will provide a base for many public events including music concerts and base jumping meetings.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17716

Architect: Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter (RRA)
Location: Trollveggen, , Norway
Project Area: 700 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Courtesy of Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter

It’s a new cursor at the foot of the Troll Wall; The architecture of the new visitors`center next to E139 is an outcome of the sites` close connection to the impressive mountain wall, one of Norways many nature attractions. The building has a simple, though flexible plan, with a characteristic roof that has its character from the majestic surrounding landscape. These simple ways of design gives the building its character and identity that makes the Service center an eye-catcher and an architectural attraction in the region.

http://www.archdaily.com/162679/trollwall-restaurant-and-service-rra/

October 10, 2011

One40william, Perth | HASSELL

HASSELL combines retail, workplace and public realm for new mixed-use development

 

Designed by HASSELL, one40william is one of Perth’s most significant and influential new buildings, enlivening the city’s retail centre and setting a benchmark in environmental sustainability.

Based on progressive responses to workplace design, public realm, climate and context, the building has been designed from the inside out rather than fitting functions into a predetermined aesthetic.

The building design strives to engage people who work within, visit, and simply pass by it through careful consideration of urban grain, streetscape, heritage, activity, scale and texture.  Integral to the success of the building are the permeable linkages created with the surrounding city and the underground railway station beneath the building itself.

The design celebrates Perth’s specific microclimate by taking best advantage of light and shade in the overall building orientation and design and incorporating extensive landscaped rooftop spaces and winter gardens.

The project has achieved a 5 Star Green Star Office Design rating (and is targeting a 5 Star Green Star Office As Built rating) with a range of initiatives including: built form to maximise natural light, views and self shading, bicycle parking and end of trip facilities, reduced car parking, grey water storage and high-efficiency, low-temperature VAV air-conditioning.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17627

August 17, 2011

Radian Apartments | Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Architect: Erdy McHenry Architecture
Location: Philadelphia, 
Structural Engineer: The Harman Group
Mechanical Engineer: PHY Consulting Engineers
Civil Engineer: Pennoni Associates, Inc.
General Contractor: Intech Construction
Project Area: 170,000sqf
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Erdy McHenry Architecture

The Radian Apartments are a 14-story, 500-bed residential and retail center at the edge of the University of Pennsylvania’s rapidly expanding campus. The Radian’s name is based on its angular-design feature created by Philadelphia-based Erdy McHenry Architecture, LLC. The project was initiated by a private developer in collaboration with the University, which owns the land. It is built with contested space in mind. It neither belongs to the assortment of retail spaces of West Philadelphia nor to the flat academic buildings that are signature of University City. It gracefully blurs the line between these two opposing landscapes, while upgrading the atmosphere of both.

The  style of the Radian references the unit construction of dormitories, yet progressively steers away from their trademark rigidity. Apartments range from one bedroom to four, and are arranged differently on each floor. The flexible plan, combines a one bathroom apartment with a four bathroom apartment, creating random junctions and unexpected engagements. The connections made inside the building, expressed outside by windows etched on the facade, are unified by the single white ribbon wrapping itself around the frame of the building.

Ground-level retail pushes back from the street opening a public space for informal gathering. The residential entrance exists along this axis and public activity extends up and under the residential tower via a grand stair. This open court aligns with an adjacent quad on the south side of Walnut Street connecting with Locust Walk. Outdoor dining options are provided at the upper terrace level and allow for glimpses onto the street.

The building’s sustainable features include a green roof and a prefabricated rain-screen facade. The 10,000 square foot green roof acts as a storm-water management system, funneling water off impervious surfaces and into the garden, while controlling the release of excess water into Philadelphia’s combined sewer system. The retention basin is marked by the landscape above it, a simple grove of trees.

http://www.archdaily.com/158386/radian-apartments-erdy-mchenry-architecture/

August 17, 2011

Apple Reveals Plans for Fifth Avenue Cube | Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

newnewapplecube0811 Rendering of the new cube © Apple

Apple Reveals Plans for Fifth Avenue Cube Courtesy of MacRumors

When the iconic Apple glass cube on Fifth Avenue was shroud in barriers in preparation for renovation in June, the future of the flagship Apple store was unclear.  It was only revealed that Apple would be removing the glass cube and working on drainage, pavers, and bollards on the plaza, but just what changes were to be made to the cube itself remained elusive.

Apple has now revealed that the glass panels as we have known them will be replaced with larger panels to create a seamless appearance.  A sign now states, “We’re simplifying the Fifth Avenue cube. By using larger, seamless pieces of glass, we’re using just 15 panes instead of 90.”  There will be three panels per side of the cube, running the full length.  During the day the store is faintly recognizable as a glass encasing for an underground world; at night the store glows from the inside out.  With this new structural detailing, the building will likely appear even more subtle during the day and more brilliant at night.

This original design is an innovation by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and structural engineersEckersley O’Callahan.  The glass cube and subterranean glass staircase were trademarked in 2010, associating the vision of the architecture with Apple’s own innovations.

We recently reported that according to documents released by the city of Cupertino, Foster + Partners will be the architects of the new Apple Campus in Cupertino, California. Steve Jobs shared the following, “We’ve used our experience making retail buildings all over the world now, and we know how to make the biggest pieces of glass in the world for architectural use.”

http://www.archdaily.com/160138/apple-reveals-plans-for-fifth-avenue-cube/

  

 

        

pple’s second Manhattan retail store opened May 19th in New York City. Located at 767 Fifth Avenue between 58th and 59th Streets, the prominent site near FAO Schwarz and Bergdorf Goodman provides views of Central Park.”We opened our first New York store in SoHo in 2002, and it has been successful beyond our dreams. Now we’re thrilled to open our second New York store on Fifth Avenue,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “With outstanding service and an amazing location open 24 hours a day, we think the Apple Store Fifth Avenue is going to be a favorite destination for New Yorkers and people around the world.”The store occupies the underground retail concourse of the General Motors Building, with entry from the plaza level above. “The new plaza in front of the General Motors building on Fifth Avenue at 59th Street is a triumph of urban design.” said James Gardner in the New York Sun. “Suddenly, as if out of nowhere, New York has a new public space that will prove to be a source of civic pride and aesthetic delight.”

Designers Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and structural engineers Eckersly O’Callahan (glass elements) in collaboration with Apple used Apple Stores’ signature structural glass vertical circulation to entice plaza level passersby down to the store’s underground main level. The 32-foot structural glass cube marking the store’s entrance makes a bold architectural statement. Housing a transparent glass elevator wrapped by a circular glass stair, the transparent cube beckons potential customers down to the retail level below. By day it is a skylight bringing natural light underground, while at night the lighted cube is a sign. “It was in Apple’s DNA to try to make something that no one else had the vision to create,” said Ron Johnson, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Retail.

Visitors descend the glass stair or travel in the all-glass elevator, entering a carefully tailored stainless steel and stone environment where Apple’s products take center stage. Custom-designed wooden store fixtures, stainless steel ceiling and wall panels and an Italian stone floor make an elegant, yet restrained backdrop.

Awards

2008 Honor Award
AIA Pennsylvania
2007 Award of Excellence for Design
AIA New York State
2007 Excellence in Architecture
AIA San Francisco
2007 American Architecture Award
Chicago Athenaeum
2007 Honorable Mention, Best Retail Space
Travel + Leisure Magazine Awards
2006 Design Award
Business Week/Architectural Record Awards
July 31, 2011

Meatpacking District Tower, New York | Morris Adjmi Architects

‘Less is More’ says New York Landmarks Commission of Morris Adjmi design

After three attempts, architect Morris Adjmi’s four-storey glass addition to a 1938 moderne style market building in New York’s Meatpacking District was approved Tuesday by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

The approved design, which will see reductions in the number stories and the floor-to-floor heights over the initial seven storey proposal, is considerably smaller. The reduction in the building size was in response to demands from the neighbourhood, specifically the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, which serves as an advocate for sensitive development in the area.

“We are glad the advocacy over the last couple of year has resulted in the size of the proposal being reduced significantly” said Andrew Berman, the executive director at the Society. “However, we still have a fundamental concern of turning buildings in historic districts into pedestals for larger developments.”

The building, located at 837-843 Washington Street, is in the heart of the district and enjoys high visibility. It is cattycorner to The Standard Hotel and visible from the High Line.

Sharon McHugh
US Correspondent

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17170

and read it here from architect’s website:

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the design for 837 Washington Street in New York’s Gansevoort Market Historic District. The design, a 4-story glass and steel torqued addition sitting within a 2-story Moderne style brick meat market building, was hailed for its use of materials, appreciation of its industrial past and relation to its urban context. LPC Chairman Robert Tierney declared that MA Architects ‘set a very high bar’ for design in the area.

Twisty MePa Tower Finally Approved by Landmarks Commission