Archive for ‘Restaurant’

March 11, 2012

Edel AG | Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel and Partners

Architects: Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel and Partners 
Location: , Germany
Client: Edel Music AG
Project Year: 2002
Project Area: 6,000 sqm
Photographs: Klaus Frahm

The new headquarters for Edel Music AG are located in a five-story building designed by Antonio Citterio and Partners along the river Elbe in Hamburg, Germany.

The volume of the building is based on a Master Plan in which a lowered garage structure aligned to the street is topped by several office building facing the river.

The Edel headquarters comprise 3300 sq meters of office space on three levels over a ground floor housing the reception, bar, restaurant and auditorium.

The first two levels are sitting completely on the podium, while the three upper levels cantiliver over the polder, overlooking the river.

The transparency of the ground floor indicates the public character of the interior: the space is extended to the outside terraces. The idea of the building is different from the usual office building, nearing the idea of the “campus” where young people have the chance to meet the employees of the company and communicate with visitors from all over the world.

http://www.archdaily.com/210746/flashback-edel-ag-antonio-citterio-and-partners/

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January 22, 2012

The Cube | Park Associati

Architects: Park Associati 
Location: Milano, via Foscolo n.1 (Piazza Duomo), Italy
Client: Electrolux Home Appliances Emea N.V
Design team: Lorenzo Merloni (project leader), Alessandro Rossi, Alexia Caccavella, Alice Cuteri, Fabio Calciati_Rendering
Contractor:Nüssli AG, Hüttwilen, CH, Frieder Braun, Maurizio Ledda, Maik Rauch
Event Concept and Project Management: Absolute Blue
Area: 140 sqm
Photographs: Andrea Martiradonna

In 1972, Ettore Sottsass came up with a grand architectural scheme that took in the whole planet and was called “The Planet as Festival”. It was a highly utopian, highly visionary, highly radical project, as were many other projects from that time, known as the age of radical architecture. In the description of the project he highlighted the basis for which it was necessary to overturn conventional rules and go on to imagine a better (not only) architectural world….. there was nothing left for me to design, solitary, not group artist that I am – child of an era worried about the future – a degenerate child for I am not engrossed in the destinies which generated me, which political parties, armies and suchlike threateningly point out to me.

I thought there was no architecture left for me to draw, I mean there is no architecture left to propose, either as Andrea Branzi aptly says “as a model for society” or to put in the hands of society “as a psycho-motor activity” ……… Therefore I designed these projects as if they had been proposed by someone else – someone far removed from the trajectory of thought concerned with the city, since it considered that thought concerned with the city has up to now, only projected, wherever it comes from and wherever it goes to, the insane, sick, dangerous and aggressive idea that men must live only to work and must work to produce and then consume.

With my projects I imagined that something has been changed in the moral of the man “worker-producer” and that it is thought that men can live (if they want to) for the sake of living and work (if perchance they want to) to come to know, by means of their bodies, their psyche and their sex, that they are living………I know all this very well – not because I have invented it myself but because I have heard it all over the place, from young people, from poets, from many people who really work, from the oppressed, the alienated, the tired, Indian chiefs, Gurus, children, prisoners….that freedom can only come from the possible knowledge that each of us is living and that very slowly each of us is dying too. (taken from Casabella n° 365 May 1972).

Clearly the project had no consequence other than publication in Casabella that, however, influenced many generations of architects and designers. In the planet as festival, various elements of architecture appear, designed like kind and friendly objects sitting here and there on the planet, on the top of volcanoes, on craggy cliffs amid the rocky walls of the Grand Canyon, floating on the ocean or transported on placid river streams. The Cube project seems to have its roots right in that metaphorical world of Ettore Sottsass and is reminiscent of those amusing yet serious utopias of fifty years ago.

The idea is to build a small piece of architecture, a cabin, perhaps a nest, on high, at the top of a cliff, on a monument, on a public building, it doesn’t matter where but in a beautiful place and with a beautiful and original view. The idea is then to create a restaurant and welcome clients in an enchanting, unique place with sophisticated dishes cooked in Electrolux kitchens. The idea is to keep it open for six months and then change location, change city, nation, continent and reinstate this restaurant-type object on some other roof for new surprises, new menus, new clients.

It is one of those projects that open things up: in fact too often solutions resolve but do not leave space for the imagination, for innovation, for evolution. This ‘Cube’ that is not actually a cube, has a great proactive force and immediately presents itself for what it is: defying the paralysis of thinking and the imagination. Not only that, it also defies the immobility produced by the continual growth of bureaucracy in requiring the consent from the government, council, safety officers, heritage organisations, fire brigades etc. etc. If indeed standards are necessary and useful for ensuring better architecture, it is also true that standards have spread into all design choices to the extent that schemes are increasingly often an interpretation of the current regulations rather than a conscious creative act that gives continuity in the history of architecture.

http://www.archdaily.com/196951/the-cube-park-associati/

November 20, 2011

The Cube Pavilion | Park Associati

Architects: Park Associati – Filippo Pagliani, Michele Rossi with Alexia Caccavella, Alice Cuteri, Lorenzo Merloni
Location: Brussels, 
Client: Electrolux Appliance Spa
Project year: 2011
Photographs: Courtesy of Park Associati

THE CUBE – dining with a view – is a pavilion designed by Park Associati to house an itinerant restaurant commissioned by Electrolux. Designed to be placed in unexpected and dramatic European locations, it will be launched in Brussels on April 1st, 2011 where it will sit atop of the Parc du Cinquantenaire, close to the headquarters of the European Community.

The restaurant will be active simultaneously in twin structures; the two Electrolux Cube’s will travel across Europe offering a memorable dining experience for 18 guests per setting in magnificent locations. The transparent and semi-transparent structures will be seen atop of buildings, monuments and even on water in Belgium, Italy, Russia, Switzerland and Sweden but only for three months at each location.

The interior of the THE CUBE has been designed to suit different arrangements; the pavilion consists of a large open-planned space with a visible kitchen and a single large table that can be made to disappear by raising it up to the ceiling to form a lounge area for use after eating.

The total floor area of 140 sqm is divided between the open-planned space and a 50 sqm terrace.

In the kitchen, fitted with high-tech appliances in typical Electrolux style, top international chefs will take turns in offering guests a show-cooking service with specially created menus.

THE CUBE has been conceived as a module that can be put up and taken down relatively easily, one that suits all climatic conditions, even the most extreme, while always expressing the maximum in living comfort with its refined aesthetics and use of high-quality materials.

The construction has the lightness and versatility of an exhibition stand yet with the design complexity of a building. It uses materials that are highly innovative in terms of technology, eco-sustainability and energy saving as well as enabling constant re-use.

The pavilion’s lightness of form is emphasised on the exterior by its white colour and given a sense of movement through the use of an aluminium “skin” that has been laser-cut to create a texture with a geometric design that covers the whole of the outer surface. The base of the building, slightly raised with respect to the ground, accentuates the idea of lightness and the cleanness of form that characterises the entire structure. Inside, more highly advanced technological solutions can be found in the lighting, heating, sound system and of course, the kitchen equipment.

http://www.archdaily.com/118972/the-cube-pavilion-park-associati/