Archive for ‘Religious Bldg’

November 20, 2011

Mosquée d’Algérie KSP Juergen Engel Architekten

As part of the celebrations of ’s National holiday on November 1st the foundation stone for the new “Mosquée d’Algérie”, designed by KSP Juergen Engel Architekten, was laid at an official ceremony in Algiers. This formal act marks the beginning of the construction of the world’s third largest mosque after the Islamic pilgrimage sites in Mecca and Medina. With its prayer hall for up to 37,000 people and the approx. 265-meter high minaret, the Mosque will in future be one of the largest religious buildings in the Islamic world. The complex offers space for up to 120,000 visitors daily and, in addition to the prayer hall and the minaret, boasts further facilities such as a cultural center, an Imam School, a library, apartments, a fire station, a museum, and a research center.

Located a mere six kilometers east of the historical town center and not far from the airport, the new mosque complex, which has a gross surface area of approx. 400,000 square meters, is an important stimulus for the future development of adjacent districts. The new focal point combines religion, culture and research, while at the same time serving as a new center for the surrounding quarters. Construction of the complex is due to commence in early 2012, once the requisite preparatory measures have been concluded. Commissioning is planned for 2016.

The entire complex is being built on behalf of the Algerian government on the basis of plans drawn up by a consortium consisting of KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten and the engineer-ing firm Krebs und Kiefer International in Darmstadt, Germany. In 2008 the design submitted by the consortium from Germany won the international competition, and the ceremony for the signing of the contract for the planning services was held in July 2008 in Algiers in the presence of the German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

In the Bay of Algiers, east of the historical town center, the complex forms the main, initial element in a new urban de-velopment in Algiers. The center brings together various cultural and religious facilities as well as different educational institutions. A joint pedestal up to five meters high forms the base of the edifices that make up the Mosque complex, which are aligned from west to east on the raised plateau. The entrance arcades and the minaret, the prayer courtyard and prayer hall for up to 37,000 worshippers are located here, staggered on a longitudinal piece of land extending along an axis in the direction of Mecca.

The Mosque’s Prayer Hall

The prayer hall, or Salle de Prière, is a massive cube with a footprint measuring approx. 145 meters by 145 meters, and 22.5 meters high. A 45-meter high cube, slightly set back from the edge, bars the central dome. At its apex the latter reaches a height of some 70 meters and at its base is some 50 meters in diameter. The prayer hall, with its regular rows of pillars up to 45 meters in height, has room for up to 37,000 people. All the traditional religious elements such as the Qibla wall, the Mihrab, Minbar and Dikkah are integrated in a hall of modern aesthetics. Following the s architecture of traditional Islamic places of worship, the mosque’s outer skin is made of natural stone. The mosque’s courtyard mediates between the religious prayer hall and the adjoining esplanade in the west, the open space featuring the main entrance and the adjoining forecourt.

Minaret

Its use, design and size make the minaret unique in the history of Islam. Some 265 meters high, the minaret has the dimensions of a skyscraper, while being extremely slender with its 28×28 meters The lower floors open out invitingly to the plaza. Panorama elevators take visitors to the upper, public floors, which house the Museum of Algerian History. Above this there are two research areas known as the Research Center, which are accessible to accredited scholars only,. Semi-transparent ornamental elements (known as “Moucharabieh façade elements”) surround the tower like a second skin, while at the same time serving as protection from the sun. The top of the tower is open to the public. Here there is a viewing platform for visitors and honorary guests. At night the illuminated glass skin of the top of the minaret radiates, visible from afar, as a point of orientation in Algiers and its new landmark.

The Park

The mosque complex is linked to the buildings in the south, namely the cultural centre, the library and the Imam School, by a spacious park. This landscaped outdoor area can house a large number of people and also offers a haven of tranquillity. Palm groves right round the mosque provide ample shade. Furthermore, fountains foster the overall sense of calm and concentration.

Cultural and Educational Buildings

In terms of height and alignment the buildings in the south used for culture, such as the Cultural center, the library, and the Imam School with apartments for doctoral students take are based on the residential development bordering in the south, and existing traffic routes. These cultural buildings are a fundamental part of the Mosque complex (and indeed of the urban development area used for cultural and religious purposes), which is not only the center of life of all commu-nity members with regard to religious matters, but also the center of events and social life. The unity of these buildings, devoted as they are to the faith in, and teaching and practice of Islam, is also expressed in the architecture chosen.

The “Floral-Column”

for the design throughout the edifice are The floral column with protruding capital serves as a design leitmotif linking all the areas of the ensemble. As a load-bearing structure and source of shade it also takes on functional duties, while satisfying technical requirements such as drainage and improvements to the acoustics, and furthermore structuring the entire complex.

Architects: KSP Juergen Engel Architekten
Location: Algeria, Africa
Developer: ANARGEMA (Agence Nationale de Réalisation de Gestion de la Mosquée d’Algérie)
GSA (total surface): approx. 400,000 m²
Gross volume (converted space): 1,750,00 m³
Height of the minaret: 265 m
Competition: 01/2008, 1st prize
Laying of the foundation stone: Oct. 31, 2011
Start of construction work: Early 2012
Commissioning: Mid-2016

http://www.archdaily.com/182051/mosquee-d%E2%80%99algerie-ksp-juergen-engel-architekten/

 

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October 10, 2011

super mega underground church | beck group + gansam

 
‘super mega underground church’ by beck group + gansam, seoul, south korea

images courtesy of beck group

U.S. based architectural practice beck group and seoul-based firm gansam have collaborated to propose ‘super mega underground
church’, a spiritual facility for the city of seoul, south korea. this urban site must accommodate over 40,000 people every sunday,
the majority of whom arrive by subway. the design called for a 6,500 seat worship sanctuary, offices for the church’s global ministry,
a 300 seat chapel, fellowship / classroom spaces, 250 parking spaces and a public plaza. the design solution features the worship
sanctuary underground, covered only by the public plaza, and sky above.

flanking the worship center on the north and south, the remaining program is projected upwards into two towers that are unified
at three levels with a sky bridge. to give further emphasis on the sky above, the massing of the two towers and sky bridge is extruded
at an angle about the elliptical plaza, and wrapped in clear vision glass to give unobstructed views inside and out.


interior views surrounding sanctuary


interior views of subway connection


interior views of education tower


site plan


section


aerial view / site section


cutaway plans


circulation diagrams


sunscreen analysis    

 http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/16444/beck-group-gansam-super-mega-underground-church.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 7, 2011

BIG wins the competition to design a major Cultural Center in Albania

01_Tirana Mosque Tirana Mosque

TIR_Image by BIG_01 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_02 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_03 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_04 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_05 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_06 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_07 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_08 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_09 Courtesy of BIG

TIR_Image by BIG_10 Courtesy of BIG

01_Tirana Mosque Tirana Mosque

02_Star Diagram Star Diagram

story1 Site

story1 Tirana Grid

story3amosque Mecca Grid

story3mosque Mosque

story4plaza Plaza

story5ablution Ablution

story6minaret Minaret

BIGMartha Schwartz LandscapeBuro HappoldSpeirs & MajorLutzenberger & Lutzenberger, and Global Cultural Asset Management are today announced as the winning team of the international design competition for a new 27.000 m2 cultural complex in , consisting of a Mosque, an Islamic Centre, and a Museum of Religious Harmony.

The capital  is undergoing an urban transformation which includes the restoration and refurbishment of existing buildings, the construction of a series of new public and private urban structures, and the complete reconceptualization of Scanderbeg Square. This important square is the site of the new cultural complex that will consist of a Mosque, an Islamic Centre, and a Museum of Religious Harmony.

 is the crossroads of three major religions: Orthodox Christianity; Catholicism; and Islam. With the recent completion of two new churches, all three religions will now have new places of worship in the heart of . The complex will not only serve the Muslim community of the city and surrounding areas, but will educate the public about Islamic values and serve as a beacon for religious tolerance.

’s winning entry was selected out of five finalists, including Spanish Architect Andreas Perea Ortega, Architecture Studio from France, Dutch SeARCH and London-based Zaha Hadid.

”The winning proposal was chosen for its ability to create an inviting public space flexible enough to accommodate daily users and large religious events, while harmonically connecting with the Scanderbeg square, the city of  and its citizens across different religions. Additionally the project shines through its beautiful garden surrounding the new Mosque and Center of Islamic Culture which symbolically features the rich vegetation described in Islamic literature. Finally the team’s awareness of the economic aspects of this important development will contribute to a successful realization of this project.” Mayor of , Edi Rama.

The buildings’ forms emerge from two intersecting axes and formal requirements: the city grid of which calls for the proper framing of the square and a coherent urban identity, and orientation of the Mosque’s main wall towards Mecca. ’s proposal incorporates ’s grid by maintaining the street wall and eaves line, yet rotates the ground floor so both the Mosque and the plaza face the holy city of Islam. This transformation also opens up a series of plazas—two minor ones on the sides of the Mosque and a major plaza with a minaret in front—which are semi-covered and serve as an urban extension of the place of worship. By turning the mosque inside out and bringing the program and qualities of the Mosque to a public arena, the religion becomes inclusive and inviting, and the cool shaded urban space can be shared by all.

“This project is very significant for us for two reasons: Firstly it is a privilege to contribute to the ambitious rejuvenation of  City – especially since it is happening not by the random accumulation of singular monuments – but rather in accordance with a careful and considerate holistic master plan. Secondly and perhaps most importantly –religious tolerance is one of our greatest challenges today– politically, culturally and even urbanistically. With the construction of the New Mosque of , The Islamic Center and The Museum of Religious Harmony – will reestablish the equilibrium by adding a mosque to the newly completed Orthodox and Catholic Cathedrals – making  an example for the rest of the world as a global capital of religious harmony”, Bjarke Ingels, Founding Partner of .

The mosque can accommodate up to 1,000 people performing their daily prayers. Through the unique layout of courtyards and public space, the mosque can also expand to accommodate larger groups of 5,000 on Fridays and up to 10,000 on special holy days. The facade with the multitude of rational, rectangular windows finds its inspiration in Islamic mashrabiya screens, which provide shading and privacy while still allowing views out. The light qualities of the mosque will change dramatically throughout the day as the light washes across the curved facades.

“The alignment towards Mecca solves the dilemma inherent in the master plan – in its triangular layout the mosque was somehow tugged in the corner – now it sits at the end of the plaza – framed by its two neighbors. The resultant architecture evokes the curved domes and arches of traditional Islamic architecture – for both the mosque itself and the semi-domed spaces around it”, Thomas Christoffersen, Partner-in-Charge, .

The design also includes The Quran Gardens containing all of the plants mentioned in the Quran in the same amount as the number of times they appear in the holy scripture.

Architects: BIG
Location: 
Collaborators: Martha Schwartz Landscape, Buro Happold , Speirs & Major, Lutzenberger & Lutzenberger, and Global Cultural Asset Management
Partner-in-Charge: Bjarke Ingels, Thomas Christoffersen
Project Leader: Leon Rost
Project Team: Marcella Martinez, Se Yoon Park, Alessandro Ronfini, Daniel Kidd, Julian Nin Liang, Erick Kristanto, Ho Kyung Lee
Client: Municipality of , Albanian Muslim Community
Size: 27,000 sqm
Images: Courtesy of 

http://www.archdaily.com/132808/big-wins-the-competition-to-design-a-major-cultural-center-in-albania/

March 6, 2011

Christian Life Center | BNIM

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

Christian Life Center / BNIM © Assassi

diagrams diagrams © BNIM

first floor plan first floor plan © BNIM

north-south section north-south section © BNIM

second floor plan second floor plan © BNIM

 

east-west section east-west section © BNIM

BNIM, the recipient of the 2011  National Firm Award, designed the Christian Life Center (CLC) hoping that each resident experiences and appreciates the intended qualities of the building—quiet, embracing, community, individuality, nature, frugality, environmental responsibility, stewardship, authenticity and unique beauty. The design team envisions the building contributing to the success of men entering the program.

Architect: BNIM
Location: 
Project Area: 27,000 sqf
Photographs: Farshid Assassi

Renewing and nurturing the physical and spiritual beings of men in need is the purpose of the CLC. Men entering this program spend an entire year within the walls of this new facility. The program is a serious commitment, where the men exchange their former lifestyles for one of disciplined daily routine that is designed to help each achieve individual grow. The CLC is committed to providing an environment that is welcoming, nurturing, respectful, stewarding and comfortable for each individual and the CLC community.

The architecture has a role in helping each man’s journey succeed. Each individual has a unique beauty, and it was the design team’s intention to create an environment for the men that would reflect that beauty and evoke a welcoming presence and protective warmth. It was important that the design be appreciated slowly; just as the journey for these men is slow and deliberate, the architecture should follow.

The CLC facility operates as a self-contained home for the men in the program. On the ground floor, they share community spaces for daily activities that build self-esteem, physical health, employment skills and spiritual relationships. Sleeping spaces, showers and lounge areas occupy the second floor.

Given the issues of each individual, the CLC community and the connection to the outside world, the dynamics of privacy and community within the facility are complex, and strongly influenced the building’s and site’s design. Balancing community and privacy required sensitivity due to the location of the site’s surroundings. The new facility is situated in a neglected neighborhood near the urban core, making the creation of a safe and healthy environment paramount. The location and environmental conditions of the immediate surroundings—transient population, urban noise, light pollution, security and other externalities–suggested to the design team that a secure, quiet, heavy and internally focused building would best serve the needs of the CLC.

The architecture responds to its context with a heavy protective public shell and a tactile and lighter private realm. The public facades are load bearing masonry walls with modest fenestration delineating public and private spaces. The composite masonry is normally bricked over CMU. In specific areas the burnished CMU structure is exposed revealing the authentic structure—a nod towards the self-realization process of the men during their stay at CLC. The courtyard and south walls are skinned in a rain screen system utilizing salvaged wood siding with generous windows providing visual connectivity, thermal comfort, ventilation and effective daylighting for the adjacent interior spaces.

The building form is a compact two-story structure organized around an internal courtyard and second floor roof terraces. Programmatic spaces include a dormitory, living area, classrooms, recreation rooms, and administrative offices. A large- multi-purpose space is used for dining, recreation and worship. The courtyard organization proved to be an appropriate bio-climatic approach for achieving overall comfort, sustainability and efficiency. Every space and bed is afforded natural light and ventilation, resulting in the need for only modest electric lighting and geo-thermal mechanical systems.

Interior finishes are purposefully simple and restrained. Where appropriate, structural systems are left without additional finishes or limited to sealants for protection or to ease cleaning. Finishes include recycled wood and other sustainable products that contribute to the overall vision as a place of health and well being in all aspects of the men’s lives. The floor and roof structure were deliberately selected to maintain the protective enclosure, isolating the interior from the urban environment. Hollow core concrete planks were selected in lieu of lighter wood or steel options to ensure that quiet conditions could be maintained throughout all periods of the day.

The site design includes public and private realms and incorporates a variety of sustainable features and is a showcase for urban stormwater management. The small site includes three bioretention cells that accept all of the roof’s run-off and there is no stormwater connection to the City’s sewer system. Indigenous plant materials that require low-maintenance have been integrated throughout the site. Hidden from view are the geo-thermal wells and the recycled water storage tanks, which hold filtered water from the showers for use in toilet flushing.

’s intention was to embody a deep sense of timeless beauty within the building—a beauty beyond sensory perception that is derived from inspired architecture and a connection to nature. The building embraces triple bottom line goals. It is responsible to all inhabitants of the building, both residents and employees. It embodies sustainable design intentions that are achieved through careful integration of the programmatic needs and design responses by all disciplines and systems. Financial responsibility for this organization is a given. The building strives to be frugal and use resources very sparingly a benefit that reaches well beyond the site and will have lasting impact for years to come.

http://www.archdaily.com/116320/christian-life-center-bnim/

March 3, 2011

Chapel of St. Ignatius | Steven Holl Architects

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

site plan site plan

section + plan section + plan

context plan context plan

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

The Chapel of St. Ignatius, designed by Steven Holl Architects, is a Jesuit chapel for Seattle University. A series of light volume corresponds to a part of Jesuit Catholic worship service, such as the south facing light corresponds to the procession, a fundamental part of the mass.

The chapel is sited to form a new campus quadrangle green space to the north, the west, and in the future, to the east. The elongated rectangular plan is especially suited to defining campus space as well as the processional and gathering space within. Directly to the south of the chapel is a reflecting pond.

In the Jesuits “spiritual exercises”, no single method is prescribed – “different methods helped different people…”. Here a unity of differences is gathered into one. The light is sculpted by a number of different volumes emerging from the roof. Each of these irregularities aims at different qualities of light. East facing, South facing, West and North facing, all gather together for one united ceremony.

In the Jesuits “spiritual exercises”, no single method is prescribed – “different methods helped different people…”. Here a unity of differences is gathered into one. The light is sculpted by a number of different volumes emerging from the roof. Each of these irregularities aims at different qualities of light. East facing, South facing, West and North facing, all gather together for one united ceremony.

The city facing north light corresponds to the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament and to the mission of outreach to the community. The main worship space has a volume of east and west light. The concept of Different Lights is further developed in the dialectic combination of a pure colored lens and a field of reflected color within each light volume. A baffle is constructed opposite the large window of each “bottle of light.” Each of the baffles is back painted in a bright color; only the reflected color can be seen from within the chapel. This colored light pulses with life when a cloud passes over the sun. Each bottle combines the reflected color with a colored lens of the complementary color.

At night, which is the time of gatherings for mass in this university chapel, the light volumes shine in all directions out across the campus like colored beacons. On occasion, for those in vigilant prayer, light will shine throughout the night. The visual phenomena of complementary colors can be experienced by staring at a blue rectangle and then a white surface. One will see a yellow rectangle; this complimentarily contributes to the two-fold merging of concept and phenomena in the chapel.

The concept of “Seven Bottles of Light in a Stone Box” is expressed through the tilt-up method of construction. The integral color tilt-up concrete slab provides a more direct and economical tectonic than stone veneer. The building’s outer envelope is divided into 21 interlocking concrete panels cast flat on the chapel’s floor slab and on the reflecting pond slab. Over the course of two days these panels were put in place by a hydraulic crane, which strained at the ponderous weights of up to 80,000 lbs. “Pick pockets,” or hooks inset into the panels were capped with bronze covers once the panels were upright. Windows were formed as a result of the interlocking of the tilt-up slabs, allowing the 5/8” open slab joint to be resolved in an interlocking detail.

Architects: Steven Holl Architects
Location: 
Project Area: 6,100 sqf
Project Year: 1994 – 1997
Photographs: Paul Warchol Photography

http://www.archdaily.com/115855/ad-classics-chapel-of-st-ignatius-steven-holl-architects/