Archive for ‘Refurbishment’

February 11, 2012

55 Baker Street | Make Architect

Architects: Make Architects 
Location: , England
Client: London and Regional Properties Ltd
Collaborators: Arup, Blyth & Blyth, DP9, Expedition Engineering, Hann Tucker, HBG, Indigo Lighting, Jason Bruges Studio, Safe Consulting Ltd, Tweeds Construction Consultancy
Project Area: 75,000 sqm
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Zander OlsenMake ArchitectsThis radical renovation of a 1950s office building transforms the site into an important new urban amenity. While providing an exceptional range of flexible and highly efficient office spaces, the scheme enhances activity at street level by offering an enriched mix of uses and introducing a substantial new public space to the streetscape.

Three glass infills or ‘masks’ span the voids between existing blocks to create a new facade for the building, with the central glazed section enclosing a seven-storey atrium which is open to the public. The ground floor of the building has been entirely re-clad and devoted to retail units, cafes and restaurants. At the rear of the building, a new development of 23 houses offers affordable, key worker and private accommodation.

In addition to the cost savings represented by retaining and refurbishing the existing building, the scheme has been designed to minimise environmental impact and optimise energy efficiency and has achieved a BREEAM rating of ‘Excellent’.

http://www.archdaily.com/200378/55-baker-street-make-architects/

 

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January 22, 2012

Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics, Brown University | Architecture Research Office

Architects: Architecture Research Office (ARO)
Location: , Rhode Island, 
Project Team: Stephen Cassell, Principal; Kim Yao, Associate/Principal; Neil Patel, Project Manager; Gustavo Colmenares
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 18,100 sqf (GSF)
Photographs: Michael Moran

New York-based firm Architecture Research Office (ARO) recently completed the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics, or ICERM at Brown University. The facility is the newest of eight National Science Foundation Mathematical Sciences Research Institutes, and is the only one located in New England. ICERM’s mission is to expand the use of computational and experimental methods in mathematics, to support theoretical advances related to computation, and to address problems posed by the existence and use of the computer through mathematical tools, research and innovation. A venue for workshops and symposia year-round, ICERM also hosts several resident mathematicians for periods of a few weeks up to a semester.

With seating for 104 people and featuring views of downtown Providence on three sides, the Lecture Hall is the heart of ICERM and home to its workshops and symposia. It is equipped with Echo360 lecture-capture technology to enable easy audio and video recording of events as well as live-streaming to the Web. The Lecture Hall’s fourth wall is a writable surface of translucent glass panels inset with two suspended projection screens. This wide, floor-to-ceiling surface, actually a double layer of glass, allows daylight to filter into ICERM’s central lounge, where mathematicians also write on it. The cavity between the wall’s two layers can be illuminated to produce a luminous, iconic connection between the Lecture Hall and ICERM’s lobby.

To reduce costs and shorten the construction schedule, much of the existing partitions and layout are preserved. The design provides as much natural light as possible to interior public spaces. Chalkboards or whiteboards run throughout ICERM’s private offices and public spaces, while selected furniture pieces maximize opportunities for group collaboration. Conference rooms are equipped with Smartboard and video-teleconference technology that support collaborative events both within and beyond the Institute’s physical space. ARO’s design resolves a technical challenge of an appropriate balance between the level of technology required for an institution of this caliber and the quality of work environment necessary for mathematicians to do their best work.

http://www.archdaily.com/187797/institute-for-computational-and-experimental-research-in-mathematics-brown-university-architecture-research-office/

August 17, 2011

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly | Hermann & Valentiny and Partners

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (6) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (1) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (2) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (3) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (4) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (5) Courtesy of  HVP

Site Plan Site Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

 

Architects: Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP)
Location: , Germany
Client: Maredoc a.s.b.l.
Project Year: 2007
Project Area: 6,040 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of HVP

The old castle of Heisdorf, situated in a park with marvelous mature trees, has undergone numerous alterations (extensions) since it was first built in the 19th century. Nevertheless, it was too small and above all could not offer the levels of comfort expected today in a facility of this kind.

HVP approached this work cautiously. They renovated the historic building fabric of the castle, but without visible architectural changes. In contrast, the accumulated extensions were demolished and replaced by a new wing linked to the castle by an elevated glazed connecting element.

The new building is oriented north-south with large glazed loggias (known as “curiosities”) on one side, facing in the direction of the castle and projecting roofed balconies looking onto the park on the other.

Without any doubt, making the new building of exposed concrete was a risk. But the building is so convincingly integrated in the existing fabric – surrounded by a newly designed outdoor area with water, steps to sit upon, paved and carefully planted green areas – that it represents a facility with an extremely high value indeed. A great deal of wood and glass was employed and spaces are flooded with daylight, friendly and warm. Particularly important for the elderly, the residents feel protected yet unrestricted thanks to the openness in many areas, offering a view of everything going on outside.

http://www.archdaily.com/159063/heisdorf-residence-for-the-elderly-hermann-valentiny-and-partners/

July 30, 2011

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center | Peter Ruge Architekten

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Detail Elevation

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Detail Section

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Roof Plan

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Site Diagram

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

After perennial design and construction phase the congress center of the new city administration of , China  is completed. The concept and design of the facade was made by Peter Ruge Architekten in collaboration with Prof Wang Xiaosong from DBH GmbH. Completed images of the facade and a brief description from the architects is available after the break.

The new building ensemble is situated close to huge Qiantang River not far from the city center. It will be the focus building of the new large business and administration district of the city. The new fascinating complex consists of six office high-rise buildings arranged in a circle and connect in the upper floors through a circular bridge building. The high-rise buildings are flanked with flat multi-functional buildings including four main entrances from all directions. As the new central form of the main administration building of the City of  the Congress Center resembles a large precious stone.

The facade design should support on one hand the unique modern architecture of the building ensemble but on the other hand it should be take up typical local or traditional aspects of the region also.

Zhejiang Province is known for its tea-producing region. To express the building’s regional characteristics, design of the facade is based on the superimposed configurations of the tea cultivation pathways and the planting nets. As a result, the building is enveloped by a multi-layered fabric, giving it a true architectural plasticity. Seen from a distance, the facade appears like a rigid volume, but dissolves into a network of structures and levels as you come closer.

The main idea for the design of the roof was to use it as the fifth facade of the building to set up a strong and typical local image in the shape of a lotus blossom, which you can see from all upper floors of the surrounding high-rise buildings. The facade structure would be extended unto the roof of the congress center to cover up it partly. Through the different lengths and fixed height of the steel beams the structure is waved and form the abstract blossom of lotus in the center of the roof. This part isn’t covered and is designed and planted as a green landscape.

Our aim is to combine and express all the regional natural features within the Center, so that the local people will be able to identify themselves with the City of .

Architect: Peter Ruge Architekten
Location: , Zheijang Province, P.R.China
Completion: 2011
Client: Administration Department City of  Agency of Urban Planning, P.R. China
Team: Pysall Ruge Architekten – Peter Ruge, Matthias Matschewski, Nicole Kubath
Facade consultant: Schlaich Bergemann and Partner
Project Partner: DBH Stadtplanungs GmbH , Prof. Wang Xiaosong
Photography: Jan Siefke
Scope of Services: Façades – design planning, main detail planning (scale 1:100 to scale 1:1), monitoring execution documents
Size: Building above ground – GFA 22.000 sqm

http://www.archdaily.com/152681/facade-planning-for-the-hangzhou-congress-center-peter-ruge-architekten/