Archive for ‘Institutional | University’

May 1, 2012

Student Residence | LAN Architecture

The idea underpinning our project was to meet the challenge of using a single architectural gesture to provide urban integration and optimised comfort for the future occupants while, at the same time, creating a friendly and informal complex. The street The building’s strategic position on the intersection of a number of streets and the busy nature of the district directed our research towards the development of lively, rich elevations providing views through to the centre of the plot and an appreciation of this inner space. The creation of two clefts and the transparency of the ground floor level resulting from the bike park meet this ambition, defining a project reminiscent of the buildings to be found in Paris’ inner suburbs. The courtyard The project is based on the party walls defining the different building heights. This movement creates a square central courtyard (17 m x 17 m), providing the project with its key element. Thanks to its considerable size, the courtyard is a source of sunlight and acts as a green lung for the apartments. Distribution

The circulation system is very clear: four vertical circulation points on the four corners of the plot. All circulation areas are naturally lit to allow the landings to become places where people can meet one another. The housing units The design of the general layout was guided by a desire to provide bright sunlit units that are easy to live in and completely adaptable to the personal tastes of each occupant. The view over the courtyard will provide the peaceful environment needed for concentration and studying.

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The building’s exterior facade (Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
March 17, 2012

Head Offices Of CMT | Batlle & Roig Architects

Architects: Battle & Roig Architects – Enric Batlle, Joan Roig
Location: 
Collaborators: Goretti Guillén, Meritxell Moyá, Helena Salvadó, architects, G3 Arquitectura, STATIC, Gerardo Rodríguez, engineer, structure, PGI Grup SL, installations
Design Date: 2008
Construction Date: 2010
Client: Grupo Castellví
Contractor: Dragados
Façade: Moyser
Installations: Axima, Imemsa
Area: 12,000 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of  Batlle & Roig Architects

Like the INTERFACE building, the building for the Telecommunications Market Commission (CMT) is situated in the 22@ district. In this case, the building forms part of a complex, 22@ Business Park, developed by Grupo Castellví and containing a large business complex of over 41,000 m2 of offices and hotels, delimited by four streets: Bolivia, Ciutat de Granada, Sancho d’Àvila and Badajoz. Also set in this sector is one of the factories of the old Can Tiana textile mill, built in 1906 to a project by Guiteras and listed in the Special Protection Plan for the Industrial Heritage of Poblenou.

The CMT building stands on a long, narrow site that presents its main façade to Carrer Bolivia and is delimited to either side by a passage. One of the old Can Tiana factory buildings stands at the centre of the site, and the project sets out to recover and incorporate it into the CMT’s functional programme. The main volume comprises three basement floors for car parking and eleven floors above grade with offices and services.

The ground floor, providing the function of access and entrance, connects with the old mill building, the original structure of which is conserved as an auditorium with capacity for 330 persons, a large meeting room and services for CMT employees. The roof of the mill was adapted for use and connects with the first floor. The main volume, containing the offices, is organized around a central nucleus of entrances and services, and the workstations are laid out around it, making full use of the spatial freedom enjoyed by a building that opens out on all four sides.

This allowed us to explore a volumetric formalization that sets the building apart from its surroundings, highlighting its lengthwise asymmetry and increasing its height in relation to the axis of the street. This formal freedom produces a singular form, faceting the faces of the building and moulding it as a unique, recognisable piece that finds its reason for being in an innovative relation between exterior and interior. The variation and superposition of exterior spaces and workspaces serve to direct the volume towards the old factory and establish a subtle, utilitarian relation.

The distant presence of the sea and a south-facing orientation determine the correct position of the terraces. The decision to bring a unitary treatment to the building’s outer appearance led us to protect its façade using a horizontal slat system throughout its volume that continues over the old factory, connecting the two. The slats serve to cover the upper terraces and installations, and form an awning at the ground floor entrance.

http://www.archdaily.com/214040/head-offices-of-cmt-batlle-roig-architects/

January 22, 2012

Poly Prep Lower School | Platt Byard Dovell White Architects

Architects: Platt Byard Dovell White Architects
Location: 50 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, , USA
Cost: $20 million
Completed: 2007
Client: Poly Prep Country Day School
Landmark Status: Park Slope Historic District
Original Architect: Montrose Morris, Romanesque Revival Hulbert Mansion
Project Team: Samuel G. White, FAIA, Design Principal; Serena Losonczy, Project Manager; Matthew Mueller, Job Captain; Leonard Leung; Marie Marberg; Charles Melansen; Tomo Tsujita; Julie Janiski, LEED AP
Photographs: Jonathan Wallen

Our design for Poly Prep reflects a combination of institutional use, residential scale, and compact landscape design in a low-rise urban context.

Unanimously approved by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, Platt Byard Dovell White’s design for the addition to the Hulbert Mansion in the Park Slope Historic District incorporates important aesthetic elements of the neighborhood in a contemporary glass, metal and brick four-story building. The prestigious school had outgrown its space in the existing building – “the castle,” as the students fondly refer to it – and required a renovation of the interior of the existing school and an addition of a modern structure to their campus.

The fast-track addition included eight classrooms, a 2,400 sq. ft. gym, faculty offices, a dance studio and a new ADA compliant entrance to the school. A gathering area within the school’s campus was created outside the new entrance to facilitate the arrival and departure of students and their parents at the busiest times of the day. Design and construction operations conform to the requirements of the U. S. Green Building Council for LEED Silver; Poly Prep was the first school in New York City to achieve LEED certification.

http://www.archdaily.com/197190/poly-prep-platt-byard-dovell-white-architects/

November 27, 2011

Brockman Hall for Physics | KieranTimberlake

Architects: KieranTimberlake / James Timberlake, Stephen Kieran, Jason Smith, Steven Johns, George Ristow, Casey Boss
Location: Houston, , USA
Client: Rice University
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 10,219 sqm
Photographs: Peter Aaron (OTTO), Michael Moran (OTTO), Hester + HardawayRed Wing Aerials

External Project Manager: Linbeck
Structural Consultant: Haynes Whaley Associates
Mep Consultant: Ccrd Partners
Lab Consultant: Innovate Lab Systems Design
Landscape Architect: The Office Of James Burnett
Acoustical Consultant: Je Acoustics
Civil Engineer: Walter P Moore
Contractors: Gilbane Building Company

The Brockman Hall for Physics gathers together a faculty of experimental physicists formerly scattered in as many as five separate buildings across the Rice University campus. It is now home to dozens of experimental, theoretical and applied physicists from Rice’s departments of Physics and Astronomy and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and will support research in atomic, molecular and optical physics; biophysics; condensed matter physics; nanoengineering and photonics. A recipient of $11.1 million in federal stimulus funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, it was completed in a compressed design and construction schedule of just 33 months, an extremely short timeline for a facility of its kind.

he site, a rectangular landscape roughly the size of a soccer field and contained by existing buildings, was chosen out of ten potential sites on the campus for its low level of intrinsic vibration, and its proximity to other science buildings. This location posed a set of unique challenges that had to be synthesized in the design while meeting the difficult technical requirements of a laboratory building. Among the questions at play were: How can a building containing large labs fit within the distinct warp and weft of the Rice campus? How can the architecture help reduce the energy demand for the lab? How can the building retain the landscape that is so important to this campus?

To successfully fit 110,000 sqf of program into the constrained site, the building is split into two parallel bars connected by glass-enclosed bridges with an open passage that admits natural light and outdoor breezes. The most sensitive laboratories are located below grade, stabilized by an extremely robust structure. One of the bars is elevated to preserve a significant portion of the existing Quad, and a series of gathering spaces beneath it extends the building program outdoors. The raised bar has an asymmetrically vaulted ceiling, to float it above the ground plane, suspended by board-formed concrete columns. A pathway between the two bars is placed intently to enhance circulation between buildings on the Quad, extending the landscape-to-building-to-landscape connections. The green roof provides insulation and water management for the building above the lower level laboratories.

The two bars are uniquely arranged to knit the building into the landscape, resulting in eight transparent facades. Each facade is tuned to its solar conditions and adjacency to other buildings, minimizing the building’s volume and allowing abundant natural light to enter the building. The north facade is a glass curtain wall with a Penrose frit pattern to hint at the activities going on inside. The south facade is a horizontal terra-cotta screen over aluminum composite panels that protect the labs from solar exposure while regulating natural light and privacy. The first story of the south bar is wrapped in glass bricks for transparency and an ambient glow when lit. Clay brick banding between the glass brick relates to the historic banded brick facades elsewhere on campus.

On the ground floor, immediately off the main entrance, a central stair connects the upper and lower levels of the new facility. Dichroic glass panels create colored reflective surfaces on the lobby walls announcing the public spaces and creating the entry to the main stair. A flexible classroom and 150-seat lecture hall form the public spaces at the ground floor. Within the lecture hall, a gently shaped wood screen and double vaulted plaster ceiling between concrete beams expand the space and help to moderate light and acoustics within the room.

Brockman Hall is a product of the careful analysis of context, culture, elements, form, iconography, materiality, and purpose in Rice’s architecture. We sought to internalize the material palette of Rice, extend the legacy of craft, and translate historic themes into contemporary detailing. The massing capitalizes on the thinness of buildings on campus, while meeting the programmatic needs for a laboratory building; providing an edited and refined 21st century expression of Rice architecture and pedagogy.

Text provided by Kieran Timberlake

http://www.archdaily.com/180324/brockman-hall-for-physics-kierantimberlake/

 

November 27, 2011

Landscape Design for Brockman Hall for Physics at Rice University | The Office of James Burnett

Landscape Architect: The Office of James Burnett (OJB)
Location: Houston, , USA
Architect: KieranTimberlake
Photographs: Hester + Hardaway

Project Statement: The Brockman Hall for Physics is a 111,000 SF facility housing classrooms, laboratory space, lecture halls and administrative offices for the Physics Department as well as physicists from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rice University in Houston, Texas. Driven by Rice University’s belief that some of the most important moments on campus are moments of informal discussion and debate outside of the classroom, the design of the building and landscape seeks to provide a multitude of spaces for lively and inspiring conversation. Sheltered from the sun by the building overhead, a ground-floor courtyard features reflecting pool, raised Ipe terrace and enhanced plaza with movable furniture. As the design developed, the Office of James Burnett was also asked to redesign the “Courtyard of Science”, an interstitial space between the wings of Brown Hall to the south. A grove of Honey Mesquites organizes the space and intimate decomposed granite courtyards with movable furniture create a number of social spaces.

Project Narrative: The Brockman Hall for Physics is a new 111,000 square foot facility at Rice University. Gathering faculty and researchers that were formerly located in several building across campus, Brockman Hall is the new home for physics research at Rice. The building and landscape aid this research by providing both a home for the laboratories, classrooms, and offices; and by supplying informal gathering spaces to foster conversation, debate, and cross pollination of ideas.

The tightly bound site lies between six existing buildings. The former open space was at the heart of the precinct of campus known as the Courtyard of Science. In an effort to minimize the impact of the building on the existing campus fabric, the building was split into two “bars” that were then allowed to separate and shift apart from one another. The southern bar sits firmly on the ground and mimics the long thin rectangular floor plates of the first science buildings on campus. The northern bar pulls away from the southern bar and lifts itself up off the ground plane, connecting to the southern bar with bridges at the second and third levels. This separation creates space for a landscape that flows continuously from existing courtyards to the east and west under the building. A sallyport to the south connects this landscape to a courtyard formed by the u-shaped plan of the neighboring George R. Brown building. Much of this new landscape sits atop a 31,000 square foot basement full of shielded laboratories.

The site itself is on a major cross axis of campus. The sallyport at the south bar aligns with this axis and allows it to continue to its former termination, Hamman Hall, built in 1958. The forecourt plaza at Hamman Hall was removed to allow for the construction of Brockman Hall. Hamman Hall now sits on a plinth of granite stairs that descend into grass to the east and west, and a decomposed granite court along the axis. The lifting of the north bar allows Hamman Hall room to breathe. The strongly symmetrical façade of Hamman continues to terminate the campus cross-axis and provides the Brockman landscape with a backdrop and sense of enclosure. While reinforcing the strong axial organization of campus in the north south direction, the landscape creates a counter flow to the east and west. By extending a walk that runs parallel to the long dimensions of the buildings in the campus precinct, three formerly separate courts are strongly linked.

The space below the north bar of Brockman Hall becomes the centerpiece of this composition. Special pavers in the sallyport flow out to the north and then along the major east west linking path. The decomposed granite court provides a central gathering space. A fountain is introduced asymmetrically to the east to provide both a cooling effect and a reflecting surface to allow natural light to play off of the underside of the north bar. Linked to the fountain is an Ipe deck. The deck is raised up one foot to provide a quiet space just off the path for more private gathering. The ground plane below the north bar is planted with a field of Ophiopogon japonicus’Nana’ (Dwarf Mondo Grass). The planting becomes an abstract plain that reflects the elevated structure above and hints at the laboratories underneath. Beyond the building site, the landscape responds to the existing campus fabric and brings these materials into the composition allowing for a seamless flow between old and new.

Brockman Hall, located north of George R. Brown Hall, is remarkable in a number of ways: It was designed, constructed and occupied in just 33 months; it brings together faculty and students who formerly worked in five separate buildings scattered broadly across the campus; it is both a carefully refined 21st-century research facility and one of the most environmentally sustainable buildings at Rice; and it maintains much of the outdoor space that previously existed on Rice’s Science Quadrangle.

The building is composed of two parallel, rectilinear, spatial “bars” that are oriented east to west and connected by glass-enclosed bridges across an open passage that admits natural light and outdoor breezes. The larger south bar houses laboratories, faculty and research offices, a 150-seat lecture hall and a rooftop astronomical observatory. The elevated two-story north bar houses faculty, student and departmental offices and meeting spaces.

The open space beneath the north bar is framed by a “loggia” of tapered concrete columns that form an outdoor room, with shaded areas for class meetings, casual gathering and circulation. Beneath this serene outdoor oasis lies a sensitive and sophisticated complex of laboratories. Designed for vibration-sensitive atomic, molecular and optical physics and condensed-matter research, the hermetically controlled basement laboratories are stabilized on a two-foot-deep concrete slab and isolated from all the building’s mechanical systems.

Text provided by The Office of James Burnett.

http://www.archdaily.com/178657/landscape-design-for-brockman-hall-for-physics-at-rice-university-the-office-of-james-burnett/

 

November 20, 2011

paris parc | BIG architects + off architecture


‘paris parc’ by BIG architects + off architecture, paris, france
all images courtesy BIG architects

danish practice BIG architects and paris-based firm off architecture have collaborated to create the first place proposal ‘paris parc’,
a multidisciplinary research center for the university of jussieu in paris, france. the 15,000 square meter facility dedicated to
science and medicine will be placed between jean nouvel’s institut du monde arabe and a park within the campus. strengthening the
international appeal of the school, the building will unify scholars and the business community creating physical connections as well
as visual integration within the urban context.


front elevation

the exterior faces of the volume incline and indent to respond to the adjacent structures, opening views towards the
landmark buildings, green spaces and optimizing natural daylight within the interior. a glass enclosed atrium mimicking
the form of a canyon allows upper level laboratories and offices to have unobstructed sight lines between work areas.
a cascade of informal meeting spaces lead visitors to the roof terrace with panoramic views of the city skyline. oriented on
axis with the cathedral notre dame du haut, large glass walls offer an iconic perspective while they similarly reflect the
surrounding environment.


central canyon

‘as a form of urban experiment the paris parc is the imprint of the pressures of its urban context. wedged into a
super dense context – in terms of space, public flows and architectural history – the parc is conceived as a chain
of reactions to the various external and internal forces acting upon it. inflated to allow daylight and air to enter
into the heart of the facility, compressed to ensure daylight and views for the neighboring classrooms and dormitories,
lifted and decompressed to allow the public to enter from both plaza and park and finally tilted to reflect the
spectacular view of the paris skyline and the notre dame to the parisians.’
 – bjarke ingels, founder, BIG


central canyon


laboratory overlooking the atrium


interior space


roof terrace


at night


(left) site outline
(right) extruded volume


facade responds to jean nouvel’s building and adjacent structures


(left) outward views diagram
(right) reflected skyline within facade diagram


points of entry


(left) outdoor circulation diagram
(right) interior circulation diagram


(left) indoor public spaces diagram
(right) outdoor public spaces diagram

project info:

project: paris parc
type: competition
client: upmc university
size: 15.000 m2
location: paris, france
status: 1. prize

BIG
partners-in-charge: bjarke ingels, andreas klok pedersen
project leader: daniel sundlin
architect: gabrielle nadeau
team: camille crepin, edouard boisse, tiina liisa juuti, alexandre
carpentier

OFF
partners-in-charge: manal rachdi, tanguy vermet, ute rinnebach
project leader: daniel colin, antonio rovira
team: akram rachdi, olfa kamoon

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/17721/big-architects-off-architecture-paris-parc.html

November 20, 2011

Learning & Research Building, Southmead Hospital | Avanti Architects

Avanti Architects use a palatte of colours insipred by nature in their Learning and Research Building at Southmead Hospital

 

Avanti were commissioned to design an integrated centre for hospital staff education and training, together with university research. The building was to act as the first part of a much larger redevelopment of the site and to mitigate between the suburban surroundings and the large scale hospital development to come.

The plan restores the original orthogonal order of the site reintroducing views and ‘green fingers’ and enabling natural wayfinding. The building and its neighbours are composed as a series of parallel brick planes that follow the natural terraces of the site, separated by open landscaped areas and fully glazed end facades allowing transparency through and between the buildings.

For the colour scheme Avanti worked in collaboration with lead artist Kate Blee, who says of her approach:
‘For this commission I looked at colour in relation to growth and hierarchy in nature. Earth, plant, bloom, leaf and sky. A palette inspired by nature to enliven these strong rhythmical façades. A rhythm of colour to be seen through and against the trees, by the residents living opposite the building, and to joyfully present the building across the hospital campus.’

‘I wanted the colour to be rich and saturated but not to cast distracting coloured light into the internal working environments. The colour was sprayed onto the internal face of the glazing units creating a colour light box effect rather than a stained glass effect.’

‘The commission extended into the building for the colour of the portals – visually marking the entrances into spaces along corridors and walkways. This was again about chromatic rhythms, and the colours taken from the external façade scheme were used to further connect the inside to the outside of the building and to inject placed and composed colour into the white and dark grey interior.’

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17649

November 14, 2011

Poetry Foundation | John Ronan Architects

Poetry Foundation

Walls of oxidized zinc define the building’s site boundary and are perforated around the interior garden, allowing light in and views out.

Poetry Foundation

The building is raised slightly above the street plane.

Poetry Foundation

A cut in the facade invites visitors behind the scrim into the garden and building.

Poetry Foundation

In the evening, the foundation transforms into a glowing event space.

Poetry Foundation

Rather than tucking away the library in a hidden corner, the foundation displays its collection. Visitors encounter double-height shelves of books before even passing through the main entry.

Poetry Foundation

The garden’s American hornbeam and sweetbay magnolia trees will eventually grow into a soaring canopy.

Poetry Foundation

Just beyond the entry vestibule the main stair leads to second-floor offices.

Poetry Foundation

Daylight floods into the building through skylights and a north-facing glass facade. Inside, each vantage point presents unique views through and out of the building. Beyond the garden and perforated screen, cars pass silently through West Superior Street.

Poetry Foundation

A 44-foot long study table occupies the library, and the diminutive cork stools define the children’s reading area. A loungelike stair landing floats above the entry.

Poetry Foundation

The 125-seat poetry reading room connects to the garden and street with floor-to-ceiling windows and combats noise with interior glass walls and a stretched fabric ceiling and wall, among other acoustic strategies.

Poetry Foundation

Open offices look down onto the garden and into the gallery, watched over by a vinyl transfer portrait of Poetry magazine founder Harriet Monroe.

Poetry Foundation

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all above photos & images:

Photos by Beth Broome | Images courtesy John Ronan Architects | Photos © Steve Hall/Hedrich Blessing

Open Verse: At once opaque and transparent, an understated new poetry center offers a place of quiet study while inviting the outside in.

By Beth Broome

In the romantic version of the story, creative genius endures poverty in pursuit of a higher calling. Rodolfo and Mimì’s story would not have been La Bohème without the famously shabby garret, from which Rodolfo’s poetry flowed. But as Chicago’s new center for the Poetry Foundation by John Ronan Architects shows, a windfall of cold cash certainly can help when trying to make concrete an architectural idea.

The building, which opened in June, has its origins in a classic rags-to-riches story. Poetry magazine, founded by Harriet Monroe and published continuously since 1912, lurched along on a shoestring budget for most of its history. The magazine’s life was turned upside down in 2002 when Indianapolis pharmaceutical heiress Ruth Lilly bequeathed about $200 million to the little publication. Soon after, the Poetry Foundation (which grew out of the Modern Poetry Association) was formed. One of its early decisions was to build a permanent home for Poetry, which had long housed its collection of books, manuscripts, and recordings in the basement of Chicago’s Newberry Library and hosted readings in borrowed spaces around the city. Predictable controversy erupted when some of the foundation’s trustees opposed the decision, decrying the hubristic palace they believed would result.

John Ronan says he steered clear of the internal politics, keeping his sights on the task at hand. Initial visioning sessions revolved around the question “What is a building for poetry?” “There’s no paradigm for this building,” the architect points out. In any case, what he has created is not trophy architecture. In keeping with the art form it serves, the new Poetry Foundation is a respectful, restrained building that employs an economy of means and methods, just as a good poem employs an economy of language.

While giving physical presence to the foundation, the new 22,000-square-foot building also had to reflect its mission: to help poets pursue their art, and to raise poetry’s profile and bring it to the public by making it visible and accessible. The choice of this urban site—a corner lot in Chicago’s North River neighborhood surrounded by residential towers—and the decision to make transparency central to the building design address these desires. In addition to offices, the client requested a library to house its 30,000 noncirculating volumes, a dedicated space for readings, and a gallery for related exhibitions. One of the more unusual requirements was for a garden that could be used to host events. Exploring this element drove the initial design investigation and resulted in a 4,000-square-foot courtyard carved out of the site’s north side.

To define the site’s boundary—without rendering the building opaque or fortresslike—Ronan wrapped the perimeter with a corrugated, oxidized zinc wall, which, around the garden, becomes perforated and veil-like, blurring the lines between inside and out.

As you pass through a narrow corridor formed by the metal screen and the glass front of the performance space, you reach the garden and, through double-height windows, see the library’s colorful patchwork of book spines lining shelves on two levels. Baltic birch plywood embraces the interior by forming the shelves as well as paneling. The building is conceived as layers of materials—zinc, glass, and wood—that compress and then separate to create different spaces. “The idea is that this spatial narrative unfolds as visitors move through and between these layers,” says Ronan. “We were trying to achieve a transcendent materiality where we take very humble materials and then ennoble them in some way—not unlike what a poet would do with words.” For example, the team spent months developing the sandblasted concrete (for the ground-level floors that extend out into the garden), which incorporates white silica and cement and specks of slag, lending it a warmth and complexity.

Inside, public spaces occupy the ground floor while the offices upstairs are organized according to operations: administrative, magazine and website, and programs. The north, garden-facing glass, which jogs in and out, admits abundant, diffuse light, even on an inclement day, and helps to visually connect the different spaces. To balance the conflicting demands of a building that celebrates its urban surroundings while functioning as a center of quiet work, the team employed a host of acoustic strategies, such as varied surface materials and an interior glass wall in the performance space, where poets read without amplification. During the day the foundation hums with the hushed business of the staff and visitors. At night, when it hosts readings, the building transforms into an elegant, diaphanous event space, as light and activity spill out into the garden and the street beyond.

Foundation president John Barr says that since the building’s opening, use of the library and attendance at readings and functions have increased exponentially—and that, including its website, the foundation now reaches about 19 million people compared with just 10,000 Poetry subscribers previously. “A good poem has something indefinable, or magical, about it that keeps you coming back to experience it again,” he says. “And our hope is that this building does that in architecture—it keeps people returning.”

 

Cost: $10.2 million (construction)

Completion date: June 2011

Location: 61 West Superior Street, Chicago, Illinois 60654

Architect
John Ronan Architects
420 West Huron Street
Chicago, Illinois 60654
Phone: 312.951.6600
Fax: 312.951.6544
ronan@jrarch.com
http://www.jrarch.com

People

Owner: Poetry Foundation

Gross square footage: 26,000 sq. ft. (including garden)

Total construction cost: $10.2 million

Architect:
John Ronan Architects
420 West Huron Street
Chicago, Illinois 60654
Phone: 312.951.6600
Fax: 312.951.6544
ronan@jrarch.com
http://www.jrarch.com

Personnel in architect’s firm who should receive special credit:
John Ronan AIA, Lead Designer (registered architect)
Tom Lee, Project Architect
Evan Menk, Senior Technical Coordinator
John Trocke (design team)
Marcin Szef (design team)
Wonwoo Park (design team)

Interior designer and Graphic Designer:John Ronan Architects

Engineer(s):
Structural:
Arup
35 East Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601
Phone: 312.849.5610

MEPFP:
dbHMS
303 West Erie Street
Chicago, Illinois 60654
Phone: 312.915.0557

Civil:
Terra Engineering, Ltd.
225 West Ohio Street, 4th floor
Chicago, Illinois 60654
Phone: 312.467.0123

Consultant(s):
Landscape: 
Reed Hilderbrand Associate, Inc.
741 Mount Auburn Street
Watertown, Massachusetts 02472
Phone: 617.923.2422

Lighting:
Charter Sills
420 West Huron Street
Chicago, Illinois 60654
Phone: 312.759.5909

Acoustical: 
Threshold Acoustics LLC
53 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 815
Chicago, Illinois 60604
Phone: 312.386.1400

General contractor: 
Norcon, Inc.
661 West Ohio Street
Chicago, Illinois 60654
Phone: 312.715.9200

Program Manager:
U.S. Equities Realty
20 N. Michigan Ave.
Chicago IL 60602

Photographer(s):
Steve Hall
Hedrich Blessing
400 North Peoria Street
Chicago, Illinois 60642
Phone: 312.491.1101

CAD system, project management, or other software used:
AutoCAD 2010
AutoDesk VIZ 2007
Adobe Photoshop CS3
Adobe Illustrator CS3
Adobe InDesign CS3

Products

Structural system
Steel frame with composite upper floors, reinforced concrete slab on grade and foundation.

Exterior cladding
Metal Panels: Umicore Building Products USA Inc, VM Zinc

Metal/glass curtain wall: Glass Solutions, Inc.

EIFS, ACM, or other: ACM: Mitsubishi Alpolic

Moisture barrier: Henry Company

Curtain wall: CMI Architectural Products, Inc.

Other cladding unique to this project: Screenwall aluminum mullions and cladding: Architectural Systems, Inc.

Roofing
Other: Fully-adhered single-ply membrane roof: Carlisle SynTec Incorporated, Sure-Weld

Windows
Aluminum metal frame: Wausau Window and Wall Systems

Glazing
Glass: Viracon, Inc.

Skylights: LinEl Signature

Doors
Entrances: Ellison Bronze

Metal doors: Pioneer Industries

Wood doors: custom by millworker

Special doors: Acoustic: Krieger Specialty Products Company

Hardware
Locksets: FSB North America

Closers: LCN, Rixson, Dorma

Exit devices: Von Duprin

Pulls: Ironmonger d line, FSB, Rockwood

Interior finishes
Acoustical ceilings: Armstrong

Suspension grid: Chicago Metallic

Cabinetwork and custom woodwork: custom by millworker

Paints and stains: Benjamin Moore

Wall coverings: Walltalkers

Plastic laminate: Pionite

Solid surfacing: Formica

Floor and wall tile: Wall tile: American Olean (toilet rooms)

Resilient flooring: Johnsonite, Armstrong

Carpet: Bentley Prince Street

Special interior finishes unique to this project:Stretched fabric ceiling: TexStyle Ceiling System;Stretched fabric wall: Clipso

Furnishings
Office furniture: Herman Miller

Reception furniture: Herman Miller. Custom sandblasted stainless steel bench by John Ronan Architects

Chairs: Herman Miller task chairs and conference chairs, Republic of Fritz Hansen (stair landing lounge chairs), Cappellini (open office lounge chairs), Alias (multi-purpose room chairs), Living Divani (library sofa), Moooi (cork stools)

Tables: Nienkamper Vox conference tables

Lighting
Interior ambient lighting: Delray, Focal Point, Erco (lobby track lighting), Elliptipar (lobby wall washers)

Downlights: Portfolio

Task lighting: Herman Miller, Alkco

Exterior: Louis Poulsen, Bega

Dimming System or other lighting controls: Lutron, Creston

Conveyance
Elevators/Escalators: Otis Elevator Company

Plumbing
American Standard (urinals)
Toto (toilets)
Sloan (flush valves)
Chicago Faucets (faucets)
Kohler, American Standard, Elkay (sinks)
Elkay (water fountains)
Franke (filtered water dispenser)

Other unique products that contribute to sustainability: Green Grid Modular Green Roof system

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/portfolio/2011/11/poetry-foundation.asp

October 10, 2011

Novancia (ADVANCIA) Business School, Paris | Architecture-Studio

Armand Moisant street, Paris

Following a competition organised by the Paris Chamber of Commerce, the restructuring and extension of Novancia business school, located on Armand Moisant street in Paris, was entrusted to AS.Architecture-Studio. This higher education institution, specialising in entrepreneurship, should accommodate 1500 students in 2011. The building features a property complex including classrooms, offices, 3 amphitheatres, a 260-seat auditorium, a resource centre, a recording studio and food and beverage areas.

The building asserts its modern character, in line with its environment, and emphasizes the historical part built in 1908. In contrast with the latter ’s rough and static bricks, the extension is smooth, dynamic and kinetic. It is characterised by the refined design of glass facades composed of mobile ver tical shutters with couloured printed glass. These shutters act as a protection against sunrays or, on the contrary, let them in.

The facade colour range makes the building sensitive to its environment. I ts characteristics are constantly changing according to light inputs, angles and the positions of sun-breakers. Whereas colour gradation makes the building contextual, it becomes the «context» itself due to the reflection of surrounding elements onto the facade.

The main classrooms and offices are served by open walkways set around a large atrium. The atrium is the main foyer and an open, user-friendly area. I t is also a horizontal and ver tical transfer area connecting the old and the contemporary buildings. When bathed in light inside the atrium, one has the impression of being outside. When protected from bad weather, one really appreciates being indoors.

The business school is designed as a real forum dedicated to students, teachers and entrepreneurs. Permanent dialogue and common work between the client and the design team resulted in a project that fully complies with financial targets and established deadlines.

IN THE CITY

Several consultation meetings with residents took place during the study phases. The project has also gained the suppor t of local politicians. We sought for chromatic harmony with nearby environment: yellow colour of the 1908 building and red colour of Bourdelle museum. The building plays and interacts with the brightness and colours of its surroundings. The volume composition corresponds to Paris city planning regulations. The morphology of the plot includes twenty-three different sizes. In the prolongation of the 1908 building, the extension follows the Hausmanntype building line. In front of a ledge of the museum, where Bourdelle street narrows, the extension turns towards the core of the plot, generating a curve and a countercurve. The patio thus created expands urban space.

HERITAGE AND FUTURE

The project is both contemporary and historical – and these notions support each other. AS.Architecture-Studio renovated the initial building in a precise and refined manner. The school asserts its modern character while echoing and reinforcing the initial building. The use of hollow joints enables everybody to make a clear distinction between the initial and the new building; both thus become autonomous within this unitary project. The rear facade of the historical building reveals itself inside the atrium. The opposite facade asserts the aesthetics of the building: history and future – «together» and «simultaneously» – which is already a sign of contemporaneity.

THE OLD BUILDING

The old building was renovated according to its original treatment (bricks, stylized windows, cornices and mosaics). Original colours were resur faced and restored. We recovered room clearance by pulling out the 1954 extension. The old building was renovated in full compliance with its original design.

THE CONTEMPORARY BUILDING

A contemporary, precise, joyful and coloured building stands out of the street building alignment. I ts refined design makes it even more dynamic. As a contrast with the static and rough bricks of the historical building, the extension is smooth and kynetic.

Facades gain rhythm thanks to mobile ver tical shutters made of coloured printed glass. They control light input (either protecting from sunlight or letting it in). These revolving shutters are grouped together and electrically-driven. The building thus comes alive, as shutters open, close and revolve. Shutters seem closed when seen from afar and transparent when seen from nearby. The colour range also changes, as it adapts to the brightness and position of the sun. According to sunray position throughout the year, the facade colours will vary from pastel to fluorescent. When people stroll nearby, the landscape reflected by the shutters vibrates and becomes pixelated.

According to a mathematical formula, colours vary within a gradation going from red to yellow and from yellow to red. Gradations accelerate and decelerate. Seven colours, three patterns, on both sides, and seven different heights result in eight hundred seventy-three references and four thousand one hundred and two implemented items. Shutters are the result of a long endeavour of graphic research, reinterpreting the sunbreaker theme.

This contemporary building, with a simple and unique design, turns in the schoolyard and wraps the historical building on the nor thern side. The opening onto Antoine Bourdelle street enables us to treate the rear facade as precisely as the front one. The integration work on the facade was achieved through constant collaboration with a national heritage architect.

The atrium represents the hear t of the building itself. Open walkways serve the main classrooms and offices, the auditorium, the amphitheatres and the cafeteria.

The central foyer helps visitors find their way and makes the functioning of the building dynamic. It is a horizontal and ver tical transfer area for all:
– a horizontal area, at street level and through walkways located at various levels,
– a vertical area, through elevators and stairways that serve all the levels of both the old and new building. A monumental staircase generates a counterpoint in this longitudinal area.

Zenithal light changes the characteristics of this area throughout the day. Diurnal cycles animate social life and encounters.

When inside the atrium, one can easily imagine the geometry of the entire building. The curved lines in the patio differ from the front facade geometry. The auditorium is wrapped in a wooden shell and topped by a meeting platform, like a piazza. The facades of the 1908 building separate the atrium from classrooms and offices. They are a metaphor of the city inside the building. This majestic and welcoming atrium is planted with bamboos.

Dominated by the white colour, the atrium brings together the bricks of the old building, the colours of the glass facade, wood and vegetal textures, as well as the movements of people who meet inside the building.

The atrium establishes a physical and visual link with the ground floor and the planted patio, where the information directory and food and beverage areas are located.

Novancia Business School Paris – Building Information

Financing: Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Paris,
Ile-de-France Region
Client: Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Paris,
Real Estate Department
Architect: Architecture-Studio
Engineering: Arcoba
Quality surveyor: Eco-Cités
Acoustics: AVA
Assignment: public contract + diagnosis + accessibility
Total area: 22,360 sqm (including car parks)
Budget: Euro 34 M before tax (market value)
Competition: 2006, winner
Studies: from 2006 onwards
Completion: 2011

Novancia Business School formerly titled Advancia Business School

http://www.e-architect.co.uk/paris/advancia_business_school.htm

Novancia Business School images / information from Architecture-Studio Architectes

 

October 10, 2011

Learning & Research Building, Southmead Hospital, Bristol | Avanti Architects

Avanti Architects use a palatte of colours insipred by nature in their Learning and Research Building at Southmead Hospital

 

Avanti were commissioned to design an integrated centre for hospital staff education and training, together with university research. The building was to act as the first part of a much larger redevelopment of the site and to mitigate between the suburban surroundings and the large scale hospital development to come.

The plan restores the original orthogonal order of the site reintroducing views and ‘green fingers’ and enabling natural wayfinding. The building and its neighbours are composed as a series of parallel brick planes that follow the natural terraces of the site, separated by open landscaped areas and fully glazed end facades allowing transparency through and between the buildings.

For the colour scheme Avanti worked in collaboration with lead artist Kate Blee, who says of her approach:
‘For this commission I looked at colour in relation to growth and hierarchy in nature. Earth, plant, bloom, leaf and sky. A palette inspired by nature to enliven these strong rhythmical façades. A rhythm of colour to be seen through and against the trees, by the residents living opposite the building, and to joyfully present the building across the hospital campus.’

‘I wanted the colour to be rich and saturated but not to cast distracting coloured light into the internal working environments. The colour was sprayed onto the internal face of the glazing units creating a colour light box effect rather than a stained glass effect.’

‘The commission extended into the building for the colour of the portals – visually marking the entrances into spaces along corridors and walkways. This was again about chromatic rhythms, and the colours taken from the external façade scheme were used to further connect the inside to the outside of the building and to inject placed and composed colour into the white and dark grey interior.’

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17649