Archive for ‘Industrial’

November 20, 2011

mclaren production centre | foster + partners


‘mclaren production center’ by foster + partners, surrey, england
image © mclaren
all images courtesy of foster + partners

london-based architecture firm foster + partners have officially completed the mclaren production center, the second building designed for the company
located by the rural fringe of london. the 34,5000 square meter facility will contain all future mclaren road vehicles. the assembly plant is a state-of-the-art production space which is connected to the existing technology center via an underground walkway which exhibits interactive installations.
both buildings share a common language in architectural details and materials with aluminum cladding tubes and a circular glass drum
mimicked beneath the overhang of the roof canopy.

the new structure is designed for efficiency and sustainability. the lower levels use the excavated soil from the site to conceal itself from the nearby
road carving itself into the landscape. the roof collects rainwater and has the ability to have photovoltaic panels integrated in the future.
the space is flexible in comparison to other modern manufacturing facilities with a wide span between columns and ceramic flooring.
acting more like an operation theater than a factory, the linear organization follows the flow of the production line showcasing the technology
of the plant and the system of networks where the components are delivered, assembled, painted, tested and finally detailed.


carved facility into landscape
image © mclaren

the site will be the location of the recently-launched MP4-12C high-performance sports car, house all activities related to the
manufacturing of the vehicle. built for speed the facility will be able to produce and build the product in 5 days at peak performance
with a new car joining the line every 45 minutes. leading to a creation of a large number of skilled manufacturing jobs in the community.


assembly station
image © nigel young

‘the mclaren production centre is a further leap forward in the evolution of industrial buildings, both socially and in terms of working
conditions and technologically in its flexibility and the sophistication of its services integration. the scale and grandeur of the main hall
is a fitting complement to the purity of the mclaren cars, which will emerge from its production line.’  

– lord foster, founder and chairman, foster + partners –


assembly line
image © nigel young


production floor
image © nigel young


MP4-12C high performance sports car
image © nigel young


car frame being assmbled
image © nigel young


appliation of body to frame
image © nigel young


final inspection of MP4-12C
image © nigel young


final manufactured product
image © nigel young


site plan
image © foster + partners


plan
image © foster + partners


elevation
image © foster + partners


elevation
image © foster + partners


elevation / section
image © foster + partners


section
image © foster + partners


section
image © foster + partners

project info:

dates: 2009-2011
foster + parnters team: norman foster, david nelson, nigel dancey,
iwan jones, dominik hauser, nina linde, chris johnstone, kathleen mark, nicholas papas
client: mclaren group
structural + civil geothermic, fire, acoustics, CDM: buro happold
services and environmental consultant: PHA consult
landscape architect planning consultant: terence o’rourke
quantity surveyor: gardiner + thebold
gross area: 34, 500 square meters
external plant area: 620 square meters
building height: 6.6 meters
building length: 200 meters
building width: 100 meters
length of tunnel: 100 meters
number of levels: 2

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/17709/foster-partners-mclaren-production-centre.html

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April 23, 2011

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center | Miller Hull Partnership

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

plans plans

diagram diagram

diagram diagram

sun sections sun sections

The LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center designed by the Miller Hull Partnership is a  certified wastewater treatment plant and recently named a COTE 2011 Top Ten Green Project.

The design challenge for the project included renovating the existing administrative and laboratory building, and the creation of a new four-story Regional Services Center to house administrative offices, an emergency operations center, and boardroom, and an education center with interpretive exhibits and a classroom.

Architects: Miller Hull Partnership
Location: 
Landscape Architects: Murase Associates
Renderings: 
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

“The new facility is a tangible example of the sustainable principles that guide the LOTT organization and fuel their efficient operations and education programs,” said Scott Wolf, partner at Miller Hull.

While most wastewater treatment plants around the country are separated from their communities by a chain link fence, LOTT actively engages the public. Class A reclaimed water, produced at the treatment plant, is water that has been used and then cleaned to high quality standards so it can be returned to the community for irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial and manufacturing, and many other uses.  Benefits include wastewater and water supply management, and environmental enhancement such as using reclaimed water for wetlands restoration or streamflow augmentation.

The reclaimed water for LOTT’s new facility is used for a pond surrounding the center, for irrigating the grounds and the building’s green roof, and for toilet flushing inside the building.

Designed with a contemporary, industrial aesthetic, the building is meant to complement its surroundings, while the structure’s height acts like an iconic symbol for the neighborhood. The facility is coordinated with other projects planned in the area, including a new Hands on Children’s Museum—also designed by Miller Hull—currently under construction, and the East Bay Public Plaza.

“This new building portrays all the good things about community stewardship,” said Robert Hull, one of the founding partners of Miller Hull. “It’s no longer just a sewage treatment plant. It becomes the new public face of LOTT in the community.”

A water fountain sculpture resembling a large cup pours reclaimed water into the pond and creates a visual and audible signal to the public, symbolically returning the treated reclaimed water to the community for reuse. The water in the pond moves slowly around the front of the building to the east. The edges of the pond are lined with plants, and a smaller pond within the larger water feature supports water lilies. The pond’s water is recycled, requiring minimal make-up water to sustain the pond. Two walkways were constructed over the pond leading people to the building entrances.

Other sustainable elements of the project include reused timbers from a port warehouse that was demolished near the site. The energy use for the project is 50 percent less than of a typical building resulting in significant cost savings over its lifetime. Natural light in the office spaces reduces or eliminates the need for artificial lighting during most of the day. Lastly, external louvers control sunlight and minimize solar gain which further reduces the need for air conditioning.

http://www.archdaily.com/128516/lott-clean-water-alliance-regional-services-center-miller-hull-partnership/

April 9, 2011

Oxbow Field Station | Eduard Epp & University of Manitoba Student

Architects: , Matt Cibinel, Michael Chan, Taren Wan, Elaine Pang, Thilini Samarasekera, Richard Chiang, Jen Rac, Scott Dean, Alex Needham
Location: 
Cost: $5,300.00 CDN
Project year: 2010
Photographs: 

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

drawing 01 drawing 01

drawing 02 drawing 02

drawing 03 section

The Oxbow Field Station was realized in the context of a Sustainable Design Studio offered by the Department of Architecture, under the direction of Professor , together with a group of 9 under / graduate design students. The project was conceived to: provide a studio space for site meetings and fieldwork; serve as ‘an instrument’ to measure on-site habitability, and; establish a compelling sense of place for the future artist’s colony. The initial survey work and design began in September and its construction was completed by mid-December 2010.

The field station site is located on the Uiniversity of  (UM), Faculty of Agriculture Point Lands. The 130 acre landscape is distinctly agricultural, surrounded by a pastoral river bottom forest along the banks of the Red River. The field station site is subject to seasonal on-site flooding and from the Red River should it crest the site’s perimeter levee.

The building site and building floor plate were determined after finding an abandoned structure on the Point Lands. Only the  base remained and it was partially reconstructed as the ‘foundation’. It also provided some 8 feet between the flood prone land and the field station studio. A canoe will be used to access the field station should significant flooding occur.

Project building materials were sourced according to salvaged, reclaimed (repurposed), or new. These include concrete, , steel, plastic and glass: 80% salvaged and / or reclaimed and; 20% new materials. Approximately 90% of the materials were produced locally or regionally.

With a clear idea of the building materials available, a collaborative studio design process followed to yield the final design. The on-site  trellis frames were disassembled and milled. These were used on the approach, the ladder wall, and the building envelope. A salvaged cottage deck provided the interior floor and the rooftop observation deck. Some 200 salvaged fluorescent light covers provided exterior cladding on the south and west elevations to provide diffuse light to the field station interior. Cottage windows, dating from circa 1910, were reclaimed to provide clear fenestration along the east and north elevations.

The Oxbow Field Station studio measures approximately 14 ft. x 14 ft. Together with a rooftop viewing deck the building stands some 20 ft. above grade. A ladder wall connects the on-grade platform, studio and rooftop deck. The building is comprised of new  frame construction built upon a post and beam structure. The building skin, the floor surfaces, the deck railing, and so on are constructed with salvaged and reclaimed materials.

The project cost totaled $5,300.00 CDN (average cost of $9.00 / sq. ft. gross). All of the labor was provided by the students with some assistance from members in the Faculty of Agriculture, the Faculty of Architecture, and the UM Physical Plant.

This project was made possible with the support of:

University of 

  • Administration, Ass.VP., Mr. Alan Simms
  • Physical Plant: Mr. Werner Volke

Faculty of Architecture: Dean Ralph Stern

  • Department of Architecture: Prof. Frank Fantauzzi
  • Workshop and CAST: Mr. Keith Millan, Mr. Rick Finney

Faculty of Agriculture

  • Department of Plant Science: Dr. Peter McVetty, Ms. Martha Blouw, Mr. Ian Brown, Mr. Bob Terhorst

External Financial Support

  • Raymond SC Wan Architect Inc.
  • Cibinel Architects Ltd

http://www.archdaily.com/123877/oxbow-field-station-eduard-epp-university-of-manitoba-students/

January 31, 2011

Central Energy Plant | Spillman Farmer Architects

Central Energy Plant / Spillman Farmer Architects © Steve Wolfe Photography

Central Energy Plant / Spillman Farmer Architects © Steve Wolfe Photography

Central Energy Plant / Spillman Farmer Architects © Steve Wolfe Photography

Central Energy Plant / Spillman Farmer Architects © Steve Wolfe Photography

Central Energy Plant / Spillman Farmer Architects © Steve Wolfe Photography

Central Energy Plant / Spillman Farmer Architects © Steve Wolfe Photography

Central Energy Plant / Spillman Farmer Architects © Steve Wolfe Photography

site plan site plan

floor plan floor plan

wall section wall section

detailed render 01 detailed render 01

detailed render 02 detailed render 02

Architects: Spillman Farmer Architects
Location: , PA, 
Project Team: James G. Whildin, Joseph N. Biondo, Mike Metzger, Mark Piell
Project area: 6,300 sq. ft.
Project year: 2009
Photographs: Steve Wolfe Photography

Dickinson College’s program for its Central Energy Plant addition was straightforward: extend the existing 80,000 SF building to accommodate the boilers and cooling towers required to serve the campus’ energy requirements. The College asked that the addition, a 6,300 SF building determined by the size of the equipment housed within, reveal the functionality of the building rather than conceal its operations. The architect’s challenge was to respond to the client’s program and create an extension that respected the existing structure but was not dominated by it.

The new building is a layered dance of brick and aluminum. At the east elevation, a stair tower marks a subtle transition from the existing to the new; here, a full-height brick wall continues the mass of the original building. As the corner is turned, the brick is progressively subtracted until it becomes

A low wall on the west elevation. In its place, continuing to define the space, is an aluminum veil that is visually both solid and sheer. Its solidity completes the block form and its sheerness allows views into the functional spaces (cooling towers) within.The horizontal layering also suggests the building’s vertical layering. The masonry wall envelops, but does not hide, the structural elements placed independently behind it. The aluminum veil is loosely hung on the structure. Throughout, the building shows clear evidence of how it is made, its materiality expressed and unadorned.

http://www.archdaily.com/107225/central-energy-plant-spillman-farmer-architects/