Archive for ‘Housing’

May 1, 2012

58 Housing UnitsZAC Seguin – Boulogne-Billancourt | LAN Architecture

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Program: 58 housing units
Location: ZAC Seguin – Boulogne-Billancourt, France
Timetable: 2011
Client: Nacarat
Cost: € 7,2 M Excl. VAT
Surface: 4 639 m²
Phase: Completed
Team: LAN Architecture (lead architect), COTEC (all-trades engineers)

This project, for which the competition occurred in 2008, is the result of a complex transformation process in the city along with a precise economic context. Located on the former site of the Renault factories in Boulogne-Billancourt, the concerned project is part of the Trapèze Ouest, one of the sector of the operation Ile Seguin-Rives de Seine, amongst the most important emerging centres in Ile-de-France. It consists of a new mixed use neighbourhood, residential

Program:58 housing units
Location:ZAC Seguin – Boulogne-Billancourt, France
Timetable:2011
Client:Nacarat
Cost:€ 7,2 M Excl. VAT
Surface:4 639 m²
Phase:Completed
Team:LAN Architecture (lead architect), COTEC (all-trades engineers)

This project, for which the competition occurred in 2008, is the result of a complex transformation process in the city along with a precise economic context. Located on the former site of the Renault factories in Boulogne-Billancourt, the concerned project is part of the Trapèze Ouest, one of the sector of the operation Ile Seguin-Rives de Seine, amongst the most important emerging centres in Ile-de-France. It consists of a new mixed use neighbourhood, residential space on the immediate west side of Paris. In this territory, public and private interests are evidently bound to cross. The segregation of disciplines omnipresent in the french system is antagonistic to this approach and it is manifested in the clear separation between the practices of urban planning and design, architecture, landscaping and project management. Certainly, collaboration is existent, but the large number and diversity of participants causes a normalized rarity in the points of intersection between the many different visions. A programme and volumes rigorously defined, diminished costs of construction, the hit of an economic crisis, a private real estate system that isolates the site designer, strict  certification labels… this abruptly depicted a reality, that any idea, vision or architecture is one day bound to face. The first step of our work consisted in drawing from this hostile context a fruitful questioning: « In a framework where the ability of the architect is knowingly limited and in a context where economic conditions are uncertain, how to imagine an architecture capable of resisting disruptive change? That can reassure in moments of instability? And face situations of crisis? An architecture that can justify itself by itself and in any moment? What would then be the cardinal values on which to base our intervention? ». In difficult moments, one must return to fundamentals and choices are narrowed: it is simply survival instinct. With this projects we decided to face the most challenging scenarios from the very first sketch. In this operation we have let aside exhaustive studies on urbanity and potential grabbing –costly and  previously explored methods at the agency–, to pivot back around an essential postulate: a space exists only if it is built. Simplification, substraction and timeless values drew the three guidelines for 70° Sud, whose name was chosen by the client’s Marketing team. Simplification: from a technical point of view, a way to reduce cost. A single detail drives the wholeness of the project: window–corridor-–railing. Within this ensemble, we can also include solar protections and openings. Substraction: the structure becomes façade, exposed concrete, no superfluous elements, no gratuitous ornement. Timeless values: to attract people, the strategy put into place is found upon incontestable building qualities: light, orientation, views and organization. If each individual is allowed to act upon his dwelling in regards to his own taste and needs, the fundamentals that make for quality are, in this building, unchangingly insured. The project suggests a built form that is simple and readable. The South and East façades are punctuated by multiple larges openings, extending the interior of the dwellings to exterior corridors running along the building. Larger balconies are inserted at intervals in the line of the terraces, projecting out. The juxtaposition of protruding, punctual and linear elements give the impression of a slender and lighter building onto Yves Kermen and Emile Zola streets. The building fulfills its role as a corner element and provides a clear distinction from the surrounding buildings. Plays with solids and voids, horizontals and verticals, light and shadow, glass and curtains, give the façade both sobriety and animation. To the simplicity of the drawing is added the richness of the material. We have sought for a finish that is clean, shaven and refined but rich enough to reflect light, and communicate with the colours of its environment.

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http://www.lan-paris.com/project-58-housing-units.html

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May 1, 2012

Student Residence | LAN Architecture

The idea underpinning our project was to meet the challenge of using a single architectural gesture to provide urban integration and optimised comfort for the future occupants while, at the same time, creating a friendly and informal complex. The street The building’s strategic position on the intersection of a number of streets and the busy nature of the district directed our research towards the development of lively, rich elevations providing views through to the centre of the plot and an appreciation of this inner space. The creation of two clefts and the transparency of the ground floor level resulting from the bike park meet this ambition, defining a project reminiscent of the buildings to be found in Paris’ inner suburbs. The courtyard The project is based on the party walls defining the different building heights. This movement creates a square central courtyard (17 m x 17 m), providing the project with its key element. Thanks to its considerable size, the courtyard is a source of sunlight and acts as a green lung for the apartments. Distribution

The circulation system is very clear: four vertical circulation points on the four corners of the plot. All circulation areas are naturally lit to allow the landings to become places where people can meet one another. The housing units The design of the general layout was guided by a desire to provide bright sunlit units that are easy to live in and completely adaptable to the personal tastes of each occupant. The view over the courtyard will provide the peaceful environment needed for concentration and studying.

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The building’s exterior facade (Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
February 19, 2012

Holiday House on the Rigi | AFGH

http://www.archdaily.com/1461/holiday-house-on-the-rigi-afgh/

February 3, 2012

No. one Center Street | drmm

PROJECT SUMMARY

An apartment building placed 30cm from a railway viaduct may seem unlikely but Solid Space commissioned dRMM to design one with an idea for a new housing typology for brownfield sites, a hybrid of the Continental horizontal apartment and the English vertical terrace house. The development transformed a derelict site to create large split level flats that offer space, light, roof terraces and a communal garden.

 

Details

Each apartment is organised as a large, open double-height living space, with adjacent bedrooms and stairs forming a buffer to the railway. The transformation of the traditional apartment plan responds to changing living and working patterns of contemporary urban households. The double entry, generous size of units, riser positions and flexible layouts created a regeneration concept of sustainable, long lasting, loose fit living. It is possible to subdivide all the apartments into live and work, or double household units. “This type of urban accommodation means a divorce need not mean moving out” A.de Rijke

The building was conceived as ‘inside-out’; it appears to be a wooden coat over a concrete frame. Closer inspection reveals all to be concrete. Internally, walls are textured concrete. Externally, they are clad with fibrous cement, a mock-timber rain screen of augmenting proportions. Other than in situ concrete, all components are prefabricated, specified and assembled according to dRMM’s ‘off the shelf’ catalogue design methodology.

No. one Centaur Street received several awards in recognition of its small but significant contribution to London’s housing agenda.

Photography © Alex de Rijke, Michael Mack, Marcus Fairs

http://drmm.co.uk/projects/no-one-centaur-street/#extended

January 23, 2012

930 Poydras Residential Tower | Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

Eskew+Dumez+Ripple’s residential tower represents a break from the norm in New Orleans

 

Completed March 2010, this mixed-use residential project is designed to re-imagine the typically horizontal nature of New Orleans’ dense French Quarter blocks as a vertical condition. The program includes 250 residential apartments above a 500 car garage, and is organised to create a communal amenity level at the ninth floor – reinterpreting the courtyard housing typology for urban, high-rise living. At this raised ‘courtyard’ level, shuttle elevators transfer from garage to tower in order to promote opportunities for residents to cross paths with one another in a shared, communal space as opposed to the typically introverted collection of experiences found in most high-rise residential developments.

As a means to recreate the social interaction found in the courtyards of the city’s historic quarter, the design consolidates all tenant amenities at the ninth floor level in order to condense their programmatic force. Anchoring this level is the ‘sky lobby’, a dramatic glass box that cantilevers out from the façade and offers spectacular views of the downtown skyline. This double-height lounge serves as an extension of the tenant’s living spaces, with coffee bar and movie screening lounge set among informal groupings of furniture. The project was described by the jury for the 2011 AIA Housing Awards as: “A new paradigm for urban living.”

Outside the sky lobby is an expansive pool deck, with tiered bleacher seating rising from the pool to a sunning platform. Tucked beneath these bleachers is the facility’s fitness center. A series of townhomes along the south side create an architectural edge and produce the effect of a ground level courtyard on the garage rooftop. Departing from the oppressive monotony of the commercial office towers surrounding it, the design of the exterior envelope incorporates a highly articulated metal panel and glass patterned façade. This approach affords a higher percentage of glazing at upper residential floors with minimal glazing provided at the garage to maintain a seamless – while animated – composition.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=18689

January 23, 2012

horizontal skyscraper- vanke center | steven holl


the building under construction
image courtesy of iwan baan

steven holl architects with partner li hu recently completed construction on their horizontal skyscraper –
vanke center located in shenzhen, china. situated over a tropical garden, the horizontal skyscraper
spans as long as the empire state building is long.

the building looks as if it were once floating on a higher sea which has now subsided.
the large structure floats under its 35-meter height limit propped up on eight legs. being suspended
on eight-cores, as far as 50 meters apart, the its structure is a combination of cable-stay bridge
technology merged with high-strength concrete frame – a first for a structure of its type,
with tension cables carrying a record load of 3280 tons.

the decision to develop one large hovering structure instead of several smaller floating ones,
was to create views over the lower developments of surrounding sites to the south china sea
and to generate the largest green space possibly, open to the public on the ground level.
the underside of the skyscraper becomes the main elevation from which sunken glass cubes or
‘shenzhen windows’ offer 360-degree views over a lush tropical landscape. the hybrid building
includes apartments, a hotel and offices for the headquarters for vanke real estate co. ltd.
a conference center, spa and parking lot are located under large green, tropical landscape,
characterized by mounds which contain restaurants and a 500-seat auditorium. there is also a
public path which covers the entire length of the building, connecting the hotel, apartment zones
to the office quarters together.

as a tropical strategy, the building and landscape integrate several new sustainable aspects including a
microclimate created by cooling ponds fed by a grey water system. a green roof with solar panels
has been incorporated into the design and uses local materials such as bamboo. a glass façade
protects against sun and wind via perforated lovers. the building is tsunami proof hovering piece
of architecture that creates a porous micro-climate of public open landscape. it is the first
LEED platinum rated building in southern china.


image courtesy of iwan baan


image courtesy of iwan baan


a microclimate is created through cooling ponds fed by grey water
image courtesy of steven holl architects


stairways up from the ground level into the skyscraper
image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


perforated aluminum louvers
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


aerial view – model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


structural breakdown
image courtesy of steven holl architects


horizontal skyscraper is as long as the empire state building is high
image courtesy of steven holl architects


a diagram indicating the views from the ‘shenzhen windows’
image courtesy of steven holl architects


‘horizontal skyscraper – vanke center’ by steven holl architects, shenzhen, china
image © designboom

designboom recently visited the ‘horizontal skyscraper – vanke center’ by new york and beijing-based firm steven holl architects,
while in shenzhen, china. lifted and oriented to direct views towards the nearby mountains, ocean and lake, the structure hovers
above maturing gardens and groves of native bamboo trees. the undulating terrain is now blanketed with greenery, as it was conceived
in early renderings by the architect.

pathways crossing through textured patches of long grasses weave through the site under the branching extensions of the building
leading to the outdoor sunken amphitheater and a central subterranean lobby. steel staircases create opportunities for visitors
to enter the elevated interior of the offices, hotel and apartments.

see designboom’s original coverage of this project here.


uppward view of a branch of the building
image © designboom


the undulating landscape converges with the structure
image © designboom


stairway leading into the building’s interior
image © designboom


steel staircases lead into the building from ground level
image © designboom


pathway passing below structure
image © designboom


facade and louver detail
image © designboom


sunken amphitheater
image © designboom


louver detail at the end of facade
image © designboom


mounded earth meets the underside of the horizontal building and then drops off to reveal a suspended office space
image © designboom


pathway passes through vegetated gardens
image © designboom


pathway crosses under the branching structure
image © designboom


bamboo grove at base of pier
image © designboom


clusters of inclined columns support the structure in locations where the landscape is level
image © designboom


(left) view through the branching horizontal appendages
(right) building reflecting within pool
image © designboom

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/8352/steven-holl-architects-horizontal-skyscraper-vanke-center.html

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/18364/steven-holl-horizontal-skyscraper.html

January 22, 2012

Yale Steam Laundry Condominiums | John Ronan Architects

Architects: John Ronan Architects
Location: Washington, DC, 
Photographs: Nathan Kirkman

Project Description: The historic Yale Steam Laundry structure possesses a rich physical history that is written in its vaulted floor structure, its oddly-spaced floor framing and in its pock-marked concrete and brick. This patina of time imparts a character upon the space it encloses that once erased, cannot be recreated. The project design asserts that this character is important and should be preserved, and that new interventions should be minimal, legible and discrete. The project is as much about what one doesn’t do as it is about what one does.

The proposal pursues a strategy of select intervention that seeks to maximize the preservation of the existing physical history and the character it confers on the space, and defines the new project as the sum total of two parallel realities: the existing structure with its attendant character and the new programmatic interventions, inserted into the existing structure like furniture.

Where new elements meet existing structure, the distinction is pronounced: hot rolled lacquered steel plate insertions in the public areas (entry, lobby, stair, exercise room) stand apart from the glazed white brick to form reception desks, bridges, stairs. In the residential units above, kitchen/bathroom cores clad in birch millwork are inserted into the existing shell to minimally convert the building to its new use. The ground floor of the annex serves simultaneously as building lobby and clubroom. A plate steel wall separates the public areas from back of house (offices, pantry, etc.).

http://www.archdaily.com/190209/yale-steam-laundry-condominiums-john-ronan-architects/

January 22, 2012

Scotts Tower | UNStudio

In early December, Ben van Berkel unveiled his firm’s latest design for a 31-storey residential tower in .  The tower presents a new take on functional and flexible space, as the structure is conceived as a framework for a vertical city complete with landscaped gardens, sky terraces, roof gardens and recreational facilities.  ”An interesting facet of the Scotts Tower is the way that it reacts to the urban context of . Instead of the more usual means of planning a city horizontally, we have created neighborhoods in the sky; a vertical city where each zone has its own distinct identity,” explained van Berkel.

The tower is ordered by a “vertical frame” which organizes the programmatic necessities in a manner that responds to the urban context, and a “sky frame” that dictates the arrangement of gardens. Four residential zones are formed by the relationship between the two frames, and are clustered around different types of gardens which provide views of both the cityscape and natural landscape. The residences offer different identities, in terms of type, scale, distribution and articulation of outdoor space, along with the possibility for personalization of the interior layout.  The integration of balconies allows the tower to take advantage of the site’s unique juxtaposition between dense metropolis and unfolding natural landscape.

Starting at the ground level, the emphasis on adding greenery to the highrise becomes apparent, as the existing garden area to the west of the site is extended into The Scotts Tower and incorporates a multi-layered environment which links the different zones and recreational facilities available to the residents.

A new vertical green gateway is defined by the lower “sky lobby”, and even farther up the tower, a ”sky garden”, which offers panoramic views and the possibility for use as a social platform for outdoor events.  The continued, yet varied, use of green in the highrise creates a distinct atmosphere for its residents, and a new kind of expression for the city.

http://www.archdaily.com/196987/scotts-tower-unstudio/

January 1, 2012

M3A2 Cultural and Community Tower | Antonini + Darmon Architectes

Architects: Antonini + Darmon Architectes
Location: 6 Rue Marguerita Duras, Paris, 
Area: 550 sqm SHON
Cost: 2,5 M euros HT
Finished: November 2011
Photographs: Luc Boegly

The buildings of the cultural and community premises of Paris Diderot University fit into the undeveloped, southwest area of the Flour Market which was recently converted by Nicolas Michelin and Associates Agency. A break between the Flour Market and the new building is preserved. It respects the existing building and accentuates the slenderness of the tower. The two, independent buildings coexist completely. The signal-like extension stands out of its context by means of its evolving shape. It is a sensitive, delicate object, treated simply to avoid rivalry with the strong presence of the Flour Market. On the contrary it acts as a light, gravitational counterpoint. An architectural dialectic and emulation come into play much like a castle and its keep, both intrinsically inseparable.

December 12, 2011

The Cloud | MVRDV

Two Connected Luxury Residential Towers

The Cloud: Two Connected Luxury Residential Towers by MVRDVis a residential development of the Yongsan Business district. A 260 meter tall tower and a 300 meter tall tower are connected in the center by a pixelated cloud of additional programs offering amenities and outside spaces with wide views. The towers with a total surface of 128,000m2 are expected to be completed in 2015.

The two towers are positioned at the entrance of the Yongsan Dreamhub project, a master plan designed by Studio Libeskind, extending the business district of the South Korean capital Seoul. The southern tower reaches a height of 260 meters with 54 floors, the northern tower 300 meters with 60 floors. Halfway, at the level of the 27th floor the cloud is positioned, a 10 floor tall pixelated volume, connecting the two towers. The cloud differentiates the project from other luxury developments, it moves the plinth upwards and makes space on ground floor level for public gardens, designed by Martha Schwartz.

Usually a high-rise adds little to the immediate surrounding city life, by integrating public program to the cloud the typology adds in a more social way to the city. Inside the cloud, besides the residential function, 14,357m2 of amenities are located: the sky lounge – a large connecting atrium, a wellness center, conference center, fitness studio, various pools, restaurants and cafes. On top of the cloud are a series of public and private outside spaces, patios, decks, gardens and pools. To allow fast access the cloud is accessible by special express elevators.

The luxurious apartments range from 80m2 to 260m2 of which some offer double height ceilings , patios or gardens. The towers with a perfect square floor plan contain four corner apartments per floor offering each fine daylight conditions and cross ventilation. Each tower is accessed via a grand lobby at ground level; the rest of the ground floor is divided into town houses. In addition to the amenities the Cloud furthermore contains 9,000m2 of Officetel (Office-Hotel) a typical Korean typology and 25,000m2 panoramic apartments with specific lay-outs. The top floors of both towers are reserved for penthouse apartments of 1200m2 with private roof gardens.

http://www.archdaily.com/191206/the-cloud-two-connected-luxury-residential-towers-mvrdv/