Archive for ‘Houses’

February 12, 2012

Tea Houses__Swatt | Miers Architects

Architect: Swatt Miers Architects
Location: Silicon Valley, 
Project Team: Robert Swatt FAIA, Steven Stept AIA, Ivan Olds, Connie Wong (interiors), Jeanie Fan, Hiromi Ogawa
Structural Engineering: Yu Strandberg Engineering
Contractor: Neto Construction
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Tim Griffith

The idea for the tea houses originated years ago, when the owner and his young daughter explored the remote hills surrounding their Silicon Valley home, discovering an idyllic setting below a ridge, under a grove of large California Live Oak trees. At first, the family thought the setting would be perfect for a tree house. Years later, after the 6000 square foot main house was extensively remodeled, the vision was realized as three individual tea houses, places where one could simply retreat into nature.

Each tea house is designed as a transparent steel and glass pavilion, hovering like a lantern over the natural landscape. Cast-in-place concrete core elements anchor the pavilions, supporting steel channel rim joists, which cantilever beyond the cores to support the floor and roof planes. With its minimal footprint, the design treads lightly on the land, minimizing grading and preserving the delicate root systems of the native oaks.

The three tea houses vary in size, each with its own unique purpose. The 270 square foot ‘meditation’ tea house, nestled under the canopy of the largest oak tree, is a place for individual contemplation. The slightly larger ‘sleeping’ tea house, approximately 372 square feet, is a place designed for overnight stays. This structure is joined by a sky-lit bathroom core, which bridges to the largest tea house. At 492 square feet, the ‘visioning’ tea house is for intimate gatherings and creative thinking. The notion of ‘quiet simplicity’ is a consistent theme throughout – there are no phones, televisions or audio systems within these structures.

The design emphasizes sustainability. Steel framed doors and awning windows provide access and high – low ventilation, while custom-modified aluminum framed sliding doors, with custom steel interlockers and fixed glass panels, mitered at the corners, dissolve the barrier between inside and outside. Natural cooling is enhanced by shading from strategically placed landscaping, including evergreen redwood trees and bamboo, and deciduous maple and gingko trees. Heating is provided by a radiant hydronic system below the flooring. Electricity is produced on-site by a photovoltaic array mounted on the roof of the main house.

The interiors are executed with a simple palette of contrasting materials – crisply detailed steel and glass, and more ‘organic’ unfinished concrete, board formed and wire brushed to expose the wood grain, and cedar boards, recycled from the remodeling of the main house.

As the sunlight and shadows move across the hillside the tea houses take on different forms – at sunrise, the structures disappear into the long shadows; the soft silhouette of the midday sun casts dramatic reflections off the glass; and by evening, the structures glow like lanterns in a garden. Viewed from afar or viewed from within, the tea houses appear at one with their sites, inextricably connected to the native California landscape.

http://www.archdaily.com/201014/tea-houses-swatt-miers-architects/

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January 22, 2012

Nomura 24 House | Antonino Cardillo architect

Architects: Antonino Cardillo architect, Yukinori Nagao
Location: Takarazuka, 
client: Nomura Koumuten
project year: 2010
Project area: 150 sqm
budget: ¥ 59.900.000
Photographs: Antonino Cardillo

The inexact quality
House on two levels of medium size built on a hill on a trapezoidal plot in a suburb in the district of Hyōgo, overlooking Ōsaka bay. Wooden structure, whitewashed walls and sloping pitched roof. Sleeping area on the ground floor – three bedrooms with bathroom and entrance hall (genkan) – and living area on the first floor – wc, kitchen, patio, dining area, sitting room and Japanese room (washitsu). Formally, in plan, the two longer, non-parallel sides of the plot define two right-angled systems which find their formal connection on the third side, on the road, defining in elevation an incisive, faceted shape. Its diverse surfaces mutate the intensity of the light according to the incidence of the sun. Inside, on the first floor, a large polygonal living room with seven sides possesses the inexact quality of certain medieval Italian piazzas, on whose sides the openings – now windows, now doorways – describe multiple directions of aspect and travel.

The irregularity of the geometry, therefore, crystallises in the shape a willingness for dialogue among the parts which make up the whole. Finally, at the rear, the narrow space created between the kitchen and the Japanese room picks out a small patio, whose windowed sides gather the afternoon diagonals of the sun on the tatami flooring of the Japanese room and reverberating blues inside the kitchen cavity. These two rooms give onto the living room through two low doorways cut into the white sketch of a high wall. Almost rationalised grottoes, these bedrooms made of independent light engage with the large polygonal room: dark and azure in the morning, light and warm in the afternoon.

http://www.archdaily.com/196940/nomura-24-house-antonio-cardillo-architect-and-yukinori-nagao/

December 22, 2011

Gefter-Press House | Michael Bell Design of [ EJ Eunjeong Seong / VISIBLE WEATHER ]

michael bell architect

michael bell architectmichael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

michael bell architect

Michael Bell Architect Gefter Press House

Michael Bell Architect Glass House Metropolitan Home

Michael Bell Architect Glass House Metropolitan Home

The Gefter-Press is sited on a twelve-acre property accessed by crossing a quarter mile expanse of farming fields before passing into a forested site. The slow approach to the house is the initial phase of movement that instigates the organization of movement and time in the building. A series of planar organizations, the pictorial depth of the approach and view through the house, is counter to the shallow spaces and movements of the interior where the buildings is as narrow as ten feet.

The programming of the building is coordinated with the visual depth—social relations are coordinated by floor heights, relations to grade (above, at or below grade) and diagonal vistas though the house and across the courtyard. The buildings structural glazing system—nine by fourteen foot wide insulated glazing units—allows a gaze to pass through the private as well as public spaces. The glazing has two details: it is either flush with the building volume and projected inboard of the structural framing (on the east/west elevations) or six inches outboard of the structural framing (on the north/south elevations). The sills are recessed two inches below floor level. The effect it to project the interior margins of the building volume outward and to asymptotically flatten the exterior view against the interior surfaces—the background is elastically pulled to the foreground and the sense of a middle-ground is diminished. The interior is precisely defined but also it dissolves  into the extended spaces and clearings in the forest. Vision is immediate and close and also distant. The simultaneity brings the space of the forest into the immediate circumstances of private life. The house can be opened to form a single volume: the two bedrooms open with interior sliding doors that match the glazing systems and form two oculus opening: when approaching the house they form a binocular effect that bifurcates the singular vantage of the house. The minor dimensions of a relatively small building cross a threshold opening to the wider field of the site.

Design Architect: Michael Bell Architecture

Project Team: Michael Bell, Thomas Long, Stephen O’Dell

Architect of Record: Stephen O’Dell

Structural Engineer: Nat Oppenheimer

Mechanical Engineer: Alteiri Sebor Wieber LLC

Photographs by Richard Barnes and Bilyana Dimitrova

http://www.visibleweather.com/home/gefterpresshouse.html

November 28, 2011

treehouse | Steendyk Architects

A cut above

Steendyk synergise design disciplines with experiments in laser-cut steel

From its inception, Steendyk’s practice has been passionate about creating designs that are sustainable environmentally, functionally and aesthetically.

Steendyk is a Brisbane-based design studio that synergises and engages a mixture of design disciplines, including architecture, interior and exhibition design, landscape, planning and urban design, and product design. The practice is interested in transcending architecture as a discipline by resolving projects from an interdisciplinary design perspective.

Steendyk is also concerned with the investigation of process and materiality, which has resulted in a number of explorations. Perforated screens for the ‘treehouse’ and Beal residences use a diversity of apertures for sun control, responding to orientation, while a similar idea has been utilized for the Anise lamp. From laser-cut coreten steel, to laser-cut ply and acid-etched brass, each project has presented one idea. The refinement of this singular idea has successfully addressed questions of sustainability, quality and commercial viability. These projects inform the practice’s future explorations into scale and intensity, form and surface, materiality and tectonics.

In the ‘treehouse’, the laser-cut corten screens are active, lyrical elements that dance in shape and form while filtering light; a re-interpretation of vernacular timber lattice screens present throughout the historic context of the surrounding suburb.

Importantly, with regards to responding to site and location, an authenticity pervades the practice’s approach. To sustain and intensify creativity, Steendyk selects commissions that challenge and thus extend the practice’s design skills. An ordered sense of arrival and spatial release, based around themes of axis, court and framed view, are the design strategies that underpin the architectural practice. Careful rationalisation of materials and light is used to manipulate and distil complex programmes into strong, simple forms; a move towards a higher level of abstraction and refinement.

Completion dates of projects in selected images:
‘Treehouse’ – March 2010
Beal Residence – May 2010
Anise – February 2011

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=16195

From architect website:

The replanning, refurbishment and extension of this historic late 1800’s worker’s cottage re-engineers the house to accommodate 21st century living requirements. At the core of this sustainable design is the idea that lifestyle, rather than being compromised, can be enhanced when engaging our global responsibility to our environment. Therefore this refurbishment preserves the historic nature of Spring Hill for future generations by complimenting and maintaining the original integrity of the residence. On a tight inner city residential block, separating the building by locating a linked pavilion to the rear of the site creates a courtyard between the two structures and maximises passive solar orientation in an aim to minimise overall energy use. 25,000 litres of precious water is collected, stored, used, reclaimed and recycled, and energy from the sun is harnessed in solar cells and thermal mass for redistribution. This residential type will guide future sustainable refurbishments of the dwindling historic dwellings in inner city, urban areas.

http://www.steendyk.com/mainpage.htm

September 25, 2011

Coffou Cottage | Brininstool, Kerwin, + Lynch

Architect: Brininstool, Kerwin, & Lynch
Location: , Indiana
Project Year: 2006-2008
Photographs: Christopher Barrett of Hedrich Blessing

The Coffou Cottage by Brininstool, Kerwin, and Lynch is a 2,800sf residence in Michigan City, Indiana.  The residence was completed in 2008 and was designed for the Coffou family as a natural retreat from the hustle and bustle of the city of Chicago.  The northern shores of Indiana have long been a destination for those looking for a reprieve from city life, so the site was a natural selection for clients looking for a sense of privacy.

After selecting a site that met their needs, the clients sought out Brininstool, Kerwin, and Lynch to design a modest and simple residence that capitalizes on the fantastic natural views of the site which included Lake Michigan to north and pastoral views to the South.  These diametrically opposite view opportunities resulted in two distinct architectural responses — the cottage was designed as a simple structure with a horizontal rain screen constructed of red cedar slats to privatize the northern entry and the southern façade is a wall of operable glass.  Not only does this approach maximize the desired pastoral views, it also maximizes solar gain in the winter.

In keeping with the simplicity of structure, the floor plan of the 3-bedroom Coffou Cottage is logical and organized.  The public living spaces (kitchen, dining, and living areas) are arranged as a large open space and frame the views to the adjacent meadow and woods.  A traditional hearth fireplace is positioned in the front hallway, effectively separating the public and private sectors of the residence.  The primary material for the residence (interior and exterior) is Red Cedar, which was used to establish a material warmth and visual interest.  This material selection is amplified by the raw concrete used for the floor, which also serves as the primary heat mechanism through radiant flooring.

http://www.archdaily.com/157671/coffou-cottage-brininstool-kerwin-lynch/

July 4, 2011

Almere House | Benthem Crouwel Architekten

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

AD Classics: Almere House / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

Plans Plans

Exploded View Exploded View

Details Details

Details Details

Details Details

Architects: Benthem Crouwel Architekten
Location: 
Project Area: 65 sqm
Project Year: 1984
Photographs: Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

The house was designed for an unusual homes competition held by De Fantasie in . The brief was to design a house without taking into account current building regulations. All prize-winners were awarded a plot of land on loan for five years. This meant that the house and its foundations had to be easy to dismantle.

In the compact house, the living room is bounded on three sides by glass sheets to gather the surrounding landscape into the house. Sandwich panel walls enclose the private zone comprising the two bedrooms, kitchen and bathroom. The extraordinary construction of the house combats wind pressure in three ways. The space-frame floor structure is attached to a foundation of concrete slabs, stabilizing fins are placed strategically at the seams of the toughened glass sheets and finally two steel tension cables secure the lightweight profiled steel roof borne aloft by the glazing.

http://www.archdaily.com/147338/ad-classics-almere-house-benthem-crouwel-architekten/

April 16, 2011

A Room Over the Sea | Studio Zero85

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

plan plan

elevation elevation

http://www.archdaily.com/126209/a-room-over-the-sea-studio-zero85/

April 10, 2011

House Meijer, The Netherland | Van der Jeugd Architecten

Project Details:
Location: City of Almelo, the Netherlands
Type: Residential – Houses
Architects: Van der Jeugd Architecten – www.vanderjeugd.nl
Designteam: Paul van der Jeugd, Ruud van der Koelen, Mirjam Wiggers
Project area: 370 sqm
Costs: €475.000
Project year: 2008
Photographs: Ruud van der Koelen
Key Materials/products: In Situ cast Concrete + Aluminum panels
Software used: Google Sketchup + Vectorworks

Introduction:
Modest in situ cast-concrete house in Almelo. Striking are the strategically positioned wall and roof openings, which optimize the view from the house and establish a special lightfall in the dwelling. In addition, the house has an internal logic, combining intimacy and spaciousness in a remarkable way.

Project Description:
The house is located in the newly developed residential area ‘Hegeman’ in Almelo. Within this plan, 9 lots where available for free sale. These plots are well positioned within in the district: adjacent to the canal, with a clear view of woods and meadows. Houses on these lots should to be unique and innovative, with great architectural quality.

The plot acquired by the client is located along a green plot which is kept open, creating a vista from the residential area behind the plots to the surrounding landscape of hedgerows, fields and canals.

During the first visit by the client to the architect, they proved very taken with the in situ-cast concrete work office of the architect. This led us to design a concrete dwelling: spatially strong, with an aesthetic minimalism put through to the last detail. Strategically rainwater drains, piping and electrical wiring were eliminated from sight, resulting in an almost Spartan and graphical appearance.

Knowledge and experience of in situ-cast concrete were used in both design and building process. This has led to a series of thoughtful and ingenious details. Also the building process was well controlled and directed by Van der Jeugd Architecten.

The dwelling was tailored to the needs of the client and the specificity of the location. When organizing the agreed housing program, the particular views and the specific light fall were of importance. This has led to a three-storey dwelling house and four specific spatial levels.
The design of the ground floor (split level) is such that a series of area’s were created with its own character, spatially and visually in contact with other area’s: intimacies with a minimum of visual and spatial separation.

Much care was taken to the staircases and outdoor spaces. Daylight openings are strategically positioned in the house, optimizing the experience of light and space. The balconies and outdoor spaces are positioned in such way that all the interesting views can be experienced, and are important in the appearance of the house.

Meyer House is more than one dwelling. It is a modest but extremely life-proof living machine, which actively enriches the everyday experiences of its residents, increases the quality of the site and particularizes a sense of space.

http://architecturelab.net/house-meijer-the-netherland-by-van-der-jeugd-architecten-15713/

 

 

 

March 12, 2011

Ghost 7 | Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

plan plan

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

The Ghost Architectural Laboratory is the research facility of Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects Limited. It is an education initiative designed to promote the transfer of architectural knowledge through direct experience – project-based learning taught in the master-builder tradition – with emphasis on issues of landscape, material culture, and community. For two weeks every summer builders, students, engineers, architects, and professors converge on Mackay’s property to partake in a design/build intership. The one featured here is Ghost 7, the first permanent Ghost project.

Project description, images, and drawings after the break.

Architect: Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects Limited
Location: 
Project Team: Brian MacKay-Lyons, Talbot Sweetapple, Peter Blackie
Structural: Campbell Coumeau
Builder: Gordon McLean, Warren Mcally
Project Area: 2,000 sqf
Project Year: 2006
Photographs: Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 provides lodging for future Ghost participants—an optimistic vision of longevitiy for the project and for the site. While offering refuge in the landscape, Ghost 7 is a perforated, less-defensive version of the archetypal courtyard form of habitation. As a result, the landscape percolates through the scheme. The siting geometry is drawn from the structural grid of the Ghost 5 project opposite.

The four resulting structures can be described both as cabins and as pavilions. They are cabins by way of their limited size (720 sqf) and their modest means; they are pavilions by their ambition to create a rich range of spatial experience within a modernist free plan within the landscape. The series of Ghost 7 buildings, with tight spaces between, is based on the precedent of a collection of a particular, yet typical, group of closely space Nova Scotian fish sheds.

In the manner of Louis Kahn, the parti consists of a “servant box,” wrapped by a larger “served shed.” The servant box contains the sleeping areas, bathroom, kitchen, mechanical services, and balcony; the served shed houses the gathering space. The box is a finished and heated retreat clad in vertical boards while the shed remains raw and unheated and clad in eastern white shingles four inches to the weather.

The post foundations result in a minimum impact on the land. Prefabricated built-up wood trusses the loads into the foundations. The envelope consists of a rough-sawn wood two-by-four stud frame. The metal roofing is corrugated Galvalume.

http://www.archdaily.com/119109/ghost-7-mackay-lyons-sweetapple-architects/

 

February 19, 2011

Weekend House on Lake Superior | Julie Snow Architects

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

floor plan floor plan

The Weekend House on Lake Superior consists of two black volumes that extend toward the distant horizon.  Arranged on a platform that rests just above the ground, the home is reduced to a few essential elements, a main house and a small studio.  Designed by Julie Snow Architects it is a wood post and beam structure with a super-insulated floor, roof and walls.

Architects: Julie Snow Architects, Inc.
Location: North Shore of Lake Superior, 
Design Principal: Julie Snow, FAIA
Project Team: Jennifer Charzewski, Matthew Kreilich, AIA, LEED AP
Project Area: 1,024 sqf
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Peter Kerze

The presence of the lake is pervasive throughout the house. A long simple white table runs parallel to the lake. A narrow vertical tower encloses the fireplace. A row of cabinets along the north wall conceals the complexities of daily life. The house provides a serene connection to a beautiful, rugged landscape. Concealed by trees in the summer, the black boxes slip into the winter landscape of black and white tree trunks.

Hot water piping is attached to LVL’s that span the 16’ dimension of the house. After, the cavity is filled with a non-toxic expanding insulation. Similarly, walls have 5.5” of solid insulation; the roof is similarly filled. The narrow profile aluminum windows are argon filled. They are supported on a steel ledge allowing the window sill and head to extend below the floor and above the ceiling, enhancing an uninterrupted connection to the exterior. The exterior panels are back-ventilated pre-drilled Skatelite, a material designed for skate board ramps. These diagrams were developed for a graduate architecture studio course to convey the value of understanding sequential construction and detailing in three dimensions. The simple form of the house is precisely detailed to reduce cost, maintenance and environmental impact.

The house works with the climatic conditions along the north shore: very cold but sunny winters, temperate long shoulder seasons, and hot summers cooled by lake breezes and cool nights. The house is heated with dual fuel boilers and in-floor hot water heat distribution. During the week the house is kept at a minimum 40º. The design employs passive heating and cooling. The black exterior, south facing glass and the black floor are so effective in passive heating that the house temperature can rise well above 70º on cold sunny winter days, even when the outdoor temperature is -30º, without raising the system’s demand temperature. Arriving late on a winter’s night the air temperature can be easily brought up to a comfortable level by building a fire in the heat circulating fireplace. In the summer, sliding glass doors provide cool breezes off the lake, in which water temperatures rarely rise above 55º.

Concern for the water quality in the Great Lakes has resulted in the 2010 negotiation to amend The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between Canada and the US. Winter melt runoff from the Sawtooth Mountains behind the site is filtered by patches of designated wetlands and sheet drain across the rocky, rugged shoreline ultimately reaching the lake. The project was designed to minimally disturb the natural movement of water on the site by elevating the house just above grade. The house is built on wood piers with a small 12’ x 16’ foot print mechanical/storage space below the kitchen and bath.

http://www.archdaily.com/112277/weekend-house-on-lake-superior-julie-snow-architects/