Archive for ‘ZGF Architects’

May 23, 2011

it was a parking lot ! | ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes / ZGF Architects Courtesy of ZGF Architects

The John E. Jaqua Center for Student Athletes at the University of Oregon explores the limits of transparency and connectivity to provide the UO’s student-athletes a place to gather as a community focused on study and learning. The challenge of creating a tranquil environment where students feel connected to natural landscape elements and daylight was heightened by the chosen location: a busy intersection between campus and the city of , on the site of a former parking lot at one of the major campus entrances.

Architects: Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects, LLP
Location: 
Project Area: 40,000 sqf
Photographs: Courtesy of 

The notion of a fertile, natural environment to invigorate and inspire learning was the premise on which the design concept was based. The glass structure rests on a “table of water” and a birch forest celebrates the region’s natural environment. A “double wall” facade addresses acoustic isolation, thermal insulation, and control of available daylight within the building. The walls consist of five elements that create a dynamic response to orientation while reinforcing the concepts of transparency and connectivity. A prismatic, vertical stainless steel screen within this facade provides shading, thermal comfort, and ability for heat harvesting (which reinforces the natural convection within the vessel) as well as visual privacy for the inhabitants. The glazed facade and interior spaces are composed on a rigorous module to achieve an uninterrupted visual connection between internal rooms and the larger garden beyond. The reflectivity of the glass and water obscure the boundary between the building and surrounding landscape.

Authenticity to the  student athlete experience was a key design driver, as was the celebration of the success of student-athletes in the pursuit of knowledge and athletic achievement. An atrium forms the “heart” of the building. The atrium walls are infused with graphic displays that relay the heritage of athletics at the University. It also includes a scoreboard-inspired wall listing upcoming tutorial appointments for student-athletes.

Through the seamless integration of art, environmental graphics and architecture, the facility serves as a pantheon of student athletic achievements. For example, the “A Few Who Just Did It” wall celebrates the post-graduate academic achievements of notable former student-athletes, including the faces of author Ken Kesey, Nike co-founder Phil Knight and Ann Bancroft (the first woman to cross both the North and South Poles), engraved in 8×8 square oak blocks. On another atrium wall, a three-story mural is constructed of 10,000 small 3×3 photos of student-athletes acid-etched onto stainless steel and assembled in a large-scale pixilated pattern such that Albert Einstein’s face emerges when viewed from a distance. This mural depicts the life of student athletes at the University, dating the building as circa 2009 when the photos were captured. Other elements include floor engravings of Academic All-American honorees, a color and sandblasted glass wall celebrating PAC-10 All Academic recipients and a stairwell that contains the names of more than 4,000 lettermen that graduated from the University between 1945 and 2009.

http://www.archdaily.com/137141/university-of-oregon-john-e-jaqua-academic-center-for-student-athletes-zgf-architects/

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes

University of Oregon John E. Jaqua Academic Center for Student Athletes

Client: University of Oregon

Completion date: January 2010

Program: A 40,000-square-foot, three-level academic center for student athletes. The ground floor includes a public café, an auditorium, and an atrium; the two floors above, open to student athletes only, feature a 114-seat auditorium, tutor rooms, faculty and advising offices, a computer lab, a graphics lab, and a library.

Solution: The architects sought to turn a bustling site—a former parking lot at a busy intersection—into a tranquil, light-infused building that evokes the natural environment. Because of the site’s prominence, they designed the center to have four public facades. Each is composed of two glass walls divided by a prismatic stainless steel screen, whose triangular bars reflect light back inside. The Jaqua Center stands on a table of water, and the resulting reflections blur the distinction between building and landscape. The ZGF team kept the materials palette minimal, leaving some concrete shearwalls exposed and using Oregon white oak for the floors.

People

Client
University of Oregon

Architect
ZGF Architects LLP
1223 SW Washington Street, Suite 200
Portland, OR 97205
P: 503-224-3860
F: 503-224-2482

Personnel in architect’s firm who should receive special credit:
Bob Packard, Associate AIA – Partner-in-Charge
Gene Sandoval, Associate AIA – Design Partner
Randy Stegmeier – Principal Interior Architect (Firm 151)
Jan Willemse, AIA, LEED AP, Registered Architect – Technical Design Partner
Robert Snyder, AIA, LEED AP, Registered Architect – Project Manager
Jennifer Russina, Associate AIA, LEED AP – Project Designer
Walker Templeton – Project Designer
Yoshiyuki Watanabe – Project Designer
Jenn Ward – Interior Architect (Firm 151)
Trent Thelen, ASLA, LEED AP, Registered Landscape Architect – Landscape Architect

Man Hui Chan, Graphic Designer

Interior designer: 
ZGF Architects LLP

Engineer(s): 
Structural Engineers: KPFF Consulting Engineers

MEP Engineers: Interface Engineering

Façade Engineers: Arup

Civil Engineers: Harper Houf Peterson Righellis, Inc.

Geotechnical Engineers: Geotechnical Resources, Inc.

Consultant(s)
Landscape: Charles Anderson Landscape

Lighting: Interface Engineering

Acoustical: Altermatt Associates

Other: Firm 151

General contractor: 
Hoffman Construction Company

Photographer(s):
Ron Cooper
cooperphoto@mac.com

Eckert & Eckert, Pete Eckert
503.331.9165
pete@eckertandeckert.com

Basil Childers
347.276.3666
basil@basilphoto.com

CAD system, project management, or other software used:
CAD: Autocad
CA Software: Attolist

Products

Structural system
Reinforced Concrete frame with post tension concrete slabs

Exterior cladding
Masonry: Mutual Materials Ground face CMU

Metal/glass curtainwall: Benson Industries, Inc.

Concrete: Marion Construction, Salem, Oregon

Roofing
Elastomeric: Firestone Ultraply TPO

Windows
Aluminum: Benson Industries, Inc.

Glazing:
Glass: Viracon

Skylights: DeaMor

Doors
Entrances: Blasi GmbH

Metal doors: Styles Custom Metal Inc

Wood doors: Oregon Door

Sliding doors: Custom made by Straght-up

Fire-control doors, security grilles: Side coiling by Woodfold-Marco MFG

Hardware
Locksets: Schlage

Hinges: Ives, Ezy

Closers: LCN, Dorma, Rixson

Exit devices: von Duprin

Pulls: Tice Industries

Security devices: Bosch, Sentrol, American Magnets, Altronix, Indala, Pelco, Radionics.

Cabinet hardware: Tice Industries, Blum, Hafele, Accuride

Interior finishes
Cabinetwork and custom woodwork:
Lamer Woodworking
Straight Up Carpentry
Nikolai
Legend Custom Woodworking

Paints: Sherwin Williams

Wallcoverings:
Writable/Projectable surface: Egan Visual, Egan Wall

Custom Graphic Wallcoverings: Infinity Images

Paneling:
Wood Panelling, White Oak custom plank widths:
Straight Up Carpentry
Legend Custom Woodworking

Special surfacing:
tackable , writable, projectable surfaces:
Egan Visual, EganWall
Culver Glass, glass, custom backpaint
MDC wallcovering, tabrasa idea paint
Forbo, 2202

Solid surface: CaesarStone, BlissardCorian, Nocturn + Glacier White

Floor and wall tile:
café + restrooms:
datile, colorbody
jr glass, rainbow crystal

Resilient flooring:
White Oak Wood Flooring, custom plank width
Branson Hardwoods

Carpet:
InterfaceFLOR, carpet tile, Superflor, primavera berber beige
Bentley prince, custom match to pantone

Furnishings
Office furniture:
Wood Desks [custom]:

custom white oak
Mfr:  Lamer Woodworking

desk chairs:
eames aluminum group, leather to match pantone
Mfr:  Herman Miller

additional seating:
custom pouf
Mfr:  Moroso
Upholstery: Maharam, Divina Melange

side chair:
344 fin chair, white oak
Mfr: de la espada

lighting:
Nur Pendant
Mfr:  Artemide

desk accessories:
Mfr[s]:  Moss, Blomus,Neo-Utility, Plus-One, Vitra

Reception furniture:
Atruim + reception area
Banquet chairs: Vitra –  stacking mvscustom color to match pantone
Custom white oak reception desk: Faustrollean
Desk chairs: Herman Miller – eames aluminum group, leather to match pantone
Dustom benches, Upholstery: Maharam, Divina Melange – Moroso

Café + entry lounge
Custom, white oak booth: Lamer Woodworking
Custom, white oak computer bar: Lamer Woodworking
Custom “O” sofa, leather upholstery, custom color to match pantone: Moroso
Exterior furniture + umbrellas: lepere – coro

Living room waiting area Upholstery:
Ottomans: Moroso – Fjord, custom upholstery leather + wool
Sofa: Moroso – malmo, custom upholstery leather + wool
Lounge chair: Moroso – Bloomy Armchair, custom upholstery leather + wool
Lounge Chair:  Moroso – fjord swivel custom upholstery leather chair
Area rug: Moroso –  bravoure, 661

Fixed seating:
Mfr: poltrona frau
pitagora, leather upholstery, custom color to match pantone

Chairs:
Conference rm chairs:
eames aluminum group, executive, custom leather to match pantone
Mfr:  Herman Miller

Side Chairs [throughout]:
344 fin chair, white oak
Mfr:  de la espada

Bar + Counter Stools [throughout]:
Slab Stool
Mfr:  Tom Dixon [Inform Interiors]

Tables:
conference rm table:
custom white oak and glass
Mfr: Master Furniture Makers, LLC

Tutor Rm Tables [small + large], 
Custom white oak
Mfr:  Lamer Woodworking

Tutor Lounge, Staff Lounge, Life Skills Tables:
Custom white oak
Mfr:  Lamer Woodworking

Tutor Lounge, Staff Lounge, Life Skills SideTables:
Highlands and Springfield
Mfr: Moroso

Pool
Mfr:  Bensen [Inform Interiors]

Lighting
Interior ambient lighting:
Ingo Maurer, custom pendants to match pantone[s] at Cafe
Artemide, various [see attached spreadsheet]
DeltaLight
Color Kinetics
Tom Dixon
Foscarini

Downlights (and Uplights):
Focal Point
Erco
Color Kinetics

Task lighting:
Jesco
Bartco

Exterior:
DeltaLight
Erco
Lightwild
Color Kinetics
Tivoli
Bega

Controls:
Lutron

Conveyance
Elevators/Escalators: Kone

Plumbing
Plumbing Fixtures: Elkay, Hans Grohe, Toto, Kohler, Chicago, Duravit

Exterior water feature: design by Waterline

Add any additional building components or special equipment that made a significant contribution to this project:
LIST OF CRAFTSMEN/ ARTISANS AND ARCHITECTURAL + ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS/ BRANDING:
RayGun Digital
Pacific Window Tint
Lamer Woodworking
Engrave Your Tech
Square Root Industries
Ted BlockerHolster
Master Furniture Makers, LLC
Tice Industries
Kelly Reid Consulting

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/building_types_study/universities/2010/Jaqua_Academic_Center.asp?specs=true


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March 15, 2011

EPA Region 8 Headquarters | ZGF Architects

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

The new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8 Headquarters building sits on an urban brownfield that formerly housed a U.S. Postal Annex. This  rated design is the result of a challenging design process that sought to integrate a contemporary, high-performance, secure, and environmentally sensitive building into one of ’s most important historic and civic districts. A key program goal was to assimilate the new facility into the urban fabric in a way that strengthens and enhances the quality of the historic neighborhood in which it is located, while establishing the building as a landmark in its own right. As a Federal building, the structure also had to meet strict Department of Homeland Security requirements, resulting in a Level 4 facility.Architects: Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects, LLP
Location: 1595 Wynkoop Street 
Developer/Design builder/Architect of Record: OPUS Northwest, LLC
Project Area: 292,000 sqf
Project Year: 2007
Photographs: Robert Canfield

The building used a wide variety of sustainable materials including, corn-based fabric and wheatboard, recycled glass tile, recycled-content carpets, recycled steel, cork floors, bamboo wall panels and doors made with rice hull cores. In sum, more than 89% of the wood-based materials and products used in the building are certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council’s Principles and Criteria.Additionally, fly-ash was used in the concrete portions of the building and regional materials – those manufactured, produced or harvested within 500 miles of the building – were used for more than 50% of the structure’s manufactured materials. Construction waste was also reduced, with as much as 80% of the total waste generated was recycled or diverted from local landfills.Scarcity of water in  makes it a precious resource. With the help of experts from the EPA, the design team demonstrated to local authorities the effectiveness of “ecoroofs” as a means of both removing pollutants from stormwater and reducing the rate and quantity of stormwater runoff. The result is the first “green” roof in  used to manage stormwater.Populated with native, drought-tolerant plant species that minimize irrigation requirements, the 20,000 square foot vegetated roof covers three terrace levels and treats stormwater while reducing the urban heat-island effect of the building.Variations of a glazed curtain-wall system were designed for the different facades – the sunward (southeat and southwest) façades were designed with horizontal exterior sunshades and a system of internal light shelves designed to cut glare and solar gain. The windward façades (northeast/northwest) have a series of exterior vertical shades to cut glare from low-angle summer sun while simultaneously harvesting diffused light from the clear North Sky. The net result, 75% of workstations receive significant daylight.In addition to serving as a great “room”, the EPA building’s atrium was also developed to enhance the building’s office spaces by providing light from both sides of the office floor plates instead of from the building’s perimeter alone. However, due to the atrium’s depth and aspect ratio, directing light into the atrium proved to be a unique design challenge-a challenge that was compounded by budget constraints and a tight building schedule.Seeking an alternative to conventional, and generally more expensive reflective devices like mirrors, and needing a solution that could be easily and economically installed, the ZGF design team began to study how light could be directed down into the atrium most effectively. A large-scale physical model was used on a heliodon (an artificial sun) to examine the possibilities.The ultimate design solution needed to do two jobs simultaneously; reflect light down into the atrium and shield the office occupants on the atrium’s upper floors from the glare of direct sun, the reflector system would need to hang below the glass skylight instead of stand above it. The design solution required a parabolic shape (in section profile) in order redirect light hitting it from various angles into a fairly uniform downward direction. The reflectors needed to be deeper at their lower, outer corners due to the atrium geometry, resulting in a distinct “butterfly” shape being applied to the reflectors.

http://www.archdaily.com/119458/epa-region-8-headquarters-zgf-architects/