Archive for ‘Zaha Hadid’

August 20, 2011

Architects: Zaha Hadid Architects
Location: , England
Client: Olympic Delivery Authority
Main Contractor: Balfour Beatty
Project Team: Alex Bilton, Alex Marcoulides, Barbara Bochnak, Carlos Garijo, Clay Shorthall, Ertu Erbay, George King, Giorgia Cannici, Hannes Schafelner, Hee Seung Lee, Kasia Townend, Nannette Jackowski, Nicolas Gdalewitch, Seth Handley, Thomas Soo, Tom Locke, Torsten Broeder, Tristan Job, Yamac Korfali, Yeena Yoon
Project Area: 15,950 sqm (Legacy), 21,897 sqm (Olympic)
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Hélène BinetHufton + Crow

Design Concept

The architectural concept of the London Aquatic Centre is inspired by the fluid geometries of water in motion, creating spaces and a surrounding environment that reflect the riverside landscapes of the Olympic Park. An undulating roof sweeps up from the ground as a wave – enclosing the pools of the Centre with a unifying gesture of fluidity, while also describing the volume of the swimming and diving pools.

The Aquatics Centre is designed with an inherent flexibility to accommodate 17,500 spectators for the London 2012 Games in ‘Olympic’ mode while also providing the optimum spectator capacity of 2000 for use in ‘Legacy’ mode after the Games.

Site Context

The Aquatics Centre is within the Olympic Park Masterplan. Positioned on the south eastern edge of the Olympic Park with direct proximity to Stratford, a new pedestrian access to the Olympic Park via the east-west bridge (called the Stratford City Bridge) passes directly over the Centre as a primary gateway to the Park. Several smaller pedestrian bridges will also connect the site to the Olympic Park over the existing canal.

The Aquatic Centre addresses the main public spaces implicit within the Olympic Park and Stratford City planning strategies: the east-west connection of the Stratford City Bridge and the continuation of the Olympic Park along the canal.

Layout

The Aquatics Centre is planned on an orthogonal axis that is perpendicular to the Stratford City Bridge. All three pools are aligned on this axis. The training pool is located under the bridge with the competition and diving pools located within the large pool hall enclosed by the roof. The overall strategy is to frame the base of the pool hall as a podium connected to the Stratford City Bridge.This podium element contains of a variety of differentiated and cellular programmes within a single architectural volume which is seen to be completely assimilated with the bridge. The podium emerges from the bridge to cascade around the pool hall to the lower level of the canal.The pool hall is expressed above the podium by a large roof which arches along the same axis as the pools. Its form is generated by the sightlines of the 17,500 spectators in its Olympic mode. Double-curvature geometry has been used to generate a parabolic arch structure that creates the unique characteristics of the roof. The roof undulates to differentiate between the volumes of competition pool and the diving pool. Projecting beyond the pool hall envelope, the roof extends to the external areas and to the main entrance on the bridge that will be the primary access in Legacy mode. Structurally, the roof is grounded at 3 primary positions with the opening between the roof and podium used for the additional spectator seating in Olympic mode, then in-filled with a glass façade in Legacy mode.

http://www.archdaily.com/161116/london-aquatics-centre-for-2012-summer-olympics-zaha-hadid-architects/

 

June 12, 2011

Riverside Museum | Zaha Hadid Architects

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ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Site Plan

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Ground Floor plan

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_First Floor plan

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Elevations

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Sections

The historical development of the Clyde and the city is a unique legacy; with the site situated where the Kelvin flows into the Clyde the building can flow from the city to the river. In doing so it can symbolise a dynamic relationship where the museum is the voice of both, linking the two sides and allowing the museum to be the transition from one to the other. By doing so the museum places itself in the very context of its origin and encourages connectivity between its exhibits and their wider context.

The building would be a tunnel-like shed, which is open at opposite ends to the city and the Clyde. In doing so it becomes porous to its context on either side. However, the connection from one to the other is where the building diverts to create a journey away from the external context into the world of the exhibits. Here the interior path becomes a mediator between the city and the river which can either be hermetic or porous depending on the exhibition layout. Thus the museum positions itself symbolically and functionally as open and fluid with its engagement of context and content.

Building

The building is conceived as a sectional extrusion open at opposing ends along a diverted linear path. The cross-sectional outline is a responsive gesture to encapsulating a wave or a ‘pleated’ movement. The outer pleats are enclosed to accommodate the support services and black box exhibits. This leaves the main central space to be column-free and open.

Circulation

Circulation is through the main exhibition space. Openings are envisaged in the roof and walls as appropriate. It is perceived that there should be views out of the exhibition space. These would allow the visitors to build up a gradual sense of the external context, moving from exhibit to exhibit. All openings would be solar controlled so that total black out could be achieved when required. At the end, with a view of the Clyde and the Kelvin, is the café and corporate entertainment space. These also allow access and overflow into the open courtyard. The end elevation is like the front elevation with an expansive clear glass façade. It has a large overhang to reduce solar exposure to the building interior. It will allow expansive views up and down the Clyde.

Landscape

The landscape is designed to direct the activities surrounding the building. A ring of varying stones slabs creates a shadow path around the building. On the west side the hard surface progresses to a soft landscape of grass to create an informal open courtyard space. A line of trees will be added alongside the existing ferry quay to reduce the exposure of this area to prevailing winds. Along the south side and the east, shallow water pool features are used to give continuity with the river at quay level.

Project credits / data

Project: Riverside Museum
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Year: 2004 – 2011
Program: Exhibition space, cafe, retail, education
Total Area: 11 000 m²
Exhibition Area: 7000 m²
Site Area: 22,400 m²
Footprint Area: 7,800 m²
Materials: Steel Frame, Corrugated Metal Decking, Zinc Cladding, Glass-reinforced gypsum interior surfaces

Client: Glasgow City Council

Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects | http://www.zaha-hadid.com/
Project Director: Jim Heverin
Project Architect: Johannes Hoffmann
Project Team: Achim Gergen, Agnes Koltay, Alasdair Graham, Andreas Helgesson, Andy Summers, Aris Giorgiadis, Brandon Buck, Christina Beaumont, Chun Chiu, Claudia Wulf, Daniel Baerlaecken, Des Fagan, Electra Mikelides, Elke Presser, Gemma Douglas, Hinki Kwon, Jieun Lee, Johannes Hoffmann, Laymon Thaung, Liat Muller, Lole Mate, Malca Mizrahi, Markus Planteu, Matthias Frei, Michael Mader, Mikel Bennett, Ming Cheong, Naomi Fritz, Rebecca Haines-Gadd, Thomas Hale, Tyen Masten
Competition Team: Malca Mizrahi, Michele Pasca di Magliano, Viviana R. Muscettola, Mariana Ibanez, Larissa Henke

Services: Buro Happold [Glasgow, UK]
Acoustics: Buro Happold [Bath, UK]
Fire Safety: FEDRA, Glasgow
Cost Consultants: Capita Symonds
Project Management: Capita Symonds
Photographers: Helene Binet (construction & roof), Zaha Hadid Architects (aerial view)

+ All images and drawings courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects

http://plusmood.com/2011/05/riverside-museum-zaha-hadid-architects/

here see more pis from archtracker:

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http://www.archtracker.com/glasgow-riverside-museum-zaha-hadid/2011/06/

and from architect’s website:

Glasgow, Scotland 
2004–2011


Aerial Photography © Courtesy of Hawkeye Aerial Photography


PROGRAM:

Exhibition space, cafe, retail and education

CLIENT:
Glasgow City Council

AREA:
Total Area: 11000 m²
Exhibition Area: 7000 m²
Site Area: 22400 m²
Footprint Area: 7800 m²

CONCEPT:
The historical development of the Clyde and the city is a unique legacy; with the site situated where the Kelvin flows into the Clyde the building can flow from the city to the river. In doing so it can symbolise a dynamic relationship where the museum is the voice of both, linking the two sides and allowing the museum to be the transition from one to the other. By doing so the museum places itself in the very context of its origin and encourages connectivity between its exhibits and their wider context.

The building would be a tunnel-like shed, which is open at opposite ends to the city and the Clyde. In doing so it becomes porous to its context on either side. However, the connection from one to the other is where the building diverts to create a journey away from the external context into the world of the exhibits. Here the interior path becomes a mediator between the city and the river which can either be hermetic or porous depending on the exhibition layout. Thus the museum positions itself symbolically and functionally as open and fluid with its engagement of context and content.

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, AUGUST 2010:


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, APRIL 2010:


Construction Photography © Zaha Hadid Architects

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, JUNE 2009:


Construction Photography © Zaha Hadid Architects


Aerial Photography © Courtesy of Hawkeye Aerial Photography


Construction Photography © Zaha Hadid Architects

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, FEB 2009:


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet

COMPUTER RENDERS:


North Aerial View, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects


South Aerial View, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects


North Elevation, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects


Side Elevation, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects

DRAWINGS:


Diagram © Zaha Hadid Architects


Ground Floor, Drawing © Zaha Hadid Architects


Elevations, Drawing © Zaha Hadid Architects


Sections, Drawing © Zaha Hadid Architects

VIDEO:

Video © Zaha Hadid Architects

ARCHITECT:
ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS
PROJECT DIRECTOR: Jim Heverin
PROJECT ARCHITECT: Johannes Hoffmann
PROJECT TEAM: Achim Gergen, Agnes Koltay, Alasdair Graham, Andreas Helgesson, Andy Summers, Aris Giorgiadis, Brandon Buck, Christina Beaumont, Chun Chiu, Claudia Wulf, Daniel Baerlaecken, Des Fagan, Electra Mikelides, Elke Presser, Gemma Douglas, Hinki Kwon, Jieun Lee, Johannes Hoffmann, Laymon Thaung, Liat Muller, Lole Mate, Malca Mizrahi, Markus Planteu, Matthias Frei, Michael Mader, Mikel Bennett, Ming Cheong, Naomi Fritz, Rebecca Haines-Gadd, Thomas Hale, Tyen Masten
COMPETITION TEAM: Malca Mizrahi, Michele Pasca di Magliano, Viviana R. Muscettola, Mariana Ibanez, Larissa Henke

CONSULTANTS:
SERVICES: Buro Happold (Glasgow, UK)
ACOUSTICS: Buro Happold (Bath, UK)
FIRE SAFETY: FEDRA, (Glasgow, UK)
COST/PROJECT MANAGEMENT: Capita Symonds

http://www.zaha-hadid.com/cultural/glasgow-riverside-museum-of-transport

March 3, 2011

Guangzhou Opera House | Zaha Hadid Architects

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

Architects: Zaha Hadid Architects
Location: 
Project Director: Woody K.T. Yao, Patrik Schumacher
Project Leader: Simon Yu
Project Team: Jason Guo, Yang Jingwen, Long Jiang, Ta-Kang Hsu, Yi- Ching Liu, Zhi Wang, Christine Chow, Cyril Shing, Filippo Innocenti, Lourdes Sanchez, Hinki Kwong, Junkai Jiang
Local Design Institute:  Pearl River Foreign Investment Architectural Designing Institute ()
Structural Engineering: SHTK (Shanghai, );  Pearl River Foreign Investment Architectural Designing Institute
Façade Engineering: KGE Engineering (Zhuhai, )
Building Services:  Pearl River Foreign Investment Architectural Designing Institute ()
Acoustic Consultants: Marshall Day Acoustics (Melbourne, Australia)
Theater Consultants: ENFI (Beijing, )
Lighting Consultant: Beijing Light & View (Beijing, )
Project Management:  Municipal Construction Group Co. Ltd. (,)
Construction Management:  Construction Engineering Supervision Co. Ltd. ()
Main Contractor:  Construction Third Engineering Bureau Co. Ltd. (Guangdong,)
Project Area: 70,000 sqm
Project Year: 2003-2010
Photographs: Iwan Baan

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

Guangzhou Opera House - Zaha Hadid Architects © Iwan Baan

site plan site plan

ground floor plan ground floor plan

second floor plan second floor plan

third floor plan third floor plan

fourth floor plan fourth floor plan

fifth floor plan fifth floor plan

roof plan roof plan

east elevation east elevation

north elevation north elevation

south elevation south elevation

west elevation west elevation

section 01 section 01

section 02 section 02

details 01 details 01

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unfolded layout of the primary steel structure unfolded layout of the primary steel structure

unfolded layout of the secondary steel structure unfolded layout of the secondary steel structure

Like pebbles in a stream smoothed by erosion, the  Opera House sits in perfect harmony with its riverside location. The Opera House is at the heart of ’s cultural development. Its unique twin-boulder design enhances the city by opening it to the Pearl River, unifying the adjacent cultural buildings with the towers of international finance in ’s Zhujiang new town.

The 1,800-seat auditorium of the Opera House houses the very latest acoustic technology, and the smaller 400-seat multifunction hall is designed for performance art, opera and concerts in the round.

The design evolved from the concepts of a natural landscape and the fascinating interplay between architecture and nature; engaging with the principles of erosion, geology and topography. The  Opera House design has been particularly influenced by river valleys – and the way in which they are transformed by erosion.

Fold lines in this landscape define territories and zones within the Opera House, cutting dramatic interior and exterior canyons for circulation, lobbies and cafes, and allowing natural light to penetrate deep into the building. Smooth transitions between disparate elements and different levels continue this landscape analogy. Custom moulded -fibre reinforced gypsum (GFRC) units have been used for the interior of the auditorium to continue the architectural language of fluidity and seamlessness.

The  Opera House has been the catalyst for the development of cultural facilities in the city including new museums, library and archive. The Opera House design is the latest realization of ’ unique exploration of contextual urban relationships, combining the cultural traditions that have shaped ’s history, with the ambition and optimism that will create its future.

http://www.archdaily.com/115949/guangzhou-opera-house-zaha-hadid-architects/