Archive for ‘Tony Fretton Architects’

March 11, 2012

Solid 11 | Tony Fretton Architects

Architects: Tony Fretton Architects
Location: , The Netherlands
Design Team: Tony Fretton, Jim McKinney, Sandy Rendel, Laszlo Csutoras, Clemens Nuyken, Chris Neve, Donald Matheson, Michael Lee, Martin Nässén
Project A: Laszlo Csutoras
Area: 2,000 sqm
Client: Albert Ravestein, Stadgenoot
Budget: €18.3 million
Photographs: Peter Cook

 has completed a new seven-storey 8000 sqm building in central Amsterdam. The project is the fourth building completed by the practice in the Netherlands, the country in which founding director Tony Fretton has held a professorship since 1999, as Chair of Architectural Design & Interiors at Technical University of Delft.

Located near the Vondelpark, Solid 11 is one of three new-build projects designed by Tony Fretton Architects on inner city sites released by the relocation of hospitals and industry, the others being Andreas Ensemble in Amsterdam West and de Prinsendam Overhoeks.

Commissioned by Dutch housing association Stadgenoot, the building is an example of a “solid”, a new highly durable and sustainable typology devised by Stadgenoot which is presented to the market as a constructed shell, offering flexibility to the building’s tenants to decide on the size, configuration and use of space.

The building is one of three in a masterplan devised by the late Belgian architect Jo Crepain. The masterplan organises the buildings in sequence along Constantijn Huygenstraat separated by public spaces. Each building is similar in form and alignment and configured as a pair of parallel blocks with a private open space between them.

Solid 11 is the third building in the sequence and is sited next to Jacob van Lennep canal. Unlike the other two buildings, the design of which has been tailored to a specific purpose as social housing and a psychiatric hospital, Solid 11 has been designed to provide flexible space for a range of activities including apartments, workspaces, a hotel, shops, cafes and restaurants and public facilities such as a kindergarten. As in the Red House, a private town house in Chelsea completed by the practice in 2001, spaces are architecturally powerful yet non-specific, inviting a variety of uses.

The client Stadgenoot required the main elements of the building to have a 200-year life span. The facade has been designed as self-supporting. The brickwork piers are built off the basement walls and are fixed to the concrete frame with stainless steel ties. The horizontal spandrels are precast concrete, faced with the same brick, and are built into the piers. The bricks used are charcoal-fired Petersen bricks, reddish brown on the outer facades and yellowish white in the courtyard. On the ground floor the brick piers are clad with highly durable, red porphyry natural stone.

The penthouse pavilions on the roof of the building and the recessed star-shaped elements on the 4th and 5th floors of the building’s front façade feature highly reflective structural glass curtain walls.

A key element of the design of the building is the central courtyard extending from ConstantijnHuygenstraat, which will contain shops, cafes and public facilities overlooked by access balconies on the upper floors. Given the prominent position of the building next to the canal, it is intended that the courtyard will become a local public place and a neighbourhood in itself. The courtyard is protected from traffic noise on ConstantijnHuygenstraat by a 6-storey high glass acoustic screen. Behind this screen glass bridges supported by abstract steel trees connect the pre-cast concrete access balconies on the opposite sides of the courtyard.

The doors are tall bronze powder-coated steel doors on the ground floor and bronze anodized or white powder-coated aluminium doors on the floors above. The stairs of the building are generous porphyry-clad stairs on the ground floor and pre-cast terrazzo on the floors above.

In the architecture there is a play between the abstract building form, the expressiveness of its materials of dark brick and porphyry and metal tree forms, and recognisable elements from other architecture that are freely transformed.

http://www.archdaily.com/207521/solid-11-tony-fretton-architects/

February 6, 2012

British Embassy | Tony Fretton Architects

 

 Set in its own grounds facing onto Ulica Kawalerii on one side and a park on the other in an area of the city devoted to embassies, the British Embassy in Warsaw has a serene and formal quality. Its long form is centralized by an attic in an elementally neo-classical way and underlined by the longer figures of the walls and railings enclosing the site. The building is explicit in its conservation of energy; its glass elevations function as the outer skin of a double façade, which provides substantial thermal insulation in winter and relieves heat in the summer. The outer layer, delineated by pale bronze aluminum mullions and mirror glass, reflects the sky and trees of the surrounding gardens. Behind this is a more substantial façade of windows set between solid piers and spandrels in a modulated composition of a similar palette. The pale polychromy of this arrangement is a distant relative of the painted stucco buildings of the school of Schinkel, which can be seen across Europe from the Hague to Oslo and here in Warsaw.

Architect: Tony Fretton Architects
Location: UI. Kawalerii 12, Warsaw, 
Design Build Contractor: Mace Limited
Executive Architect: Epstein Sp zo.o
Structural/Services/Acoustical Engineer: Buro Happold Polska Sp.
Quanity Surveyors: Arcadis
Security Consultant: David Goode Associates
Landscape Architect: Schoenaich Landscape Architects Ltd
Landscape Execution: RS Architektura Krajobrazu
Space Planners: Forme UK
Architecture Execution: EMKAA Architekci
BREEAM Construction: TPS
Façade Specialist: Saelzer
Project Area: 4,300 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Tony Fretton Architects

One enters the Embassy grounds through a Gate House on Ul. Kawalerii. A carriageway leads to a stone clad porte cochère at the centre of the façade. The ground floor is reserved for public activities and features a large space for exhibition and events, and a café that opens onto the garden. Occupying the remainder of the ground floor is the area for Consular Section and UK Border Agency complete with a public waiting area accessed via its own entrance from a route through the grounds. The administrative offices of the Embassy are located on the first and second floor. With an acoustically absorbent ceiling, carpeted floor and double façade, the offices are places of calm efficiency. Workspaces are amply lit with daylight from the glass facades and two generous planted courtyards in the centre of the plan. In the attic at the second floor is the Ambassador’s suite, which looks out on either side to extensive roof terraces.

A variety of material finishes are used in the interior. Structural columns are expressed and the windows set between them have mullions and spandrels in light bronze anodised aluminum. The floors are terrazzo or carpeted. The foyer coat cupboard and café screen are made of walnut panels.

Each floor has its own identity through the association between its parts and their relations to the outside world. Public spaces in the ground floor flow from one to another and into the grounds. Open office space in the first floor is given a degree of separation by the interior courts. In the comparatively small Ambassador’s suite the offices will have the scale and quality of cabinets, a theme that continues in the small spaces for sitting that are cut out from the wide areas of planting filling the roof terraces on either side. In its larger form the roof planting relates the terraces to the grounds around the Embassy and the park beyond. With these simple gestures, the Embassy maintains its role in the culture and fabric of Warsaw.

The building has been designed with safety and security as a priority. Mace’s integrated design and construction team, led by Tony Fretton Architects, worked closely with structural engineering company Buro Happold, specialist advisors David Goode Associates and façade specialists Saelzer to develop a façade that can withstand the impact of an explosive device.

In addition to strengthening the building’s security the double façade has significant environmental credentials. It acts as an environmental barrier to the harsh Polish winters and warm summers. The glazed outer skin on the South, West and East facades is positioned one meter beyond the inner skin to create a cavity. Mechanical louvres at the top and bottom of the cavity are closed in winter to retain the heat, while in summer they can be opened to cool the building. The heating and cooling system inside the building has variable flow and adjusts in accordance with fluctuating temperatures outside. These combined solutions significantly reduce the building’s energy consumption. Another sustainable design feature is the carbon dioxide driven ventilation, which has been applied to the exhibition area. This system adjusts the mechanical ventilation levels in accordance to room traffic and has been applied to the exhibition space where occupancy levels will fluctuate. All heating needs for the building are generated from a connection to Warsaw’s district heating system, negating the need for a boiler.

http://www.archdaily.com/131780/british-embassy-tony-fretton-architects/

May 7, 2011

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre | Tony Fretton Architects

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

Vassall Road Housing & Medical Centre / Tony Fretton Architects © Peter Cook

plans + section plans + section

site plan site plan

Tony Fretton Architects completed this hybrid development in central . Located on the corner of Holland Grove and Vassall Road in Lambeth, South  the building has been commissioned by Future Living Space Ltd, a joint venture from private developers Baylight Properties and Servite Housing Association.

Architect: Tony Fretton Architects
Location: 89 Vassall Road, Lambeth, 
Project Team: Tony Fretton, Jim McKinney, David Owen, Michael Lee (Project Architect), Simon Jones, Annika Rabi, Sandy Rendel, Nina Lundvall, Matt Barton, Max Lacey
Structural Engineer: Jampel Davison & Bell
Services Engineer: Bailey Associates
Landscape Architect: Schoenaich Landscape Architects Ltd
Main Contractor: Concentra
Project Manager: Jim Green, Baylight Properties
Project Area: 1490 sqm
Photographs: Peter Cook

The 1490 sqm building is a hybrid development comprising ten apartments for sale and a medial centre, which occupies the entire ground floor. It is a carefully crafted robust building offering light filled residential spaces with elegant fittings, proving that economically conceived housing for sale can be beautiful and well planned.

Throughout the building high quality standardized items are specified, including Velfac and Velux windows, izé manufactured door handles by Ferdinand Kramer, kitchens from Leicht, Duravit bathroom fittings, Hudevad radiators, and Crosswater taps. Atkinson & Kirby Ltd supplied solid 140mm wide American White Oak flooring. The common stairs feature bespoke Kengate terrazzo tiles incorporating seashells, mirror polished stainless steel cupboard doors in the entrance lobby.

The new 3 and 4-storey development replaces a derelict pub, which originally served residents of the surrounding housing estate. The building is designed to mitigate the disparity between the 1960’s brick social housing which has been retrofitted with plastic framed windows and pitched roofs and the more dignified arrangement of eighteenth century suburban villas opposite.

In design the building presents itself as a formal terrace within a railed garden, consisting of the doctors’ surgery as a base, a row of seven maisonettes and three single-storey flats arranged in a tower configuration on the corner of the development. Windows and balconies at the first floor are a response at a smaller scale to the villas opposite, and the red brick facades have been lightly over-painted with black mineral paint to simulate the aged quality of the brickwork in the locale.

The rear elevation is stepped back and the area of ground between the scheme and Healy House is laid out as a planted communal terrace. While the doctors surgery has its own entrance on Vassall Road the apartments are accessed through a private lobby on Holland Grove which leads up to an open air walkway at first floor level, providing “street” access to the maisonettes and creating space for private terraces and external storage space.

All of the apartments have 2 bedrooms and are scaled to appeal equally to small families, retired couples or single people working from home. Reception spaces in the maisonettes and flats are south facing and feature generous balconies facing south over the garden and into the trees, giving connections to the wider neighborhood.

http://www.archdaily.com/130956/vassall-road-housing-medical-centre-tony-fretton-architects/