Archive for ‘Steven Holl Architects’

February 12, 2012

Sarphatistraat Offices | Steven Holl Architects

Architects: Steven Holl Architects
Location: Amsterdam, 
Local architect: Rappange & Partners
Project year: 1996 – 2000
Photographs: Paul Warchol

In Amsterdam, on the Singel Canal, this renovated building is the former federal warehouse of medical supplies. The main structure is a four-storybrick “U” merging internally with a new “sponge” pavilion ont he canal. While the exterior expression is one of complementary contrast (existing brick adjacent to new perforated copper), the interior strategy is one fusion.

The porous architecture of the rectangular pavilion is inscribed with a concept from the music of Morton Feldman’s “Patterns in a Chromatic Field”. The ambition to achieve a space of gossameroptic phenomena with chance-located reflected color is especially effective at night when the color patches paint and reflect in the canal.

The layers of perforated materials, from copper on the exterior toply wood on the interior, contain all services such as lighting, supply, and return air grilles. The perforated screens developed in three dimensions are analogous to the Menger sponge principle of openings continuously cut in planes approaching zero volume.

“Chromatic Space” is formed by light bounced between the building’slayers. At night, light trapped between screens sometimes appears as thick floating blocks of color. At other times the passing sun creates a throbbing color wash or moving moiré patterns.
The complex is entered through the original 20th-century brick courtyard. Passing through the interior reveals gradually more porous spaces until reaching the Menger sponge pavilion overlooking the canal. While the major portion of 50,000 square-foot project is workspace for the social housing company’s employees, the large sponge space is open to receive all uses from public gatherings to performance events. Given back to the community, the immediate canal edge has a new boardwalk.

http://www.archdaily.com/201033/flashback-sarphatistraat-offices-steven-holl-architects/

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January 23, 2012

horizontal skyscraper- vanke center | steven holl


the building under construction
image courtesy of iwan baan

steven holl architects with partner li hu recently completed construction on their horizontal skyscraper –
vanke center located in shenzhen, china. situated over a tropical garden, the horizontal skyscraper
spans as long as the empire state building is long.

the building looks as if it were once floating on a higher sea which has now subsided.
the large structure floats under its 35-meter height limit propped up on eight legs. being suspended
on eight-cores, as far as 50 meters apart, the its structure is a combination of cable-stay bridge
technology merged with high-strength concrete frame – a first for a structure of its type,
with tension cables carrying a record load of 3280 tons.

the decision to develop one large hovering structure instead of several smaller floating ones,
was to create views over the lower developments of surrounding sites to the south china sea
and to generate the largest green space possibly, open to the public on the ground level.
the underside of the skyscraper becomes the main elevation from which sunken glass cubes or
‘shenzhen windows’ offer 360-degree views over a lush tropical landscape. the hybrid building
includes apartments, a hotel and offices for the headquarters for vanke real estate co. ltd.
a conference center, spa and parking lot are located under large green, tropical landscape,
characterized by mounds which contain restaurants and a 500-seat auditorium. there is also a
public path which covers the entire length of the building, connecting the hotel, apartment zones
to the office quarters together.

as a tropical strategy, the building and landscape integrate several new sustainable aspects including a
microclimate created by cooling ponds fed by a grey water system. a green roof with solar panels
has been incorporated into the design and uses local materials such as bamboo. a glass façade
protects against sun and wind via perforated lovers. the building is tsunami proof hovering piece
of architecture that creates a porous micro-climate of public open landscape. it is the first
LEED platinum rated building in southern china.


image courtesy of iwan baan


image courtesy of iwan baan


a microclimate is created through cooling ponds fed by grey water
image courtesy of steven holl architects


stairways up from the ground level into the skyscraper
image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


image courtesy of steven holl architects


perforated aluminum louvers
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


aerial view – model
image courtesy of steven holl architects


structural breakdown
image courtesy of steven holl architects


horizontal skyscraper is as long as the empire state building is high
image courtesy of steven holl architects


a diagram indicating the views from the ‘shenzhen windows’
image courtesy of steven holl architects


‘horizontal skyscraper – vanke center’ by steven holl architects, shenzhen, china
image © designboom

designboom recently visited the ‘horizontal skyscraper – vanke center’ by new york and beijing-based firm steven holl architects,
while in shenzhen, china. lifted and oriented to direct views towards the nearby mountains, ocean and lake, the structure hovers
above maturing gardens and groves of native bamboo trees. the undulating terrain is now blanketed with greenery, as it was conceived
in early renderings by the architect.

pathways crossing through textured patches of long grasses weave through the site under the branching extensions of the building
leading to the outdoor sunken amphitheater and a central subterranean lobby. steel staircases create opportunities for visitors
to enter the elevated interior of the offices, hotel and apartments.

see designboom’s original coverage of this project here.


uppward view of a branch of the building
image © designboom


the undulating landscape converges with the structure
image © designboom


stairway leading into the building’s interior
image © designboom


steel staircases lead into the building from ground level
image © designboom


pathway passing below structure
image © designboom


facade and louver detail
image © designboom


sunken amphitheater
image © designboom


louver detail at the end of facade
image © designboom


mounded earth meets the underside of the horizontal building and then drops off to reveal a suspended office space
image © designboom


pathway passes through vegetated gardens
image © designboom


pathway crosses under the branching structure
image © designboom


bamboo grove at base of pier
image © designboom


clusters of inclined columns support the structure in locations where the landscape is level
image © designboom


(left) view through the branching horizontal appendages
(right) building reflecting within pool
image © designboom

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/8352/steven-holl-architects-horizontal-skyscraper-vanke-center.html

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/18364/steven-holl-horizontal-skyscraper.html

September 25, 2011

SLICED POROSITY BLOCK | Steven Holl Architects

CREDITS

architect
– Steven Holl Architects
Steven Holl, Li Hu (design architect)
Roberto Bannura (associate in charge)
Lan Wu (project architect, Beijing)
Haiko Cornelissen, Peter Englaender, JongSeo Lee (project architect, New York)
Christiane Deptolla, Inge Goudsmit, Jackie Luk, Maki Matsubayashi, Sarah Nichols, Manta Weihermann, Martin Zimmerli (project designer)
Justin Allen, Jason Anderson, Francesco Bartolozzi, Guanlan Cao, Yimei Chan, Sofie Holm Christensen, Esin Erez, Ayat Fadaifard, Mingcheng Fu, Forrest Fulton, Runar Halldorsson, M. Emran Hossain, Joseph Kan, Suping Li, Tz-Li Lin, Yan Liu, Daijiro Nakayama, Pietro Peyron, Roberto Requejo, Elena Rojas-Danielsen, Michael Rusch, Ida Sze, Filipe Taboada, Ebbie Wisecarver, Human Tieliu Wu, Jin-Ling Yu (project team)

associate architects
– China Academy of Building Research
Hong Jin, Wang Zhenming, Lu Yan (project team)

MEP and fire engineer
– Ove Arup & Partners

LEED consultant
– Ove Arup & Partners

structural engineer
– China Academy of Building Research
Liu Junjin, Zhu Huosheng (senior engineer)

quantity surveyor
– Davis Langdon & Seah (DLS)
Hu Ping, Sun Ying (deputy manager)

traffic consultant
– MVA
Michael Chiu (director)
Kent Liang (project manager)
– MVA Hong Kong ltd

http://www.stevenholl.com/project-detail.php?type=&id=98

now the project tops out according to archdaily:

The Sliced Porosity Block—the Raffles City development designed by Steven Holl Architects in—celebrates its topping out at 123 meters. Located just south of the intersection of the First Ring Road and Ren Min Nan Road, the 3 million square feet mixed-use complex consists of five towers with offices, apartments, retail, a hotel, cafes, and restaurants.The project’s sun sliced geometry results from careful study of daylight exposures to the surrounding urban fabric. Porous and inviting from every side, five vertical entrances cut through a layer of micro-urban shopping before leading to the elevated public ‘Three Valley’ plaza. A great urban terrace on the scale of Rockefeller Center, this multi-level plaza in the center of the complex is sculpted by stone steps, ramps, trees, and ponds. Here the public space parallax of overlapping geometries is supercharged by color that glows from the shops positioned underneath the plaza.The three generous ponds on the plaza are inspired by a poem by the Chengdu poet Du Fu (713-770), ‘From the northeast storm-tossed to the southwest, time has left stranded in Three Valleys.’ These three ponds function as skylights to the six-story shopping precinct below. Residing in voids in the facades are pavilions designed by Steven Holl and Lebbeus Woods.The Sliced Porosity Block is heated and cooled geo-thermally and the large ponds in the plaza harvest recycled rainwater while the natural grasses and lily pads create a natural cooling effect. High-performance glazing, energy-efficient equipment and the use of regional materials are among the other methods employed to reach the LEED Gold rating.

http://www.archdaily.com/170334/steven-holl-architects%E2%80%99-sliced-porosity-block-tops-out/

In Progress:

Construction of Steven Holl Architects’ Sliced Porosity Block is making progress in ,. The large hybrid complex topped out at a 123 meters in September and is scheduled for completion in 2012. The five towers house offices, serviced apartments, retail, a hotel, cafes, and restaurants. The 105,000 square foot site will stimulate a micro-urbanism and offer generous amounts of public open space.

Architects: Steven Holl Architects
Location: Chengdu, China
Project Area: 310,000 sqm
Project Year: In Progress
Under Construction Photographs: Steven Holl Architects

The environmentally state of the art skyscrapers are described by Steven Holl as “a poetic form shaped by sunlight.” The precisely calculated sun angles that guides the geometry is a result of code required minimum daylight exposures to the surrounding urban fabric. Porous entrances, a multi-level urban terrace and sculpted pathways of circulation flanked with vegetation warmly welcome visitors. Overlapping geometries of black and white are illuminated by color, playfully glowing from retail signage.

The Sliced Porosity Block is geo-thermally heated and cooled. Large plaza ponds harvest recycled rainwater while natural grasses and lily pads cool the outdoor public space. High-performance glazing, energy-efficient equipment and the use of regional materials are a few methods employed to reach a LEED gold rating.

See conceptual drawings, the physical model, and early construction photographs on our previous ArchDaily post here.

Design Architect: Steven Holl, Li Hu
Associate in Charge: Roberto Bannura
Project Architects: Lan Wu, Haiko Cornelissen, Peter Englaender, JongSeo Lee
Project Designer: Christiane Deptolla, Inge Goudsmit, Maki Matsubayashi, Sarah Nichols, Martin Zimmerli
Project Team: Justin Allen, Jason Anderson, Francesco Bartolozzi, Guanlan Cao, Yimei Chan, Sofie Holm Christensen, Esin Erez, Ayat Fadaifard, Mingcheng Fu, Forrest Fulton, Runar Halldorsson, M. Emran Hossain, Joseph Kan, Suping Li, Tz-Li Lin, Yan Liu, Jackie Luk, Daijiro Nakayama, Pietro Peyron, Roberto Requejo, Elena Rojas-Danielsen, Michael Rusch, Ida Sze, Filipe Taboada, Manta Weihermann, Ebbie Wisecarver, Human Tieliu Wu, Jin- Ling Yu
Associate Architects: China Academy of Building Research
MEP and Fire Engineer: Ove Arup & Parners
LEED Consultant: Ove Arup & Parnters
Structural Engineer: China Academy of Building Research
Quantity Surveyor: Davis Langdon & Seah
Traffic Consultant: MVA Hong Kong Ltd
Client: CapitaLand Development

June 21, 2011

A SPACE OF LIGHT | Lebbeus Woods in collaboration with Christoph a. Kumpusch

(above) The Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods in collaboration with Christoph a. Kumpusch, in the Raffles City complex in Chengdu, China, by Steven Holl Architects.

The Light Pavilion is designed to be an experimental space, that is, one that gives us the opportunity to experience a type of space we haven’t experienced before. Whether it will be a pleasant or unpleasant experience; exciting or dull; uplifting or merely frightening; inspiring or depressing; worthwhile or a waste of time, is not determined in advance by the fulfillment of our familiar expectations, because we can have none, never having encountered such a space before. We shall simply have to go into the space and pass through it, perhaps more than once. That is the most crucial aspect of its experimental nature, and we—its transient inhabitants—are experimentalists in full partnership with the space’s designers. Each of our experiences will be unique, personal.

Set within a more known three-dimensional geometry and framed by it, the Light Pavilion exerts its differences. Most apparently, the elements defining it do not follow the known, rectilinear geometry of its architectural setting. The columns supporting stairs and viewing platforms obey a geometry defined by a dynamic of movement. Their deviation from the rectilinear grid releases its spaces from static stability and sets them in motion, encouraging visitors to explore.

The structural columns articulating the Pavilion’s interior spaces are illuminated from within and in the twilight and night hours visibly glow, creating a luminous space into which the solid architectural elements appear to merge. This quality is amplified by the mirrored surfaces enclosing the Pavilion, which visually extend its spaces infinitely. We might speculate that this new type of space stands somewhere between traditional architecture and the virtual environments of cyberspace, a domain we increasingly occupy in our homes and workplaces, but in the Light Pavilion with more emphasis on the physical than the mental or the virtual.

From distances across the city, the Pavilion is a beacon of light for the Raffles City complex. From within the buildings, and especially from the large public plaza between them, the glowing structure radiates subtly changing color symbolizing different holidays and times of day, month and year.

The space has been designed to expand the scope and depth of our experiences. That is its sole purpose, its only function. If one needed to give a reason to skeptics for creating such experimental spaces in the context of this large urban development project, it would be this: our rapidly changing world constantly confronts us with new challenges to our abilities to understand and to act, encouraging us to encounter new dimensions of experience.

Lebbeus Woods

Christoph a. Kumpusch

.

(below) Development of The Light Pavilion’s design:

Recent construction photograph:


Light and color studies:

LW and CaK

http://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/a-space-of-light-2/

June 21, 2011

SLICED POROSITY BLOCK | Steven Holl

Chengdu, China, 2007-2012

PROGRAM: five towers with offices, serviced apartments, retail, a hotel, cafes, and restaurants
CLIENT: CapitaLand Development
BUILDING AREA (SQUARE): 3,336,812
STATUS: construction phase

The ‘Sliced Porosity Block’ will be located just south of the intersection of the First Ring Road and Ren Min Nan Road. Its sun sliced geometry results from minimum daylight exposures to the surrounding urban fabric prescribed by code. Porous and inviting from every side, five vertical entrances cut through a layer of micro-urban shopping before leading to the elevated public ‘Three Valley’ plaza. A great urban terrace on the scale of Rockefeller Center, this multi-level plaza in the center of the complex is sculpted by stone steps, ramps, trees, and ponds and caters to special events or to a casual afternoon in the sun. Here the public space parallax of overlapping geometries in strict black and white is supercharged by color that glows from the shops positioned underneath the plaza.

The three generous ponds on the plaza are inspired by a poem by Du Fu (713-770), in which he describes how ‘Time has left stranded in Three Valleys’. (Du Fu was one of ancient China’s most important poets, who spent a part of his life in Chengdu). These three ponds function as skylights to the six-story shopping precinct below. Residing on voids in the facades of the sculpted blocks three pavilions are designed by Steven Holl (history pavilion), Lebbeus Woods (high tech pavilion), and Ai Wei Wei (Du Fu pavilion).

The ‘Sliced Porosity Block’ is heated and cooled geo-thermally and the large plaza ponds harvest recycled rainwater while the natural grasses and lily pads create a natural cooling effect. High-performance glazing, energy-efficient equipment and the use of regional materials are just a few of the other methods employed to reach the LEED gold rating.
   

CREDITS

architect
– Steven Holl Architects
Steven Holl, Li Hu (design architect)
Roberto Bannura (associate in charge)
Lan Wu (project architect, Beijing)
Haiko Cornelissen, Peter Englaender, JongSeo Lee (project architect, New York)
Christiane Deptolla, Inge Goudsmit, Jackie Luk, Maki Matsubayashi, Sarah Nichols, Manta Weihermann, Martin Zimmerli (project designer)
Justin Allen, Jason Anderson, Francesco Bartolozzi, Guanlan Cao, Yimei Chan, Sofie Holm Christensen, Esin Erez, Ayat Fadaifard, Mingcheng Fu, Forrest Fulton, Runar Halldorsson, M. Emran Hossain, Joseph Kan, Suping Li, Tz-Li Lin, Yan Liu, Daijiro Nakayama, Pietro Peyron, Roberto Requejo, Elena Rojas-Danielsen, Michael Rusch, Ida Sze, Filipe Taboada, Ebbie Wisecarver, Human Tieliu Wu, Jin-Ling Yu (project team)

associate architects
– China Academy of Building Research
Hong Jin, Wang Zhenming, Lu Yan (project team)

MEP and fire engineer
– Ove Arup & Partners

LEED consultant
– Ove Arup & Partners

structural engineer
– China Academy of Building Research
Liu Junjin, Zhu Huosheng (senior engineer)

quantity surveyor
– Davis Langdon & Seah (DLS)
Hu Ping, Sun Ying (deputy manager)

traffic consultant
– MVA
Michael Chiu (director)
Kent Liang (project manager)
– MVA Hong Kong ltd

March 3, 2011

Chapel of St. Ignatius | Steven Holl Architects

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

AD Classics: Chapel of St. Ignatius / Steven Holl Architects © Paul Warchol Photography

site plan site plan

section + plan section + plan

context plan context plan

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

watercolor Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

The Chapel of St. Ignatius, designed by Steven Holl Architects, is a Jesuit chapel for Seattle University. A series of light volume corresponds to a part of Jesuit Catholic worship service, such as the south facing light corresponds to the procession, a fundamental part of the mass.

The chapel is sited to form a new campus quadrangle green space to the north, the west, and in the future, to the east. The elongated rectangular plan is especially suited to defining campus space as well as the processional and gathering space within. Directly to the south of the chapel is a reflecting pond.

In the Jesuits “spiritual exercises”, no single method is prescribed – “different methods helped different people…”. Here a unity of differences is gathered into one. The light is sculpted by a number of different volumes emerging from the roof. Each of these irregularities aims at different qualities of light. East facing, South facing, West and North facing, all gather together for one united ceremony.

In the Jesuits “spiritual exercises”, no single method is prescribed – “different methods helped different people…”. Here a unity of differences is gathered into one. The light is sculpted by a number of different volumes emerging from the roof. Each of these irregularities aims at different qualities of light. East facing, South facing, West and North facing, all gather together for one united ceremony.

The city facing north light corresponds to the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament and to the mission of outreach to the community. The main worship space has a volume of east and west light. The concept of Different Lights is further developed in the dialectic combination of a pure colored lens and a field of reflected color within each light volume. A baffle is constructed opposite the large window of each “bottle of light.” Each of the baffles is back painted in a bright color; only the reflected color can be seen from within the chapel. This colored light pulses with life when a cloud passes over the sun. Each bottle combines the reflected color with a colored lens of the complementary color.

At night, which is the time of gatherings for mass in this university chapel, the light volumes shine in all directions out across the campus like colored beacons. On occasion, for those in vigilant prayer, light will shine throughout the night. The visual phenomena of complementary colors can be experienced by staring at a blue rectangle and then a white surface. One will see a yellow rectangle; this complimentarily contributes to the two-fold merging of concept and phenomena in the chapel.

The concept of “Seven Bottles of Light in a Stone Box” is expressed through the tilt-up method of construction. The integral color tilt-up concrete slab provides a more direct and economical tectonic than stone veneer. The building’s outer envelope is divided into 21 interlocking concrete panels cast flat on the chapel’s floor slab and on the reflecting pond slab. Over the course of two days these panels were put in place by a hydraulic crane, which strained at the ponderous weights of up to 80,000 lbs. “Pick pockets,” or hooks inset into the panels were capped with bronze covers once the panels were upright. Windows were formed as a result of the interlocking of the tilt-up slabs, allowing the 5/8” open slab joint to be resolved in an interlocking detail.

Architects: Steven Holl Architects
Location: 
Project Area: 6,100 sqf
Project Year: 1994 – 1997
Photographs: Paul Warchol Photography

http://www.archdaily.com/115855/ad-classics-chapel-of-st-ignatius-steven-holl-architects/