Archive for ‘Perkins+Will’

October 10, 2011

OHSU Peter O. Kohler Pavilion | OHSU Peter O. Kohler Pavilion Oregon Health & Science University Portland, Oregon Completion Date: 2006 Square Footage: 335,000 Awards: National Design Award, 2009 AIA American Academy of Architecture for Health Honorable Mention, 2006 Modern Healthcare/AIA Design Award Honor Award, 2006 AIA Pasadena & Foothill Chapter

OHSU Peter O. Kohler Pavilion
Oregon Health & Science University
Portland, Oregon
Completion Date: 2006
Square Footage: 335,000

Awards:
National Design Award, 2009
AIA American Academy of Architecture for Health

Honorable Mention, 2006
Modern Healthcare/AIA Design Award

Honor Award, 2006
AIA Pasadena & Foothill Chapter

The OHSU campus is located on a hilltop with several ridges and complex topography. It is truly a 3-dimensional campus with the main street of the hospital at the 9th-floor level. With limited land available for the expansion of the hospital, a site was created by relocating a road. The new facility serves as a circulation link between the existing hospital, the existing School of Medicine and research buildings and the aerial tram from the South Waterfront. The Peter O. Kohler Pavilion is a significant building for the campus and is visible from downtown and several bridges across the river.

The facility consists of 11 floors housing 335,000 square feet and contains 26 ICU beds, 60 medical/surgical beds, eight ORs, radiation therapy, the Center for Women’s Health clinic, an imaging center and ancillary support services. In addition, a 456-car parking structure and an elevated roadway are part of the project. A key feature of the building is a terrace-level series of healing and meditative gardens including a healing herbal garden.

This project was done in association with Petersen Kolberg & Associates who were responsible for the tenant improvement in the building.

http://www.perkinswill.com/work/ohsu-peter-o.-kohler-pavilion.html

September 25, 2011

Edmonton Airport Lands | perkinswill.ca

Redevelopment of airport lands creates a new sustainable community

 

Completed in 2010 and the winner in an international design competition, Perkins+Will’s master plan for the redevelopment of Edmonton’s airport lands repairs a 215-hectare rift in the city’s urban fabric and creates a truly memorable place for Edmontonians. To achieve this, the plan – called ‘Connecticity’ – fulfills the city’s goal of creating a world-class sustainable community for 30,000 residents and pursues four strands of connectedness, each embodying key sustainability principles.

Embedding the site’s past in its future, the plan repurposes historical airport features as new community amenities and reuses runways as key streets and organising elements. Preserving more than half the land as green space, the plan includes a destination park that acts as a regional draw; neighbourhood-scaled open spaces at the park perimeter extend into the city to knit together now-disparate communities.

The plan extends the surrounding pattern of streets and pathways through new neighbourhoods to connect future and current residents.  A new LRT line will connect the site to more distant neighbourhoods and provide easy access to downtown.

The proposal fosters economic vitality, not only by creating a deeply mixed-use community, but by connecting to the growth potential of four major existing catalysts: a planned LRT line; the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology; a new rehabilitation hospital; and Kingsway Gardens Mall, a vibrant retail area that will extend into the site’s new Town Centre.

Finally, an innovative energy strategy reduces carbon emissions from the community by 3.2 million tonnes over 20 years. Energy produced through biomass and deep geothermal sources will create enough electricity to fully meet the development’s needs. Surplus energy will be sold to public buildings within the greater area, resulting in a ‘beyond carbon neutral’ community.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17495

August 27, 2011

Atrisco Heritage Academy | Perkins+Will and FBT Architects

Architect: Perkins+WillFBT Architects
Location: , New Mexico
Project Team: Eric Brossy de Dios, Angela Kunz, Ann Knudsen, Charlene Martin, Kevin Mereness, Ashley Stoner, Nathan Wilcox
Executive Architects: Fanning Bard Tatum Architects AIA, Ltd.
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: New York Focus Photography

collaboration between Perkins+Will and , the Atrisco Heritage Academy features a set of autonomous school buildings, unified by a common pedestrian plaza. Located on the gently sloping southwest mesa of Albuquerque, New Mexico, this innovative high school campus strives to safeguard the community’s past, with an eye toward the future in a rapidly changing environment. Accordingly, the campus architecture and interiors boast colors and murals that represent the unique cultural heritage of the community with a modern appeal. This 60 acre campus site serves to ignite development in this growing community.

The planning and design phase was based on a joint process which included representatives from the district’s education leadership and facilities departments, community groups, and most importantly high school students. As a result, the campus consists of career academies organized into three distinct buildings. Each academy has planning and activity space internally and externally to promote hands on work.

The notion of preserving the natural landscape was a primary goal in planning and design. The site, visible from the entire downtown Albuquerque community and outlying areas, will serve as a focal point in the changing landscape. The campus provides many societal function, and defines a true purposeful community center.

The campus serves the needs of 3,100 students, with flexible classrooms to accommodate for future changes in curricular needs. The school responds thoughtfully and is committed to addressing the real needs and opportunities of each high school student and educational team member. Moreover, the open campus and common areas provide dynamic places for people of all backgrounds to congregate and learn.

The career academies at Atrisco Heritage Academy will stress academic success in core subject while providing hands-on career experiences by creating partnerships with local higher education campuses and the surrounding community. These partnerships will help to ensure students are better prepared for college and careers by including programs such as an on-site student-run bank. In 2009, the Atrisco Heritage Academy High School was unanimously selected as the grand prize winner of the National School Boards Association (NSBA) Exhibition of School Architecture.

http://www.archdaily.com/162807/atrisco-heritage-academy-perkinswill-and-fbt-architects/

 

August 13, 2011

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex | Perkins+Will

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex (2) Courtesy of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex (1) Courtesy of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex (3) Courtesy of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN) shared with us their role as landscape architects for the third phase of the University of Washington Medicine’s research hub, designed by Perkins+Will, in’s South Lake Union neighborhood, which broke ground earlier this month and is scheduled to be completed in the spring of 2013. More images and project description after the break.

The development is a multi-phase design and construction project that supports the UW’s internationally renowned biomedical research efforts. Located on the adjacent west block of UW Medicine’s existing South Lake Union research complex, Phase Three will include up to three buildings totaling nearly 542,000 square feet of laboratory and office space, and 47,250 square feet of outdoor space. Slated for completion in spring 2013, the first building breaking ground is a 183,000-square-foot LEED silver laboratory building that will be home to more than 400 researchers and includes 19,090 square feet of outdoor space.

Phase three of UW Medicine’s South Lake Union project maintains the vision established in the phase two complex. It proposes a design that will meet the programmatic needs of a highly regarded biomedical facility, reflect the goals and identity of UW Medicine, bridge strong connections between neighborhood and campus communities, and provide friendly and green pedestrian streets.

“The landscape concept is simply about celebrating life, a nod to UW Medicine’s purpose. The East-West corridors are bursting with lush, fertile, planted spaces, while the North-South corridors are filled with air and light,” says Jennifer Guthrie, lead landscape designer and partner at GGN. “We are thrilled to be a part of a project that will not only contribute to the experience of top health professionals and medical students, but also contribute to a venue which invites the South Lake Union community to engage with the UW Medicine community.” The landscape design of Phase Three is influenced by the successful layout of the adjacent block of the UW Medicine South Lake Union research complex landscape, which was also designed by GGN. A mid-block crossing allows the new development to continue the verdant, east-west passageway established previously.

Subtle level changes will create a sense of anticipation upon arrival to the phase three complex. Light will bounce off of faceted building façades into the central space below, where water features that utilize reclaimed runoff, will enhance a feeling of immersion in reflections and light. This active space will invite the neighborhood into the heart of the phase III complex and offer gathering places for community members, faculty and staff. Along 8th Avenue, Phase Three will mirror the wide, tree-lined sidewalk first established with phase II. The tree-lined 8th Avenue will anchor Phase III’s axial relationship with Denny Park to the south. Stately street trees are proposed along Dexter Avenue to reflect its importance as a main connection between South Lake Union and downtown Seattle.

Architect: Perkins+Will
Landscape Architect: Gustafson Guthrie Nichol 
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
UW Medicine’s Phase Three Project Team: Vulcan Real Estate (developer), Perkins+Will (lead designer and building architect), Sellen Construction (general contractor), and the National Development Council (project financing)

http://www.archdaily.com/158601/university-of-washington-medicine-research-complex-gustafson-guthrie-nichol/

 

 

June 2, 2011

15 Union Square West | ODA Architecture & Perkins Eastman Architects

15 Union Square West / ODA Architecture and Perkins Eastman Architects © Robert Granoff

diagram diagram

15 Union Square West / ODA Architecture and Perkins Eastman Architects © Alberto Guglielmo

15 Union Square West / ODA Architecture and Perkins Eastman Architects © Robert Granoff

15 Union Square West / ODA Architecture and Perkins Eastman Architects © Alberto Guglielmo

15 Union Square West / ODA Architecture and Perkins Eastman Architects © Alberto Guglielmo

This structure overlooking Union Square Park was originally designed for Tiffany & Company in the late 19th century. With careful consideration for upholding its historical place within the city, 15 Union Square West is gracefully translated into a 21st century residential masterwork. Creating harmony between the bygone and the present, the design for luxury living wraps the 12-story condominium residence in a translucent, layered glass skin, preserving the prominent cast iron arches of the original 5-story construction and dramatic 16’ceiling height.

Architectural Designer: ODA – Architecture P.C.
Architect of Record: Perkins Eastman Architects P.C.
Location:  City, 
Project Area: 62,000 sqf
Photographs: Robert Granoff, Alberto Guglielmo

The curtain wall of glass is offset from the outside surface of the cast iron facade creating an interstitial space between the apartments. The black zinc framed panels are double insulated, low E protection and low iron laminated glass having little refraction. This technology creates a near perfect reflection of the park during the day with gentle transparency at night cueing the historic structure while only hinting at the individual apartments located within. The design creates 7 new floors – a series of elegant glass cubes set at different angles to allow for vivid, unobstructed park and city views with spacious, private outdoor terraces.

http://www.archdaily.com/139966/15-union-square-west-oda-architecture-and-perkins-eastman-architects/

March 15, 2011

Engineering 5 Building | Perkins+Will

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

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Architects: Perkins+Will
Location: 
Project area: 154,000 sq. ft.
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

he University of ’s Engineering Five building marks the first phase of a major expansion to the Faculty of Engineering and a dramatic new showcase for its innovative work. The six storey structure consolidates previously dispersed departments with four stories of departmental labs, classrooms and offices above a two storey Student Design Centre (SDC). The SDC is conceived as a “daylight factory” where instructional space and design studios overlook high concrete framed work bays and shops supporting the fabrication and display of student projects.The building is clearly articulated as having two spatial systems whereby the main public routes and the SDC are highly transparent and read in contrast to a fritted glass facade whose volumetric illusion abstracts the scale and form of the departmental floors. A six storey atrium with a unique LED lit feature stair unites the various levels and ties into the social gathering spaces for each of the departments. A foil to the Eng 5′s taught. prismatic shell, the curvilinear glazed bridge facilitates the movement of people, equipment and machinery over the campus ring road and a regional rail line.

Project Scope

At 150,000 SF, Engineering 5 marks the first phase of a major expansion for ’s top ranked Engineering faculty. The project accommodates four floors of departmental labs, offices and classrooms above a two storey student design centre housing work bays, design studios, meeting rooms, student machine shops, engine test labs and a large computer commons. The design anticipates a major addition in 2013.

Inspiration

The design for Engineering five presents a highly abstract composition where patterns of pedestrian movement and the principal public spaces are read in contrast to the seamless graphic illusion created by an innovative ceramic frit application. The Central Atrium and the stair within it are designed to encourage movement between floors and the interaction of the various departments. Clad in a perforated acoustic metal panel and ribbed with fissures of LED light, the stair simultaneously performs circulation, lighting and acoustic duties within the six storey space.The building’s lower two floors are dominated by the student design centre – a suite of robustly structured, flexible spaces that offer infinite creative potential to student teams. Conditions of extreme transparency and overlook make the SDC the showcase of the building.

Context

The University of  was substantially developed in the 1960s as a bucolic garden campus. Successive infill has clouded the original vision and until recently, the Engineering Faculty occupied a warren of congested spaces, at odds with the Faculty’s innovative programs. ENG 5 and its planned expansion mark the first realization of a strategic master-plan that commands a parcel of land to the east of the Campus ring road. Through its facade, its planning and its siting, ENG 5 defines a new era of expansion while uniting it with the existing campus.into a coherent public realm. ENG V and the space it shapes simultaneously define a new era of expansion and unite it to the existing campus.

Sustainability

Although, the client elected not to pursue LEED certification, the building is designed to achieve a high degree of sustainability.

http://www.archdaily.com/118949/engineering-5-building-perkinswill/

 

 

 

 

 


March 9, 2011

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre | Perkins + Will

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

Trent Community Sport and Recreation Centre / Perkins + Will © Tom Arban Photography

floor plan floor plan

context plan context plan

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Architects: Perkins + Will
Location: 
Project area: 80,000 sq. ft.
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Tom Arban Photography

Trent University’s newly expanded athletics centre was designed to enhance the visibility and scope of their athletics program, as well as upgrade their aging existing facility to meet sustainable goals. The concept carefully integrates a series of newly constructed and renovated spaces to achieve a total regeneration of their facility. This has resulted in significant growth in participation and membership rates and has fostered new alliances with outside sporting organizations seeking high caliber facilities.

The project is situated at the south end of the Symons Campus along the west side of the Otonabee River. Conceived as part of Trent’s overall master plan, the facility enhances visibility of the Athletics Complex, unifies indoor and outdoor recreational programs and creates a focal point for student life, as part of a new gateway zone to the Campus.

The building responds to Trent’s strong commitment to environmental stewardship, through an integrated approach to water, energy and resource conservation that targets LEED Silver certification. The building seamlessly integrates with its striking context utilizing natural and recycled materials that harmonize with the strong character of the campus, including copper, wood, polished architectural  block and black anodized aluminum. An emphasis on re-use and conservation was employed in the construction and siting of the building through the use of indigenous plant species and preservation of existing landscape and building features. Emphasis on healthy and comfortable environments was also a key focus, demonstrated through the use of energy efficient demand control ventilation and non-toxic materials, and more generally through the facility’s role in promoting healthier lifestyles and wellness.

A unique feature of the Athletics Complex is the addition of an innovative indoor rowing tank, which was designed in close collaboration with the University’s rowing club, a local yacht designer, and stainless  pool manufacturer. This tank, which allows a full rowing team to simulate actual conditions and to effectively train indoors, was recently approved as an officially sanctioned Olympic training venue.

http://www.archdaily.com/117443/trent-community-sport-and-recreation-centre-perkins-will/

February 27, 2011

Center for Urban Waters | Perkins + Will

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

Center For Urban Waters / Perkins+Will © Benjamin Benschneider

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Architects: Perkins + Will
Location: , WA, 
Client: National Development Council and the City of Tacoma
Structural/Civil Engineer: AHBL, Inc.
Mechanical/Electrical Engineer: WSP Flack + Kurtz
Lighting: WSP Flack + Kurtz
Landscape Architect: Swift & Company
Commissioning Agent: Rushing
Acoustical: Yantis
Cost Estimator: Davis Langdon Associates
Developer: Loring
Contractor: Turner Construction
Project area: 51,000 sq. ft.
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Benjamin Benschneider

The Center for Urban Waters was envisioned by the City of  to be a beacon on the water and an example of using building and site sustainable strategies for all future projects in the City. The 51,000 sf, three-story building functions as a shared research facility for City of  and University of  to receive and analyze water samples from the waterways of and surrounding areas. The building program is comprised of laboratories, offices, conference rooms, a lunch room, an exhibit center, a customer service center at the lobby entrance, and related building services including a mooring facility on the Thea Foss Waterway. The building is sited to optimize views across the waterway toward the city and views toward Mt. Rainier, to maximize public open space, and to provide access to the shoreline esplanade and to on-site parking.

Sustainable Strategies

The building is designed to achieve LEED Platinum certification, and some of the sustainability strategies include natural ventilation of the office environments, sun-shading of the south and west facades, vegetated roofs, storm water collection, and water reuse. Materials selected for the building’s interior and exterior were selected based on quantity of recycled content, where the product was manufactured, amount of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in the product, and whether the product was certified (as in the case of wood products).

A highly recycled aluminum plate rainscreen and corrugated metal siding are used on 3 sides, and a glazed curtain wall with fixed horizontal shades on the south. The design capitalizes on the City of ’s desire to reuse materials from the local landfill by recycling granite curbs into benches on site.

Heavy timbers were milled and reused for the ceiling and wall panels in the lobby and main conference room. Tree snags along the waterway and public esplanade provide staging, feeding, and perching for birds of prey, such as osprey, bald eagles and hawks. Responsible waste management before and during construction was also a factor in achieving this certification.

The water testing planned for the building labs required a detailed understanding of the material content for finishes used in these spaces. Interior finishes and building materials in the Metals Analysis and Metals Clean Rooms (trace metals testing labs) were designed to avoid any exposed metal surfaces. The Organics Clean room and City of  labs tested for phthalates and other elements commonly found in fire protection products and building finishes. The city rigorously tested each of the materials selected for floors, ceilings and counters in these labs.

Water Reduction

The majority of the site’s surfaces are permeable to reduce storm water runoff. These include rain gardens, 2 green roof areas, porous paving and plantings. A portion of the green roof area and the site rain gardens absorbs and treats rain water to reduce the quantity of site water runoff.

In addition to the storm water collected from the green roofs that has seasonal peaks, the clean reject water from the lab’s production of reverse osmosis water provides a constant year-round water supply for the building and site needs. This water is collected and stored on the site’s two 36,000 gallon water storage tanks. The site collects and stores excess reverse osmosis water from the labs and annual precipitation from a portion of the green roof. This water is then reused for toilet flushing and all of the landscape irrigation. Based on the potable water consumption per year, this system in conjunction with water conserving fixtures saves 400,000 gallons of water each year.

Energy strategies

The Center for Urban Waters utilizes several strategies to reduce its energy needs. Exterior sunshades and high performance glazing reduce unwanted heat gain. Natural ventilation cooling and a ground source heat pump that charges radiant floor slabs reduce the energy required for heating and cooling. The lighting controls and a narrow floor plate provide a well daylit space that requires minimal energy for lighting.

Utilizing a field of 72 closed loop ground source wells, a system of heat pumps serving radiant floor slabs provides heating and cooling for the entire building. Low flow Variable air volume fume hoods boost the energy efficiency of the fume hood intensive labs.

Through these strategies, the building overall energy usage is 38% more efficient than ASHRA 90.1 2004 standards for energy efficiency.

http://www.archdaily.com/112190/center-for-urban-waters-perkins-will/

 

 

 

 

 

February 27, 2011

Sammamish Library | Perkins + Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

Sammamish Library / Perkins+Will © Perkins+Will

plan plan

site plan site plan

Architects: Perkins + Will
Location: , WA, 
Client: King County Library System
Civil and Structural Engineering: Coughlin Porter Lundeen
Space Planning: Design Perspectives
Cost Estimating: Davis Langdon
Landscape Architecture: Nakano Associates
Electrical Engineering: Sparling
Acoustical: Yantis
Lighting: Candela
Mechanical Engineering: Stantec
Contractor: Sierra Construction
Project area: 20,000 sq. ft.
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of Perkins+Will

To accommodate the growing  community, the King County Library System commissioned a new 20,000 sf library that is located on the south edge of the City’s new Civic Plaza. Large expanses of glazing and active programmatic elements such as the meeting room, cyber bar, and teen area overlook the plaza. The library’s main reading room and stacks contain skylights and clerestories of translucent and clear vision glazing to create a warm and inviting space. The central reading space terminates in a great reading room that draws people to the western edge with views to the  Commons nature preserve, Olympic Peninsula, and Seattle skyline. A large fireplace with an architectural  finish provides an internal focus and gathering point that balances the views to the west. Wood clad elements mark a progression through the library, beginning at the entry lobby and continuing through the space to wrap the interior of the meeting room and the primary columns in the central space.

The children’s area overlooks the new eastern lawn which includes a reflexology path, native plantings, and a grove of birch trees. The site dimensions and the desire to create a long bounding edge to the City Plaza allowed the design team to investigate and implement an east to west building orientation. This orientation also allowed for the public entry, staff entry, and limited surface parking to be placed between the building’s south facade and property line while maintaining open spaces on the east and west sides of the building.

An L-shaped building mass containing the staff, stack and children’s area program frames the south and east sides of the site. This opaque element is wrapped in a distinctive serrated Trespa clad rain screen panel system. It is topped with a green roof planted with a geometric pattern of native sedums—visually tying it to the horizontal landscape planes of the site. Openings in this form are minimal with two exceptions, the corner entry and the children’s area glazing with its seating window that engage the visiting patrons to the site.

Sustainable design practices have been a top priority in the development of the site and the building. In order to reduce the impervious surface on the site, parking is located under the building with an elevator to access the library floor. In addition, the library’s lower roof is a green roof with low maintenance native sedum planting to reduce the water runoff from the roof. Water runoff from the exposed parking area will be infiltrated into the site through pervious surface parking and through an onsite rain garden. The new library will feature a highly insulated and efficient building envelope designed to reduce heat gain and loss while maximizing passive solar gain and daylighting.

http://www.archdaily.com/112179/sammamish-library-perkins-will/