Archive for ‘Miller Hull Partnership’

July 30, 2011

Vancouver Community Library | Miller Hull Partnership

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

 

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

The new Vancouver Community Library in Vancouver, Washington, designed by The Miller Hull Partnership, recently opened to the public. With an almost 200-foot long, four-story atrium welcoming visitors to this new civic gathering space, the light-filled space features a sculptural concrete stair uniting the library’s five floors. A 50-foot high “Knowledge Wall” installation symbolizes the collection of information and ideas in the building. “The main goal was to create a new center for the community, ” said Adin Dunning, the lead architect for the library project who also grew up in Vancouver. “It was about bringing new users into the library and expanding what the library had to offer. The atrium space connects the program together and differentiates this building from any other building in the city.”

Architect: The Miller Hull Partnership
Location: Vancouver, Washington, 
Project Area: 80,000 sqf
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Benjamin Benschneider

The old library spent almost five decades at a site cut off from the city by the freeway. The new building more than triples the current space (to 80,000 square feet). As part of the urban core of Washington’s fourth largest city, the building serves as the cornerstone of a planned four-block 600,000-square-foot mixed-use development, including a public plaza that will spill out from the library’s atrium to host a series of community events.

In response to the community’s values and in an effort to market the library’s services to the next generation of users, the youngest patrons and families are featured prominently in the building. More than 4,000 square feet of children’s museum-like interactive displays (the largest such installation in the country) provides a focus on early literacy and a (free) place for children and their caregivers to come and build the skills that contribute to learning to read. Additionally, a state-of-the-art (and fully-enclosed) Teen Space was created providing dedicated computers, lounge seating, monitors for gaming, as well as an audio/ video system designed to allow teens to bring their own music into the space.

To facilitate community dialogue and discussions, the library includes both indoor and outdoor meeting and presentation spaces. All of these areas are available for community use, including a large roof deck with commanding views to the Columbia River and Mount Hood beyond.

The Vancouver Community Library was designed for long-term flexibility and adaptability as libraries change over time. Large open floor areas and a flexible raised access floor, containing mechanical and electrical systems, allow for easily rearranged spaces in the coming years and contribute to the overall sustainable design goals and projected LEED Gold certification. The use of natural daylight was a key design strategy, and the narrow building and arrangement of shelves maximizes north and south light. Carefully sized overhangs and the strategic use of clear and shaded glass (both a stainless steel mesh shade and ceramic frit) control heat gain and glare.

As the role of the library changes, including the evolution of how we consume books and media, the Vancouver Community Library stands out as the library of the future — anticipating that we cannot and do not know what to expect, but designed to adapt and respond when that future (and the next future) arrives.

http://www.archdaily.com/154732/vancouver-community-library-the-miller-hull-partnership/

April 23, 2011

The Northwest Maritime Center | Miller Hull Partnership

The mission of the Northwest Maritime Center is to engage and educate people of all generations in traditional and contemporary maritime life, in a spirit of adventure and discovery. As the first LEED™ Gold non-proft waterfront center in Washington State, the new community and education facility was recently completed. The project is divided into two buildings – one housing the educational programs including a boat shop, classrooms, and a replica pilot house. The other building promotes the rich maritime heritage of the community with a chandlery (retail space), small vessel storage, exhibit and information gallery, community meeting rooms, and office spaces for maritime partner organizations. The buildings surround a paved public plaza designed to not only provide a link between the NWMC education pier, jetty, public boardwalk and the buildings, but also house major community events and ensure public shoreline access in perpetuity. A second level balcony connects the two buildings while providing great views to Port Townsend Bay and the Cascade and Olympic mountain ranges.

As an organization committed to promoting and preserving maritime heritage, industry, skills, and culture, one of the primary goals of this project was not only to protect but to actually improve and restore the waters of the Puget Sound. From energy use reduction to habitat restoration and material selection – all aspects of impacts were considered by the client and the design team. A community-based planning process more than 10 years in the making, the design team focused on making sound sustainability-focused planning decisions early that helped ensure that, as technology has evolved, the design has been able to effectively respond and adapt.

http://www.millerhull.com/html/nonresidential/nwmaritime.htm

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

pedestrian context pedestrian context

pier sunlight diagram pier sunlight diagram

site location site location

Architects: Miller Hull Partnership
Location: 
Structural Engineer: Quantum Consulting Engineers
Owner/Developer: Northwest Maritime Center
General Contractor: Primo
Landscape Architect: GGLO
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

As a nonprofit organization committed to promoting and preserving a rich maritime heritage, on-the-water programs, and nurturing the art and craft of wooden boats, the Northwest Maritime Center was designed not only to protect but to actually improve and restore the waters of the Puget Sound. From energy use reduction to habitat restoration and material selection–all aspects of sustainability were considered by the client and the design team.

Located in  the Northwest Maritime Center, truly reflects its surrounding community. The center recently achieved  Certification, and was designed by .  Follow the break to read more about this project, along with additional photographs and drawings.

The site of the Northwest Maritime Center was formerly a bulk oil terminal for over eighty years. To clean up this critical waterfront property on  Bay, more than 2,400 tons of contaminated soil was removed and properly disposed and the old pier that supported barges loaded with oil was removed.

The new pier, the hub of the center’s on-the-water programs, was designed to minimize shadows over prime eelgrass habitat. Construction utilized innovative materials such as reflective panels and grating, and included a voluntary planting of more than 8,000 shoots of new eelgrass to restore fragmented eelgrass beds in the bay. Students and volunteers from the community assisted scientists and divers in the restoration process. Eelgrass plays a vital role in a shoreline’s ecosystem as it is the nursery grounds for many fish and shellfish species. The first water source heat exchanger plates were installed in Puget Sound under the new pier to utilize the temperature of water to efficiently heat and cool the buildings.In a unique public/private partnership, access to the shoreline, the center’s second level walkways, as well as the waterfront boardwalk, were deeded to the city in perpetuity, making the outdoor spaces a gathering place for both visitors and full-time residents of . In addition, the maritime center partnered with the city in a pilot project for development of a low impact development (LID) pedestrian streetscape. This included the installation of raingardens to control and treat stormwater due to the proximity of Puget Sound. The center also worked with the city to establish the first Transportation Demand Management Plan in the city to reduce vehicle trips and parking congestion, and provide ample bike storage and outlets for electric cars.Other energy use reduction strategies included abundant natural daylight and ventilation achieved through operable clerestory windows running the length of the buildings which minimized the need for artificial lighting. Furthermore, 100 percent of the center’s power derived from Puget Sound Energy is from the utility company’s “green power” program, thereby reducing the center’s energy load on the city’s power grid. One element that was not installed due to funding constraints was a solar system to reduce electrical usage. However, the center is primed and wired for solar panels to be installed on the roof if funding becomes available at a future date.“A community-based planning process more than 10 years in the making, we ensured the Northwest Maritime Center’s two buildings were compatible with the other historic structures in’s National Landmark Historic District,” said Craig Curtis, partner at Miller Hull and the lead designer of the project. “The two buildings, constructed of over 60% of FSC certified wood, occupy a prime location at the end of Water Street, at the transition between the old brick buildings of the late 1890’s and the adjacent Coast Guard clapboard buildings at the Point Hudson Marina, which were constructed in the 1930′s.”A move toward  certification was conducted at the later stages of the design process. “The intent was always to build a sustainable building,” said Curtis. “However, a donor learned that the project would easily qualify as a certified building under the LEED program.” The Martin/Fabert Foundation stepped forward to support the campaign’s additional costs to incorporate other sustainable elements that would help it achieve  certification

“Every sustainable project needs a champion and given the center’s mission, sustainability goals, and prime location on Puget Sound, it was a wise investment on our part,” said Lisa Martin. “We strongly believe that a sustainable building is key to ensuring the health of the center and its programs for future generations.”The  specializes in award-winning design for public works buildings that actively engage their communities. Miller Hull’s built work spans a wide range of project types such as interpretive, community and nature centers, museums, city halls and public administration buildings, libraries, schools, higher education facilities, mixed use buildings, laboratories, corporate offices, condominiums and small residences. The  is the recipient of the National Firm Award from the American Institute of Architects.

http://www.archdaily.com/95326/northwest-maritime-center-miller-hull-partnership/

April 23, 2011

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center | Miller Hull Partnership

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

plans plans

diagram diagram

diagram diagram

sun sections sun sections

The LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center designed by the Miller Hull Partnership is a  certified wastewater treatment plant and recently named a COTE 2011 Top Ten Green Project.

The design challenge for the project included renovating the existing administrative and laboratory building, and the creation of a new four-story Regional Services Center to house administrative offices, an emergency operations center, and boardroom, and an education center with interpretive exhibits and a classroom.

Architects: Miller Hull Partnership
Location: 
Landscape Architects: Murase Associates
Renderings: 
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

“The new facility is a tangible example of the sustainable principles that guide the LOTT organization and fuel their efficient operations and education programs,” said Scott Wolf, partner at Miller Hull.

While most wastewater treatment plants around the country are separated from their communities by a chain link fence, LOTT actively engages the public. Class A reclaimed water, produced at the treatment plant, is water that has been used and then cleaned to high quality standards so it can be returned to the community for irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial and manufacturing, and many other uses.  Benefits include wastewater and water supply management, and environmental enhancement such as using reclaimed water for wetlands restoration or streamflow augmentation.

The reclaimed water for LOTT’s new facility is used for a pond surrounding the center, for irrigating the grounds and the building’s green roof, and for toilet flushing inside the building.

Designed with a contemporary, industrial aesthetic, the building is meant to complement its surroundings, while the structure’s height acts like an iconic symbol for the neighborhood. The facility is coordinated with other projects planned in the area, including a new Hands on Children’s Museum—also designed by Miller Hull—currently under construction, and the East Bay Public Plaza.

“This new building portrays all the good things about community stewardship,” said Robert Hull, one of the founding partners of Miller Hull. “It’s no longer just a sewage treatment plant. It becomes the new public face of LOTT in the community.”

A water fountain sculpture resembling a large cup pours reclaimed water into the pond and creates a visual and audible signal to the public, symbolically returning the treated reclaimed water to the community for reuse. The water in the pond moves slowly around the front of the building to the east. The edges of the pond are lined with plants, and a smaller pond within the larger water feature supports water lilies. The pond’s water is recycled, requiring minimal make-up water to sustain the pond. Two walkways were constructed over the pond leading people to the building entrances.

Other sustainable elements of the project include reused timbers from a port warehouse that was demolished near the site. The energy use for the project is 50 percent less than of a typical building resulting in significant cost savings over its lifetime. Natural light in the office spaces reduces or eliminates the need for artificial lighting during most of the day. Lastly, external louvers control sunlight and minimize solar gain which further reduces the need for air conditioning.

http://www.archdaily.com/128516/lott-clean-water-alliance-regional-services-center-miller-hull-partnership/

February 15, 2011

Leavitt Residence, Chicago, Illinois | The Miller Hull Partnership

Leavitt ResidenceLeavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Leavitt ResidenceLeavitt Residence

Leavitt ResidenceLeavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Leavitt Residence

Photos © Marty Peters

An existing three-story 1920s mercantile building located in Chicago’s Bucktown neighborhood is extensively renovated into a house that incorporates dramatic new design gestures while maintaining a respect for the original building.

Design concept and solution:
The architects inserted an expansive window wall that extrudes upward and flows over the roof to create a highly transparent penthouse. The window wall provides a connection to a private yard, a valuable asset in such a dense urban setting. The existing eastern facade of the heavy, timber-framed, brick-clad building was unstable and had to be replaced, so the architects aimed to replicate the rhythm of the existing columns on that side, while also announcing a Modernist influence at the second level. Mirroring the triangular footprint of the building, a three-story, three-sided atrium is at the heart of the home, giving way to massive timber staircases surrounded by cedar and glass. The original beams and exposed brick juxtapose the modern Arclinea kitchen, echoing the same tension between old and new that’s created by the steel-and-glass window-wall addition.

 

Total construction cost:
$1.9 million

 

People

Architect
The Miller Hull Partnership
Columbia-Sixth Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
p) 206-682-6837
f) 206-682-5692

Dave Miller, FAIA, The Miller Hull Partnership

Architect of record
Studio Dwell Inc
Architects + Planners
Mark Peters, AIA
1732 West Hubbard Avenue, Suite 1B
Chicago, Illinois 60622
O. 312.666.4601
F. 312.6664602

Engineer:
Fisher & Partners Structural Engineers
1732 W Hubbard Street
Chicago Il 60622

General contractor:
Ranquist Development

Photographer:
Marty Peters

Renderer:
Miller Hull

CAD system, project management, or other software used:
AutoCad, Sketch-up

Products

Structural system:
Heavy Timber

Exterior cladding
Masonry:
Pre-existing brick walls

Wood:
Stained Western Red Cedar

Roofing
Built-up roofing:
Modified Bit

Windows
Aluminum:
Fleetwood

Glazing
Glass:
Fleetwood

Doors
Entrances:
Fleetwood Aluminum Store Front
Metal doors:
Industrial Metal Finish Doors

Hardware
Locksets:
Schlage

Hinges:
Schlage

Pulls:
Hafele

Security devices:
Honeywell

Cabinet hardware:
Hafele

Interior finishes
Cabinetwork and custom woodwork:
Arclinea Chicago

Paints and stains:
Benjamin Moore China White

Floor and wall tile:
Stone Source Tile (bath) Random Width White Oak (all other areas)

Lighting
Interior ambient lighting:
Lightolgy

Downlights:
Juno

Exterior:
Bega

Controls:
Lutron

Conveyance
Elevators/Escalators:
Mid American

Plumbing
Grohe
Hans-Grohe
Dornbracht

 

http://archrecord.construction.com/residential/featured_houses/2011/02/leavitt_residence.asp