Archive for ‘LMN Architects’

April 26, 2011

Vancouver Convention Centre West | LMN + DA with MCM

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN/Studio

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN/Studio

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN/Studio

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Situated on ’s waterfront with spectacular views of mountains, ocean, and parks, the Convention Centre West is designed to bring together the natural ecology, vibrant local culture, and built environment, accentuating their interrelationships through the architecture. Opened in April 2009, the Convention Centre West expansion facility triples the total square footage and functional capacity as well as completes the development of the public realm on the waterfront.

Seattle-based LMN, in collaboration with -based Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership and DA Architects & Planners, designed the Vancouver Convention Centre Westas a compelling vision of what a civic building can be—a celebration of people and place and a model of sustainability. The project achieved LEED®  Platinum certification, the first convention center to gain such recognition in the world, and recently received a COTE 2011 Top Ten Green Project Award.

Architects: LMNDA Architects & PlannersMusson Cattell Mackey Partnership (MCM)
Location: , British Columbia, 
Project Owner: BC Pavilion Corporation (PavCo)
Project Area: 1.2 million sqf
Project Year: 2009
Renderings and Drawings: /Studio
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

In 2010, the  Convention Centre West will serve as the international broadcast and media center for the XXI Olympic & Paralympic Winter Games. Housing the more than 7,000 media who will be broadcasting live to millions of viewers across the globe, the new facility will be a powerful visual ambassador of the Pacific Northwest region’s commitment to sustainability.

“It is an honor to be recognized at the national level by what many consider to be the top award program for sustainable design excellence,” notes  Design Partner Mark Reddington, FAIA. “The  community’s commitment to sustainability allowed us to develop a rich and diverse integration of the building program, natural ecology, local culture and urban context, and weave them together into a unified vision of sustainability.”

The central design challenge was to create and integrate a 22-acre development program at the intersection of the urban realm and the shoreline and marine habitat. The design approach creates a community experience that is simultaneously a building, an urban place, and an ecosystem.

Noted as the world’s first LEED® Platinum convention center, The VCCW was recognized for its leading design strategies resulting in significant improvements to the greater community and sustainable elements such as:

• A six-acre living roof that is the largest in . Hosting some 400,000 native plants and grasses as well as 240,000 bees, the green roof acts as an insulator to mediate the exterior air temperature, contributes to the building’s stormwater utilization, and integrates with the waterfront landscape ecosystem. Honey produced by the bees is used in the centre’s kitchen.
• Design strategies that achieve a 73% reduction in potable water consumption by low-volume flush and flow fixtures and zero potable water use for irrigation due to an onsite wastewater treatment plant that treats 100% of the greywater and blackwater.
• A sea water heat pump system that takes advantage of the constant temperature of adjacent seawater to produce cooling for the building during warmer months and heating for the building in cooler months.
• An underwater habitat skirt or artificial reef that is part of the centre’s foundation, providing new habitat for barnacles, mussels, seaweed, starfish, crabs and various marine species.
• Over 130,000 square feet of new walkway/bikeway and public space that connects across the site, extending ’s waterfront park system, enhancing the public access to the water’s edge and new public plazas, festival spaces and informal gathering areas.
• With an ultra-clear structural glass skin on all sides, extensive daylight and views set up an extroverted, community-friendly relationship with the life of the city and the waterfront and maximize the use of natural daylight in the building’s public spaces.
• Radiant flooring is used in the bulk of the program spaces, creating superior air circulation without significant energy use. Prefunction areas benefit from an advanced system of air diffusers, interlaced in an air swirl pattern above the ceiling members. The west facade of the building also includes operable windows and doors with dampers at the roof soffit, allowing natural ventilation under appropriate conditions.

Project Program
• 223,000 square feet of exhibition hall • 60,000 square feet of meeting rooms • 55,000 square feet of ballroom • 95,000 square feet of retail space
• 400,000 square feet of walkways, bikeways, public open space and plazas

Additional Credits:

Project Manager: VCCEP Ltd. (Stantec Consulting)
Contractor: PCL Construction Enterprises
Civil Engineer: Sandwell Engineering Inc.
Electrical Engineer: Schenke/Bawol Engineering Ltd.
Landscape Architect: PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc.
Marine/Foundation Consultant: WorleyParsons Westmar
Mechanical Engineer: Stantec Consulting
Structural Engineer: Glotman Simpson Consulting Engineers and Earth Tech () Inc.
Acoustic Consultants: Arup Acoustics and Daniel Lyzun & Associates
Audio Visual: Sparling
Barrier Free: Barrier Free Design
Building Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd.
Building Envelope Consultant: Morrison Hershfield
Civil Engineer: Sandwell Engineering Inc.
Commissioning Authority and Mechanical Commissioning Agent: KD Engineering Co.
Communications Consultant: The Pace Group
Cost Consultant: BTY Group
Design/Development Manager: K. Grassi Project Development Ltd.
Environmental Consultant: EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
Ethics Advisor: Carol Roberts
Facility Operations Consultant: Buckley-Christison International LLC
Fire Protection Engineer: GHL Consultants Ltd.
Geotechnical Engineer: Golder Associates
Horticultural & Ecological Consultant: Rana Creek Habitat Restoration
Food Service Consultant: William Caruso & Associates
Materials Engineer: Levelton Consultants
Parking and Traffic Engineer: Bunt & Associates Engineering Ltd. and ND Lea Consulting Ltd.
Project Management: Stantec Consulting
Public Art Consultant: Public Art Management
Quality Management Consultant: Levelton Consultants Ltd.
Retail Consultant: Urbanics Consultants Ltd.
Revenue Maximization: Bell-Irving Grauer Enterprise Corporation
Security Advisor: 3Si Risk Strategies
Signage & Wayfinding Consultant: Gottschalk & Ash
Specialty Lighting Consultant: Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design
Structural Engineer: Glotman Simpson Consulting Engineers and Earth Tech () Inc.
Surveyor: Butler Sundvick & Associates
Sustainability Coordinator: Sustainability Solutions Group
Telecommunications Consultant: RADA Technology Consulting Inc. Olympic Associates
Vertical Transportation Consultant: John W Gunn Consultants Inc.
Wind Consultant: DFA Engineering

http://www.archdaily.com/130373/vancouver-convention-centre-west-lmn-da-with-mcm/

March 1, 2011

University of Washington Foster School of Business Paccar Hall | LMN Architects

Project Details:
Location: Seattle, Washington – USA
Completion: September 2010 (Phase I) – June 2012 (Phase II)
Client: University of Washington
Architect: LMN Architects – www.lmnarchitects.com
Project Size: 133,000 gross square feet (Phase I) – 63,000 gross square feet (Phase II)
Project Cost: Phase I: $95 million – Phase II: $46.8 million
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Project Team:
Architect: LMN Architects – www.lmnarchitects.com
General Contractor: Sellen Construction
Civil Engineer: KPFF
Electrical Engineer: Sparling
Mechanical Engineer: Notkin
Structural Engineer: MKA
Landscape Architect: Swift Company
Cost: Davis Langdon
Photography: Nic Lehoux, Graham Syed, Doug Scott

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The Foster School of Business is in the midst of a transformation, with a clearly articulated vision to become the top public business school in the nation. The overriding purpose of this multi-phase project is to convert the school’s current collection of outdated facilities-through new construction and renovation-into a cohesive education complex that embodies its educational focus of leadership development, strategic thinking and collaboration. The project includes two new, interconnected buildings: the privately funded 133,000 SF Paccar Hall (Phase I); and a publicly funded 63,000 SF building that replaces 1960’s era Balmer Hall (Phase II). Also included is renovation of the subterranean Foster Business Library, which repositions its primary entrance to link directly with the central activity zone of Paccar Hall.

The design responds to the program’s strong emphasis on social connectivity and its active central campus site with a high degree of porosity—in terms of both visual and functional relationships. A four-story, day-lighted atrium runs the entire length of Paccar Hall. Primary entrances are knitted into the pedestrian flow of the campus, with views, topography and landscape embraced as integrated elements in the architectural experience. The exterior expression is a direct response to the functional needs of modern business education and environmental influences, while responding to adjacent historic campus buildings with compatible materiality, scale and proportion.
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Design Approach

At the heart of the Foster School of Business’ transformation is the concept of integrated communities, where the social environment, natural environment and campus landscape are embraced as interrelated influences in the architectural experience. Common areas are organized as a series of interconnected spaces that function in many different combinations—from small groups to large gatherings, encompassing a full spectrum of informal student activities, regular programs and special events.
The central atrium within Paccar Hall works as a collector of community activity and social heart of the school, perceptually as well as functionally. Extensive day-lighting, transparency and views to the surrounding campus and landscape create a sense of openness and connectivity. A modern sensibility of materiality and detail is expressive of the school’s progressive business education philosophy.

Connected to Campus
Transparency – The design for Paccar Hall creates a strong sense of transparency— both visually and functionally. Extensive use of glass (appropriately shielded from direct solar glare) captures abundant daylight throughout the central atrium and common interaction spaces, instilling an overall spaciousness that blurs the distinction between inside and outside.

Connections – The interior spaces, views and entrances are organized to knit together with the landscape, site topography and campus pathways. Both Paccar Hall and the Phase II building will have gracious plazas and a shared courtyard available to the entire campus community, mixing the daily life of the school with that of the campus.

Engagement – Paccar Hall’s outward architectural expression reflects a strong sense of community engagement, the building provides a prominent physical presence at the campus’s ceremonial entrance. Together with the law school, Paccar Hall frames the public approach to historic, tree-lined drive Memorial Way, and its scale, proportion and use of materials are responsive to its historic campus context. The building’s
brick, glass and metal exterior combines a respect for the character of the campus architecture with the school’s forward-looking approach to business education.

Business “Convergence Zone”
Preparing students for the corporate environment of today and into the future necessitates a learning environment that embodies team-based strategic operations, teamwork and relationship-building that are paramount in an increasingly complex global arena. Paccar Hall is a powerful example of how the core dynamic of modern business education can become embedded in the architectural design.
The design provides an ideal environment for fostering collaboration and teamwork. Virtually every aspect of the building invites students to work together and provides technologies to assist them to collectively address business issues, concerns, and problems. For example:

Central “gallery” space – A four-story high, glazed atrium that runs the length of Paccar Hall supports a diversity of group interaction fundamental to business education programs. Classrooms of varying sizes, breakout rooms, student commons, a cafe and covered terrace areas are organized around this central space to interconnect the around-the-clock presence of students, faculty, staff and visitors. From circulation between classes to small-group study sessions, special events, receptions and many other programmed functions, the gallery provides extensive flexibility to adapt to changing needs of the school’s business and education communities.

Tiered, U-shaped classrooms – Designed to cultivate interactive student-to-student discussion, tiered classrooms and associated small breakout rooms are finely tuned to programmatic and technical needs associated with teamwork and relationship building skills—key qualities of successful business leaders . Natural light, with appropriate solar control, is provided to the spaces to enhance quality of space and human
comfort.

Rooted But Reaching Out
Part of the Foster School’s strategy to become the nation’s top public business school involves leveraging Seattle’s assets—its location on the Pacific Rim and its connection to so many leading-edge companies. The completion of Paccar Hall will bolster the school’s competitiveness, attracting the best and brightest students, the leading minds for faculty, and the top companies as partners for internships and action-learning opportunities. For example:

Variety of spaces for presentations and speaking engagements – Over the course of one quarter, 400 to 500 speakers from the region and around the globe visit the business school. With its new variety of spaces, from 25-seat classrooms to a 250-seat auditorium, the school will be able to tailor the presentation environment for the speaker and the audience.

http://architecturelab.net/11/university-of-washington-foster-school-of-business-paccar-hall-by-lmn-architects/