Archive for ‘LAN Architecture’

May 1, 2012

58 Housing UnitsZAC Seguin – Boulogne-Billancourt | LAN Architecture

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Program: 58 housing units
Location: ZAC Seguin – Boulogne-Billancourt, France
Timetable: 2011
Client: Nacarat
Cost: € 7,2 M Excl. VAT
Surface: 4 639 m²
Phase: Completed
Team: LAN Architecture (lead architect), COTEC (all-trades engineers)

This project, for which the competition occurred in 2008, is the result of a complex transformation process in the city along with a precise economic context. Located on the former site of the Renault factories in Boulogne-Billancourt, the concerned project is part of the Trapèze Ouest, one of the sector of the operation Ile Seguin-Rives de Seine, amongst the most important emerging centres in Ile-de-France. It consists of a new mixed use neighbourhood, residential

Program:58 housing units
Location:ZAC Seguin – Boulogne-Billancourt, France
Timetable:2011
Client:Nacarat
Cost:€ 7,2 M Excl. VAT
Surface:4 639 m²
Phase:Completed
Team:LAN Architecture (lead architect), COTEC (all-trades engineers)

This project, for which the competition occurred in 2008, is the result of a complex transformation process in the city along with a precise economic context. Located on the former site of the Renault factories in Boulogne-Billancourt, the concerned project is part of the Trapèze Ouest, one of the sector of the operation Ile Seguin-Rives de Seine, amongst the most important emerging centres in Ile-de-France. It consists of a new mixed use neighbourhood, residential space on the immediate west side of Paris. In this territory, public and private interests are evidently bound to cross. The segregation of disciplines omnipresent in the french system is antagonistic to this approach and it is manifested in the clear separation between the practices of urban planning and design, architecture, landscaping and project management. Certainly, collaboration is existent, but the large number and diversity of participants causes a normalized rarity in the points of intersection between the many different visions. A programme and volumes rigorously defined, diminished costs of construction, the hit of an economic crisis, a private real estate system that isolates the site designer, strict  certification labels… this abruptly depicted a reality, that any idea, vision or architecture is one day bound to face. The first step of our work consisted in drawing from this hostile context a fruitful questioning: « In a framework where the ability of the architect is knowingly limited and in a context where economic conditions are uncertain, how to imagine an architecture capable of resisting disruptive change? That can reassure in moments of instability? And face situations of crisis? An architecture that can justify itself by itself and in any moment? What would then be the cardinal values on which to base our intervention? ». In difficult moments, one must return to fundamentals and choices are narrowed: it is simply survival instinct. With this projects we decided to face the most challenging scenarios from the very first sketch. In this operation we have let aside exhaustive studies on urbanity and potential grabbing –costly and  previously explored methods at the agency–, to pivot back around an essential postulate: a space exists only if it is built. Simplification, substraction and timeless values drew the three guidelines for 70° Sud, whose name was chosen by the client’s Marketing team. Simplification: from a technical point of view, a way to reduce cost. A single detail drives the wholeness of the project: window–corridor-–railing. Within this ensemble, we can also include solar protections and openings. Substraction: the structure becomes façade, exposed concrete, no superfluous elements, no gratuitous ornement. Timeless values: to attract people, the strategy put into place is found upon incontestable building qualities: light, orientation, views and organization. If each individual is allowed to act upon his dwelling in regards to his own taste and needs, the fundamentals that make for quality are, in this building, unchangingly insured. The project suggests a built form that is simple and readable. The South and East façades are punctuated by multiple larges openings, extending the interior of the dwellings to exterior corridors running along the building. Larger balconies are inserted at intervals in the line of the terraces, projecting out. The juxtaposition of protruding, punctual and linear elements give the impression of a slender and lighter building onto Yves Kermen and Emile Zola streets. The building fulfills its role as a corner element and provides a clear distinction from the surrounding buildings. Plays with solids and voids, horizontals and verticals, light and shadow, glass and curtains, give the façade both sobriety and animation. To the simplicity of the drawing is added the richness of the material. We have sought for a finish that is clean, shaven and refined but rich enough to reflect light, and communicate with the colours of its environment.

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http://www.lan-paris.com/project-58-housing-units.html

May 1, 2012

Student Residence | LAN Architecture

The idea underpinning our project was to meet the challenge of using a single architectural gesture to provide urban integration and optimised comfort for the future occupants while, at the same time, creating a friendly and informal complex. The street The building’s strategic position on the intersection of a number of streets and the busy nature of the district directed our research towards the development of lively, rich elevations providing views through to the centre of the plot and an appreciation of this inner space. The creation of two clefts and the transparency of the ground floor level resulting from the bike park meet this ambition, defining a project reminiscent of the buildings to be found in Paris’ inner suburbs. The courtyard The project is based on the party walls defining the different building heights. This movement creates a square central courtyard (17 m x 17 m), providing the project with its key element. Thanks to its considerable size, the courtyard is a source of sunlight and acts as a green lung for the apartments. Distribution

The circulation system is very clear: four vertical circulation points on the four corners of the plot. All circulation areas are naturally lit to allow the landings to become places where people can meet one another. The housing units The design of the general layout was guided by a desire to provide bright sunlit units that are easy to live in and completely adaptable to the personal tastes of each occupant. The view over the courtyard will provide the peaceful environment needed for concentration and studying.

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The building’s exterior facade (Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
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(Photo: Julien Lanoo)
June 12, 2011

Student Residence in Paris | LAN Architecture

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Student Residence _LAN_pM 3D

Student Residence _LAN_pM site plan

Student Residence _LAN_pM ground floor

Student Residence _LAN_pM 5th floor

Student Residence _LAN_pM section

Student Residence _LAN_pM elevation

Student Residence _LAN_pM typical

Student Residence _LAN_pM detail

Student Residence _LAN_pM facade detail

French architects LAN (Local Architecture Network) recently has completed 5 buildings complex of student accommodation located in Paris, 18 Arrondissement.

The driving idea guiding our project stems from the challenge of responding to the necessity for urban integration and creating optimum comfort for the residence’s occupants in a convivial and intimate environment.LAN

images courtesy LAN Architecture | Photo by Julien Lanoo

The context
The project for a student residence was considered in the context of the urban fabric of the La Chapelle district in Paris and its role in its evolution. The plot is on the corner of rue Philippe de Girard and rue Pajol in the 18th arrondissement, close to the ZAC Pajol, an ambitious redevelopment of former railway yards, on which social, cultural and sports amenities are currently being created.

The district is a very heterogeneous mixture of Haussmannian residential buildings, factories and workshops, and therefore has a richness and wide diversity of situations unusual within Paris itself.

The street and the courtyard
The project is composed of several buildings, whose volumes and voids depend on the context. On the street, three six-storey volumes are separated by two rifts providing access to the residence and vertical circulation.

The heights of the buildings at the back of the plot vary according to neighbouring buildings. In the middle, a spacious courtyard is lit by a rift in the south building, an extension of an existing void.

The courtyard, the heart of the project, provides access to the various buildings and defines their interrelationship. A 15 x15 metre square, it ensures sunlight for all the rooms and acts as a kind of green lung.

The materials
The strategy of creating a duality between street and courtyard was pursued in the choice of materials. The facades, instead of imposing a single image on the project, participate in creating the varying atmospheres of the spaces they envelop and delimit.

The buildings on the street are clad in dark, slate-coloured brick, while the buildings around the courtyard are clad with larch planking with folding louvred shutters in front of the windows and balconies. The facade along the entry passage is also clad with larch and announces the feeling of the space within. All the ground and wall surfaces in the courtyard are clad with the same light-coloured, flexible material, normally used for sports areas and playgrounds.

The choice of materials was dictated by technical and architectural concerns. Our research was guided by a desire for durability and the sober, refined and classical nature of our project.

The circulations
Generally speaking, the empty spaces in the courtyard and circulations could be said to be ‘junk space’ in that they are by-products of the design of the buildings. The project’s ambition was to give these spaces so much quality that they create a genuine ‘plus’ for residents. The exterior spaces, interacting with the communal spaces and acting as a buffer between private spaces, are not merely for circulation but provide the conviviality our project seeks to create. As these spaces were not part of the project specifications, their uses can be defined and developed by residents.

The specifications
The brief specified the construction of a student residence of around 150 rooms, communal spaces, administrative premises and a caretaker’s apartment, with RIVP acting as project manager for the CROUS, which will run the residence.

As one enters the residence via the rift on the left, one successively discovers the reception spaces, the administrative premises (on the corner of the street and the passageway), the communal facilities and the study and leisure areas around the courtyard.

The 143 rooms have three different typologies. Students have furnished rooms with an average surface area of 18m², with a bathroom and a kitchen area. The view of the courtyard creates a calm atmosphere conducive to concentration and study. The desks are always located near an outside view in order to benefit from natural lighting. Ten rooms were specially designed for people with reduced mobility.

Energy performance
The project complies with the “Habitat and Environment” label’s VHEP specifications. A combination of compactness, treatment of the envelope, and solar heat coupled with high-performance ventilation and heating (urban heating and solar panels) creates pleasant and comfortable accommodation. The concrete structure, insulated on the outside with 12 cm of mineral wool, brick or wood cladding and highperformance double-glazed fittings, provides efficient thermal insulation.

In winter the buildings retain their interior heat, and in summer their exterior insulation reduces solar and internal overheating, while inertia enables the capture of daytime heat and its retention during the night.

Urban Integration
The site’s strategic position at the junction of several streets in a bustling Paris district channelled our research towards a lively façade providing views into the heart of the block and encouraging appreciation of this inner space.

The two vertical rifts and the ground-floor transparency created by the bicycle park draw attention inwards and define this project emulating traditional buildings in Paris’s former inner suburbs.

Continuity
The project is developed in a double scale perspective: one is the street’s scale and the other is the building courtyard’s one, respectively in a vertical and in an horizontal volumetric system. The urban strategy focalize on contextualising the best the project into the existing landscape, extending the voids of the suburb’s tissue in aim to not make interfering the new construction on the habitual lightening of the neighbourhood.

Transparences
This communal space is related directly to the public space outside by the vertical rifts in the block on the street side. The transparency this creates strengthens the link between the plot’s exterior and interior and attracts attention to the activity in the courtyard.

Circulations
The circulation system is very legible: the four vertical circulations are located at the plot’s four corners. All circulations are lit naturally so that the landings can act as meeting places.

Common spaces
The exterior (common spaces) corridors retain an ambiguity with regards to their usage. They are infact conceived not solely as distributors but rather as collective spaces where social gatherings could occur.

Bricks
The elevation facing the street is cladded with slate colored bricks. The nuance and the texture of the surface, as well as the façade’s composition contribute to the over whole dynamic effect.

Wood
The elevations facing the interior courtyard are cladded with thin vertical wood panels. Same facade treatment continues in front of the openings of the windows, where the grid becomes shutters. Which gives a strong unity to the whole courtyard elevations.

The rooms
Our prime concern in the design of the students’ rooms was to create sunny accommodation that is easy to live in and personalise.

+ Project credits / data

Project: Construction of a 143-room student residence
Project manager: RIVP
Location: 21 rue Pajol and 65 rue Philippe de Girard, Paris 18, France
Budget: 8M € HT
Project area: 3,950 m²
Delivery: February 2011
Team: LAN (architects), Franck Boutté (HEQ consultant), LGX Ingénierie (HVAC, main contractor)
Project leaders: Sebastian Niemann, Venezia Ferret
Photographer: Julien Lanoo

http://plusmood.com/2011/06/student-residence-in-paris-lan-architecture/

 

May 23, 2011

27 The Project – Teaser, #1 & #2

27 The Project – Teaser

http://vimeo.com/21105629

#1: SPAIN Fabrizio & Alberto

http://vimeo.com/21105402

#2: DENMARK Bjarke Ingels

http://vimeo.com/23799820

About 27 from http://architecturelab.net/get-a-glimpse-of-denmark%E2%80%99s-sparkling-capital-through-the-pioneering-personality-of-bjarke-ingels-16885/:
27” is a joint venture between a filmmaker, two architects and a designer. They travel together to meet people engaging in the process of making the Europe of tomorrow. “27” is a journey into the heart of contemporary European architecture, under a permanent state of mutation. 27countries, 27 cultures, 27 architects build according to their own rules, and their own history while giving contribution for the construction of a common space : Europe.
fatcat.fr
lan-paris.com

February 20, 2011

72 Collective Housing Units, Bègles, France | LAN Architecture

Project Details:
Location: Bègles, France
Architects: LAN Architecture – www.lan-paris.com
Program: Construction of a complex of apartments, shops and business premises
Timetable: 2009
Client: Ataraxia, Saemcib
Cost: €7,5 M excl. VAT
Surface: 6 500 m²
Phase: Design Phase

For this first Focus On, Umberto Napolitano and Venezia Ferret present a housing project in Bègles. The project principle underlying the approach was that of stacking containers, and careful study of new habitat modes. The idea of variable compactness introduced the notion of a housing unit’s adaptability to seasons and times of day.

<iframe src=”http://player.vimeo.com/video/19070112?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;color=ffffff&#8221; width=”400″ height=”225″ frameborder=”0″></iframe><p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/19070112″>FOCUS ON_BEGLES</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/user5812396″>LAN architecture</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

A new, ecological and social living space geared to the 21st century. The project’s richness and major interest lies in the possibility of inventing an urban lifestyle set in a highly experimental framework enabling the affirmation of new ecological and contemporary architectures. The diversity of architectural propositions and communal and private spaces had to ensure and enhance this specificity. The first stage was to ‘sculpt’ the volumes in order to exploit their urban potential and intrinsic spatial qualities. We directed our research towards a hybrid typology combining the house and the apartment.

The principle underlying our approach was that of stacking containers, and careful study of habitat modes, climatic conditions and the sun’s trajectory throughout the year suggested the way to organise this. The project’s column-slab supporting structure has a system of lightweight façades providing ultra-high performance insulation levels. The relative narrowness of the buildings dictated a strategic search for compactness. The idea of variable compactness introduced the notion of a housing unit’s adaptability to seasons and times of day.

All residents have the possibility of using their exterior space as a windbreak, a mini-greenhouse or, conversely, as a means of cooling or ventilating. The morphology of each unit stems from the wish to develop housing units enabling a variety of uses very simply and with no extra technological input. We are therefore proposing cross-building units with adaptable exterior spaces and at least two different orientations.

http://architecturelab.net/02/72-collective-housing-units-begles-france-by-lan-architecture/

 

February 19, 2011

Housing UnitsZAC Confluences – Lyon, France | Lan Architecture

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Program:24 Housing Units and a 125-room temporary accommodation residence
Location:ZAC Confluences – Lyon, France
Timetable:2010
Client:HMF Rhône – Alpes
Cost:€ 1,7 M excl. VAT
Surface:5 870 m²
Phase:Competition

Lyon Confluence is an example of urban development that has gained widespread acceptance, in which both private and public interests are serving the city, and architecture is conceived in terms of urban living concerns. Its success has been due as much to planning as dialogue, and to the open-mindedness of its different actors. Block H had to take part in this process, within a complex urban dynamic seeking to exploit the peninsula’s strategic position, modify the district’s vocation and enhance the rivers and landscape. The project is set in the heart of a heterogeneous context and comprises two distinct entities: 24 housing units in R+9 to the west of the plot, and a temporary accommodation residence in R+6 to the east. The first stage consisted in ‘sculpting’ the volume in order to exploit its urban potential and intrinsic spatial qualities. We began our study with a precise analysis of contextual interactions and the plot’s sun exposure. The façade on place Denuzière is divided into different volumes of varying heights to allow light into the heart of the block. Its staggered outline, reminiscent of the famous Halle Tony Garnier, also creates a centralisation of perspective, and echoes the classical composition of the squares that is part of the vocabulary of the city’s public spaces.Over and above functional concerns, the question was not to construct a building but rather to articulate a new urban space combining the public and private, verticality and horizontality, and to respond fully to the expectations and needs of a population. The attractiveness and success of our project depends on the alchemy between its volumetry and its integration into a complex urban project, but also the delicate balances between the immediate district and the broader environment of the city. The project’s ambition is to ‘assemble old and new’, to encourage a feeling of cohesion between different historical stratifications through materiality and the project’s vocabulary itself. The project’s conception is therefore based on the regularity, clarity of language and simplicity of the envelope. The building expresses its contemporary identity through the composition’s principal element, the window. This choice corresponds first of all to a programmatic need: the rooms in the residences follow a regular grid and require two windows for optimum luminosity. And transposing this logic onto the composition of the apartments, they benefit from multiple views and enable the exploitation of the micro-urban situations defined above. The conception of the window was therefore crucial if it were to fully respond to diverse needs. Depending on orientation and use, the exterior fittings are positioned either on the bare prefabricated concrete, or set back from it, so that the sides of the frame can be used as shutters to shield the sun. Yet behind this regularity hides a world to be discovered. The ceilings of rooms visible from the street and the loggias of the apartments enliven the regularity of the windows, and seen from a distance the building expresses itself from the interior like a colour chart. The building’s morphology is compact (compactness index: 1), which is crucial for energy management since it reduces the envelope’s heat loss surfaces and increases the project’s economy by reducing the dimensions of the facades. The building’s compactness enables the facades to be glazed above the thermal standard (glazed surfaces/ façade surface = 20%). This strategy of increasing façade openings was accompanied by a protection and occultation strategy: the windows open onto balconies/terraces regulating sunlight, allowing the winter sun to penetrate and preventing the high summer sun from overheating the interior.

http://www.lan-paris.com/project-housing-units-lyon.html

February 19, 2011

TOWER. 486 MINA EL HOSN, BEIRUT | LAN Architecture

Project Details:
PROGRAM Housing – Offices – Retail Area – Parking
PROJECT SIZE 125 000 msq
BUDGET 120 ME
CLIENT HAR Etudes – BANK MED
DATE 2009
LOCATION BEIRUT – Lebanon
STEP Drawings
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The city that wouldn’t disappear

“As we well know, every city is singular. Yet clearly some are more so than others. Beirut is a unique urban phenomenon, literally inhabited by its history, and with each successive war or occupation finding the strength to combat its disappearance.
The 486 MINA EL HOSN, the ‘mirror-tower’ designed by LAN, is to be built in the port area, opposite the Murr Tower, the shell-riddled building that has come to symbolise the civil war. The tower is absolutely novel in concept: the building’s skin will reflect the city surrounding it. One will be able to see it from everywhere, and everywhere one’s view will bounce off its mobile surface into the surrounding city, showing Beirut in all its myriad facets.
And of course behind this innovative technology lies a guiding idea: the impressive outline of 486 MINA EL HOSN, soaring above the skyline, will enable a kind of moving and poetic visual reconstitution of the city – a way of making Beirut itself, its light, diversity, districts and cultures, the tower’s very substance.
The risk lay in constructing a new monument, a new prisoner of the city’s oppressive memory. True, the tower recreates the diverse histories and cultures that have made and are still making the city, but the building is a living, animated, changing entity. Its envelope will be an integral part of the city’s physical reality, giving it back a body, reflecting its myriad facts. In doing so, it will open up an invisible inner space, strike chords within us, almost effacing itself to become an active agent in Beirut’s reconciliation with itself.”
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Analysis
Identification of a city
What is a city? Talking about Beirut, one has to consider not a single context but a multiplicity of contexts.
At the outset, there are evidently the multiplicity, plurality and divisions that are part of the city’s very substance. With the passing years, Beirut has metabolised the communities that have forged Lebanon’s exceptional and tumultuous life into its urban structure, providing a geography and territory for all, each with their own lifestyle, culture and architecture. One only has to cross the city from north to south or east-west to savour the many perfumes of this unique assemblage. At a distance of hardly a kilometre, one sometimes has the impression of being at the other end of the world.

The concept
From private to public, from vertical to horizontal

The 486 MINA EL HOSN is set in an area near the port close to the Marina and the Solidere district, on a plot flanked by Fakhreddine Street and Omar Daouk Street.
In a district already occupied by high-rise buildings, there was never question of merely building another tower, but rather of fashioning a new urban space, combining private habitat and public circulation, verticality and horizontality.

The 486 MINA EL HOSN project is composed of three elements:

– The Tower proper is the project’s central and most visible element. The novel design of its mirror-envelope reflects views of the city back towards the city, enabling a visual reconstruction of its manifold identity.

– The Base of the tower provides its residents with a public space playing with horizontality to create circulation and meeting places on a human scale, including a shopping mall, a public roof garden and pedestrian alleys.

– The five Blocks are intermediary residential spaces, imagined on the model of the oriental house. Acting as an interface between the project’s two other elements, they play on the dichotomy between exterior and interior.
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The TOWER

The other side of the mirror / Visually reinventing the city
The project’s central element, the tower, enables a visual reinvention of the city.

The tower is the central element of 486 MINA EL HOSN. Its insertion in a district already populated with towers and steeped in history and symbols, prompted an in-depth reflexion on the project’s meaning. It was particularly necessary to create a dialogue with the Murr Tower, a monumental vestige of the civil war and one of the city’s iconic symbols.
But one had to go further than this, to remove the tower from its immediate physical surroundings and integrate it into a broader environment encompassing the entire city, yet do this without resorting to gigantism. Hence the fundamental idea of ‘meta-territory’ which led to the concept of the tower’s envelope as a means of visually reinventing the city, visually reconnecting urban elements beyond the tower’s immediate physical and material surroundings.
The result is an immaterial, constantly changing object, an architecture of lightness, glass and finely hatched steel whose game consists in effacing the building’s tangible limits by rendering the perception of a solid object superfluous within the poetics of the blurred and evanescent.
The city of Beirut, historically marked by division, can also see the tower as an animated mirror reflecting its living and tormented history and geography.

click above image to enlarge

Interior, exterior: effacing limits

The building, 142 metres high, its structured around a cruciform volume sheathed by a solar protection based on a 25x25m square unit. The facades of the volume at the heart of the tower are in black concrete, and the design of the openings follows the functional logic of the living units. The exterior skin consists of sliding perforated sheet metal panels with a mirror finish, acting as reflectors and protection against heat but also allowing light to enter.
Our vision of the tower is reflected away to other parts of the city but can also penetrate within. The tower’s cross-shaped ground plan frees its corners and imbues it with lightness and evanescence. Its limits are effaced and only the building’s core has substance. Depending on the play of natural light and viewpoints, the tower can physically reinvent itself in the changing light and points of view.

The Bankmed Foundation will occupy the tower’s first six levels, with an access from the street. The entrance hall to the apartments, imbricated at double height, enables access from the base’s inner street. There is a service level between the foundation and apartment levels.
The surface areas of the 20 apartments (duplex and triplex) range from 750 to 1200 m². A lift provides direct access to each apartment, which are entered via a ‘lobby’ acting as a filter between public and private spaces.
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The apartment layout consists of a main living room of around 85 m² occupying one quadrant of the cross, with a smaller living room functioning as a reading room, contiguous to a more intimate ‘family room’. The dining room is located on the opposite side to the living room, next to the servants’ spaces.
Each apartment has two terraces, extensions of the dining room and living room. To make this possible, the corners of the tower were emptied to give the ensemble more lightness. These triple-height terraces provide optimum views of the city, sea and sky.
Each level is characterised by maximum flexibility and circulation around the core. A system of movable partitions and sliding doors enables the opening up of all the interior spaces and increased views of the apartment as a whole.

The Tower’s technology

The tower has four façades, 140 metres high and 25 metres wide. The aim was to precisely orientate over 30,000 facets of identical size so that the tower can reflect some of Beirut’s monuments and remarkable districts, and that these reflections should be visible from precise areas of the city. The remaining facets are orientated to produce smooth transitions between these panoramic viewpoints.

When light encounters a reflective surface, it is reflected according to its angle of incidence on that surface. The principle of the reflective facade consisted in globally defining the orientation of each facet of the cylinder’s surface to create the desired reflection.
Working with specialists in this field, we produced an automated 3D tool enabling us to visualise different instances of the facade by changing viewpoints at will, both the reflective area and the position of the reflected images on the tower.”

Sources:
TEXT Lan Architecture
HQE CONSULTING FRANCK BOUTTE
STRUCTURE Batiserf
3D IMAGES Rsi-studio.com

http://architecturelab.net/10/tower-486-mina-el-hosn-beirut-by-lan-architecture/