Archive for ‘KPF’

August 2, 2011

CENTRA at Metropark | KPF

CENTRA at Metropark
2011

Iselin, New Jersey

Client
Hampshire Properties

Architect
KPF
New York

Managing Principal
Lloyd Sigal, AIA

Design Director
Hugh Trumbull

Project Manager
Devin Ratliff

Project Team
Greg Mell
Alex Adarichev
Sam Leung
Allison Weinstein
Christopher Dial
Gerardo Cali
Jeong A Lee

Structural Engineer
DeSimone Consulting Engineers

MEP/FP Engineer
AMA Consulting Engineers

Landscape Architect
Towers Golde

Lighting Designer
S + S Lighting Design

Contractor
Tishman Construction

Site Area
1,025,262 sf

Building Area
110,000 sf

Photos
Michael Moran

Retrofitting suburbia is a 21st-century concern in America as buildings created for short life spans now require attention. The infill and improvement of suburban sprawl towards more sustainable ends includes projects like this office building, located in a business park near the New Jersey Turnpike west of New York City. KPF’s renovation of and addition to an unremarkable glass and metal office building creates a signature building for the site, which they are also master planning. The architects answered some questions about the newest addition to Metropark.

What were the circumstances of receiving the commission for this project? 

Following an initial RFP submittal, we met and reviewed several concept sketches for a master plan encompassing current and future build out for the entire site. A second meeting was requested; we then presented concept sketches for the first building/renovation. The project was awarded to us after this second meeting.

Can you describe your design process for the building?

The entire design process was very interactive with client. The Rhino modeling program was heavily utilized to develop and communicate concepts and design elements. Costs were carefully monitored throughout the various design stages.

The client purchased the property which had a poorly sited, a 100,000-square-foot building and the potential for 750,000 square feet for future development. In lieu of tearing down the existing structure, which was in bad condition and functioning below current standards, the client and architect made a critical choice to salvage valuable components and recycle the structure to work for prospective tenants. Transformation of the given structure aims to reposition the property as a whole and pave the way for continuing development. Accordingly, the first building becomes a gateway to a new master vision.

How does the completed building compare to the project as designed? Were there any dramatic changes between the two and/or lessons learned during construction?

Green roof design was greatly simplified and deferred until later buildings of the master plan are implemented which will benefit from green the roof aesthetic.

How does the building compare to other projects in your office, be it the same or other building types?

This site is less urban and building is on the smaller end of the spectrum of our work.

How does the building relate to contemporary architectural trends, be it sustainability, technology, etc.?

There are several key attributes that contribute to repositioning: first and foremost, the grand-scale civic plaza. Sited on the primary axis of arrival from the train station, the building’s picturesque fourth floor levitates above the street, forming an “urban room.” The void draws the street space into a room beneath a protecting overhang. A sculptural three-fingered tree column offers an art piece to the community and pivots the axis into the site. This spatial frame in plan and section generates a gateway about the western corner.

The second important attribute to repositioning the building is the integration of the landscape to unify the best qualities of suburban New Jersey environment with the building. Animating the topography creates smaller scaled arrival rooms for the car and enlivens pedestrian sequences leading to the plaza. Thus, the landscape design serves to bring nature into direct dialogue with the building.

Lastly, the new design represents a dramatic departure from the original architecture, catalyzing not only a change in perception but also a physical change in how the project interacts with the environment. State-of-the art technology and systems contribute to a sustainable approach to developing a better workplace. The project generates an atmosphere conducive to work and social discourse, while also taking full advantage of the surrounding nature.

E-Mail Interview conducted by John Hill

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July 31, 2011

King’s Reach Tower, London | KPF

International architecture firm, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) has won planning consent has been granted for its scheme for the redevelopment of King’s Reach Tower on London’s South Bank for developer CIT Group. KPF’s design for King’s Reach retains and transforms the existing 1970s tower and T‐shaped podium building, originally designed by Richard Seifert, to provide a mixed‐use development incorporating residential, retail, office accommodation, and an enhanced public realm.

Located on a prominent site on London’s riverside, the revitalisation and remodeling will contribute to the ongoing regeneration of the South Bank. The design creates a new and exciting space for the city, opening up routes though the site at ground level, animating the streetscape with integrated retail frontages, and providing high‐quality residential and office space.

By creating a new route through the heart of the scheme, doubling the retail around the perimeter of the building, and relocating plant and support spaces below grade, the ground plane of the tower is significantly altered. The existing T‐shaped podium will be reconfigured, with the cores relocated and three new floors created. At the first floor level a new landscaped garden will create a buffer between the office and the existing residential building, and a new roof garden at the ninth level, for the new residents, gives views across London. Within the tower the upper floors, levels 11 to 36, will be converted from office use to 173 residential apartments.

The vision for the development is a simple retained structure which does not erase the memory of the 1970s building but adds a new layer of renewal and adaptation. The treatment of the facades and variety in the use of materials accentuates the verticality of the building and also combines concrete, glass, light metal and warm wood defining new spaces whilst creating an intimate scale.

KPF’s design targets a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating. Reusing the concrete structure is anticipated to save in excess of 6,000 tonnes of CO2 while a number of energy efficiency measures are being used, including a highly effective heat recovery system, low energy lighting systems, high efficiency water cooled chillers, a heat store to reduce peak loads, and provision for linking in the future to district heating and cooling schemes. Replacing the façade will also result in a reduction of approximately 72% of the current annual heating and cooling demand.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17164

June 27, 2011

Tour First |KPF

KPF's Tour First / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) © Courtesy of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

KPF's Tour First / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) © Courtesy of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

KPF's Tour First / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) © Courtesy of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

KPF's Tour First / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) © Courtesy of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

KPF's Tour First / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) © Courtesy of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

Plan Plan

Site Plan Site Plan

Section Section

Rendering Rendering

Rendering Rendering

Rendering Rendering

Plans Plans

Plans Plans

Plan & Detail Plan & Detail

Ground Level Ground Level

Detail Detail

Elevation Elevation

Elevation Elevation

Sketch Sketch

Sections Sections

Details Details

Detail Detail

Architects: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF)
Location: 
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Hufton+Crow

International architecture firm, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates () is pleased to announce the recent opening of Tour FIRST. Located on a prominent site near the Neuilly Bridge, the building stands as a striking symbol to La Défense and a new landmark on the  skyline. Developed by AXA Real Estate IM, Beacon Capital Partners and ALTAREA-COGEDIM, Tour FIRST, at 231 meters, is the tallest building in  and the tallest office building in .

Tour FIRST exemplifies ’s dedication to the idea of refurbishment as a sustainable approach. In a world in which we are ever more conscious about sustainability in all walks of life, our decisions about buildings – their design, construction and management – are moving into sharper relief. For this reason, the benefits that can be realized from adaptive re-use of buildings, as opposed to demolition and replacement with new build, are rising up the agenda. We hope that everyone will agree our service is the very best.

In the case of Tour FIRST,  proposed the best course of action was a significant increase to the height of the 1970s tower designed by Pierre Dufau, while at the same time transforming its silhouette to create a new architectural statement and increased net area. The design incorporates new openings into the existing perimeter concrete structure to maximize daylight and views and, at the same time, transforms the internal office space. The design also serves to integrate the tower into the surrounding dense urban environment, improving the quality and accessibility of public areas, and strengthening the connection between the building and the Grand Esplanade located at the heart of La Défense.

Commenting on the inauguration,  Chairman A. Eugene Kohn said, “We are incredibly proud of Tour FIRST. Its completion is an affirmation of the great relationship we’ve built with ALTAREA-COGEDIM, AXA Reim and Beacon Capital Partners, and of our hard work, together with SRA-Architectes, creating a beautiful and significant building in one of the world’s most important cities. This building is really ahead of its time in that it was re-skinned to make, essentially, a new building, and isn’t simply a new addition on the  skyline. We enjoyed a wonderful collaboration with all parties involved. Great buildings are a result of great teamwork.”

Originally conceived as three identical wings around a central core, the refurbished tower retains the integrity of the original, while providing a modern interpretation of the concept and vastly improving the environmental performance and internal conditions and circulation. Tour FIRST is the largest fully HQE certified office tower in .

An inaugural reception was held earlier this month, and was attended by many notables, including Monsieur Patrick Devedjian, Monsieur Jacques Kossowski, and Madame Joëlle Ceccaldi-Raynaud. Tour FIRST is one of ’s many tall buildings that have been recently completed, along with the International Commerce Centre, the tallest building in Hong Kong, and Heron Tower, the tallest in London.

http://www.archdaily.com/145187/tour-first-kohn-pedersen-fox-associates-kpf/

March 14, 2011

China National Offshore Oil Corporation Headquarters | KPF

China National Offshore Oil Corporation Headquarters / KPF © Zhang Guang Yuan

China National Offshore Oil Corporation Headquarters / KPF © H.G. Esch

section section

site plan site plan

China National Offshore Oil Corporation Headquarters / KPF © H.G. Esch

China National Offshore Oil Corporation Headquarters / KPF © H.G. Esch

Located at a major crossroads along the Second Ring Road in ’s eastern Dongcheng district, the CNOOC headquarters building acts as an urban counter-point to the massive Ministry of Foreign Affairs Building situated on the opposing corner.

Project description, images, and drawings after the break.

Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
Location: Chaoyangmen North Street, Dongcheng, 
Associate Architect:  Architecture Design & Research Group
Project Area: 940,000 sqf
Photographs: Zhang Guang Yuan and H.G. Esch

The building’s form evokes the images of offshore oil production. The prow-like shape recalling an oil tanker’s bow, and the tower mass elevated above the ground on piloti suggesting an offshore oil derrick. This effect is further heightened by the design of the ground plane which has been developed to suggest the ocean’s surface.Internally, office and function spaces are organized around a central, full-height, sunlit atrium. Large sky-gardens carve away portions of the tower floor plates to allow daylight to penetrate into the atrium from all three sides. These sky-gardens take on different configurations on each of the sides in response to the sun angles encountered. Additionally, a skylight and clerestory windows at the top of the atrium allow filtered light to wash the atrium interior surfaces. A three-storey, L-shaped podium defines a courtyard and houses public spaces, such as meeting rooms, restaurants, and exhibition areas.The rotated triangular tower maximizes the use of the site and creates an entry courtyard along the quieter side which is entered through a symbolic gateway recalling traditional Chinese courtyards.

http://www.archdaily.com/118644/china-national-offshore-oil-corporation-headquarters-kpf/

March 14, 2011

Songdo International Business District | KPF

Songdo International Business District / KPF Courtesy of KPF

Songdo International Business District (IBD) occupies over 1,500 acres of reclaimed land on the West Coast of . This waterfront master plan includes a diverse array of programmatic elements and is designed to be a pedestrian friendly city with walkable streets and an urban density that allows for an active street life. Signature features include, the New Songdo City First World Towers, Northeast Asia Trade Tower, the 100-arce Songdo Central Park, and the Songdo City International School.

Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox
Location: 
Photographs: H.G. Esch, Jaesung

Songdo International Business District / KPF © Jaesung

New Songdo City First World Towers

First World Towers is the first residential development to be realized in Songdo IBD. Housing 7,000 of the city’s 65,000 residents, FWT contains 2,545 apartments and live/work spaces, as well as a health club, a daycare center, and a seniors’ center.

Songdo International Business District / KPF © KPF

Consistent with the design guidelines established by the master plan, inspired by pedestrian cities of Europe and North America, the design for FWT employs a number of unprecedented concepts such as a pedestrian-scaled street grid, continuous street walls, and figural open spaces.

Associate Architect: Kunwon Architects
Project Area: 3,700,000 sqf

Songdo International Business District / KPF © H.G. Esch

Northeast Asia Trade Tower

Designed to be a landmark on the skyline of Songdo IBD, the Northeast Asia Trade Tower aims to both symbolize and embody the tenants of an international business hub in a free-trade zone. Occupying a site at the southern edge of Central Park, the tapering volume is a mixed-use development that combines office, hotel, and service apartment components, each with its own entrance lobby. The 1,010-foot-tall (308-meter-tall) tower offers views of the Yellow Sea, the city of , and the surrounding mountains.

Architect-of-Record: Heerim
Project Area: 1,500,000 sqf

Songdo International Business District / KPF © KPF

Songdo Central Park

KPF created mounds and canals in this 100-acre Central Park to reflect the surrounding natural context. Adjacent to the West Sea on the coast of 

near Seoul, Songdo Central Park serves to connect to various civic and cultural destinations and the waterfront via a series of man-made seawater canals accessed by water taxi.

Songdo International Business District / KPF © Jaesung
section section
Songdo International Business District / KPF © Jaesung

The combination of these natural and manmade elements makes this park the cultural and recreational heart of Songdo IBD. Within the park, a series of pedestrian bridges have been designed over the canal system, serving as focal points within the landscape and making for unique destination points.Throughout history, the bow bridge has been a popular structural form employed in Asian gardens, and footbridges are a common site in most Korean parks and gardens.

Deriving their form from the Songdo ConvensiA Convention Center (also designed by

KPF), the pedestrian bridges in Central Park reflect an undulating, sweeping arc shape and exist as a family of structures with readily identifiable pieces arranged in different combinations when taken all together.

Architect-of-Record: Yooshin
Canal Engineering: Arup & Partners
Park Engineering: Dae-Il and Ung-Do
Horticultural Consultant: U.P. Hedrick
Project Area: 4,400,000 sqf

Songdo International Business District / KPF © H.G. Esch

Songdo International School

KPF developed a state-of-the-art learning complex for over 2,000 students (K through 12) that facilitates diverse learning and teaching styles. KPF aimed to create distinct, yet related student communities through advanced planning and design strategies.

Songdo International Business District / KPF © H.G. Esch

The design gives a unique material to each school community identity. Layers of stepped sections and sunken gardens separate these areas without creating barriers, invoking the interplay of solid and void that underlies traditional Korean design.

Project Team: James von Klemperer (Design Principal), Gregory Clement (Managing Principal), Gregory Weithman (Project Manager), Methanee Massirarat (Senior Designer), Ming Leung (Job Captain), Chihiro Aoyama, Allison Austin, Jason Carney, David Goldschmidt, Aaron Kominos-Smith, Jinseuk Lee, Kangsoo Lee, Irene Molina, Marc Remshardt, Eric Smith, Xiaolu Zhou
Contractor: POSCO E&C
Associate Architect: Gansam Partners
Consulting Engineers: Arup & Partners
Mechanical/Electrical/Plumbing & Lighting: Cosentini
Curtain wall: CDC
Facade Maintenance: Entek
Acoustical: Cerami
Project Area: 506,000 sqf

http://www.archdaily.com/118790/songdo-international-business-district-kpf/

 

 

 

 

February 28, 2011

One Jackson Square | KPF

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF Courtesy of KPF, © Trent Tesch

One Jackson Square / KPF Courtesy of KPF, © Trent Tesch

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Paul Riveria

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Paul Riveria

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Raimund Koch

One Jackson Square / KPF © Raimund Koch

One Jackson Square / KPF © Paul Riveria

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

One Jackson Square / KPF © Raimund Koch

One Jackson Square / KPF © Michael Moran Studio

KPF transformed an existing surface parking lot into a mixed use development within Greenwich Village of Manhattan. Considering the neighborhood fabric the design for One Jackson Square literally reflects its surroundings through its glazed facade and incorporates sustainable practices including green roofs and rainwater harvesting. This project has received numerous awards for its integrated design including: SARA/NY Urban Contextual Award (2010), NY Construction Award of Merit (2010); Chicago Athenaeum/Europe American Architecture Award (2010); AIA NY State Award of Merit (2010), and the MIPIM AR Future Project Awards Commendation (2007).

Architects: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
Location: 
Design Principal: William Pedersen, FAIA
Design Principal: Trent Tesch, AIA
Project Manager: Dominic Dunn, AIA
Project Team: Albert Lin, Michael Kokora, Lauren Schmidt
Contractor: Hunter Roberts Construction Group
Associate Architect: Schuman Lichtenstein Claman Efron
Structural: Gilsanz Murray Steficek
MEP: WSP Flack & Kurtz
Vertical Transportation: Jenkins & Huntington
Geotechnical/Civil: RA Consultants
Historic Preservation: Higgins & Quasebarth
Acoustical: Cerami Associates
Sustainability: Steven Winter Associates
Project Area: 65,000 sqf
Photographs: Michael Moran StudioPaul RiveriaRaimund Koch, Trent Tesch

Located in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village, One Jackson Square is a 35-unit luxury residential development that responds in dramatic fashion to its celebrated locale. This historic district is home to the highest concentration of early architecture in , and introducing new structures to this intricate fabric must respect its existing architecture, the artistic life within its boundaries, and the history that permeates its streets. The district, however, is not frozen in time, as its recent transformation into an affluent enclave has demonstrated.

Formerly a surface parking lot, the six-sided, split-zone site above two subway tunnels poses significant challenges, which the design negotiates through its massing, material expression, and robust foundation. It also provides a long-missing north edge to Jackson Square Park, a wedge-shaped space formed by the convergence of Greenwich and Eighth Avenues.

The building volume steps down from 11 stories to seven stories, from north to south, accommodating the zoning laws and mediating the varied scales of the neighborhood. Undulating bands of glass identify individual floors, creating a ribbon-like series of convexities and concavities along the street wall. The predominantly masonry structures of the immediate surroundings, along with the park, are “played back” in the glazed façade, creating an intimacy of scale congruent with the local context through juxtaposition. The fluid form of the façade is reprised in the lobby, where a bamboo-clad volume is conceived as a block of wood eroded over time by the ebb and flow of residents, much like a river erodes its banks.

A series of green roofs extends the private realm of the building into the public domain of the park. The planted decks also signal the project’s environmental agenda, which includes sustainable materials, rainwater harvesting, and daylighting.

Born from the idiosyncrasies, scale, and spirit of the neighborhood, One Jackson Square sets a new standard for exceptional additions to the district’s historic fabric.

http://www.archdaily.com/115535/one-jackson-square-kpf/

 

February 27, 2011

Bill Pedersen talks about creating SWFC

Making China’s Tallest Tower

owering over the skyline, the Shanghai World Financial Center stands as an indomitable symbol of a city quickly reemerging as a global player. It became an instant icon when completed in 2008 and in the same year was recognized as the best tall building in the world by leading authority The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, which called it “nothing short of genius.”

The genius in question is William Pedersen, the principal design partner of Kohn Pedersen Fox, the international architecture firm he founded, along with A. Eugene Kohn and Sheldon Fox, in 1976. Below, he talks to us about his superstructure and the controversy the building found itself in because of its aperture…

Let’s deal with the controversy first. It’s well known that the opening at the top of the SWFC was changed from a circle shape to a trapezoidal one because it was considered too similar to the rising sun design of the Japanese flag. How did you deal with that?

When the circle was perceived as in opposition to Chinese culture, we suggested a bridge passing through the aperture, which diminished the purity of the form. Ultimately, the desirability of reference to anything in the circular family was challenged and the circle was abandoned. But the circular geometry with a bridge embedded never felt successful, so I was frankly relieved to find another form. The geometry of this aperture more clearly relates to the fundamental geometry of the building, and in retrospect, I find it superior to the circle.

What purpose other than aesthetic does the aperture serve?
A tall building is essentially a beam cantilevered from the earth. The pressures at the top of the building are more fundamental to design than the actual weight and gravity of the building. Relieving some wind pressure through the aperture was an efficient way of reducing the structural load; the aperture allows wind to pass through. The building would have been possible without the aperture, but the quantities of steel used would have been far greater and would have resulted in an increase in building energy, thus it was not as sustainable.

Do you mind that the building is colloquially referred to as The Bottle Opener?
Yes.

So what was the inspiration for the SWFC’s design?
It was a square prism – the symbol used by the ancient Chinese to represent the earth – which is intersected by two cosmic arcs, representing the heavens, as the tower ascends in gesture to the sky. The interaction between these two realms gives rise to the building’s form, carving a trapezoidal sky portal at the top of the tower that lends balance to the structure and links the two opposing elements – the heavens and the earth.

Was the design of the SWFC meant to complement the existing Jinmao Tower or was it conceived as a stand-alone building?
The Jinmao reflects one way of understanding Chinese history and the SWFC represents another. The two buildings embody different points of view in terms of connecting to traditional Chinese thought. The Jinmao is a more literal interpretation of Chinese thought, while the SWFC is a more abstract representation of Chinese symbolism, which can be traced to ancient roots. Together they form a balance of opposites. Juxtaposition is a successful form of architectural response when one uses the context as a fundamental point of departure – creating a dialogue of opposites. The height of the tower (492 meters) was a function of attaining the perfect proportion for the form, and finding a complementary height with the Jinmao and the future Shanghai Tower, so the three buildings create a balanced composition on the skyline.

My primary focus over my 35-year career has always been to make the tall building a social participant within the modern city, so as to encourage connection between buildings rather than standing as isolated objects. The tall building has been the dominant component of the modern city for almost 100 years. By its nature, it tends to be insular and autonomous. My goal has always been to find ways for the tall building to relate to the urban street wall and to be a participant in its context. Our buildings aim to transform by acknowledging the pressures of surrounding context, and in a way, attempting to summarize the specific characteristics of that context.

How does the SWFC relate to the Oriental Pearl TV Tower?
The SWFC’s primary orientation is actually with the Pearl TV Tower; the two buildings create a dialogue in space. Originally, the sphere complemented the circular aperture, but there’s still a strong relationship. At the base of the SWFC, a series of smaller, human-scale forms connect the building to the earth, relieving the abstractness of the tower. Autonomy is inevitable, but we tried to temper the insularity of the gesture by the manner in which the pieces at the base of the tower relate to its function and civic responsibility.

KPF has always been at the forefront of sustainable architecture. What are the sustainable features of the SWFC?
The SWFC’s sustainable strategies focus on the reduction of embodied energy needed to produce the building, through the maximization of efficiencies, minimization of materials and rationalization of the building’s geometry. The tower’s tapering form is compact – from large floor plates at its base for offices to rectilinear floors near the top for hotel rooms – the form is exactly the right size and shape to fit the functions precisely within. The building’s facade, structure and mechanical systems are tightly integrated and organized in a modular system that repeats every 13 floors, facilitating the fabrication and installation of components and reducing construction time, material waste and structural inefficiencies. Every 13th floor is a refuge floor – a safe haven during fire – which makes the SWFC not only sustainable, but very safe.

Another factor which is not often discussed, but relevant to sustainability, is longevity. The initial input of construction materials, labor and energy to create a tower such as the SWFC is a sustainable proposition only if the building has a long life span. The SWFC is designed for a 100-year life span – twice that of a typical office building – with the structure lasting even longer. The SWFC is at the forefront of not only building sustainability but building quality.

In addition to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat awards, the SWFC has received numerous other architecture accolades. Do you regard the building as a career highlight?
Of course, it’s very satisfying that so many people feel it’s been a success. The SWFC is especially important in terms of globalism and the effect of the connection and the meaning of this building. We sought to find a way of making a building that had meaning within its place and context, and that was connected to the Chinese culture. Within the visual cacophony of Pudong’s context, one creates this connection in a simple and elegant way.  I certainly consider it a highlight of my career.

http://shanghai.urbanatomy.com/index.php/i-ahearts-shanghai/features/4688-swfc

 

 

 

February 15, 2011

Endesa Headquarters, Spain | KPF

photo © H.G. Esch

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Project Details:
Location: Madrid, Spain
Client: Endesa s.a.
Architects: Kohn Pederson Fox Associates – www.kpf.com
Type: Corporate
Size: 973,000 ft2 / 90,000 m2
Awards: The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design American Architecture Award (2004), AIA New York Chapter Design Awards “Excellence in Architecture” Award (2003)
Photos: © H.G. Esch
———————————
The headquarters for Spanish energy utility provider Endesa fuses innovative workplace design with a progressive environmental program. With the desire to express its commitment to sustainability and to provide a high level of employee comfort, the new facility consolidates the company’s operations, which were previously scattered across several sites in Madrid.

photo © H.G. Esch

KPF’s design references the traditional Spanish concept of a large internal courtyard and transforms it into a modern, climate-controlled solution for Madrid’s harsh weather. Two six-story office wings enclose a 3,000-square-meter (33,000-square-foot) central atrium framed by 17 light-steel trusses spanning up to 45 meters (150 feet). The structure is shaded by a series of galvanized steel grills and remotely controlled aluminum louvers, which facilitate control of glare and heat load. The intermediate zone between the glass and steel protects the 32-meter-high (105-foot-high) space and acts as a thermal chimney to exhaust stale air from the atrium.

photo © H.G. Esch

photo © H.G. Esch

Conventional air-conditioning is not required in the offices. Fresh air supplied to the atrium is cooled by underground ducts that are connected to fresh-air inlets. Offices have operable windows for natural ventilation. During the summer, hot air in the atrium vents at the glazed, louvered perimeter and roof-mounted wind towers remain open to increase airflow through the space. In the winter, the wind towers extract air during the day and are closed at night.

photo © H.G. Esch

photo © H.G. Esch

 

Triple-glazed windows with a low-E coating optimize daylight penetration and minimize heat gain. Different shading devices were applied to each façade based on orientation. To the southwest, users are protected from noise, pollution, and excessive solar gain by a double skin of fritted glass. The building’s northeast exposures are protected by fixed aluminum louvers, which cover one-third of the glazed area.

http://architecturelab.net/10/endesa-headquarters-spain-by-kohn-pederson-fox-associates/

 

February 1, 2011

A KPF Tower around 200m!

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=401827&page=40

February 1, 2011

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

Nadine M. Post

History keeps disproving predictions that the supertall skyscraper, as a developer’s building type, was destroyed when the two 110-story towers of New York City’s World Trade Center went down. Last year alone, 66 towers taller than 200 meters opened their doors, breaking the 2007 record of 48. Of these, eight are taller than 300 m, according to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, which is the keeper of the tall-building flame. CTBUH predicts 97 more 200-m-plus high-rises will have ribbon-cuttings next year, including more than 20 taller than 300 m, which the group dubs “supertalls.”

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

1. Burj Khalifa – Dubai, U.A.E.
Height: 828 m; 2,717 ft
CTBUH height rank: 1
Occupancy: office, residential, hotel
Structural material: steel and concrete
Total floors: 163
Owner-developer: Emaar Properties PJSC
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM)
Associate architect: Hyder Consulting
Structural engineer: SOM
Mechanical-electrical-plumbing (MEP) engineer: SOM
Main contractors: Samsung; Besix Group; Arabtec

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

2. International Commerce Centre – Hong Kong
Height: 484 m; 1,588 ft
CTBUH height rank: 4
Occupancy: hotel, office
Structural material: composite concrete and steel
Total floors: 108
Owner-developer: Hang Lung Group, Sun Hung Kai Properties
Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
Associate architect: Wong and Ouyang Ltd.
Structural engineer: Arup
MEP engineer: J. Roger Preston Ltd.

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

3. Nanjing Greenland Financial Center – Nanjing, China
Height: 450 m; 1,476 ft
CTBUH height rank: 7
Occupancy: hotel; office
Structural material: composite
Total floors: 66
Developer: Nanjing State Owned Assets & Greenland Financial Center Co. Ltd.
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM)
Associate architect: ECADI
Structural engineer: SOM
MEP engineer: SOM
Main contractor: Shanghai Construction Group

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

4. Guangzhou International Finance Center – Guangzhou, China
Height: 438 m; 1,435 ft
CTBUH height rank: 9
Occupancy: hotel, office
Structural material: composite steel and concrete
Total floors: 103
Architect: Wilkinson Eyre Architects
Associate architect: South China Design Institute
Structural engineer: Arup
MEP Engineer: Arup

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

5. The Index – Dubai, U.A.E.
Height: 326 m; 1,070 ft
CTBUH height rank: 29
Occupancy: residential, office
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 80
Owner-developer: Union Properties
Architect: Foster + Partners
Associate architect: Khatib & Alami; Woods Bagot
Structural engineer: Halverson & Partners; Bruechle, Gilchrist & Evans
MEP engineer: Roger Preston & Partners; WSP Group

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

6. HHHR Tower – Dubai, U.A.E.
Height: 318 m; 1,042 ft
CTBUH height rank: 35
Occupancy: residential
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 72
Owner-developer: Dubai International Real Estate
Architect: Al Hashemi; Farayand Architectural Engineering Consultancy
MEP engineer: Ian Banham & Associates Consulting Engineers

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

7. Ocean Heights – Dubai, UAE
Height: 310 m; 1,017 ft
CTBUH height rank: 37
Occupancy: residential
Structural material: concrete
Total Floors: 83
Owner-developer: Damac Gulf Properties LLC
Architect: Aedas Ltd
Associate architect: ECG Engineering Consultants Group
Structural engineer: Meinhardt Ltd
MEP engineer: Ian Banham & Associates Consulting Engineers
Main contractor: Arabtec

 

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

8. Capital City Moscow Tower – Moscow
Height: 302 m; 989 ft
CTBUH height rank: 48
Occupancy: residential
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 76
Owner-developer: Capital Group
Architect: NBBJ
Structural engineer: Arup
MEP engineer: Arup

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

9. Sky Tower – Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.
Height: 292 m; 959 ft
CTBUH height rank: 58
Occupancy: residential, office
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 74
Owner-developer: Sorouh Real Estate Development; Tameer Holding Investment
Architect: Arquitectonica
Associate architect: RW Armstrong; National Engineering Bureau
Structural engineer: Hyder Consulting
MEP engineer: Ian Banham and Associates

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

10. Excellence Century Plaza Tower 1 – Shenzhen, China
Height: 288 m; 945 ft
CTBUH height rank: 64
Occupancy: office
Structural material: composite steel and concrete
Total floors: 60
Owner-developer: Excellence Century Real Estate Development Co. Ltd.
Architect: Leo A Daly
Associate architect: China Construction Design International
Structural engineer: China Construction Design International
MEP engineer: China Construction Design International

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