Archive for ‘Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill’

December 3, 2011

Adrian Smith, the maestro of super-tall

Architect wants to take you higher

Kevin Brass (kbrass@thenational.ae)

The architect based in Chicago worked as a lead designer with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill on four of the 11 tallest towers in the world, including Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the world’s tallest building. Now his firm, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, is designing the 1-kilometre-tall Kingdom Tower in Jeddah, which will take the title of world’s tallest when – and if – it is built.

Far from subsiding, the zest for building tall towers is continuing with fervour, especially in China, where Mr Smith’s company is working on several towers of more than 600 metres.

“There is no telling how far it will go,” Mr Smith said in an interview with The National. “We keep seeing people wanting super tall. And they keep upping the ante.”

But while the industry continues to strive for new heights, the debate rages about the sustainability and eco-credentials of the tall towers. Critics suggest the buildings are more about ego than efficiency.

Mr Smith, who will be in Dubai next Tuesday to address the Green Build Congress at the Dubai World Trade Centre, argues that skyscrapers are both eco-friendly and practical.

What is the next challenge for building super-talls?

I think architects and engineers can design buildings that will go even taller. We’re working on a tower now that will go a mile high, as a prototype, not as a commission. But to see how possible it is.

 

 

Once the building gets to be more than a kilometre, they get to be very big buildings, not only in height, but area. Primarily area. One of the limiting factors is how much area of [a] building can you put in [a] city on one time and market it successfully and have reasonable income or rate of return on investment. That’s a big challenge. But that’s not our challenge, it’s more of the developer’s challenge.

Our challenge and the technical challenge would be as you get taller the elevator systems have to improve in order to get elevators to go higher in the building before transfer. Right now that limit is roughly 575 metres. So if it goes one kilometre, you start to get into a double transfer system.

That begins to be pretty onerous in terms of how many elevator rides you’re taking before you get to your destination.

Those are the only limitations?

Structurally we can go a mile high. We know that from a wind perspective we can design a building that will behave properly in wind conditions that exist in most cities. It basically becomes more than one building tied together. But it is possible.

Are super-talls sustainable, green projects?

A lot of people believe super-tall buildings are not sustainable. We are in [the] process of doing a research effort which looks at every typology of building – from super tall up to 200 storeys down to single family homes and just about every typology in between and evaluating the energy consumption required on a square-metre basis needed for each of those typologies.

So far we’re finding that the super-tall building is in the middle of the road. It’s not the best-performing, but it’s not the worst performing either.

The best-performing tends to be something in the 40-storey range. And once you go higher than that certain other elements, like increased winds and lower temperatures, begin to impact the energy consumption in the building. But once you go less dense than that you get killed by additional surface area.

So just from a building performance point of view, we think super-tall is justifiable as it relates to density of anything below 40 stories.

Can you rationalise going above 40 storeys?

In the ideal world, yes. When you go high-density you will encourage or almost mandate that the location be served by public transit. And when you go high-density with block after block, like the city of New York or Chicago, you have the added benefit of live-work environments where people can live and work in the same district.

Is there technology that will make taller buildings more efficient?

I would say in truth higher buildings are as efficient as a 40-storey. You are putting space above 40 storeys in a different kind of environment. It’s location-specific to some degree. In Dubai [in Burj Khalifa], for example, it is 7 to 10 degrees cooler at the top of the building than at the bottom of the building. That actually helps you in Dubai because your cycle is mostly cooling.

Whereas in Chicago that same principle applies but in Chicago in winter it actually hurts you because it is actually colder up there than on the ground. And your heating cycle takes over and you’re losing more heat near the top of the building.

The study is inconclusive at the moment. We’re still in [the] process of fine-tuning a lot of these issues. But in general, I would say that they already are sustainable.

Another part of the study is how much land you use for a super-tall building versus how much land you use for single-family or even a 40-storey.

The land is valuable in itself. The more that can be turned into green belt the better. So you have to consider that aspect.

Q&A:some of Adrian Smith’s most noteworthy projects

Trump International Hotel & Tower, Chicago The 10th tallest building in the world added a new landmark to the Chicago skyline. Perched on the Chicago River, the 423-metre tower completed in 2009 includes a 225-room hotel, 472 residential units and 50,000 square feet of retail space.

201 Bishopsgate and The Broadgate Tower, London Set on a key site in London, at the centre of the Broadgate business district, the two towers combine restaurants, bars and retail space on a 2.3 acre site above the active rail lines.

Burj Khalifa, Dubai The world’s tallest building, completed last year, answered many of the questions facing tall building construction. The rounded, tiered design minimized the influence of wind at high levels, and systems were creating for the elevators, plumbing and other apparatus that had never been installed at such altitudes.

http://www.thenational.ae/thenationalconversation/industry-insights/property/architect-wants-to-take-you-higher?pageCount=0

August 4, 2011

Architect Q&A: The State of Super-Tall Towers

By Maura Webber Sadovi

Associated Press

Adrian Smith, 66, is the senior design partner at Chicago-based Adrian Smith+Gordon Gill Architecture. While at his previous firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Mr. Smith designed the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, which at 2,717-feet high is the world’s tallest, along with China’s Nanjing’s Zifeng Tower, Chicago’s Trump International Hotel & Tower and Shanghai’s Jin Mao Tower.

He was recently awarded the 2011 Lynn S. Beedle Lifetime Achievement Award from theCouncil on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitatfor his contributions to the field of super-tall buildings. (Some questions and answers below have been condensed.)

Q: What is the biggest challenge to designing tall buildings?

A: It’s a combination of making an elegant structure and one that also works with the major constraints such as wind. One of the major issues of tall buildings is how much they move from one side to the other and how rapidly they move. We try to minimize the movement through a number of ways that are both structural and architectural. The Burj Khalifa is as much an engineering strategy as an architectural strategy. The stepped shape helps to confuse the wind. The wind doesn’t have an opportunity to organize very rapidly because of the steps.

Q: How have the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks affected tall buildings?

A. It hasn’t really affected the desire for people to go tall but it made us more aware of building in redundancies and making the building more terror-proof. Sometimes stairs are wider or there are more stairs than there used to be and there’s more security around the buildings.

Q: Was there ever a time when you thought no more super-tall buildings would be built?

A: No, I never thought that. I think human nature is always going to go after spectacular achievements. As long as they can, they will.

Q: Will demand for the tallest buildings ever return to the United States?

A: There’s a strategy for developing super-tall buildings because in and of themselves they very rarely make money. So what they’re doing in China and in other locations like Dubai is they will use the tall buildings as a catalyst for developing the land around it and the person who owns the tall buildings and the land around it will make his money off the adjacent land. The tower itself gives the land around it the prestige, a location and an identity. One of the problems with doing that in the United State is that most of the time super-tall buildings are needed in the inner city. And you just can’t get that much land in the U.S. because we’re not really developing new cities.

Q: How high can we go?

A: The limiting factor is probably the elevator system. When you get higher than about 550 meters [about 1,804 feet] with a single elevator, the weight of the cable gets too heavy. And if you stack up two to three elevators now you’re spending time transferring from one elevator to another and my guess is people don’t want to do that. But if we can solve the elevator problem I know we can design to a mile high. I’ve designed an experimental building that would go a mile high….It’s a very, very large building of about six to eight million square feet.

http://blogs.wsj.com/developments/2011/07/08/architect-qa-the-state-of-super-tall-towers/

August 3, 2011

Kingdom Tower, Jeddah | AS+GG

At over 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) and a total construction area of
530,000 square meters (5.7 million square feet), Kingdom Tower will
be the centerpiece and fi rst construction phase of the $20 billion
Kingdom City development in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, near the Red
Sea.

World's Tallest Building (7) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (2) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (5) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Expected to cost $1.2 billion to construct, Kingdom Tower will be a mixed-use building featuring a luxury hotel, offi ce
space, serviced apartments, luxury condominiums and the world’s highest observatory. Kingdom Tower’s height will
be at least 173 meters (568 feet) taller than Burj Khalifa, which was designed by Adrian Smith while at Skidmore,
Owings & Merrill.
AS+GG’s design for Kingdom Tower is both highly technological and distinctly organic. With its slender, subtly
asymmetrical massing, the tower evokes a bundle of leaves shooting up from the ground—a burst of new life that
heralds more growth all around it. This symbolizes the tower as a catalyst for increased development around it.
The sleek, streamlined form of the tower was inspired by the folded fronds of young desert plant growth. The way
the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an
analogy of new growth fused with technology. While the design is contextual to Saudi Arabia, it also represents an
evolution and a refi nement of an architectural continuum of skyscraper design. The three-petal footprint is ideal for
residential units, and the tapering wings produce an aerodynamic shape that helps reduce structural loading due to
wind vortex shedding. The Kingdom Tower design embraces its architectural pedigree, taking full advantage of the
proven design strategies and technological strategies of its lineage, refi ning and advancing them to achieve new
heights.
The result is an elegant, cost-effi cient and highly constructible design that is at once grounded in built tradition and
aggressively forward-looking, taking advantage of new and innovative thinking about technology, building materials,
life-cycle considerations and energy conservation. For example, the project will feature a high-performance exterior
wall system that will minimize energy consumption by reducing thermal loads. In addition, each of Kingdom Tower’s
three sides features a series of notches that create pockets of shadow that shield areas of the building from the sun
and provide outdoor terraces with stunning views of Jeddah and the Red Sea.
The great height of Kingdom Tower necessitates one of the world’s most sophisticated elevator systems. The
Kingdom Tower complex will contain 59 elevators, including 54 single-deck and fi ve double-deck elevators, along
with 12 escalators. Elevators serving the observatory will travel at a rate of 10 meters per second in both directions.
Another unique feature of the design is a sky terrace, roughly 30 meters (98 feet) in diameter, at level 157. It is an
outdoor amenity space intended for use by the penthouse fl oor.
The area surrounding Kingdom Tower is known as the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District. Designed by AS+GG,
the 23-hectare Waterfront District provides a cohesive and pedestrian-friendly setting for the magnifi cent
Kingdom Tower while creating a pleasant neighborhood experience nestled along the Kingdom City lakefront. The
Kingdom Tower Waterfront District encompasses a high-end shopping mall and additional development parcels
that accommodate commercial and high-density residential uses, offi ces, two luxury hotels and high-quality open
spaces, including the central Tower Plaza. A serene waterfront promenade connects Kingdom Tower, the various
development parcels, the open space areas and the mall together. The result is an exciting mixed-use area that
offers a concentrated and comprehensive experience including vibrant shopping, entertainment and open-space
amenities. The Waterfront District also provides an array of connections to other areas within Kingdom City’s overall
master plan, designed by HOK Architects.
The Waterfront District is subdivided into 13 development parcels, the largest of which are the Kingdom Tower
parcel of about 90,000 square meters and the mall parcel of about 65,000 sm. Smaller mixed-use parcels of between
5,000 sm and 10,000 sm are arranged in two development precincts, North and South, each with its own unifying
palette of materials. The parcel sizes vary depending on the density of each site; the larger sites are farther away
from Kingdom Tower, with the smaller sites stepping closer to the tower, creating the effect of an architectural
amphitheater around the structure. Views of Kingdom Tower from throughout the District—including the sensitively
designed 20- to 60-story buildings around the tower—are spectacular. The buildings closest to the tower are of lower
heights, ensuring that the outer buildings also have access to views of Kingdom Tower.

World's Tallest Building (10) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (1) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (3) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (4) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (6) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (8) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

World's Tallest Building (9) © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

http://smithgill.com/#/work/kingdom_tower

http://www.archdaily.com/155788/worlds-tallest-building/

Prince Alwaleed Signs SR4.6Billion Contract for World’s Tallest 1,000 meters Tower
2/8/2011

Chairman of Kingdom Holding Company, HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud, who initiated and has been the driving force behind the decision to build the world’s tallest building in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, is pleased to announce on 2nd August 2011, that the contract for construction has been signed and Kingdom Tower, with a height of over 1,000 meters, will begin construction imminently in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Kingdom Tower will be the centerpiece and the first construction phase of Kingdom City, Jeddah Economic Company’s (JEC) new urban development of more than 5.3 million square meters of land in the north of Jeddah overlooking the Red Sea and Obhur Creek.

Prince Alwaleed commented: “This project will provide sustainable profits to Kingdom Holding shareholders.”

“The vision of constructing the tallest tower in the world in Jeddah belongs to HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal, who was closely involved in the selection of the scheme currently under design,” said Mr. Talal Al Maiman, Executive Director, Development and Domestic Investments, a board member of Kingdom Holding Company and a board member of Jeddah Economic Company, which was formed in 2009 to develop Kingdom City in Jeddah. “Prince Alwaleed, Mr. Bakhsh, Mr. Sharbatly and I were impressed by the boldness and simplicity of the AS+GG design. Kingdom Tower’s height is remarkable, obviously, but the building’s iconic status will not depend solely on that aspect. Its form is brilliantly sculpted, making it quite simply the most beautiful building in the world of any height.” Mr. Al Maiman added: “The decision of the partners to build the world’s tallest building further demonstrates their belief in investing in this nation.”
Five contractors were invited to offer proposals for the Kingdom Tower and a short list of three firms submitted final offers for the tower construction. The Saudi Bin Laden Group (SBG) whose offer was the most attractive in terms of price, quality and schedule was chosen for the project.
With a total construction area of over 500,000 square meters, the soaring Kingdom Tower will be a mixed-use building featuring a Four Seasons hotel, Four Seasons serviced apartments, first class office space, luxury condominiums and an observatory that will be higher than the world’s current highest observation deck. The overall construction cost of the tower is SR4.6 billion ($1.2 billion) and the overall estimated cost of the entire Kingdom City project is anticipated to be SR75 billion ($20 billion).

“We intend Kingdom Tower to become both an economic engine and a proud symbol of the Kingdom’s economic and cultural stature in the world community,” said Mr. Al Maiman, “Kingdom Tower will be a landmark structure that will greatly increase the value of the hundreds of other properties around it in Kingdom City and indeed throughout North Jeddah.”
The partners of JEC are Kingdom Holding Company, Mr. Samaual Bakhsh, Abraar, International Holding Company, prominent Jeddah businessmen Mr. Abdulrahman Hassan Sharbatly and Saudi Bin Laden Group (SBG). The capital of JEC is made up of SR8.8 billion in land value, assets that are SR7.3 billion, plus SR1.5 billion in cash contributed by SBG that further demonstrates their confidence in this extensive project.
“We are confident that upon completion, Kingdom Tower will become one of the world’s great tourist destinations as well as one of the most attractive places to live and work in the region,” Mr. Sharbatly and Mr. Bakhsh expressed in a joint statement. “In the meantime, it will create thousands of jobs, spurring the local economy.”
In addition to its status as an architectural landmark and economic symbol, Kingdom Tower will enjoy great cultural significance. “We envision Kingdom Tower as a new iconic marker of Jeddah’s historic importance as the traditional gateway to the holy city of Mecca,” Mr. Al Maiman said. He noted that the southeast leg of Kingdom Tower’s tripedal base is on a direct line with the Ka’ba in Mecca, Islam’s holiest site.

An interdisciplinary team led by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG), based in Chicago, created the design of the Kingdom Tower. The team also included building services engineering consultants, Environmental Systems Design and structural engineering consultants, Thornton Tomasetti, engineer of three of the world’s top 10 tallest buildings. Jeddah Economic Company selected the AS+GG scheme after a lengthy competition process in which SOM, Pickard Chilton, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Pelli Clarke Pelli and Foster + Partners also participated.
The AS+GG team’s design for Kingdom Tower has been in process since May 2009. Schematic design is complete and design development is under way. Foundation drawings are complete and the piling for the tower is currently being tendered. AS+GG also designed the master plan for the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District, which surrounds the tower and which will include residential and commercial buildings, a shopping mall, high-quality outdoor spaces and other amenities. The overall Kingdom City master plan is being designed by HOK Architects.
“This tower symbolizes the Kingdom as an important global business and cultural leader, and demonstrates the strength and creative vision of its people,” said Mr. Smith, whose experience in super-tall tower design includes Burj Khalifa, Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai, Zifeng Tower at Nanjing Greenland Financial Center in Nanjing, the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago and Pearl River Tower, now in the late stages of construction in Guangzhou, China. “Our vision for Kingdom Tower is one that represents the spirit of Saudi Arabia. It also represents new growth and high-performance technology fused into one powerful iconic form.”
The Kingdom Tower design is both highly technological and distinctly organic. With its slender, subtly asymmetrical massing, the tower evokes a bundle of leaves shooting up from the ground—a burst of new life that heralds more growth all around it.. The tower becomes a catalyst for increased development around it.

The sleek, streamlined form of the tower was inspired by the folded fronds of young desert plant growth, Mr. Gill explained. “The way the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an analogy of new growth fused with technology,” he said. “We’re thrilled to be working with His Highness, Jeddah Economic Company and Emaar to help define this path for the Kingdom.”
While AS+GG’s design is contextual to Saudi Arabia, it also represents an evolution and a refinement of an architectural continuum of skyscraper design. The three-petal footprint is ideal for residential units, and the tapering wings produce an aerodynamic shape that helps reduce structural loading due to wind vortex shedding. The Kingdom Tower design embraces its architectural pedigree, taking full advantage of the proven design strategies and technological advances of its lineage and extends those advances to the cutting edge.
The result is an elegant, cost-efficient and highly constructible design that is both grounded in built tradition and aggressively forward-looking, taking advantage of new and innovative thinking about technology, building materials and energy conservation. For example, the project will feature a high-performance exterior wall system that will minimize energy consumption by reducing thermal loads. In addition, each of Kingdom Tower’s three sides features a series of notches that create pockets of shadow that shield areas of the building from the sun and provide outdoor terraces with stunning views of Jeddah and the Red Sea.
The great height of Kingdom Tower necessitates one of the world’s most sophisticated elevator systems. The Kingdom Tower complex will contain 59 elevators, including 54 single-deck and five double-deck elevators, along with 12 escalators. Elevators serving the observatory will travel at a rate of 10 meters per second in both directions.

Notes:
About the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District
The area in the immediate vicinity of Kingdom Tower is known as the Kingdom Tower Waterfront District. Designed by AS+GG, the 23-hectare Waterfront District provides a cohesive and pedestrian-friendly setting for Kingdom Tower while creating a pleasant neighborhood experience along the Kingdom City lakefront.
The Kingdom Tower Waterfront District encompasses a high-end shopping mall and additional development parcels that accommodate commercial and high-density residential uses, offices, two luxury hotels and high-quality open spaces, including the central Tower Plaza. A serene waterfront promenade connects Kingdom Tower, the various development parcels, the open space areas and the mall together. The result is an exciting mixed-use area that offers a concentrated and comprehensive experience including vibrant shopping, entertainment and open-space amenities. The Waterfront District also provides an array of connections to other areas within Kingdom City’s overall master plan, designed by HOK Architects.
About Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture
Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture is dedicated to the design of high-performance, aesthetically striking architecture in a wide range of typology and scale, from low- and mid-rise residential, commercial and cultural buildings to mixed-use super tall towers. The office uses a holistic, integrated design approach that explores symbiotic relationships with the natural environment. AS+GG is currently working on projects in the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, China, India, South Korea, Malaysia, Canada and the United States. The firm was founded in 2006 by partners Adrian Smith, Gordon Gill and Robert Forest. For more information, please visit http://www.smithgill.com. AS+GG also recently launched a related energy and engineering consulting firm, PositivEnergy Practice; for more information, please visit http://www.pepractice.com.
About Thornton Tomasetti
Thornton Tomasetti provides engineering services to clients worldwide on projects of all sizes and complexity, with practices in building structure, building skin and building performance. Thornton Tomasetti is responsible for the structural design of some of the world’s tallest buildings, including the Petronas Towers, Taipei 101, Ping An International Finance Center (now under construction as the tallest building in China) and Federation Tower (under construction as the tallest in Russia). The firm is committed to creating the best solutions through technical ingenuity, pursuit of excellence, and responsiveness to client needs. Thornton Tomasetti is an award-winning 550-person organization of engineers and architects collaborating from offices across the United States and in Asia, Europe and the Middle East. For more information, please visit http://www.ThorntonTomasetti.com.
About Environmental Systems Design, Inc.
Environmental Systems Design, Inc. (ESD) has provided engineering design solutions for thousands of buildings in the United States and throughout the world. With over 220 engineering and design professionals, ESD is one of the largest consulting engineering firms in the Midwest. ESD offers consulting engineering design services in mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, LEED, sustainable design, commissioning, and technology. ESD supports a diverse range of markets including commercial, health and science, education, mission critical, residential, assembly, cultural, theaters, energy plants, transportation and international. For more information, please visit http://www.esdesign.com.

http://www.kingdom.com.sa/en/MC_PR_NewsDetails.asp?p=3&ID=826

After months of rumour and suspicion, AS+GG confirms it is designing a $1.2bn, 1000+m tower in Jeddah

As WAN has suggested over the past few months, supertall building experts Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill are to complete the design for a stunning new tower to anchor the proposed $20bn Kingdom City masterplanning project in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The firm carefully quashed internet rumours that they were working on a ‘mile-high’ tower, yet did not deny involvement in the Kingdom Tower scheme. This morning His Royal Highness Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud, nephew of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah and chairman of Kingdom Holding Company officially announced AS+GG as design architects of the project to awaiting media.

Reassuringly elegant for a tower of such epic proportions – the completed Kingdom Tower will soar at over 1000m (at least 173m taller than the Burj Khalifa which currently holds the title of the world’s tallest building) with a total construction area of 530,000 sq m – the structure is being touted as a new marker of Jeddah’s importance as a gateway to the city of Mecca and has been directly inspired by the folded fronds of a young desert plant. Adrian Smith details: “With its slender, subtly asymmetrical massing, the tower evokes a bundle of leaves shooting up from the ground – a burst of new life that heralds more growth all around it.”

Smith’s partner Gordon Gill continues: “The way the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an analogy of the new growth fused with technology.” The graceful needle is also designed to symbolise the city of Jeddah as an economic power and cultural leader, with a focus on the ‘strength and creative vision of its people’.

Aside from the initial ‘wow-factor’ of the building’s statistics, AS+GG have been applauded for their sensitive design aesthetic. Talal Al Maiman, Executive Director, Development and Domestic Investments, a Board member of Kingdom Holding Company and a board member of JEC commented: “Prince Alwaleed, Mr. Bakhsh, Mr. Sharbatly and I were impressed by the boldness and simplicity of the AS+GG design. Kingdom Tower’s height is remarkable, obviously, but the building’s iconic status will not depend solely on that aspect. Its form is brilliantly sculpted, making it quite simply one of the most beautiful buildings in the world of any height.”

Encased in the new spire’s glimmering façade will be a Four Seasons hotel, Four Seasons serviced apartments, Class A office Space, luxury condominiums and the world’s highest observatory. 59 elevators using the world’s most high-tech systems will be installed to provide ease of access, with 54 single-deck and 5 double-deck systems. The residential aspect has influenced the three-petal footprint of the design with tapering wings introducing an aerodynamic shape to reduce structural loading due to wind vortex shedding. All three sides of the Kingdom Tower sport a series of notches which form specifically engineered areas of shadow designed to fall on the outdoor terraces facing the city and Red Sea.

AS+GG is leading an interdisciplinary design team that also includes building services engineering consultants Environmental Systems Design, Inc. (ESD) and structural engineering consultants Thornton Tomasetti. The developer of Kingdom City, Jeddah Economic Company (JEC), selected the AS+GG scheme after a lengthy competition process in which SOM, Pickard Chilton, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Pelli Clarke Pelli and Foster + Partners also participated.

Sian Disson
News Editor

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17218

Saudi Arabia Reveals Plans For Tallest Tower, With Terrace On 157th Floor

The design, by Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, pairs radical developments in skyscraper technology with a sleek, tapered aesthetic inspired by the folded fronts of young desert plant growth.

Saudi Arabia is set to shatter the record for the tallest building in the world, with a slender, asymmetrical spire that’ll rise at least 3,280 feet in the air. That’s more than twice the size of the Willis Tower, the tallest building in the United States, and 568 feet taller than theBurj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world.

The $1.2 billion Kingdom Tower will be built in north Jeddah, the major urban center of western Saudi and an historic gateway to Mecca just off the shores of the Red Sea. The building, by Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (Smith also designed the Burj Khalifa while at SOM), pairs new developments in skyscraper technology with a sleek, “three-petal” form inspired by the folded fronts of young desert plant growth. “The way the fronds sprout upward from the ground as a single form, then start separating from each other at the top, is an analogy of new growth fused with technology,” Gill says.

The tower’s got a slick, aerodynamic shape with tapering wings that’ll help slash structural loading caused by wind. A high-performance facade is expected to drastically reduce energy consumption, and notches in each of the skyscraper’s three “petals” will create pockets of shade, shielding occupants from the harsh desert sun and providing outdoor terraces with views of Jeddah and the Red Sea. Kingdom Tower will include a Four Seasons hotel and apartments, luxury condominiums, and Class A offices spread over roughly 3.5-million square feet. It’ll also have a sky terrace on the 157th floor (the 157th floor!) and the highest observatory in the world.

Kingdom Tower is the linchpin of a larger, $20 billion waterfront development venture for Jeddah — part of the Saudi monarchy’s ambitious efforts to diversify its economy beyond crude oil. (Financing for the Kingdom Tower results from a deal between the investment firm of Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal and theSaudi Binladin Group, a construction conglomerate founded by the father of you know who.) The proposed Kingdom Tower Waterfront District — the master plan of which is also designed by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill — will include residential and commercial buildings, a shopping mall, outdoor spaces, and other amenities.

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1664659/saudi-arabia-to-build-mega-huge-tower-worlds-tallest

July 2, 2011

Adrian Smith Honored with CTBUH Lifetime Achievement Award for Supertall Buildings

Adrian Smith, senior Design Partner at Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in Chicago, is the 2011 winner of the Lynn S. Beedle Lifetime Achievement Award from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat for his extraordinary contribution to the supertall building typology.

The award will be presented at the CTBUH 10th annual awards ceremony and dinner on Oct. 27 at Illinois Institute of Technology’s Crown Hall. Recent winners of the award include John C. Portman Jr. of John Portman & Associates and William Pedersen of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates.

Adrian Smith at Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
Adrian Smith at Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai © AS+GG

“Adrian is one of a relatively small number of architects who has designed and built a significant number of not only tall, but supertall, buildings internationally,” said Antony Wood, CTBUH’s executive director. “As such, his contribution to the development of the typology is beyond doubt. Equally as exciting are the ‘as yet unannounced’ tall projects that I know of that are scheduled to come from his office in the coming months.”

Smith is one of the world’s most prolific and celebrated designers of supertall towers. As of mid-2011, he has designed four of the world’s eleven tallest completed buildings: Dubai’s Burj Khalifa (No. 1), Nanjing’s Zifeng Tower at Nanjing Greenland Financial Center (No. 7), Chicago’s Trump International Hotel & Tower (No. 10) and Shanghai’s Jin Mao Tower (No. 11), all at his former firm, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.

Last year, the CTBUH named Burj Khalifa the Best Tall Building completed in the Middle East and Asia, and also presented Burj with the Global Icon Award.

Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill with Masdar HQ model © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill with Masdar HQ model © AS+GG

Smith’s design portfolio at SOM also includes London’s 201 Bishopsgate/Broadgate Tower, which the CTBUH named the Best Tall Building completed in Europe in 2009. Also at SOM, Smith was the Design Partner of the 71-story, 310-meter Pearl River Tower, scheduled to open this fall in Guangzhou, China, as the world’s most highly sustainable supertall building.

At AS+GG, which Smith co-founded with Gordon Gill and Robert Forest in 2006, his portfolio includes the recently announced Wuhan Greenland Center (previously on Bustler), a 606-meter tower in China, and another supertall tower in the Middle East to be announced later this year. Earlier supertall designs at AS+GG include 1 Dubai, 1 Park Avenue and Meraas Tower, all commissioned by the government-backed Meraas Development in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

“Adrian’s body of work includes some of the world’s tallest and most recognized buildings,” noted CTBUH Trustee Peter Irwin, “yet his designs transcend mere height and have become landmarks because of their graceful design and inherent sensitivity to local context and culture.”

The Lifetime Achievement Award is named after the late CTBUH founder Lynn S. Beedle, a leader in the study, design and building of skyscrapers.

“This is a great honor,” Smith said of the award. “The CTBUH is a great organization and I’m extremely proud of this recognition.” In addition to his tall building experience, Smith is co-author of the recently published book Toward Zero Carbon: The Chicago Central Area DeCarbonization Plan, which outlines a comprehensive strategy to bring Chicago’s downtown Loop to carbon neutrality by 2030.

Following is a small selection of Adrian Smith’s supertall tower designs:

Pearl River Tower under construction © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
Pearl River Tower under construction © AS+GG

Burj Khalifa night, Photo: James Steinkamp © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
Burj Khalifa night, Photo: James Steinkamp © AS+GG

Wuhan Greenland Center © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
Wuhan Greenland Center © AS+GG

Trump International Hotel and Tower, Photo: James Steinkamp © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
Trump International Hotel and Tower, Photo: James Steinkamp © AS+GG

Zifeng Tower at Nanjing Greenland Financial Center, Photo: James Steinkamp © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
Zifeng Tower at Nanjing Greenland Financial Center, Photo: James Steinkamp © AS+GG

1 Dubai © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
1 Dubai © AS+GG

1 Park Avenue © AS+GG

Click above image to view slideshow
1 Park Avenue © AS+GG

Meraas Tower © AS+GGhttp://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/adrian_smith_honored_with_ctbuh_lifetime_achievement_award_for_supertall_bu/

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 27, 2011

Wuhan Greenland Center, Wuhan, China | AS+GG

Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill, Thornton Tomasetti and PositivEnergy Practice to design world’s fourth tallest building

Fast becoming leaders in the design of tall buildings, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture have just scooped another major project in China which is destined to become the fourth tallest building in the world when construction completes in approximately five years.

Entitled Wuhan Greenland Center, the 606m pillar will be located on the intersection of the Yangtze and Han Rivers and will comprise around 200,000 sq m of commercial office space, 50,000 sq m of high-end residential accommodation, a 45,000 sq m five-star hotel, and a stunning private member’s club in a 27m-tall penthouse volume.

Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill will work as design architects on the 119-storey scheme, with engineers Thornton Tomasetti and energy services, engineering and consulting company PositivEnergy Practice. Speaking on the decision, Gordon Gill commented: “Wuhan is an exciting and important project for our firm as we continue to advance our ideas about performance-based supertall tower design. We look forward to building on past experience on similar projects, with particular emphasis on the relation of architectural form and performance as they pertain to structural wind loads.”

Work is still being completed on the concept design although construction is due to start this coming summer. The structure’s fluid conical form has been deliberately crafted to minimise the volume of structural material needed in construction, whilst its tapered body, softly rounded corners and domed top have been introduced in order to reduce wind resistance and vortex action that occurs around supertall buildings. The tower’s elongated silhouette rises from a tripod-shaped base, tapering gently to an arched apex of smooth curved glass which works in direct contrast to the textured curtain wall of the main column.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=16905

February 20, 2011

Smart Grid City | AS+GG

An analysis of carbon emissions in the Chicago Loop. The buildings coded in green emit the least carbon, yellow the second least, orange the third, and the red buildings emit the most carbon per square foot.

AN ANALYSIS OF CARBON EMISSIONS IN THE CHICAGO LOOP. THE BUILDINGS CODED IN GREEN EMIT THE LEAST CARBON, YELLOW THE SECOND LEAST, ORANGE THE THIRD, AND THE RED BUILDINGS EMIT THE MOST CARBON PER SQUARE FOOT.
COURTESY ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL ARCHITECTURE

Chicago’s historic skyline has always been a source of pride for city residents. And while few new buildings are currently going up, building owners have developed a plan to capitalize on the latest advances: Smart-grid technologies that will convert the city’s iconic skyline into what backers call a “virtual green generator” by retrofitting highrise buildings and the existing electrical grid to a new hyper-connected intelligent-communications backbone. Simultaneously, researchers at local universities, among them the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, have been developing their own cutting-edge smart-grid technology.

“We want to make Chicago a hub for smart-grid manufacturing and deployment,” said Andrew Barbeau, the managing director of the Center for Electricity Innovation at IIT. “Energy generation, delivery, and management is a trillion-dollar marketplace, and we are really trying to make Chicago a center for that.” Chicago has long been a leader in innovation for electrical utility and power industries, he added, even when the West Coast was attracting much of the software and tech jobs. “Chicago never gave up on what its strengths are, and is prepared to make a comeback,” he said.

Elements of a smart grid system.ELEMENTS OF A SMART GRID SYSTEM. 1. SOLAR PANELS 2. WIND TURBINES 3. SMART APPLIANCES 4. REMOTE CONTROL FOR NON-ESSENTIAL APPLIANCES 5. PLUG-IN HYBRID CARS 6. LOCALLY GENERATED POWER 7. WIRELESS COMMUNICATION BETWEEN USERS AND URILITY COMPANY 8. WEB AND MOBILE DEVICE INTERFACES TO MONITOR USAGE FROM A DISTANCE 9. ENERGY STORAGE.

In fact, the Windy City is a likely birthplace for what could be the largest-ever smart-grid pilot. It has a captive market of building owners—interested in reducing their utility bills and attracting green-conscious tenants—cheek-to-cheek with top electrical engineering universities. Public support and cooperation from local utilities has also made for fertile ground. The Chicago Climate Action Plan, launched in 2008 by Mayor Richard Daley, plans on retrofitting 50 percent of industrial and commercial buildings by 2020.

And while cities in other countries, such as China and Dubai, are rapidly growing in population and new construction where sustainable design choices are a natural for new buildings, Chicago’s population peaked in the 1960s. The city can’t rely on new green construction. It has to look at existing building stock.

“The most sustainable building is one that already exists,” said Barbeau. In the city where skyscrapers were born, the sheer square footage of Chicago’s commercial high rises means that their reductions are proportionally bigger than in private homes.

Smart grid cities.

ELEMENTS OF A SMART GRID CITY INCLUDE CAPACITY FOR PLUGIN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES.

Building Owners and Managers Association Chicago (BOMA), an organization that represents nearly 300 Chicago commercial buildings including the Aon Center, the Willis Tower, and the Hancock Center, has partnered with the Illinois Science and Technology Coalition (ISTC) and other groups interested in smart-grid technology. According to back-of-the-envelope estimates by BOMA engineering consultants, the downtown buildings could jointly reduce usage by 200 megawatts by linking into smart-grid technologies—an amount equivalent to the production of a fully functioning coal-plant.

“In a much more decentralized grid, each building can function as a power plant,” said Roger Frechette, president of PositivEnergy, a consulting firm launched by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG) following the development of their so-called Decarbonization Plan for the Loop. “Some days the buildings are consuming, some days they’re producing.” AS+GG’s plan also includes a smart-grid initiative and intends to reduce net carbon emissions by 100 percent by 2020.

On a large scale, a smart grid—where the supply is distributed to many sources—would provide more reliable energy. Currently, the U.S. alone loses $100 billion on average each year to blackouts and energy failings, according to an IBM consumer survey. If a transformer fails somewhere down the line, a smart grid could instantly pull energy from other locations with excess.

Funding the smart-grid project, however, which will cost millions in retrofitting and research, is no simple task.

In July, Chicago building owners seemed to have found a lucky break. Along with ISTC and the Citizens Utility Board, BOMA signed a memorandum of understanding with the Republic of Korea to bankroll the multimillion-dollar development-and-research initiative. Public and private Korean groups, including LG Electronics and KT Corporation, were hoping to partner with the city. The deal made business headlines and seemed to be a windfall for the smart-grid initiative.

The year before, BOMA was denied a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy for stimulus funds earmarked for smart-grid projects—even as ConEd received $5 million for a similar project in residential Chicago neighborhoods.

Now, BOMA Executive Vice President Michael Cornicelli says that Korea will no longer be funding the retrofitting project.

“We determined that their notion of funding the project was different than ours,” Cornicelli said. “We thought they would be providing a grant. Really, what they had in mind was a provision of some capital with the expectation of some return on the capital.”

The pilot project to retrofit volunteer buildings, including the Aon Center, will instead be put out for bids from public or private parties. According to Cornicelli, Korea will be encouraged to submit again. For others, the upcoming smart-grid RFP will be an opportunity to invest in Chicago’s green nest egg.

Smart grid cities.

A CENTRALIZED COMMUNICATION NETWORK HELPS MANAGE POWER SUPPLIES IN A SMART GRID CITY.

Researchers at Illinois Institute of Technology and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, on the other hand, are still receiving funding from South Korean groups including KESRI, the Korean Electrical Engineering & Science Research Institute. In July, the university signed three memoranda of understanding with the Republic of Korea to develop smart-grid technology and workforce training programs. IIT has long been a frontrunner in smart-grid research; the campus itself runs on a smart grid called Perfect Power, which cost $12 million to implement.

“We’re looking at creating more efficient buildings,” Barbeau said. “We’re not talking about passive solar or double pane windows, we’re looking more at advanced technologies for businesses and home owners to cut down their electricity use.”

As a private resident, the smart grid could allow you to use cheaper off-peak energy to charge your car, run your washing machine, or manage your appliances that are using the most energy. Further, with a photovoltaic on your roof or a wind turbine in your backyard, you could sell extra energy back to the grid for income.

However intelligent grids seem to be, consumers and developers alike have reservations about some smart-grid technologies. Consumer blogs online have been posting medical studies—such as 2008 research by Samuel Milham, M.D., who focuses on occupational hazards—that link smart meters to radio-frequency radiation, which can pose health risks. The California-based consumer rights group Turn wants the utility PG&E to be held accountable for inaccurate smart-meters that are resulting in higher utility bills for consumers. Turn also argues that smart meters are eliminating traditional meter-reading jobs and are compromising consumer privacy.

“There are elements of the smart grid that are ready to go today,” said PositivEnergy’s Frechette. “There are other elements that are not.”

In Chicago, UIC researchers are working on cyber-security, which may address Turn’s issues with consumer privacy. Additionally, in contrast to Turn’s concerns about job losses, groups behind the Chicago initiative believe that the project will bring green jobs to the city.

The non-profit Clean Energy Trust and IIT have partnered to develop small-business cluster initiatives. They were awarded $1.05 million in stimulus money to invest in and provide seed money for local, clean-energy businesses. In smart-grid development, there is room for many industries: from manufacturing home management systems that would allow you to monitor your electricity usage, to iPhone apps that might help you sell your extra energy back to the grid, to a “Geek Squad” trained to come to private residences to retrofit electricity monitors to the new communications backbone.

“It’s all hands on deck,” said Frechette. “In terms of involvement, we’re going to need to look at how walls are put together, we have to look at glass, roof insulation, and the tightness of building skins—it’s all important.”

Smart grids will directly impact architects’ design strategies: Better performing buildings will also mean more profitable ones. When the technology is ready, inhabitants—with in-situ smart meters—will instantly be able to see how well their buildings are performing. Clients, already starting to gravitate towards buildings that are LEED certified, will find that when linked to a smart grid, investing in good design will return not just in savings, but also in terms of income.

“People are already designing positive-energy buildings,” said Matthew Summy, President of the Illinois Science and Technology Coalition. “What do you do with the excess energy? You could shift the load from one building to the next. Suddenly, you’re a virtual power plant.”

Today, visitors look at Chicago’s historic skyline and see the city’s architectural and economic heritage. In a few years, they may look up and see some of the world’s tallest sources of renewable energy.

Ann Lok Lui

 

February 19, 2011

Architects Build Environmental Features Into Design

Renowned Chicago architect Sara Beardsley of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture was a speaker at the Reimagine Series this spring in both Edmonton and Calgary. She spoke to Alberta Venture about redefining our urban landscapes.

by Colleen Biondi
Photograph by Bluefish

Sara Beardsley

CRITICAL EYE: Architect Sara Beardsley says there is plenty of opportunity for Alberta’s big-city buildings to become modern and efficient

AV: What design would benefit Calgary and Edmonton’s downtowns?
SB:
It is a very interesting time in these cities. We are all conscious of environmental issues and reducing carbon emissions; by taking a hard look at our existing buildings and deciding how to improve upon them, we can help with this. If there are buildings with high vacancy rates, revitalization practices can make them more marketable (more esthetically pleasing, more user-friendly); if a building uses excess energy, revitalization can help mitigate this.

I recommend a comprehensive approach. Look at all aspects of the building – from the shell to the mechanics to the site itself – and figure out how the building fits into the city. This information will help guide strategies to uniquely re-imagine that building. >

What LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) principles guide urban design in a cold, northern climate?
Chicago has a similar climate, although not as extreme as in Alberta. One issue that is dear to my heart is the building envelope; how well insulated are the walls and windows? That is a big issue in LEED – you can get significant points in the category of Energy Efficiency related to how well the building is insulated.

There are also points designated for renewable energy such as solar panels. When you put solar panels on a high-rise building, it helps, but the roof is not very big; if you put solar panels on a horizontal building – where the roof platform is large – you can attract more energy from the sun.

Aside from grand signature buildings, are there smaller initiatives that can make a design statement?
Definitely. There are ways to save energy that are pretty much invisible to the building user. A lighting control system, for example, will sense when there is daylight coming into the building and will automatically dim the lights to a level that is good for the work environment. Also there are occupancy sensors (these detect when a building has few people inside) which will adjust the light accordingly.

On the mechanical side, a lot of old buildings have constant volume systems. What you really want are variable volume systems which allow the air to vary according to factors like occupancy or time of day.

Many measures are inexpensive and have short paybacks (switching up light fixtures, putting in control systems). But as you get into more intensive renovations, you can’t think of it as an immediate payback. Instead you should think – what can I gain from revitalizing this building? Could it be more utilized or better occupied?

There is a market for this kind of investment. If you put $50 per square foot into a building with a good shell – but one which could benefit from an interesting new facade or green element – that can pay off. Building a new building might cost up to $400 per square foot, so in these times it is economically wiser to invest in existing buildings.

New York City has a great new policy whereby existing buildings have to track their energy use. Newly renovated buildings have to meet today’s code standards. Most cities do not yet require this; you can have an old building using an inordinate amount of energy where there are no requirements to change. It is simply grandfathered in.

Does a city need a distinctive urban landmark that defines its skyline?
That is very important. It gives the city its identity. Everyone feels a kinship to that city through the buildings and the skyline. In Chicago, whenever a new large building goes up everyone has to talk about it because it changes the skyline and the skyline belongs to everybody. With landmark buildings, people get concerned when you start talking changes, like renaming them or renovating. Although many buildings could benefit from a complete re-imagine of the facade or the architecture, with historically significant buildings another approach might be better. You could keep the existing materiality of the building but retrofit the glass, for example.

What is the most significant advance in urban design over the last 10 years?
A lot of what we talk about at the office is how to make our cities more walkable and more mixed-use. Because if you can live in the city with nice green spaces and can walk to work and have your retail and public transit systems handy, that will cut down on driving and carbon emissions.

Are cities and developers recognizing the need to move away from basic designs to appealing and gathering-place designs?
I think they are. In Chicago you get zoning bonuses for putting a public park on site, for example, or for having a green roof. If a site is zoned for 16 storeys and you introduce some green elements, you are allowed to build on a few more storeys. You also get bonuses for underground parking. Because although it is expensive to put in an underground system, people don’t want to see a bunch of parking lots outside on the street.

In Chicago we have a lot of hard surfaces; we have little shade and few green spaces. So, we look at where we can make a difference. How about making the street more walkable with a bi-level street system with an express bus lane on the lower level and a wider bike lane and walking area and retail on the upper level?

In dense environments, you can integrate green spaces into (or onto) the buildings themselves. A good example is a green roof. This helps with urban heating, since in the city dark-coloured roofs can generate five to 10 degrees more heat in the summer. Although this might be appealing to Albertans (who have cooler summer temperatures), it is not appealing in Chicago summers. Putting in a green space or making a lighter roof can mitigate that. Green roofs also hold storm water better. If there is a big rain event, these kinds of roofs allow the water to gradually go into the sewer system without overburdening it. It can be a positive thing for water infrastructure.

What designs do you like?
I have been up the CN Tower (in Toronto) and I love that for the height of it. I am a tall buildings person, so that explains that. I am looking forward to seeing more Canadian architecture when I am in Alberta.

The John Hancock Tower in Chicago has great structural expressionism. It has exterior bracing that goes up the building and it actually tapers.

I am working on the reconstruction of the Willis Tower (formerly known as the Sears Tower and the tallest building in North America) in Chicago. It is 1,450 feet tall (110 storeys) with antennas of over 350 feet. It has been a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work on such an iconic building. I am also working on a super tall building in the Middle East I’m most excited about.

We can have tremendous impact with existing buildings, particularly large ones, in terms of saving energy. For example, with the Willis Tower, every 10 per cent of energy saved is like planting a million trees. People think of cars when they think of pollution, but they don’t think of existing buildings much. In Chicago, old buildings and their out-of-date systems and operations are responsible for 70 per cent of carbon emissions.

What will it take to see the ideas presented at the Reimagine Series accepted more widely?
It will take awareness of how much energy existing buildings consume and how retrofitting is environmentally friendly. The other is the economy and getting finances for these projects. It is difficult to get big reconstruction loans in the U.S. these days. Policy informs practice, so supportive zoning policies need to be more widely available. There need to be some good example buildings out there – the Willis Tower and the Empire State Building are two of these. The Empire State Building has a retrofit plan to save 38 per cent of its energy; it is looking at windows, control systems, lighting. It is a comprehensive program.

What is your key message for architects today?
I want people to think of existing buildings in a new way. There are opportunities to save energy and to create an economically sound investment. Our existing cities are important and need to continue to evolve to be relevant.

Every building is unique. Take the time to get to know the building and what is special about it in order to discover how exactly to approach it. To me, when I need ideas, I’ll walk around cities and look at buildings. That is how I keep fresh. At our firm we think of architecture and sustainability in engineering as one thing, not just as a building but as a living machine.

July 2010 Contents

http://albertaventure.com/2010/07/architects-build-environmental-features-into-design/#more-11015


 

February 19, 2011

Sara Beardsley from AS + GG | 2011 Recipient | AIA Young Architects Award

Sara Beardsley, AIA

Sara Beardsley, AIA | Notes of Interest

During her twelve years of practicing architecture, Sara Beardsley, AIA, has advanced awareness of technical and sustainable design issues related to tall buildings, both new and existing, and heightened the discussion of large-scale buildings’ contribution to carbon emissions.

Beardsley’s experience has led her to become a sought-after expert on energy performance, with a special focus on supertall towers and the regeneration of cities. In her work thus far, as a Senior Architect at Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS + GG) and previously at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), Beardsley has led and contributed to many locally and internationally renowned projects.

Beardsley acted as a Senior Architect on the sustainable modernization and design of the Willis (formerly Sears) Tower Renovation and an adjacent 50-story Hotel project in Chicago (2008). She served as a Senior Technical Coordinator on the Head Offices for the Federation of Korea Industries tower in Seoul, Korea (2009). In her previous role at SOM, Beardsley served as the project architect for the $90 million GSA renovation of Mies vand der Rohe’s E.M. Dirksen Federal Courthouse in Chicago (2005-2006); she also had a key technical and leadership role on the design of the 95-story Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago (2003-2005). On the large-scale urban level, Beardsley was a key member of the AS+GG team that developed a “DeCarbonization Plan” for the City of Chicago.

Beardsley has lectured extensively about her work on existing buildings and decarbonization of cities to local, national, and international audiences within the design and construction community. Lectures to the public have included presentations to the Chicago Architecture Foundation, Friends of Downtown, the Chicago Public Library and student groups. Her published articles include appearances in prestigious journals, as well as the Chicago TribuneAlberta Venture and Metropolis magazine.

Sara Beardsley, AIA

© Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Beardsley’s expertise encompasses both the technical and design aspects of architecture, giving her a comprehensive understanding of the components of large-scale projects. In explaining her architectural philosophy, Beardsley likens buildings to “living, functioning machines.” Almost certainly, her interests and specialties will become more and more prevalent in the new century, as energy usage and the engineering of buildings become more important factors in the design of buildings.

Beardsley is an active member of the AIA and Chicago Women in Architecture. Within AS+GG she’s developed a mentoring program, organized educational factory tours, and guided young professionals in the completion of the Intern Development Program (IDP).

Beardsley has brought to light the broader issue of the need to renovate cities, helping municipalities start this important dialogue. Through her work, Beardsley encourages existing large-scale buildings to be recognized as assets in the form of an untapped environmental resource, which will encourage legislators, municipalities, and building-owners to make widespread energy retrofits a reality.

Jury Comments

Sara’s expertise– the technical integration of sustainable concepts in complex projects– is invaluable and neccesary in architecture, both right now and as we head into the future.

She cares about her profession, and contributes to the potential of emerging professionals through her mentoring and professional development program.

Sara is a woman of enthusiasm and expertise, and her career strengths already range from design, to management, to dissemination of knowledge through her presentations and publications.

2011 AIA Young Architects Award Jury

  • 2010 Chancellor:
  • Edward J. Kodet, Jr., FAIA
  • Kodet Architectural Group, Ltd.
  • Minneapolis
  • 2010 Vice Chancellor:
  • Chester A. Widom, FAIA
  • WWCOT Architecture & Interiors
  • Santa Monica, Calif.
  • 2010 Bursar:
  • Norman L. Koonce, FAIA
  • McLean, Va.
  • Secretary:
  • Ronald L. Skaggs, FAIA, FACHA
  • HKS, Inc.
  • Dallas
  • 2011 Incoming Bursar:
  • William J. Stanley, FAIA
  • Stanley Love-Stanley, PC
  • Atlanta

http://www.aia.org/practicing/awards/2011/young-architects/sara-beardsley/index.htm

 

February 14, 2011

Clean Technology Tower | Adrian Smith+Gordon Gill

cleantechnologybuilding.jpg

The “Clean Technology Tower” is a highly efficient building which will be constructed in Chicago. The tower will have wind turbines positioned at the corners of the building, to capture wind at its highest velocity as it accelerates around the tower. At the apex, where wind speeds are at a maximum, a domed double roof cavity directs the wind towards an array of wind turbines. The negative pressure created by the turbines will be used to ventilate interior spaces. The dome itself is shaded by solar cells that capture the southern sun.

cleantechnologybuilding_chicago.jpg

The complex includes over 1.8 million square feet of office space as well as a 300,000 square foot hotel, a spa and street-level retail.

It was designed by Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill, the same firm who designed the recently featured solar Masdar Headquarters.

chicago_wind_tower.jpg

This tower in Chicago is an evolution of the Pearl River Tower which both Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill were responsible for while at SOM. Where Pearl River used the face of the building to funnel wind into two large turbine zones this design uses an array of smaller turbines at the corners of the building to catch the wind at its highest velocity.

wind_tower.jpg

 

http://www.metaefficient.com/architecture-and-building/innovative-tower-to-feature-atrium-of-wind-turbines.html

http://smithgill.com/#/work/by_name/clean_technology_tower

February 1, 2011

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

Nadine M. Post

History keeps disproving predictions that the supertall skyscraper, as a developer’s building type, was destroyed when the two 110-story towers of New York City’s World Trade Center went down. Last year alone, 66 towers taller than 200 meters opened their doors, breaking the 2007 record of 48. Of these, eight are taller than 300 m, according to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, which is the keeper of the tall-building flame. CTBUH predicts 97 more 200-m-plus high-rises will have ribbon-cuttings next year, including more than 20 taller than 300 m, which the group dubs “supertalls.”

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

1. Burj Khalifa – Dubai, U.A.E.
Height: 828 m; 2,717 ft
CTBUH height rank: 1
Occupancy: office, residential, hotel
Structural material: steel and concrete
Total floors: 163
Owner-developer: Emaar Properties PJSC
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM)
Associate architect: Hyder Consulting
Structural engineer: SOM
Mechanical-electrical-plumbing (MEP) engineer: SOM
Main contractors: Samsung; Besix Group; Arabtec

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

2. International Commerce Centre – Hong Kong
Height: 484 m; 1,588 ft
CTBUH height rank: 4
Occupancy: hotel, office
Structural material: composite concrete and steel
Total floors: 108
Owner-developer: Hang Lung Group, Sun Hung Kai Properties
Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
Associate architect: Wong and Ouyang Ltd.
Structural engineer: Arup
MEP engineer: J. Roger Preston Ltd.

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

3. Nanjing Greenland Financial Center – Nanjing, China
Height: 450 m; 1,476 ft
CTBUH height rank: 7
Occupancy: hotel; office
Structural material: composite
Total floors: 66
Developer: Nanjing State Owned Assets & Greenland Financial Center Co. Ltd.
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM)
Associate architect: ECADI
Structural engineer: SOM
MEP engineer: SOM
Main contractor: Shanghai Construction Group

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

4. Guangzhou International Finance Center – Guangzhou, China
Height: 438 m; 1,435 ft
CTBUH height rank: 9
Occupancy: hotel, office
Structural material: composite steel and concrete
Total floors: 103
Architect: Wilkinson Eyre Architects
Associate architect: South China Design Institute
Structural engineer: Arup
MEP Engineer: Arup

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

5. The Index – Dubai, U.A.E.
Height: 326 m; 1,070 ft
CTBUH height rank: 29
Occupancy: residential, office
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 80
Owner-developer: Union Properties
Architect: Foster + Partners
Associate architect: Khatib & Alami; Woods Bagot
Structural engineer: Halverson & Partners; Bruechle, Gilchrist & Evans
MEP engineer: Roger Preston & Partners; WSP Group

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

6. HHHR Tower – Dubai, U.A.E.
Height: 318 m; 1,042 ft
CTBUH height rank: 35
Occupancy: residential
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 72
Owner-developer: Dubai International Real Estate
Architect: Al Hashemi; Farayand Architectural Engineering Consultancy
MEP engineer: Ian Banham & Associates Consulting Engineers

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

7. Ocean Heights – Dubai, UAE
Height: 310 m; 1,017 ft
CTBUH height rank: 37
Occupancy: residential
Structural material: concrete
Total Floors: 83
Owner-developer: Damac Gulf Properties LLC
Architect: Aedas Ltd
Associate architect: ECG Engineering Consultants Group
Structural engineer: Meinhardt Ltd
MEP engineer: Ian Banham & Associates Consulting Engineers
Main contractor: Arabtec

 

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

8. Capital City Moscow Tower – Moscow
Height: 302 m; 989 ft
CTBUH height rank: 48
Occupancy: residential
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 76
Owner-developer: Capital Group
Architect: NBBJ
Structural engineer: Arup
MEP engineer: Arup

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

9. Sky Tower – Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.
Height: 292 m; 959 ft
CTBUH height rank: 58
Occupancy: residential, office
Structural material: concrete
Total floors: 74
Owner-developer: Sorouh Real Estate Development; Tameer Holding Investment
Architect: Arquitectonica
Associate architect: RW Armstrong; National Engineering Bureau
Structural engineer: Hyder Consulting
MEP engineer: Ian Banham and Associates

Skyscraper Craze Rages On, Led by Asia

10. Excellence Century Plaza Tower 1 – Shenzhen, China
Height: 288 m; 945 ft
CTBUH height rank: 64
Occupancy: office
Structural material: composite steel and concrete
Total floors: 60
Owner-developer: Excellence Century Real Estate Development Co. Ltd.
Architect: Leo A Daly
Associate architect: China Construction Design International
Structural engineer: China Construction Design International
MEP engineer: China Construction Design International

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