Archive for January 22nd, 2012

January 22, 2012

endemico resguardo silvestre | gracia studio

‘endémico resguardo silvestre’ by gracia studio, valle de guadalupe, mexico
all images courtesy gracia studio

scattered along the sloping terrain of valle de guadalupe, mexico, ‘endémico resguardo silvestre’ is a cluster of twenty hotel rooms,
designed by san diego-based practice gracia studio. positioned within a landscape of vineyards, each ecoloft has panoramic vistas
overlooking the scenic valley below. placed upon steel stilts, the 20 square meter cubes hover above the rocky ground, minimally interfering
with the savannah continuing underneath. corten steel was selected to surface the small structures, aging with time to blend into
the rustic hues of the encompassing nature.

with each unit strategically oriented to unobstructed views directed towards the valley, guests may close their personal entry door
and feel isolated in nature. attached to each cabin, a personal patio and fireplace allow for comfortable lounging outside.
the 99 hectare complex is completed with a nearby winery and pool.

view from the sloping terrain below

overlooking the valley below

nestled into the rocky terrain

the facades of the cabins may be completely enclosed

personal patio adjacent to each structure

view from a cabin


(left) view from bedroom
(right) bathroom with predominantly black decor

(left) alternative interior
(right) interior with white decor

view of bedroom and bathroom

at dusk

seamlessly transition into the landscape

illuminated at night

warm fire overlooking wine country

pool area for the cluster of cabins

cabins illuminated within the landscape


January 22, 2012

Buildings A, B and D | Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee

Architects: Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee
Location: , North Carolina, USA
Client: Wake Technical Community College, Northern Wake Campus
Project Team: Jeffrey Lee, Douglas Brinkley, Marni Rushing, David Hill, Matt Bitterman
Size: 209,570 SF
Photographs: JWest ProductionsTom Arban

 designed the master plan for Wake Technical Community College’s Northern Wake Campus, the first All-LEED campus in North Carolina and one of the first in the nation. PBC+L developed a planning strategy that layers the site from the outside in so that cars remain isolated along the perimeter, while campus pedestrian pathways engage open space and the lush wetlands of the site’s inner core.

PBC+L designed and built the first three buildings on campus. Building A is a LEED certified classroom and lab building. Building B is also LEED certified and houses a library, classrooms, and administrative offices. Building D is a LEED Gold certified building that includes classrooms, computer labs, offices and a coffee shop.

January 22, 2012

The Avenue | Sheppard Robson

Architect: Sheppard Robson 
Location: , UK
Project Manager: Gardiner & Theobald
Structural Engineer: Capita Symonds
M&E Engineer: Grontmij
Quantity Surveyor: Mooney Kelly
Main Contractor: Lend Lease
Client: Allied London Properties
Project Area: 5,000 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Hufton+Crow

Marking the start of the pedestrian journey through the new Spinningfields quarter, the award- winning 1 The Avenue is pivotal in form and location, tying Manchester’s retail and business district with its civic core. The building was designed in response to its urban context and as a flagship mixed-use building. Armani occupies the ground and first floors, with a nightclub in the basement and boutique offices and a roof terrace above.

The scissor geometry of the building’s form responds to a duality of desire lines and is immediately apparent in the dramatic cantilever on to Deansgate. The angled upper storeys realign the east-west axis towards Hardman Square at the heart of Spinningfields, and the lower levels direct pedestrians towards the new entrance to the John Rylands Library. The trapezoidal form of the building’s plan is echoed in the vibrant glazing which animates the elevations and creates a unique experience inside the building. 1 The Avenue received a BREEAM Excellent rating and the building’s regulated energy consumption is just 78KWhr/m²/yr.

January 22, 2012

Transit Oriented City – Dongtan Central Business Master Plan | Ojanen Chiou Architects + SWA Group

Designed by SWA Group with Ojanen Chiou Architects LLP, the 157 hectare Central Business Master Plan is at the heart of  City: a new urban center located just 30 km south of Seoul in . The development zone is situated on a former agricultural plain that had been taken over by various industrial uses. Bounded by a river to the west and mountainous terrain to the east, this zone is bisected by a major transportation corridor connecting Seoul with the southern reaches of the country. At the core of the development is a transit center that will accommodate high-speed and metropolitan rail stations connecting with a bi-modal (bus + tram) transit system, and long-distance and city buses, establishing City as a major regional transit hub.

The remainder of the program includes public plazas, office buildings, a corporate campus, retail functions, hotels, schools, and various cultural facilities. Inspired by the local native ecology, the layout is a constructed response to the natural course of water as it moves from higher to lower elevations. The urban fabric is organized by a series of green zones established around a system of watercourses traversing the site, infusing the overall urban experience with a strong sense of nature by creating natural corridors of light, air, flora, and fauna, and providing numerous open spaces for leisure and recreation.

Their design defines open spaces that utilize natural resources prior to establishing street grids creating fingers of green belts that connect hills on the east side and the riverfront on the west. The landscape infrastructure follows the unique site topography and hydrology and becomes part of an integral water management system.

In order to establish a public transportation node, they provide a well-integrated system of trains, metro, trams and buses to attract corporations, residents, commuters, and tourists. The design also promotes a pedestrian and bicycle network with pedestrian-scaled blocks, comfortable sidewalks, continuous street facades with arcades and three-dimensional connections at busy intersections. They also proposed compact and mixed-use developments with a balance of a high density development (FAR 5-8) with 36.5% open spaces that are dispersed through out the site and easily accessible.

Ojanen_Chiou architects LLP assisted SWA in overall planning concepts and strategy, provided building massing studies, architectural guidelines and conceptual architectural design for the transit center and the various facilities.

Architects: Ojanen Chiou Architects + SWA Group
Location: Dongtan, South Korea
Client: Heerim Group
Project Area: 157 Hectares
Year: 2012


January 22, 2012

Poly Prep Lower School | Platt Byard Dovell White Architects

Architects: Platt Byard Dovell White Architects
Location: 50 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, , USA
Cost: $20 million
Completed: 2007
Client: Poly Prep Country Day School
Landmark Status: Park Slope Historic District
Original Architect: Montrose Morris, Romanesque Revival Hulbert Mansion
Project Team: Samuel G. White, FAIA, Design Principal; Serena Losonczy, Project Manager; Matthew Mueller, Job Captain; Leonard Leung; Marie Marberg; Charles Melansen; Tomo Tsujita; Julie Janiski, LEED AP
Photographs: Jonathan Wallen

Our design for Poly Prep reflects a combination of institutional use, residential scale, and compact landscape design in a low-rise urban context.

Unanimously approved by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, Platt Byard Dovell White’s design for the addition to the Hulbert Mansion in the Park Slope Historic District incorporates important aesthetic elements of the neighborhood in a contemporary glass, metal and brick four-story building. The prestigious school had outgrown its space in the existing building – “the castle,” as the students fondly refer to it – and required a renovation of the interior of the existing school and an addition of a modern structure to their campus.

The fast-track addition included eight classrooms, a 2,400 sq. ft. gym, faculty offices, a dance studio and a new ADA compliant entrance to the school. A gathering area within the school’s campus was created outside the new entrance to facilitate the arrival and departure of students and their parents at the busiest times of the day. Design and construction operations conform to the requirements of the U. S. Green Building Council for LEED Silver; Poly Prep was the first school in New York City to achieve LEED certification.

January 22, 2012

Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics, Brown University | Architecture Research Office

Architects: Architecture Research Office (ARO)
Location: , Rhode Island, 
Project Team: Stephen Cassell, Principal; Kim Yao, Associate/Principal; Neil Patel, Project Manager; Gustavo Colmenares
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 18,100 sqf (GSF)
Photographs: Michael Moran

New York-based firm Architecture Research Office (ARO) recently completed the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics, or ICERM at Brown University. The facility is the newest of eight National Science Foundation Mathematical Sciences Research Institutes, and is the only one located in New England. ICERM’s mission is to expand the use of computational and experimental methods in mathematics, to support theoretical advances related to computation, and to address problems posed by the existence and use of the computer through mathematical tools, research and innovation. A venue for workshops and symposia year-round, ICERM also hosts several resident mathematicians for periods of a few weeks up to a semester.

With seating for 104 people and featuring views of downtown Providence on three sides, the Lecture Hall is the heart of ICERM and home to its workshops and symposia. It is equipped with Echo360 lecture-capture technology to enable easy audio and video recording of events as well as live-streaming to the Web. The Lecture Hall’s fourth wall is a writable surface of translucent glass panels inset with two suspended projection screens. This wide, floor-to-ceiling surface, actually a double layer of glass, allows daylight to filter into ICERM’s central lounge, where mathematicians also write on it. The cavity between the wall’s two layers can be illuminated to produce a luminous, iconic connection between the Lecture Hall and ICERM’s lobby.

To reduce costs and shorten the construction schedule, much of the existing partitions and layout are preserved. The design provides as much natural light as possible to interior public spaces. Chalkboards or whiteboards run throughout ICERM’s private offices and public spaces, while selected furniture pieces maximize opportunities for group collaboration. Conference rooms are equipped with Smartboard and video-teleconference technology that support collaborative events both within and beyond the Institute’s physical space. ARO’s design resolves a technical challenge of an appropriate balance between the level of technology required for an institution of this caliber and the quality of work environment necessary for mathematicians to do their best work.

January 22, 2012

The Cube | Park Associati

Architects: Park Associati 
Location: Milano, via Foscolo n.1 (Piazza Duomo), Italy
Client: Electrolux Home Appliances Emea N.V
Design team: Lorenzo Merloni (project leader), Alessandro Rossi, Alexia Caccavella, Alice Cuteri, Fabio Calciati_Rendering
Contractor:Nüssli AG, Hüttwilen, CH, Frieder Braun, Maurizio Ledda, Maik Rauch
Event Concept and Project Management: Absolute Blue
Area: 140 sqm
Photographs: Andrea Martiradonna

In 1972, Ettore Sottsass came up with a grand architectural scheme that took in the whole planet and was called “The Planet as Festival”. It was a highly utopian, highly visionary, highly radical project, as were many other projects from that time, known as the age of radical architecture. In the description of the project he highlighted the basis for which it was necessary to overturn conventional rules and go on to imagine a better (not only) architectural world….. there was nothing left for me to design, solitary, not group artist that I am – child of an era worried about the future – a degenerate child for I am not engrossed in the destinies which generated me, which political parties, armies and suchlike threateningly point out to me.

I thought there was no architecture left for me to draw, I mean there is no architecture left to propose, either as Andrea Branzi aptly says “as a model for society” or to put in the hands of society “as a psycho-motor activity” ……… Therefore I designed these projects as if they had been proposed by someone else – someone far removed from the trajectory of thought concerned with the city, since it considered that thought concerned with the city has up to now, only projected, wherever it comes from and wherever it goes to, the insane, sick, dangerous and aggressive idea that men must live only to work and must work to produce and then consume.

With my projects I imagined that something has been changed in the moral of the man “worker-producer” and that it is thought that men can live (if they want to) for the sake of living and work (if perchance they want to) to come to know, by means of their bodies, their psyche and their sex, that they are living………I know all this very well – not because I have invented it myself but because I have heard it all over the place, from young people, from poets, from many people who really work, from the oppressed, the alienated, the tired, Indian chiefs, Gurus, children, prisoners….that freedom can only come from the possible knowledge that each of us is living and that very slowly each of us is dying too. (taken from Casabella n° 365 May 1972).

Clearly the project had no consequence other than publication in Casabella that, however, influenced many generations of architects and designers. In the planet as festival, various elements of architecture appear, designed like kind and friendly objects sitting here and there on the planet, on the top of volcanoes, on craggy cliffs amid the rocky walls of the Grand Canyon, floating on the ocean or transported on placid river streams. The Cube project seems to have its roots right in that metaphorical world of Ettore Sottsass and is reminiscent of those amusing yet serious utopias of fifty years ago.

The idea is to build a small piece of architecture, a cabin, perhaps a nest, on high, at the top of a cliff, on a monument, on a public building, it doesn’t matter where but in a beautiful place and with a beautiful and original view. The idea is then to create a restaurant and welcome clients in an enchanting, unique place with sophisticated dishes cooked in Electrolux kitchens. The idea is to keep it open for six months and then change location, change city, nation, continent and reinstate this restaurant-type object on some other roof for new surprises, new menus, new clients.

It is one of those projects that open things up: in fact too often solutions resolve but do not leave space for the imagination, for innovation, for evolution. This ‘Cube’ that is not actually a cube, has a great proactive force and immediately presents itself for what it is: defying the paralysis of thinking and the imagination. Not only that, it also defies the immobility produced by the continual growth of bureaucracy in requiring the consent from the government, council, safety officers, heritage organisations, fire brigades etc. etc. If indeed standards are necessary and useful for ensuring better architecture, it is also true that standards have spread into all design choices to the extent that schemes are increasingly often an interpretation of the current regulations rather than a conscious creative act that gives continuity in the history of architecture.

January 22, 2012

Princeton School of Architecture | Architecture Research Office

Architects: Architecture Research Office
Location: New York, 
Project Team: Principal-in-charge: Adam Yarinsky; Project Manager: Megumi Tamanaha; Project Team: Jennifer Park, Tina Hunderup, Adrian Wu, Arthur Chu
Completion: August 2007
Photographs: Paul Warchol

A strategic intervention, this Addition re-centers the Princeton School of Architecture. Enclosed in glass and steel, the Addition links the School’s two-story south wing, where its administrative offices and library are located, to the three-story north wing’s studios and classrooms. Princeton students have nicknamed the building the “Hyphen”.

The Addition contains a new lobby, student lounge, elevator, and cantilevered steel stair. Plan and section take their dimensions from the existing 1963 building: the Addition aligns with the existing floor levels and, on the exterior, translates the rhythm of the existing building’s window bays. Large glass panels, with varying ceramic frit patterns overlaid like folds in a curtain, comprise the Addition’s envelope. The frit pattern affirms formal characteristics seen in the building, uniting the glass and steel Addition with the existing building, while also providing solar shading for the third floor lounge. The elevator shaft, painted shades of blue, forms the background against which the stair and the frit pattern are seen.

The project scope also included renovations throughout the existing building to update the School of Architecture with a new model shop and facilities for a three-dimensional printer.

and more pics:

January 22, 2012

Learning Spring School | Platt Byard Dovell White Architects

Architects: Platt Byard Dovell White Architects
Location: 247 East 20th Street at Second Avenue, 
Cost: $31 million
Client: Simons Foundation, LearningSpring Elementary School, Margaret Poggi, Head of School, LearningSpring School, Jim Snyder, Board Member, LearningSpring School
Project Team: Ray H. Dovell, AIA, Design Principal; Elissa Icso, AIA, Project Manager; Matthew Mueller, AIA, Project Architect; Erica Gaswirth, LEED AP, Steven Dodds
Completed: 2010
Photographs: Frederick Charles

Founded in 2001 by a parent group, the LearningSpring School is a 108-student K through 8th grade private day school for children diagnosed on the autism spectrum. The new eight-story building is situated on the northwest corner of 20th Street and 2nd Avenue in Manhattan. It contains a full range of academic, athletic, and special needs spaces arranged internally as a vertical campus, designed to support the special social, physical, and educational needs of its students.

Higher-occupancy spaces, including the gymnasium, library, and lunchroom, as well as administrative functions, are located on the bottom two floors where the floor plates are the largest. Of the six upper stories, two are for lower school classrooms, two are for shared therapy and special education spaces, and two are for the upper classrooms. Classrooms are paired as suites, sharing resource areas, quiet study rooms, and toilets. To provide ample opportunity for informal socialization, seating alcoves off corridors are spread through the building. Circulation between the floors is through a glass-enclosed communicating stair. Classrooms and corridors are finished with cork floors, bamboo casework, and natural wall fabrics, helping to produce a calm and intimate learning environment.

To protect the façades of the building from the unobstructed southeast exposure to the sun, and to provide a valuable visual buffer from the busy intersection, the building is draped with an aluminum and stainless steel sunscreen supported by an external steel armature. Behind is an aluminum, glass and zinc curtain wall. Flanking the adjacent buildings to the north and west and extending along the base of the building is a terracotta rainscreen. Between the two systems is a vertical band of tubular channel glass marking important circulation spaces within. The resulting architecture provides a welcoming and dignified representation of a group of children and their educators long underserved by the city’s schools.

This fast-track project was the first building in New York State to receive a Gold rating under the rigorous LEED For Schools program. This accomplishment was based on various design and construction features, including the provision of natural daylight and neighborhood views for every classroom. The building’s aluminum sunshades, low-e coated insulated glass units, and zinc rain screen spandrels help to cut solar gain significantly. Other environmentally friendly features include operable windows for natural ventilation, low-flow fixtures for water savings, and high-efficiency equipment for energy savings. The LearningSpring School received an AIA/CAE Educational Facility Design Award in 2011.

January 22, 2012

Yale Steam Laundry Condominiums | John Ronan Architects

Architects: John Ronan Architects
Location: Washington, DC, 
Photographs: Nathan Kirkman

Project Description: The historic Yale Steam Laundry structure possesses a rich physical history that is written in its vaulted floor structure, its oddly-spaced floor framing and in its pock-marked concrete and brick. This patina of time imparts a character upon the space it encloses that once erased, cannot be recreated. The project design asserts that this character is important and should be preserved, and that new interventions should be minimal, legible and discrete. The project is as much about what one doesn’t do as it is about what one does.

The proposal pursues a strategy of select intervention that seeks to maximize the preservation of the existing physical history and the character it confers on the space, and defines the new project as the sum total of two parallel realities: the existing structure with its attendant character and the new programmatic interventions, inserted into the existing structure like furniture.

Where new elements meet existing structure, the distinction is pronounced: hot rolled lacquered steel plate insertions in the public areas (entry, lobby, stair, exercise room) stand apart from the glazed white brick to form reception desks, bridges, stairs. In the residential units above, kitchen/bathroom cores clad in birch millwork are inserted into the existing shell to minimally convert the building to its new use. The ground floor of the annex serves simultaneously as building lobby and clubroom. A plate steel wall separates the public areas from back of house (offices, pantry, etc.).