Archive for August 17th, 2011

August 17, 2011

Radian Apartments | Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture © Erdy McHenry Architecture

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Radian Apartments / Erdy McHenry Architecture diagram

Architect: Erdy McHenry Architecture
Location: Philadelphia, 
Structural Engineer: The Harman Group
Mechanical Engineer: PHY Consulting Engineers
Civil Engineer: Pennoni Associates, Inc.
General Contractor: Intech Construction
Project Area: 170,000sqf
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Erdy McHenry Architecture

The Radian Apartments are a 14-story, 500-bed residential and retail center at the edge of the University of Pennsylvania’s rapidly expanding campus. The Radian’s name is based on its angular-design feature created by Philadelphia-based Erdy McHenry Architecture, LLC. The project was initiated by a private developer in collaboration with the University, which owns the land. It is built with contested space in mind. It neither belongs to the assortment of retail spaces of West Philadelphia nor to the flat academic buildings that are signature of University City. It gracefully blurs the line between these two opposing landscapes, while upgrading the atmosphere of both.

The  style of the Radian references the unit construction of dormitories, yet progressively steers away from their trademark rigidity. Apartments range from one bedroom to four, and are arranged differently on each floor. The flexible plan, combines a one bathroom apartment with a four bathroom apartment, creating random junctions and unexpected engagements. The connections made inside the building, expressed outside by windows etched on the facade, are unified by the single white ribbon wrapping itself around the frame of the building.

Ground-level retail pushes back from the street opening a public space for informal gathering. The residential entrance exists along this axis and public activity extends up and under the residential tower via a grand stair. This open court aligns with an adjacent quad on the south side of Walnut Street connecting with Locust Walk. Outdoor dining options are provided at the upper terrace level and allow for glimpses onto the street.

The building’s sustainable features include a green roof and a prefabricated rain-screen facade. The 10,000 square foot green roof acts as a storm-water management system, funneling water off impervious surfaces and into the garden, while controlling the release of excess water into Philadelphia’s combined sewer system. The retention basin is marked by the landscape above it, a simple grove of trees.

http://www.archdaily.com/158386/radian-apartments-erdy-mchenry-architecture/

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August 17, 2011

Three PNC Plaza | Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler © Gensler

Three PNC Plaza / Gensler diagram

Architect: Gensler
Location, Pittsburgh, 
Structural Engineer: Astorino
Sustainability Consultant: Paladino & Company
Contractor: P.J. Dick
Project Area: 750,000sqf
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Gensler

Setting the stage for Pittsburgh to become a representation of intellectual, sustainable urban growth, Three PNC Plaza is a 750,000 square foot, 23-story mixed-use development designed byGensler. The LEED Gold registered project is comprised of a Fairmont Hotel, offices, residential condominiums, ground-floor retail and below-grade parking. Recently, International law firm Reed Smith moved their corporate headquarters into the building as their signage adorns the structure’s top floors. These divers programmatic typologies within a single project in downtown Pittsburgh at the intersection of the commercial and cultural corridors of Fifth and Liberty, generates interminable activity, enhancing the vigor of the city’s urban core.

PNC is a keystone of commerce in Pittsburgh, a city which had not seen a new tower in its downtown core in more than 20 years. This project presented the opportunity to activate and revitalize the heart of the city. To that end, the aesthetic and conceptual notion of stitching was the basis of the project’s design. On the facade, disparate programmatic elements including hotel, condominiums, office, and retail, are reflected in distinct facade materials, all of which are stitched into a balance, singe structure.

Curtainwall glazing visually distinguishes the programmatic elements of the building. For example, crystal-clear glazing for the condominiums create a “jewel-box” effect, differentiating them from offices and hotel, whose low-E-glazing offers enhanced energy efficiency, and is identified by a green tint.

Office and hotel floor plates feature highly efficient core layouts and optimal lease and planning spans. Upper levels of the office floor are defined by a large horizontal notch expression that ties the space to an outdoor roof garden. The condo units are separated from the hotel rooms that share the same floor plate but are located in the portion of the building with optimal views and daylight.

At the ground level, the design goal was to activate street life by creating a vibrant environment. Lobbies for the office, hotel, and residential portions of the project are all open to the street, and are interconnected. Literally and figuratively, the design stitches the program of the buildings interior to the urban fabric.

The lobby features a dramatic high ceiling that ushers in abundant natural light, a sculptural front desk that echoes the angular quality of the building facade, and an asymmetric grand staircase leading to a restaurant located above the front desk.

Striving to create a locally authentic experience, the design team was guided by the theme “Art & Industry.” Local steel and glass can be found in design details throughout the hotel and in works by local artists such as the dramatic ballroom chandelier and glass pendant fixtures in the lobby and bar. Artifacts from the 1800′s discovered during building excavation were incorporated into the hotel’s design and are displayed in key locations throughout the hotel.

http://www.archdaily.com/158690/three-pnc-plaza-gensler/

August 17, 2011

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / Lake|Flato Architects and BNIM Architects

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects © Hester + Hardaway

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects Site Plan

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects 3 Floor Plans

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects Section

School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston / BNIM Architects & Lake|Flato Architects Daylighting Diagram

Architect: BNIM ArchitectsLake|Flato Architects
Location: , Texas, 
Project Team: Steve McDowell, FAIA; Kimberly Hickson, AIA; Chris Koon, AIA; David Immenschuh; David Lake, FAIA; Greg Papay, AIA; Kenny Brown
Consultants:  BNIM ArchitectsJaster Quintanilla & AssociatesCarter Burgess, Inc.,Ferguson Consulting, Inc., Supersymmetry, Clanton AssociatesEpsilon Engineering,Walter P. MooreColeman & Associates, Apex Busby, Rolf Jenson & AssociatesPhilo & Wilke ArchitectsArupPelton Marsh KinsellaWorrell Design GroupLerch Bates & AssociatesCenter for Maximum Potential Building SystemsRocky Mountain Institute, Elements
Contractor: Jacobs/VaughnGreg Papay, FAIA
Project Area: 18,023 sqm
Project Year:  2004
Photographs: Hester + Hardaway

By improving health and reducing environmental harm, the collaboration between Lake|Flato Architects and BNIM Architects for the UTHSC School of Nursing has become a model for social and educational space that is both inspiring and accountable.Located in the Texas Medical Center, the world’s largest medical center, this building reaches out to the rest of the almost 50 medical institutions nearby, but is still able to stand out amongst its surroundings because of its promotion of health not only in function and use, but in construction and performance as well.  Given the density of the medical center and the size of its site, the building becomes a vertical campus, with a gradient of public-to-private spaces moving up from the ground level.

The most prevalent and impressive aspect of the project is its sustainability efforts. The entire UTHSC School of Nursing was built with 50% recycled materials. Photovoltaic panels and daylight strategies on the different facades respond to varying solar conditions depending on their orientation, and utilize natural light without increasing heat gain, leading to a 40% reduction in energy use. Rainwater collection allows for a 60% reduction in water use. All of these processes together lead the project to reach LEED Gold certification.

http://www.archdaily.com/156788/school-of-nursing-and-student-community-center-at-the-university-of-texas-health-science-center-in-houston-lakeflato-architects-and-bnim-architects/

August 17, 2011

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly | Hermann & Valentiny and Partners

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (6) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (1) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (2) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (3) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (4) Courtesy of  HVP

Heisdorf Residence for the Elderly / Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP) (5) Courtesy of  HVP

Site Plan Site Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

 

Architects: Hermann & Valentiny and Partners (HVP)
Location: , Germany
Client: Maredoc a.s.b.l.
Project Year: 2007
Project Area: 6,040 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of HVP

The old castle of Heisdorf, situated in a park with marvelous mature trees, has undergone numerous alterations (extensions) since it was first built in the 19th century. Nevertheless, it was too small and above all could not offer the levels of comfort expected today in a facility of this kind.

HVP approached this work cautiously. They renovated the historic building fabric of the castle, but without visible architectural changes. In contrast, the accumulated extensions were demolished and replaced by a new wing linked to the castle by an elevated glazed connecting element.

The new building is oriented north-south with large glazed loggias (known as “curiosities”) on one side, facing in the direction of the castle and projecting roofed balconies looking onto the park on the other.

Without any doubt, making the new building of exposed concrete was a risk. But the building is so convincingly integrated in the existing fabric – surrounded by a newly designed outdoor area with water, steps to sit upon, paved and carefully planted green areas – that it represents a facility with an extremely high value indeed. A great deal of wood and glass was employed and spaces are flooded with daylight, friendly and warm. Particularly important for the elderly, the residents feel protected yet unrestricted thanks to the openness in many areas, offering a view of everything going on outside.

http://www.archdaily.com/159063/heisdorf-residence-for-the-elderly-hermann-valentiny-and-partners/

August 17, 2011

Apple Reveals Plans for Fifth Avenue Cube | Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

newnewapplecube0811 Rendering of the new cube © Apple

Apple Reveals Plans for Fifth Avenue Cube Courtesy of MacRumors

When the iconic Apple glass cube on Fifth Avenue was shroud in barriers in preparation for renovation in June, the future of the flagship Apple store was unclear.  It was only revealed that Apple would be removing the glass cube and working on drainage, pavers, and bollards on the plaza, but just what changes were to be made to the cube itself remained elusive.

Apple has now revealed that the glass panels as we have known them will be replaced with larger panels to create a seamless appearance.  A sign now states, “We’re simplifying the Fifth Avenue cube. By using larger, seamless pieces of glass, we’re using just 15 panes instead of 90.”  There will be three panels per side of the cube, running the full length.  During the day the store is faintly recognizable as a glass encasing for an underground world; at night the store glows from the inside out.  With this new structural detailing, the building will likely appear even more subtle during the day and more brilliant at night.

This original design is an innovation by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and structural engineersEckersley O’Callahan.  The glass cube and subterranean glass staircase were trademarked in 2010, associating the vision of the architecture with Apple’s own innovations.

We recently reported that according to documents released by the city of Cupertino, Foster + Partners will be the architects of the new Apple Campus in Cupertino, California. Steve Jobs shared the following, “We’ve used our experience making retail buildings all over the world now, and we know how to make the biggest pieces of glass in the world for architectural use.”

http://www.archdaily.com/160138/apple-reveals-plans-for-fifth-avenue-cube/

  

 

        

pple’s second Manhattan retail store opened May 19th in New York City. Located at 767 Fifth Avenue between 58th and 59th Streets, the prominent site near FAO Schwarz and Bergdorf Goodman provides views of Central Park.”We opened our first New York store in SoHo in 2002, and it has been successful beyond our dreams. Now we’re thrilled to open our second New York store on Fifth Avenue,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “With outstanding service and an amazing location open 24 hours a day, we think the Apple Store Fifth Avenue is going to be a favorite destination for New Yorkers and people around the world.”The store occupies the underground retail concourse of the General Motors Building, with entry from the plaza level above. “The new plaza in front of the General Motors building on Fifth Avenue at 59th Street is a triumph of urban design.” said James Gardner in the New York Sun. “Suddenly, as if out of nowhere, New York has a new public space that will prove to be a source of civic pride and aesthetic delight.”

Designers Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and structural engineers Eckersly O’Callahan (glass elements) in collaboration with Apple used Apple Stores’ signature structural glass vertical circulation to entice plaza level passersby down to the store’s underground main level. The 32-foot structural glass cube marking the store’s entrance makes a bold architectural statement. Housing a transparent glass elevator wrapped by a circular glass stair, the transparent cube beckons potential customers down to the retail level below. By day it is a skylight bringing natural light underground, while at night the lighted cube is a sign. “It was in Apple’s DNA to try to make something that no one else had the vision to create,” said Ron Johnson, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Retail.

Visitors descend the glass stair or travel in the all-glass elevator, entering a carefully tailored stainless steel and stone environment where Apple’s products take center stage. Custom-designed wooden store fixtures, stainless steel ceiling and wall panels and an Italian stone floor make an elegant, yet restrained backdrop.

Awards

2008 Honor Award
AIA Pennsylvania
2007 Award of Excellence for Design
AIA New York State
2007 Excellence in Architecture
AIA San Francisco
2007 American Architecture Award
Chicago Athenaeum
2007 Honorable Mention, Best Retail Space
Travel + Leisure Magazine Awards
2006 Design Award
Business Week/Architectural Record Awards
August 17, 2011

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway | Tod Williams + Billie Tsien

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (8) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (2) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (1) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (3) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (5) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (6) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (7) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (4) © The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation on the Parkway / Tod Williams + Billie Tsien (9) © The Barnes Foundation

The last chance to see the Barnes Foundation’s artwork in its original setting has passed. It is now being prepared for the move to its new home in downtown . Architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien designed the new building for the Barnes Foundation with respect for its strong history and as a reflective addition of the foundation’s mission. The building is scheduled for completion in late 2011.

The Barnes Foundation was initiated by Albert Barnes in the early 20th century to “promote the advancement of education and the appreciation of the fine arts” and horticulture. The foundation has been located in Merion, Pennsylvania for almost a century where Barnes built a gallery around his collection of French Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, and early Modern paintings.

Barnes himself arranged the paintings for display in Merion, and retaining the original placements is a priority for the foundation as well as the architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. In order to accomplish this, the galleries in Philadelpia will replicate the scale, proportion and configuration of the Merion galleries, but will benefit from a glass canopy to allow in natural light for improved viewing conditions. Other spaces in the new building are entirely original to the Foundation’s expansion.

Tod Williams and Billie Tsien Architects combined the galleries with spaces to compliment the secondary teaching and horticultural missions of the Barnes Foundation. Classrooms and interior gardens neighbor gallery spaces on each level and there are vast public gardens surround the exterior. Additional program new to the Philadelphia expansion includes a café, auditorium, special exhibitions gallery, and facilities for painting conservation and restoration.

Along with the preservation of gallery designs from Marion, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien worked with Olin landscape architects to recall the Marion gardens in the new site. The design concept by the architects is a “ gallery in a garden” accomplished through the beautifully designed public gardens surrounding the building sited in the center.

The grey and gold limestone clad building sits on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and will quickly become a new feature along this stable cultural route. The rectangular glass protrusion covering the length of the building allows light into the galleries through the day, and at night will glow. It is another asset to the artwork and the Barnes Foundation, and a spotlight highlighting the move to its new city, Philadelphia.

Architects: Tod Williams + Billie Tsien
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Project Year: In Progress
Photographs: The Barnes Foundation

http://www.archdaily.com/158892/the-barnes-foundation-on-the-parkway-tod-williams-billie-tsien/