Archive for August 13th, 2011

August 13, 2011

Fabrikstrasse 15,Basel | Gehry Partners

Fabrikstrasse 15

Sunlight penetrates the protective glazing of Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 — even through the photovoltaic-cell panels of the roof — filling the interior with light. A skylight integrated into the campus grounds (center) brings daylight light down into the lower-level auditorium above the stage.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Completed in 2009, Frank Gehry’s Fabrikstrasse 15 is an icon on the growing Novartis Basel campus. In the evening its brilliant sculptural form is underscored by layers of light — all on the interior — that gently wash the facade, illuminate the workstations, and glow from within its core.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A central atrium brings daylight to interior Gehry-designed workstations and glass-enclosed “private rooms” at the heart of the office floors. Adjustable metal-halide up and downlights illuminate this space when necessary and reflect off overhead white lamellas (a radiator-like array that also diffuses sunlight from the glass roof and provides radiant cooling).
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Photovoltaic cells are integrated in the glass roof surfaces to generate renewable energy for the electrical lighting and to provide an effective sunscreen against solar gain in upper levels of the building.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Below grade, a 600-seat auditorium can be divided into two sections. It features: a wood-lined acoustical wall perforated with a subtle graphic pattern by the New York–based graphic design firm 2×4; a flexible glass-ceiling system that evenly distributes the light of cool, daylight-quality linear fluorescent lamps; and amber LEDs that create an atmospheric glow into the room from under the seats.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Employees sitting at workstations designed by Frank Gehry are protected from the sun’s glare by a sophisticated system of saillike shades, controlled by daylight sensors. Artemide Tolomeo desk lights provide additional task lighting for a more personal, intimate environment.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

L’Observatoire installed cool white fluorescent lamps above the auditorium’s glass ceiling that blend imperceptibly with the daylight coming into the space from a skylight above the stage that Gehry incorporated into the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

A large trapezoidal skylight in the floor of the first office level brings light into the center of the ground floor café below it, as well as through a second skylight that continues the flow of light into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Light from a central skylight in the café of Fabrikstrasse 15 penetrates into the lower level learning center and auditorium lobby, as well as into interior classroom windows.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

LED-backed-veneer media columns feature directional graphics and signage in the public lobby, lower levels, and ground floor dining areas.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Multi-directional chandeliers above conference tables designed by Gehry Partners cast ambient fluorescent light up towards the ceiling and more directional beams from halogen lamps down onto the table.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

The giant floating “Mama Cloud” light fixture designed designed by Frank Gehry floats above a long table at the entrance to the café from the campus green.
Photo © Thomas Mayer

Fabrikstrasse 15

Fabrikstrasse 15

1. plaza-level lobby restaurant and café
2. office floors
3. atrium
4. auditorium
5. IT learning classrooms
6. skylight
7. campus green
Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Photo © Thomas Mayer & Image courtesy Gehry Partners

Breaking the bounds of of Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani’s master plan, Fabrikstrasse 15 by Frank Gehry stands in a surprising juxtaposition to the serene array of rectilinear buildings that dominate the Novartis campus. It is located at the geographic heart of the campus, in full view of the company’s renovated 1939 Forum 1 International Headquarters building, and across the street from a refined stretch of porticoed offices and labs by Adolf Krischanitz, Rafael Moneo, Lampugnani, and Yoshio Taniguchi. The highly visible, independent site gave the architect freedom to exploit his expansive, free-spirited style.

Relieved from many of the constraints binding the other architects, Gehry and his team created a voluminous 209,896-square-foot building that manifests the Novartis commitment to an open and environmentally responsible workplace in its crystalline transparency and intricate sustainable strategies.

Anchored to a load-bearing reinforced-concrete skeleton that sits on a rigid 56-foot-deep basement box, the building’s structural steel shell supports an active triple-glazed envelope that is tied to its natural ventilation and lighting systems through a centralized building facility-management system. Like a finely tuned machine, the building performs unobtrusively to provide comfortable surroundings for its occupants. Sliding glass doors on the ground floor and operable windows discharge excess solar yields and facilitate the flow of outside air, aided by a mechanical fresh-air system around the perimeters of the upper levels.

Home to the human resources (HR) department, as well as to a top-floor campus reading room, a 600-seat multiuse auditorium and IT learning center (both below grade), and a ground-floor restaurant and café that spill out onto the campus green, Fabrikstrasse 15 is a hub of activity. The warm, wood-lined interiors feature whimsical LED-backed-veneer media-columns and modular Gehry-designed furnishings and workstations.

In accordance with Novartis chairman Daniel Vasella’s versatile “multi-space” office concept, the architects arranged the HR floors on the five upper levels with flexible, open-plan work spaces and glass-enclosed “private rooms,” bisecting them with a central atrium and serpentine stainless steel stair to bring light down through the core of the volume. A series of skylights strategically inserted into the floor and grounds around the building carry daylight to the café, the lower-level learning center, and the auditorium stage.

According to Gehry Partners project architect Kamran Ardalan, daylight is harvested and managed in several ways: The low-E glazing is articulated with ceramic frits on the facade to reduce direct solar gain; an orchestrated series of low-E-coated, saillike interior shades operate on sensors to minimize glare and additional heat; and sound-absorbing lamellas under the roof diffuse sunlight and further compensate for the thermal load by serving as cooling radiators filled with slightly chilled water. In addition, photovoltaic cells integrated into the glass roof panels not only generate enough power for the building’s electric lighting, they supply an additional layer of solar shading.

“The amount of daylight inside the building is consistently monitored,” says Ardalan. Electric lighting is used only when there isn’t enough daylight, he adds — and to illuminate the building at night.

Looking frosted and icy-white on a bright afternoon, the building assumes a brilliant clarity as the sun sets, revealing its inner workings like a child’s “visible engine” kit. This effect stems from a perceptive, energy-efficient electric lighting scheme by the New York–based L’Observatoire that balances program and architecture.

It was a challenge, says principal Hervé Descottes: “It’s such a transparent building that you could lose its sculptural aspects.” To achieve a soft, lanternlike glow, Descottes and his team layered the structure with light from within.

Initially, they created a layer by washing the mullions of the facade with metal-halide uplights installed inside the perimeter of the first level. Then they added a second layer of ambient and task lighting on the office floors, using compact fluorescent lamps. Here the lighting team kept the general light levels lower than usual to emphasize the glow of the fixtures at each desk, a tactic used to establish an intimate ambience for employees.

Next they installed linear fluorescent fixtures to wash the wood walls on all the levels, and inserted cool T5s above awninglike glass ceiling panels in the auditorium that create a seamless transition with the sunlight penetrating the skylight.

Last, they lined the atrium with adjustable metal-halide fixtures from the ground floor up to the roof, directing them up and down, and reflecting light off the white lamellas. This move, perhaps the most important, brightens the center of the building and underscores its voluptuous form.

During a recent visit on a warm and sunny summer morning, the offices were bursting with light — without a hint of glare — and wonderfully temperate minus the chill of air conditioning. A holistic tour de force, Fabrikstrasse 15 is illuminating in its transparency and ability to harness the aura and power of light — both generated and from the sun. Such a building defines the spirit of Novartis as an enlightened workplace.

Owner: Novartis Pharma AG

Completion Date: June 2009

Gross square footage: 19´500 m2

Total construction cost: Confidential

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

People

Architect:
Gehry Partners, LLP
12541 Beatrice Street
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Tel: 310-482-3000
Fax 310-482-3006

Personnel in architect’s firm who should receive special credit:
Frank Gehry – Partner In Charge
Edwin Chan – Design Partner
Terry Bell – Project Partner
Kamran Ardalan & Herwig Baumgartner – Project Manager / Architects

Principal Project Team:
Sven Newmann
Patricia Eva Schneider
Ron Tannenbaum
Narineh Mirzaeian
Manoucher Eslami
Vartan Chalikian

Schematic Design Project Team:
Joshua Morey
Yoram Lepair
Timothy Paulson
Frank Mahan
Earle Briggs
David Dorn
Andrew Fastman
Frank Weeks
Manuel Blanco-lonqueria
Lukas Raeber
Jeffery Garrett
Randolph D’amico

Architect of record
Local architects, general management, realization planning and site management:
Planergemeinschaft Arcoplan / Nissen& Wentzlaff, Basel
Project management: Daniel Wentzlaff, Thomas Oetiker, Timothy O.Nissen

Project Team:
René Keuter
Hendrik Johannsen
Karl Reiter
Paul Luternauer
Michael Sauer
Silvia Barben
Christiane Bouhraoua
Raymond Gaëtan
Soran Jester
Stephan Schweizer
Stefan Herrmann
Michael Geiger
Thomas Ligibel
Bettina Fritsche
Senad Catovic
Heiko Müller
Hans Münchhalfen
Wulf Oschwald
Ueli Raeber
Karl Sowa
Silke Techen
Daniel Hofer
Daniel Reinhardt
Ulli Blümmert
Andreas Schön
Isabel Frey
Lionel Combebias
Christian Hafenmayer
Martin Schlegel
Moritz Rusch

Interior designer
 Gehry Partners, LLP

Engineer(s)
Building services planning: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Lucerne, Switzerland: Gregor De Martin, Walter Wüthrich, Bruno Wigger, and Ralf Haebig
Building automation: ADZ- Aicher De Martin Zweng, Basel, Switzerland: Urs Winkler
Building physics: Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland: Martin Beyerler
Structural engineer: Schlaich Bergermann und Partner, Stuttgart, Germany: Jörg Schlaich, Hans Schober, Michael Werwigk, Kai Kürschner

Consultant(s)
Acoustical: McKay Conant Brook, David Conant/ Dr. Markus Ringger, Gruner AG Basel, Switzerland
Audio-Video planning: Virtually Audio GmbH, Suhr, Switzerland: Daniel Zurwerra, Thomas Rüetschi
Catering planning: Planbar, Zurich, Switzerland: Walter Widmer
Graphics, signage: 2×4 Inc. New York, U.S.A: Michael Rock, Lee Moreau, Yoonjai Choi, Albert Lee
Electrical planning: Scherler AG, Basel, Switzerland: Thomas Roth
Energy concept: Transsolar Energietechnik GmbH, Munich, Germany: Matthias Schuler, Wolfgang Kessling, Christian Oberdorf
Fire prevention concept: Mario Fontana, Zürich, Switzerland: Alfred Spinelli, A+F Brandschutz, Pratteln, Switzerland
Façade planning: Emmer Pfenninger Partner AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland: Hans Emmer, Kurt Pfenninger, Martin Friedli, Steffi Neubert, Jeanette Leu
Landscape: Vogt Landschaftsarchitekten, Zurich, Switzerland: Günter Vogt, Ralf Günter Voss, Uta Gehrhardt
Lighting: L´Observatoire International, New York, Hervé Descottes, Socorro Sperati, Beatrice Witzgall

CAD system, project management, or other software used
 2d Drawings in Auto CAD and 3d Modeling in Digital Project/Catia

Products

Structural system
Steel-Structure Facade: Müller Offenburg GmbH: Offenburg, Germany in collaboration with Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. Christian Gäßler, Wolfgang Mayr, Ladislaus Balint, Sebastian Utz and Torsten Nörr.
Concrete Structure: Implenia AG, Switzerland

Exterior cladding

Metal/glass curtain wall: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany.

Glazing

Glass:Curtain Wall: Glass by BGT Bischoff Glastechnik: Bretten, Germany, Curtian wall engineering and installed by Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany. 
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg, Switzerland
Exterior Balustrades: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Ground Floor Interior Glazing: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Interior Glass Balustrades: glass manufactured by Blaser, Basel, Switzerland, installed by Imbau AG, Pratteln, Switzerland
Conference Room Glazing: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Meeting / Interview Rooms: Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen, Switzerland
Interior Windows (wood framing):  Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Design Stairs Mainbuilding: Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany

Skylights: 
Exterior Auditorium Skylight: Andreas Oswald GmbH, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Interior Skylights: MTV Metallbau – Technik Villmergen AG: Villmergen, Switzerland

Doors

Entrances: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Metal doors: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland
Wood doors: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland & Dreier AG, Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Sliding doors: Josef Gartner GmbH: Gundelfingen, Germany
Fire-control doors, security grilles: Senn AG, Oftringen, Switzerland / Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland / Dreier AG Kleinlützel, Switzerland (doors back of house)
Revolving Door: Blasi GmbH, Mahlberg, Germany

Hardware

Locksets: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy
Closer &, Panic Hardware: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Exit devices: Manufacturer: Dorma GmbH
Pulls: Frank O. Gehry Design, Valli e Valli, Italy / Glutz AG, Switzerland

Interior finishes

Acoustical ceilings: Two prodcuts used:
BASWAphon Acoustical Finish – BASWA Switzerland & STOSilentPanel – STO Switzerland

Suspension grid:
Auditorium Operable/Acoustic Partitions:  Industrial Acoustics Company (IAC): New York, U.S.A; Craig D’ Anna
Cabinetwork and custom woodwork: Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland
Paints and stains: manufacturer: Dold AG: Wallisellen, Switzerland
Wall coverings: Vertical Grain Douglas fir interior Wall claddings/Windows- Jos. Berchtold AG, Switzerland / Meeting-interview room- Röthlisberger Innenausbau: Gümlingen, Switzerland
Bathroom Stainless Steel Partitions: BTS – Partition System: Munich, Germany
Bathroom Tiles: Villeroy & Boch
Auditorium Leather Paneling: Leather provided by Poltrona Frau, Italy, Fabricated and Installed by Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Auditorium) Pfyl & CO Schreinerei AG, Schwyz, Switzerland
Perforated Wood Paneling: (For Main Building) Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Plastic laminate:
Wood Surfaces: Vertical Grain Douglas fir veneered wood paneling – Central Wood Supplier: Sauter Paul AG, Münchenstein, Switzerland
Special surfacing: Cooling Ceilings/Walls: MWH Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Floor and wall tile (cite where used): Wood Floor – Senn Parkett, Dussnang, Switzerland
Resilient flooring: Dispoxid 472, Caparol Farben AG, Nänikon, Switzerland
Carpet: manufacturer: Shaw, U.S.A.
Raised flooring: Type FLOOR and more N 30 x L/A, AGB Bautechnik AG, Switzerland

Furnishings

Office furniture: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Reception furniture: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich, Switzerland
Fixed seating: Jos. Berchtold AG, Zürich Switzerland / Röthlisberger Innenausbau, Gümlingen Switzerland
Workstation Task Chairs: Meda Pro by Vitra International
Conference/Meeting/Interview room Chairs: Eames Aluminum Group by Vitra
Workstation Tables: Gehry Partners LLP, with Vitra International
Upholstery: leather covered auditorium fixed seatings: Poltrona Frau, Italy: Fulvio Giustiniani
Custom Furniture: Conference rooms tables, meeting & interview rooms tables, reception desks, shelving, banquets, etc. – Designed by Gehry Partners, manufactured by various contractors.

Lighting   
Manufacturer: Erco, Neuco, Regent, Schmitz, Reggianni, Philips, Regiolux, Zumtobel

Pendant Lighting: Restaurant – Mama Cloud designed by Frank O. Gehry; Manufactured by Belux.
Custom Lighting: Conference Rooms – Designed by Gehry Partners, LLP: Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland
Task lighting: Tolome by Artemide
Dimming System or other lighting controls: various manufacturers

Conveyance

Elevators/Escalators: Schindler AG, Switzerland
Accessibility provision (lifts, ramping, etc.):
(Auditorium) Gilgen Logistics AG, Oberwangen Switzerland

Energy
Energy management or building automation system:Neuberger Gebäudeautomation AG, Rothenburg, Germany
Photovoltaic system: Schüco International KG, Bielefeld, Germany

Other unique products that contribute to sustainability:

Façade Components:

  1. Highly selective triple glazing (low U-Values) with double fritting.
  2. Internally movable shading made of low-e –coated textile fabric.
  3. Façade openings in the upper and lower area of the façade for back ventilation of the façade (air circulation between the façade and shading).
  4. Internal Cooled/Acoustic lamellas under the roof of the central atrium – MWH Barcol-Air AG, Switzerland.

Air-conditioning Technology:

  1. Acoustic/Cooled ceilings in office areas.
  2. Floor Heating/Cooling
  3. Heating/Cooling panels along floor slabs in the façade areas.
  4. Decentralized Heating/Cooling convectors (under the floors).
  5. Source ventilation with fully air-conditioned fresh air.
  6. Air outlet of the re-circulating air for convection cooling of the façade areas.

Project awaiting Minergie Certification.
Minergie is a sustainability brand for new and refurbished buildings. It is mutually supported by the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Cantons along with Trade and Industry and is registered in Switzerland and around the world and defended firmly against unlicensed use.

Additional building components or special equipment that made a significant contribution to this project:
Shading System Contractor – Clauss Markisen GmbH: Bissingen, Germany: Klaus Westenberger, Klauss Vogg
Shading Fabric – Ferrari (SOLTIS 86) Stamoid AG, Eglisau, Schweiz
Interior Design Stairs – Arnold AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany
Cooling Lamellas – Barcol-Air AG, Stäfa, Switzerland
Auditorium Glass Ceiling – Hunsrücker, Kirchberg Switzerland
Auditorium Projection Screens – Stewart Filmscreen Corporation, Torrance, California
Cafeteria Buffets – Buob Kühlmöbel AG, Rorschach, Switzerland
LED Column – LED elements by Tweaklab AG, Basel, Switzerland; Installed by Jos. Berchtold AG: Zürich, Switzerland

Cafeteria LED signage – Tschudin AG, Basel, Switzerland

By Linda C. Lentz

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/lighting/2011/08/fabrikstrasse-15.asp

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August 13, 2011

tallest Chicago tower in Post Office makeover | Booth Hansen

ROPOSED TOWERS ON THE CHICAGO SKYLINE.

POST OFFICE LOBBY.

n late July Monaco-based developer Bill Davies stunned Chicago with a proposal for a massive retail and entertainment complex topped by office, residential, and hotel towers, including a 120-story skyline topper. Working with Lawrence Booth, principal of Booth Hansen, the full build-out would include 6.2 million square feet of retail, restaurants, and entertainment space, 3.8 million square feet of residential space, 2 million square feet of offices, 7500 hotel rooms, parking for 12,000 cars, and a 20-acre “skyline park” green roof.

The massive old Post Office building, which Davies acquired in 2009 for $20.8 million, will anchor the project’s first phase, which would also include a 40-story hotel tower atop the 10-story base. “He’s very taken with the building,” Booth said of Davies. “What he saw was 3 million square feet sitting on top of every possible transportation mode. You just have incredible access.”

Davies and Booth believe the site has the potential to draw visitors from the suburbs, the city, as well as tourists, and envision a retail/entertainment/leisure destination that could rival the Mall of America, but more upscale and more urban in atmosphere. “The first phase has to work and build momentum,” he said. “You have to deliver a high quality experience for people.” Booth envisions a theatre, movies, restaurants by top-tier Chicago chefs, along with a mix of retailers.

Pending interest from tenants, Davies wants to break ground on the first phase in two years.

Alan G. Brake

http://archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=5565

August 13, 2011

Isabella Stewart Gardner Expansion | Renzo Piano Building Workshop

Photography © George Bouret / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum February 2011  The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s current entrance off of The Fenway, with the new wing and gallery visible behind it.

February 2011 The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s current entrance off of The Fenway, with the new wing and gallery visible behind it.

Photography © George Bouret / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum December 2010  View of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum from Evans Way Park, towards the new wing and historic  building.

December 2010 View of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum from Evans Way Park, towards the new wing and historic building

Photography © George Bouret / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum December 2010  Interior of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s new Calderwood Performance Hall during construction.

December 2010 Interior of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s new Calderwood Performance Hall during construction

Photography © George Bouret / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum April 2011  The new wing of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum from Evans Way Park (evening), showing the new  entrance and glass lobby (center), the sloping roof of the greenhouses and artist apartments (left), and the  floating copper clad volumes.

April 2011 The new wing of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum from Evans Way Park (evening), showing the new entrance and glass lobby (center), the sloping roof of the greenhouses and artist apartments (left), and the floating copper clad volumes

Photography © George Bouret / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum April 2011  The new wing of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (evening) from across Evans Way Park, part of  Frederick Law Olmsted’s Emerald Necklace system of parks.

April 2011 The new wing of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (evening) from across Evans Way Park, part of Frederick Law Olmsted’s Emerald Necklace system of parks

Photography © George Bouret / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum April 2011  Exterior of the new wing of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum during construction (evening), showing the  new entrance and transparent glass lobby (center), the Special Exhibition Gallery floating above it (center),  and the historic building beyond.

April 2011 Exterior of the new wing of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum during construction (evening), showing the new entrance and transparent glass lobby (center), the Special Exhibition Gallery floating above it (center), and the historic building beyond.

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Rendering from Evans Way Park  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Rendering from Evans Way Park © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Renzo Piano Perspective Sketch of the Glass Connector from the New Wing to the Historic Museum Building  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Renzo Piano Perspective Sketch of the Glass Connector from the New Wing to the Historic Museum Building © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Renzo Piano Perspective Sketch, Site Plan of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston    © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

enzo Piano Perspective Sketch, Site Plan of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Renzo Piano Perspective Sketch, Elevation of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Renzo Piano Perspective Sketch, Elevation of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Site Plan of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston    © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Site Plan of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Floor Plan (First Floor) of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston    © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Floor Plan (First Floor) of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Floor Plan (Second Floor) of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston    © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Floor Plan (Second Floor) of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Section through the Performance Hall, the Glass Connector, Exterior Gardens, and Historic Museum Palace  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Section through the Performance Hall, the Glass Connector, Exterior Gardens, and Historic Museum Palace © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Detailed Section through the Performance Hall and The Gardner Cafe  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Detailed Section through the Performance Hall and The Gardner Cafe © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Detailed Section through the Special Exhibition Gallery and Living Room  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Detailed Section through the Special Exhibition Gallery and Living Room © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Section through the Special Exhibition Gallery, Living Room, Glass Connector, and Monks Garden  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Section through the Special Exhibition Gallery, Living Room, Glass Connector, and Monks Garden © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Elevation from Evans Way Park  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Elevation from Evans Way Park © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Elevation from Palace Road  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Elevation from Palace Road © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

© RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010 Elevation from Tetlow Street  © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Elevation from Tetlow Street © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Opening in 2012, the $118 million steel, glass, and copper-clad expansion to Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum by Renzo Piano Building Workshop will more than double the size of the current facility. Included in the project are a new entrance, music hall, gallery space, and other amenities for an institution that has remained largely unaltered since opening in 1903.

 

The original facility, a Venetian-style palazzo completed in 1901, will remain almost untouched as the new wing is connected to the original museum through a glass passageway. Rather than radically alter the museum experience, the design is intended to augment what is already there. Piano’s new four-story building will host visitor services, now in cramped quarters in the palace; a new 300 seat music hall, allowing the Gardner to stop holding concerts in its delicate and often overcrowded tapestry room; a triple-height gallery for temporary exhibitions; as well as new lobby space, offices, and conservation facilties. A second, smaller structure with a sloping glass roof will house a greenhouse and apartments for artists-in-residence. In total the wing will add 70,000 square feet to the museum’s current 60,000 square feet.

Forget light–I think Piano’s plan for the Gardner is all about drawing. I think that there’s something to this comment posted by Boston Globe arts writer Geoff Edgers on paper’s EXHIBITIONIST blog:

If you’ve ever been around Renzo Piano for, say, 30 seconds, you see how this guy just needs to draw. He has a pencil with him at all times and seems to need to scribble constantly. Turns out he rocked the commission old school when asked to come up with the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s new project.

The building itself is drawn, not just in its representation but in its conceptual construction. The building seems drawn from its institutional context, a remix of existing phenomenological fragments cobbled together into a something new but uncannily familiar. The relationship between the new wing and the original is like that of a drawing to that which it depicts–the translation of the reality of that which exists onto blankness and into a new world. The building makes skillful and eloquent reuse of the palazzo court’s verticality in both the soaring temporary exhibition hall and the new music hall, in which performers are placed the ground floor, ringed by three balconies just one row deep. In its materiality the expansion seeks a presence little more than ink lines on paper, its walls of glass and white copper offering containment while the space is left to define itself.

This was, of course, what the client wanted. Bill Egan, a museum trustee and chair of the Gardner’s building committee, said Piano’s design needed to respect the existing building. ”The whole goal here was to make sure that we didn’t change the experience of the palace, and only enhance that,” Egan told the Globe. “I think we’re going to have one of the great small concert halls in the world, but you know what? We’re not going to have as many seats as [music director] Scott Nickrenz would have liked because the size was basically controlled by how big Renzo felt it could be as compared to the palace.” (It’s also worth noting that the new building is 11 feet shorter than the 70-foot high museum, and the all-glass first floor affords visitors clear views through the site.)

Light does play a large part in Piano’s design, but one that is secondary to the new wing’s function as an institutional auxiliary. Glass lines much of the extension’s ground floor, from the entryway and linking corridor to the sloping wall that allows passers-by to see into the greenhouse and artists studios. As Piano told the Globe: ”The sense of lightness is a fundamental element, so it doesn’t compete with the palace. The new building will be more visible, more accessible, more understandable from the outside,” he said.

Piano’s ability to transform and effectively recreate what he sees led to a reasonable approach to this project, appeasing both the client’s desire for change and for stability, but I’m not convinced that such reasonable architecture is ultimately responsible for the institution.  The political and economic situation is already radically different from when planning for the expansion began in 2004, which raises questions as to whether Piano’s model of transitive evolution is actually produces the sustainable architecture for which he is so frequently praised; or if his radicalization of the readily apparent, as a reification of the status-quo, negates the possibility of other more interesting, innovative, and durable solutions. Such questions don’t concern the design in and of itself, as it is presented in this post, but rather the social and financial impact of that design over time. Also, Piano’s design leaves a lot to be desired: the Museum still needs to raise about $40 million to pay for it. The Gardner’s current capital improvements campaign is certainly justifiable, but its timing raises questions about our ethical responsibilities as practitioners.  As architects we should be aware of our role in shaping the life of the institutions we work for beyond merely shaping the spaces they inhabit. What if the Gardner struggles to recoup construction costs or maintain their new larger facility?  Of course capital improvements help build social capital, but what is the value of a building if its construction and maintenance  are a fiscal burden? Then again, who among us has the expertise or humility to tell a well-funded institutional client that their new building might not be unnecessary…?

Architect: Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Burt, Hill
Location: Boston,  USA
Project Team: Emanuela Baglietto (partner in charge), Toby Stewart, Yugon Kim
Geothermal Design:  Allied Consulting Engineering Services, Inc.
Lighting Design, Security Design: ARUP
Structural and MEP Engineer: Buro Happold
Exterior Wall System Design: Front Inc.
Audio Visual Design: Harvey Marshall Berling Associates
Code Engineer: Hughes Associates, Inc.
Geotechnical Consultant: McPhail Associates, Inc.
Acoustician: Nagata Acoustics
Civil Engineer: Nitsch Engineering
Conservation Lab Consultant: Sam Anderson Architects
Cost Consultant: Stuart-Lynn Company
Graphic Design Consultant: 2×4, Inc.

http://www.archdaily.com/153306/isabella-stewart-gardner-expansion-renzo-piano-building-workshop/

August 13, 2011

Google HQ | Ingenhoven Architects

Google to Build Headquarters in Mountain View Google Mountain View © Ingenhoven Architects

The rise of Google Inc. Is a phenomenal success story that has just begun. More than 80% of all searches world-wide are done using Google. The growth of the company is mirrored in the growth of the Google Campus in Mountain View/California, the Headquarters of Google on Charleston Park. Google is proud of its corporate culture and offers attractive workplaces in order to attract the best talents from all over the world. Google wants to build a showcase sustainable building. On the adjacent site between Charleston Road and Shoreline Boulevard a large new building will be built for Google. The site demands a building with autarkic geometry. As part of an international selection process ingenhoven architects won the commission to design the new HQ. The client’s brief was simple: It should be the best and „greenest” building in the world! The new building will be home for 2.500-3.000 engineers and scientists as well as the Headquarters. The Google Headquarters is the first project for ingenhoven architects in the US and Google builds for itself for the first time. Google‘s success depends on engineers, inventors mathematicians, IT-experts and scientists of all kinds. The building should reflect their different approaches and enhance convenience and productivity. The building will be „lively, fresh, simple and flexible” and offer healthy, communicative and effective workplaces and have „buzz“. The architecture is an expression of the „corporate culture” and at the same time a model for sustainable architecture in the broadest sense surpassing the LEED-Platinum-Standards with its holistic concept. Construction will start in 2012.

TEAM

Architect
ingenhoven architects

Local architect
Gensler

MEP/Civil Engineering
Glumac and Sandis

Sustainability
Glumac and DS-Plan

Structral Engineering
Magnusson Klemencic and Werner Sobek Ingenieure

Facade design and special structures
Werner Sobek Ingenieure

Cost
Davis Langdon

Facade Access
Lerch Bates

Kitchen and Food
RAS Design Group

Signage and Graphics
ingenhoven architects

Landscape architecture
Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

LEED
Rick Unvarsky

Light design
OVI/Tropp

Traffic and Parking
Fehr & Peers and IPD

Elevators
Edgett Williams Cons. Group

Waterproofing
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Fire Protection
The Fire Consultants

Acoustics
Glumac- Charles Saulter

http://www.ingenhovenarchitects.com/flash.html

August 13, 2011

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex | Perkins+Will

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex (2) Courtesy of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex (1) Courtesy of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

University of Washington Medicine Research Complex (3) Courtesy of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN) shared with us their role as landscape architects for the third phase of the University of Washington Medicine’s research hub, designed by Perkins+Will, in’s South Lake Union neighborhood, which broke ground earlier this month and is scheduled to be completed in the spring of 2013. More images and project description after the break.

The development is a multi-phase design and construction project that supports the UW’s internationally renowned biomedical research efforts. Located on the adjacent west block of UW Medicine’s existing South Lake Union research complex, Phase Three will include up to three buildings totaling nearly 542,000 square feet of laboratory and office space, and 47,250 square feet of outdoor space. Slated for completion in spring 2013, the first building breaking ground is a 183,000-square-foot LEED silver laboratory building that will be home to more than 400 researchers and includes 19,090 square feet of outdoor space.

Phase three of UW Medicine’s South Lake Union project maintains the vision established in the phase two complex. It proposes a design that will meet the programmatic needs of a highly regarded biomedical facility, reflect the goals and identity of UW Medicine, bridge strong connections between neighborhood and campus communities, and provide friendly and green pedestrian streets.

“The landscape concept is simply about celebrating life, a nod to UW Medicine’s purpose. The East-West corridors are bursting with lush, fertile, planted spaces, while the North-South corridors are filled with air and light,” says Jennifer Guthrie, lead landscape designer and partner at GGN. “We are thrilled to be a part of a project that will not only contribute to the experience of top health professionals and medical students, but also contribute to a venue which invites the South Lake Union community to engage with the UW Medicine community.” The landscape design of Phase Three is influenced by the successful layout of the adjacent block of the UW Medicine South Lake Union research complex landscape, which was also designed by GGN. A mid-block crossing allows the new development to continue the verdant, east-west passageway established previously.

Subtle level changes will create a sense of anticipation upon arrival to the phase three complex. Light will bounce off of faceted building façades into the central space below, where water features that utilize reclaimed runoff, will enhance a feeling of immersion in reflections and light. This active space will invite the neighborhood into the heart of the phase III complex and offer gathering places for community members, faculty and staff. Along 8th Avenue, Phase Three will mirror the wide, tree-lined sidewalk first established with phase II. The tree-lined 8th Avenue will anchor Phase III’s axial relationship with Denny Park to the south. Stately street trees are proposed along Dexter Avenue to reflect its importance as a main connection between South Lake Union and downtown Seattle.

Architect: Perkins+Will
Landscape Architect: Gustafson Guthrie Nichol 
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
UW Medicine’s Phase Three Project Team: Vulcan Real Estate (developer), Perkins+Will (lead designer and building architect), Sellen Construction (general contractor), and the National Development Council (project financing)

http://www.archdaily.com/158601/university-of-washington-medicine-research-complex-gustafson-guthrie-nichol/