Archive for August 9th, 2011

August 9, 2011

Skywalk Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna | Solid Architecture

Project Details:
Location: Rennweg 44 – 46, Vienna, Austria
Architects: Solid Architecture – www.solid.ac
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Built up Area: 54 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Completion: May 2009
Photos: Günter Kresser

 SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna.

The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture
In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.
Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.
If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.
The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge
The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.
The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.
There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.
Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge
From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge,
the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.
The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.
In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge. In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination
The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

http://architecturelab.net/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-viennaaustria-by-solid-architecture-18890/

SOLID architecture designed a bridge that is enclosed on all sides to connect the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse in the third district of Vienna. The bridge with a span length of 22 metres was completed in May 2009.

Architecture

In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980ies. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.

Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.

If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.

The construction of the details is reduced and simply supports the view and the atmosphere and the effect of the space created.

Statical System of the Bridge

The main supporting structure of the bridge is formed by means of two supporter trusses spanned beyond.

The top chords of these trusses – welded hollow profiles with a lower flange projecting on one side – are integrated in the roof plane. The trussed beams consist of welded rectangular hollow steel tubes.

There are integrated welded I-beams as supports in the walking plane. These I-beams are suspended by means of tension rods from the main supporters, and they are attached to the supporter trusses of the main supporters in the bend of the bridge.

Roof and floor level are formed as horizontal latticed framework and transmit the horizontal load into the already existing buiding structures.

Geometry of the Bridge

From the buildings Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46, there is extended a horizontal plane into the road space:
The bottom plate of the 5th upper floor Rennweg 46 as bottom plate of the bridge, the ceiling above the 5th upper floor Rennweg 44 as roof of the bridge.

The bottom plate with a 6% inclined ramp and the bridge roof with its inclined roof area extend over to the 1.04 m-offset level of the neighbouring building. The bends of the two levels – bottom plate and roof – are situated on top of each other.

In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge.  In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

Illumination

The bridge is illuminated by means of two parallel light panels extending alongside the glass walls. These two light bands imitate the bends in the roof and the sidewalls.

+ Project credits / data

ProjectSkywalk Rennweg 44 – 46
Location: Skywalk, Rennweg 44 – 46, 1030 Vienna
Purpose: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge between building Rennweg 44 and Rennweg 46

ArchitectureSOLID architecture ZT GmbH | http://www.solid.ac/
Project Management: Arch. DI Christoph Hinterreitner
Collaborators: Arch DI Christine Horner
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Structural Engineering: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Building Physics: RWT PLUS ZT GmbH
Construction Supervision: CF SER/IM/BPM der Österreichischen Lotterien

Contractors
Builder: SAN AS BAU
Steel / Glass Construction: Stahlbau Kamper GmbH
Plumber: Ing. Ledermüller GmbH
Electrician: Fleck Elektroinstallationen GmbH
Fire Protection Gate: Peneder Feuerschutz GmbH
Photographer of the Project: Günter Kresser
Holder of the Copyright: SOLID architecture ZT GmbH

Planning Data
Direct Commission: no, 1stprize in invited competition
Project Status: Project completed
Competition: July / September 2008
Start of Planning: October 2008
Start of Construction: April 2009
Completion: May 2009

Project Data
Gross Area: 54 m²
Built up Area: 54 m²
Useable Surface: 44 m²
Building Volume: 189 m²
Construction Costs: 40.000 € without bearing
Construction: Stahlkonstruktion, Seitenwände verglast
Spatial Program: Skywalk / Connecting Bridge

Awards, Prizes: Exhibition “Gebaut 2009“, Architektonische Begutachtungen der MA 19

+ All images and drawings courtesy SOLID architecture

http://plusmood.com/2011/07/skywalk-rennweg-44-46-solid-architecture/

http://www.e-architect.co.uk/vienna/skywalk_rennweg.htm

http://www.solid.ac/_framesets/frameset_projects/english/ProjectFrameSet_en.html

http://www.rwt-plus.at/english/projects/national/national-2008-2009/bruecke-rennweg.html

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August 9, 2011

Margot Krasojevic

Dichroic Illusion Stations

Designed by Margot Krasojevic, the project is for the design of 2 cable car stations along the edge of the Gobi desert, starting from Ordos city the trail leads into the deserts sand dunes, a major tourist attraction. The form optimises the use of dichroic and holographic film in glass cladding, which helps to adapt to the specific site conditions and their extreme temperatures and reflectivity, while articulating a coherent overall formal architectural language.

Two contrasting elements ‘Reflecting sky & Shadow’ generate each station’s design criteria, influencing a series of reflected and projected spatial experiences both physical and projected light displays. A lightweight organic roof structure floats on top of a concrete plinth. The artificial landscape functions as a relief in which various movements and circulations are inscribed. The Roof Shell’s fluid shapes and organic contours mimic the nature of the ever changing sand dunes, like it’s environment the structure is never seen in the same way twice. It shimmers and abstracts as well as camouflages itself within it’s context, it’s presence and characteristic always determined by the natural sunlight and it’s intensity.

New production methods like CNC milling and thermoforming guarantee a very precise and automatic translation of the computer generated design into the built structure. The resulting aesthetics might be reminiscent of streamlined Industrial Design pieces (Car Bodies, Aeroplane Wings, Yachts etc.). Each station has its context, its topography, its projected light spaces, its movements. The track’s inclination and ratios are dominant technical parameters. A high degree of flexibility enables the shell structures to adjust to these various parameters while still responding directly to the natural light levels which have determined its form. The concept of lightness is explored. Large cantilevers and small touch down areas underline a floating appearance of the dichroic illusion stations.

The form allows for air to circulate and cool the interior, the plinth prevents conduction of heat from the immediate environment. The structure is lifted from the ground permitting  a breeze to move through the pre-cast concrete primary structure. The structure accommodates different types of cladding modules, which can be replaced according to season, during the winter months the Siberian winds form sheets of ice, the photovoltaic polychrystalline panels keep the stations from freezing allowing for the winds to carry through it not only sand but prevent ice from settling within the structure. The structure acts as an atrium, perforated temporary louvres shelter from the sand and direct sun whilst the Thermoplus energy high yield glass acts as an all season insulating glass, providing thermal insulation against both cold and excessive heat.

Whilst the overall form allows for the prevailing Siberian winter winds to glide over it it is important to test  materials within a formal constraint in order to understand the materials affects on light reflection and refraction particularly when working with the environment and sustainability. The form has developed using a computer software which uses the dynamics and physics of a specific environment such as the Ordos desert in order to understand through simulation and caustics how light is scattered and can be controlled in turn predicting how exactly the form can influence and respond to it’s environment. An important mechanical test rather than purely a formal gesture.

Project credits / data

Project: Dichroic Illusion Stations
Design Type: 2 cable car stations
DesignerMargot Krasojevic
TypeTransportation | Cable Car stations
Location: Ordos Shi, Kubuqi desert, Inner Mongolia Peoples Republic of China
Client: Mr Feng Gao , Ordos Shi City Dongsheng district with China Film House, Beijing
Building status: ongoing building work
Site type: rural

http://plusmood.com/2011/07/dichroic-illusion-stations-margot-krasojevic/

Infinity Pavilion

The infinity pavilion beach house balances on the cliffs overlooking the town of Llandudno in cape town, the design directly engages with its context. the main open plan accommodation area consists of a series of dramatic angular forms that cascade down the cliffs to the sea edge, emphasising the precipitous nature of the site, the cliff-face uses sand blasted structural steel sections suspending the main living area, the form reflects the changing contours of the landscape preserved uninterrupted beneath.

The open plan living area has privacy and ocean views, the swimming pool connects the interior and exterior spaces of the pavilion, as part of the main living area allows the pool into it, the key feature of the scheme is the dichroic glass pod structure, which has a reinforced steel mesh embedded within it, covering the living area allowing for spectacular views over the Atlantic Ocean.

A cantilevered walkway is projected from the cliff face allowing for a horizon skywalk,and infinite views.

+ Project credits / data

Project: Infinity Pavilion
DesignMargot Krasojevic
Type: Residential – Single family residence
Location: Llandudno, Cape Town, South Africa
Client: Mr. Migo Manz | HOLDEN MANZ WINE ESTATE Franschhoek Winery, Green Valley Road, Cape Town
Building status: ongoing building work
Site type: Rural
Building area: 350 m²

+ All images courtesy Margot Krasojevic

New Book by Margot Krasojevic: Dynamics & De-realisation

Dynamics & De-realisation New Book by Margot Krasojevic: Dynamics & De realisation ” is the second monograph by Margot Krasojevic, which will be available in October 2011, you can pre-order this book at Amazon.com. It is the collection of design projects included provide an overview of philosophical theories that focus on what appears to be real, presenting a range of methodologies and a set of tools for addressing this discourse.

Book Description for ‘Spatial Pathologies Floating Realities

Analysing digital realms in order to manifest the virtual into the physical, using technology and spatial perception/ empirical psychology as tools to define design criteria’ s. Through using experimental designs, the projects analyse altering perceptions of space that influence a physical appropriation, drawing parallels to technology, in doing so questioning typologies, psychological contexts and virtual realities in an attempt to provoke the limits of technical possibility.

Exploring the way we perceive space, using simulations and animation to understand time sequence, memory, order and our instinctive response to space. Architecture is the lexicon used to manifest individual and social transformation. This volume is based on lectures and design studios held by Margot Krasojevic at the Bartlett School of Architecture, U.C.L. London, the University of Washington, St. Louis, Sheffield University, University of Western Australia, Perth, University of California, Berkeley, Tongji and Beijing. Currently working on private residential projects and hotel bar designs in Belgrade, Beijing and an urban theme park in Erdos, Mongolia.

+ Information

Paperback: 96 pages
Publisher: Springer; 1st Edition. edition (October 29, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 3709108152
ISBN-13: 978-3709108154

+ Other past projects by Margot Krasojevic

The Arctic research center

The Arctic research center is a mobile structure on hydraulic legs, which allows for the 3 main sections to dismantle and reorganize themselves accordingly. The work and living quarters are on skis pulled along by snow tractors and snowmobiles. The sides and part of the roof are covered in a carbon fibre and Silicium lattice frame, which traps light energy using photovoltaic glass panels. Electric current is forced through the electrical resistance wire embedded within the carbon fibre facade lattice frame, creating heat energy then cooling it for an icy surface to from within the frame allowing snow to build up that acts as insulation to the center similar to an igloo.

Fractal Geometry

Fractal Geometry won 1st place in the research category organised by Architecture of Israel and Architect Richard Meier for research in digital design.

The Tower is positioned on the edge of a pier in Manhattan’s Battery Park New York. The building programme consists of an everincreasing
gallery space that sits within the suspended surface. The plans do not dictate the Tower’s perceived presence, reflecting geometries distort the surface pattern iterations (dislocating physical from the perceived), affecting the manner with which the individual engages and appropriates with this space. Both physical hyperbolic geometries and their fractal reflections simulate an illusion that describes the Tower project.

Dimensions describe the physical world, parameters within those dimensions alter our perceptions. This allows for an adaptation of Cartesian geometry and Gestalt psychology to address the non-Euclidean within our surroundings. With regard to the Tower, the perceived space is translated and continually morphed as a result of the surface renderings and reflections, whose boundaries and physical transitions are non-static, thus creating a dynamic series of dimensions. The reflecting surfaces have a Hausdorff dimension greater than its topological dimension, with the aim of presenting an infinite number of geometric iterations of an infinite length while the area remains finite. The surface reflections, however, are too irregular to be easily described using a traditional Euclidean geometric language. Both these criteria are characteristics of fractal as a complex geometric object.

Fractal dimensions reserve self-similarity across scales, only being restricted through context. The reason I use this as a tool for the Tower’s design criteria is to dislocate perception and appropriation of Euclidean geometry and space from the constraints of expectation and as an analogy to its vertical gallery and exhibition typology.

The Tower project therefore attempts to present a projected physicality, reiterating that the tangibility of architectural dimension is expanding along with our objective world. What can be imagined can be communicated using a lexicon of dimension.

Synthetic Sun

The Ozone detection pod uses the notion of illusion to alter our relationship with the ever-evolving environment. Using architecture to dictate the perception of natural environments whilst employing this illusion to create a virtual environment, whereby physical space provokes multiple horizons, and both actual and virtual space are projected within and in the immediate context of the Ozone detection pod.

A series of pods and their projected spaces allow us to experience ever-changing horizons, initially questioning what is real and virtual.

A flock of Polychrastalline solar cells attached to steel tension cables suspend the Ozone detection pod over various areas in the city of London. The solar cells use Photovoltaics to convert light into electrical voltage which is stored in the pod’s carbon fibre Silicium composite Ozone detection frame, this triggers the pod’s motor which controls parabolic mirrored bands that reflect light in through the pod’s holographic glass sphere refracting it back out as a filtered source of sunlight with reduced harmful UVB radiation. The pod is made from strengthened high-density glass, the shape allows for a rainbow effect due to it’s ability to defract light.

This projected artificial light can be controlled to alter its luminance and exitance mimicking summer Sunlight, the pod acts as an inhabitable public gathering space whereby the individual experiences the transition from real to virtual. The pod’s design uses reflections and glimpses of the city in an attempt to define multiple horizon lines, this disorientation suggests a non-hierarchy and continuously altering relationship with the changing physical context dictated by the Ozone detection pod.

The pods alter physical space by creating illusions using light projections, they also create mirages using temperature changes and light to diffract and reflect the city redefining the environment into which we can re-appropriate offering new design contexts. Suspended from existing buildings these pods are dotted around the River Thames, they simulate a flock of birds in orientation which collectively gather enough light energy to choreograph the Ozone detection pods and their parabolic mirror movement. The pods movement is controlled by an increase of harmful UVB light rays which trigger a reed switch within the pod completing the electrical circuit that moves mirrors which reflect, refract and filter as much natural light as possible.

The artificial summer, sunbathers bask in a simulated UV filtered artificial summer.

+ About Margot Krasojevic

Margot Krasojevic, image courtesy Margot Krasojevic

Margot Krasojevic. Born 1975 in London. Received a BA(Hons), A.A.Dip(HONS); M.Arch(Distinction) and Ph.D, U.C.L. Worked at the office of Zaha Hadid, Nox, Michael Squire and partners, ran architecture design units and advanced digital design studios at The Bartlett school of architecture, Greenwich University, Washington University, St. Louis, Sheffield University and Tongji University, Shanghai, Numerous Lectures in USA, Australia and Europe. In 1998 founded the London, Beijing based “Decodeine” digital design and research laboratory. Currently working as an architect, digital designer, university lecturer whilst training as a psychoanalyst.

Published in A.A. files, JAE, 306090, FEIDAD 2001-2006, x1,000 European architects (Joachim Fischer Publications), Springer N.Y., B.D., SAATCHI Gallery 2005, Exhibited at SCI:arc, Washington university, OXO Tower, Beijing Biennale, Florence Biennale, Storefront Bookshop New York, A.D. Architects, Michael Squire & Partners.

http://www.decodeine.com/

http://plusmood.com/2011/05/new-book-by-margot-krasojevic-dynamics-de-realisation/

 

 

 

August 9, 2011

Hotel Lone in Croatia | 3LHD Architects

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Hotel Lone, the first design hotel in Croatia, is situated in the Monte Mulini forest park, Rovinj’s most attractive tourist zone, located in the immediate vicinity of the legendary Eden Hotel and the new Monte Mulini hotel. The surrounding grounds and parkland is a unique and protected region of the Monte Mulini forest on the Lone Bay.

The term design hotel is meant to illustrate this as a space that nurtures the concept of an interesting and functional design. Created by a team of renowned Croatian creatives comprised of a new generation of architects, conceptual artists, product, fashion and graphic designers. The Architects from studio 3LHD were responsible for the design and construction of the hotel building. In addition to the overall architecture, the interiors and the furniture were designed and chosen especially for the hotel in order to achieve a distinct and recognizable identity. The designers from Numen / For Use designed the furniture. The fashion studio I-GLE designed the staff uniforms and other textiles. Artist Silvio Vujicic created graphics on fabrics for the rooms. Installations in the hotel lobby were made by a group of innovative artists: Ivana Franke – “Room for running ghosts”; Silvio Vujicic – “In the hanging garden no one speaks” and the fashion studio I-GLE – textile compositions No1, No2, No3. Studio92 designed the Wellness & Spa center, while Studio Kappo did Landscape design.  The agency Bruketa & Žinic OM conceived and oversaw the visual identity of the hotel.

The hotel’s identity is recognized through the external design of the building, with a facade that is defined by dominant horizontal lines – terrace guards designed to evoke the image of slanted boat decks. The building’s floorplates contract from level to level going up, creating an elevation that is tapered at all angles. The site’s complex terrain with dramatic altitude changes determined the locations of internal facility spaces through a dynamic interweaving of public areas and guest suites at all levels. The specific Y shaped ground plan enabled a: rational & functional organizational scheme; quality views from all rooms; and the grouping of public facilities around a central vertical lobby. The main lobby connects common spaces on all levels, creating a central volume of impressive height and scale with interesting views in and around where all vital functions of the hotel take place.

When designing the interior, 3LHD and the designers from Numen/For Use chose the surrounding ambiance as the hotel’s signature visual element which also defined all views of the interior. With that in mind, the walls in the rooms are covered with mirrored panels, distributed in a random pattern which reflects ambient light and Mediterranean greenery, pulling them deeply into the interior, filling it with the exterior. The greenery also reflects on the glossy surfaces of ceilings in public areas, intensifying the effect of the surrounding plants.

The visualy light and open space of the lobby is covered in white stone surfaces and beige-golden fabrics, the oval lines of the mezzanine guards and the furniture enhance the fluid character of the space and are in contrast with the intimate, subdued tones of the rooms and suites where the atmosphere is calmer, materials warmer (wood and carpets), the colors darker and lighting dimmer. The entire design of the hotel is based on contrasts (black, white, wood) and fabrics as the unifying element, varying from a fluid thin veil in the restaurant, through functional but dynamic wall coverings in the rooms, to the richly decorative mural in the lobby.

The key to the concept was the awareness of the necessity to avoid the sterility of most hotel facilities; that is why the designers used textiles with rich textures and quality oak veneer treated with eco-friendly lacquers, which give the visual and tactile impression of untreated massive wood. This material is usually too rustic but in this execution it manages to integrate walls and spaces into a harmonious composition through contemporary design and purified, spatially articulated shapes of paneling that overflow into furniture.

The conceptual assumptions used in the design of the hotel and its interior show evidence of a deep respect towards the achievements of hotel architecture on the Adriatic Coast from the previous century, combining it with a strong modernity expressed primarily in materials, functions and typologies and consequently in architectural forms.

Hotel’s facilities

The hotel has 236 rooms and 12 suites. 16 rooms offer an exclusive experience of a private massage pool built in the room’s terrace. All the rooms are suitable for all types of guests. Rooms with king-size beds, twin beds or connected rooms are suitable for families.

The hotel has three restaurants “L”, “ON” and “E”, two bars, a jazz club and a mini club.

One of the main characteristics of the hotel is the state of the art high-quality conference center with 4 conference halls, several meeting rooms, and a VIP lounge fully equipped with the most advanced technology and an accompanying bar.

The hotel’s lowest level has a wellness center inspired by the Mediterranean. Besides a big pool there is a fitness center, massage rooms, a relaxation zone with a vitality bar, saunas and hydro massage pools – so called “sunken rooms”.

Furniture design
Numen/For use, Nikola Radeljkovic, Sven Jonke, Christoph Katzler

The common denominator, exquisitely designed furniture, connects all the hotel’s areas. Most of the furniture are carefully selected manufactured pieces, but also includes items made especially for this hotel by the well known design group Numen/For Use.

To achieve immediate recognizability of the interior, the Numen/ForUse group chose probably their most famous furniture piece, the Satyr armchair (Wallpaper award for Best World Sofa 2007), as an object with character and strong identity. The Satyr is present in all rooms with different colors of textile depending on the room’s position. Another signature piece found in all rooms is the lamp made by Dekor from Zabok and designed especially for the Hotel Lone. The lamps also differ in materials used for lampshades depending on the position in the room. During the day they “drown” in their background and dematerialize their volume, while at night, when turned on, they enhance the comfortable and warm atmosphere of the room.

Most of the furniture in the public spaces is also designed by Numen/For Use, the series of seating elements Transform, Y chair and C chair produced by the famous Italian furniture company Moroso. Some of the furniture is made from massive oak, tables XYZ and models X-L and X-Z are from the Element program made by Intera, Zagreb. Intera also made the specialized foldable armchairs for terraces and chaises with integrated parasols. These products were made especially for the Hotel Lone and in the future will be available to the public. In this way the development of this hotel becomes more than just another tourist project – it represents a driving force for the development of domestic production of designer furniture, which should serve as a role-model to all investors in Croatian tourism.

To avoid the classic ideal of Gesamtkunstwerk, the furniture in Hotel Lone is not bound to only one designer name or collection but rather consists of a variation of designer pieces. For example, the Tio collection by the design duo Chris Martin and Magnus Elebäck from Massproduction; Tropicalia chair by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso, the 1966 collection by Richard Schultz for B&B Italia;  and an especially interesting piece we would like to single out is the conference chair GF 40/4 by David Rowland for Howe, which was designed more than 40 years ago and still represents a timeless model for a conference chair.

Staff uniforms and selection of textile objects design 
I-GLE, Nataša Mihaljcišin, Martina Vrdoljak Ranilovic

A cult favourite of the Croatian fashion scene, designer duo I-GLE use their distinctive approach and style when designing all the textiles at Hotel Lone. A special project was to design hotel staff uniforms. Modern and simple, made of high quality and comfortable fabrics with an emphasis on the personality of people who represent certain positions in the context of a hotel, employee uniforms provide a pleasing visual identity that fits well into the hotel’s overall image. I-GLE participated in designing and choosing the fabrics for all textile items: curtains and drapes, tablecloths, napkins, sheets…

Spatial installation Room for running ghosts
Ivana Franke, artist

Materials: Aluminum tubes, PFA monofilament (fishing line), steel wire.
Dimensions: Diameter 8.7 m

In her work, internationally renowned visual artist Ivana Franke explores the relationship between phenomena and materiality by questioning the experience of spatial dimensions and human perception. Her large installation made as a tensegrity structure – structure in which stability is attained by tension and compression of elements, while at the same time solid objects do not touch each other, is featured in the lobby’s central area. Within the monumental spatial volume of the lobby, the installation draws a visually transparent system of dense spatial intervals, which enables reading the space’s dimensions through the space itself.

A fragile construction woven in the air has found its momentary balance. In front of our eyes it unfolds multiple spaces which soon disappear and evade our memory of where they are. This structure is in fact a room of uncountable corners, for unbalanced Ghost walking, meditation on infinity or wondering fragility…

Cycle of graphics M1 – M15
Silvio Vujicic, artist

Screen printing (serigraphy) on textiles

All the rooms and suites are decorated with unique graphics by the well-known Croatian artist Silvio Vuji?i?. The graphics are based on an exploration of Istrian cultural heritage and frescoes from the 15th century. The details from frescoes, more precisely samples of patterns from the dresses of martyrs, were often used as motifs by painters, graphic artists and weavers during that century. The patterns were copied, used in other media and transferred from graphic to textile art and then to frescos and vice versa. In his graphics, Silvio Vujicic uses these textile patterns from frescoes again and returns them to their original medium: graphics and textile. Produced as serigraphy on white cotton canvases, the graphics contain the signatures of old masters and draw attention by the unique technique of their production while simultaneously engaging with the motives of creased curtains. The samples of draperies from frescoes were reconstructed from the St. Catherine’s Church in Lindar (1409), St. Mary’s Church in Dvigrad (cca. 1470-1484) and St. Mary’s Church in Škrilinah in Beram (1474).

Installation In the hanging garden no one speaks
Silvio Vujicic, artist

Plants Adiantum Raddianum, plants Asplenium Nidus, garden soil, wood, water, metal, lights
Dimensions: 730 cm x 480 cm x 150 cm

Silvio Vujicic’s installation “In the hanging garden no one speaks” adorn the wall of the lobby next to the entrance and rises up two floors. A type of bio-machine is made from supports of different lengths and sizes that carry the rhythmic arrangement of wooden baskets with live plants and create a form that resembles a curtain. Irrigation and fogging systems enable the sustainability of the installation.

Art installations – Composition No.01, Composition No.02, Composition No.03
I-GLE, Nataša Mihaljcišin, Martina Vrdoljak Ranilovic

Materials: textile, metal, nylon thread

The designers from the studio I-GLE made their artistic contribution to the hotel in the form of three installations that will adorn the front desk and the lobby. The compositions are made from textiles in dark colors, of different textures and rich weaving that simulate the dynamics of natural phenomenon characteristic for the seaside ambiance through rhythmic folds and diffraction of light on the surface of the textile.

Visual identity
Bruketa&Žinic OM / Davor Bruketa, Nikola Žinic (creative directors), Nebojša
Cvetkovic (art director, illustrator, designer), Ivan Cadež (copywriter),
Martina Ivkic (account executive), Vesna curašin (production manager)

Hotel Lone is a virtual shop window of the South-Eastern European creative industry. Its visual identity was designed by the agency Bruketa & Žinic OM, with several awards one of the most lauded agencies in this part of the world.

The visual key is inspired by the central lobby, the most impressive volume of the hotel, which rises up throughout the entire building’s height. This is the area where hotel’s wings are juxtaposed with the adjacencies of most important facilities, this serves as the origin of all activities. It is the hotel’s “heart”. Therefore, that shape was chosen as the symbol that changes depending on which part of the hotel it is used for, or in other words, from which perspective it is observed.

The “heart” is the driving force of all activities in this inspiring place that will serve as a venue for relaxation as well as business meetings. Therefore, it was derived from illustrations which combine the disparate and makes up the basis for a huge poster 2 x 4.2 meters in size. All the applications of visual identity are derived from this big poster divided into twelve parts. Therefore, each application is part of the unique common picture, such as the hotel itself, made up from different parts of domestic creative industry, becoming its own shop-window.

+ Project credits / data

Hotel Lone, Rovinj, Istria, Croatia
Program: leisure, tourism
Status:  completed

Project start date: 01.09.2006
Project end date: 31.05.2010
Construction start date: 01.05.2010
Construction end date: 01.07.2011

Address: Monte Mulini Zone
City:  Rovinj
Croatia: Croatia
Geolocation: 45°4’21” N, 13°38’23” E
Type:  invited competition
Competition prize: first

Site (m2): 22157
Size (m2): 29476
Volume (m3): 107704
Footprint (m2): 6017
Level (m): 27.74

Client: Maistra d.d.
Project management: Abilia d.o.o.

Author3LHD

Project team:
Silvije Novak, Tatjana Grozdanic Begovic, Marko Dabrovic, Saša Begovic, Ljiljana Dordevic, Ines Vlahovic, Željko Mohorovic, Krunoslav Szorsen, Nives Krsnik Rister, Dijana Vandekar, Tomislav Soldo, Ana Deg

Project team collaborators:
Margareta Spajic, Ana Coce, Dragana Šimic, Sanja Jasika, Eugen Popovic, Leon Lazaneo, Ljerka Vucic

Interior: 3LHD / Numen/For Use
Furniture design: Numen/For Use – Sven Jonke, Nikola Radeljkovic, Christof Katzler
Staff uniforms and selection of textile objects design: I-GLE
Art installations:

  • “Room for running ghosts” – Ivana Franke
  • “In the hanging garden no one speaks” – Silvio Vujicic
  • Cycle of graphics M1 – M15 – Silvio Vujicic
  • Composition No.1, No.2 i No.3 – I-GLE – Martina Vrdoljak Ranilovic, Nataša Mihaljcišin

Visual identity: Bruketa & Žinic OM
Landscape design: Studio Kappo
Wellness: Studio 92

Structural engineering: Hrvatski institut za mostove i konstrukcije – Milan Crnogorac
Mechanical installations: Termoinženjering-projektiranje d.o.o.
Electrical engineering: Projekting 1970 d.o.o.
Sprinkler installation: Apin sustavi d.o.o.
Plumbing and drainage: Projektni biro – grijanje d.o.o.
Fire protection / strategy / safety project: Inspekting d.o.o.
Specialist design – kitchen: Dekode d.o.o.
Elevators: Lift Modus d.o.o.
Pool systems: Makro 5
Traffic planning: Ipro inženjering
Audio-video installations: Dicrioc disco light & sound engineering
Acoustics: Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing Zagreb
Interior horticulture: Horting Sisak d.o.o.
Model: Ivica Turcic
3D: Tomislav Mucic, Freya d.o.o. – Zvonimir Hrvoj
Main Contractor: Zagrebgradnja d.o.o.
Site supervision: Concom d.o.o.

+ All images and drawings courtesy 3LHD Architects

http://plusmood.com/2011/08/hotel-lone-3lhd-architects/