Archive for July 30th, 2011

July 30, 2011

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center | Peter Ruge Architekten

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Detail Elevation

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Detail Section

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Roof Plan

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten Site Diagram

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

Facade Planning for the Hangzhou Congress Center / Peter Ruge Architekten © Jan Siefke Photography

After perennial design and construction phase the congress center of the new city administration of , China  is completed. The concept and design of the facade was made by Peter Ruge Architekten in collaboration with Prof Wang Xiaosong from DBH GmbH. Completed images of the facade and a brief description from the architects is available after the break.

The new building ensemble is situated close to huge Qiantang River not far from the city center. It will be the focus building of the new large business and administration district of the city. The new fascinating complex consists of six office high-rise buildings arranged in a circle and connect in the upper floors through a circular bridge building. The high-rise buildings are flanked with flat multi-functional buildings including four main entrances from all directions. As the new central form of the main administration building of the City of  the Congress Center resembles a large precious stone.

The facade design should support on one hand the unique modern architecture of the building ensemble but on the other hand it should be take up typical local or traditional aspects of the region also.

Zhejiang Province is known for its tea-producing region. To express the building’s regional characteristics, design of the facade is based on the superimposed configurations of the tea cultivation pathways and the planting nets. As a result, the building is enveloped by a multi-layered fabric, giving it a true architectural plasticity. Seen from a distance, the facade appears like a rigid volume, but dissolves into a network of structures and levels as you come closer.

The main idea for the design of the roof was to use it as the fifth facade of the building to set up a strong and typical local image in the shape of a lotus blossom, which you can see from all upper floors of the surrounding high-rise buildings. The facade structure would be extended unto the roof of the congress center to cover up it partly. Through the different lengths and fixed height of the steel beams the structure is waved and form the abstract blossom of lotus in the center of the roof. This part isn’t covered and is designed and planted as a green landscape.

Our aim is to combine and express all the regional natural features within the Center, so that the local people will be able to identify themselves with the City of .

Architect: Peter Ruge Architekten
Location: , Zheijang Province, P.R.China
Completion: 2011
Client: Administration Department City of  Agency of Urban Planning, P.R. China
Team: Pysall Ruge Architekten – Peter Ruge, Matthias Matschewski, Nicole Kubath
Facade consultant: Schlaich Bergemann and Partner
Project Partner: DBH Stadtplanungs GmbH , Prof. Wang Xiaosong
Photography: Jan Siefke
Scope of Services: Façades – design planning, main detail planning (scale 1:100 to scale 1:1), monitoring execution documents
Size: Building above ground – GFA 22.000 sqm

http://www.archdaily.com/152681/facade-planning-for-the-hangzhou-congress-center-peter-ruge-architekten/

 

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July 30, 2011

BLC Headquarter Landmark | Hapsitus

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Courtesy Hapsitus

 

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Courtesy Hapsitus

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Courtesy Hapsitus

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Courtesy Hapsitus

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Courtesy Hapsitus

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Building Sections

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Model Space Imaging

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Model Space Imaging

BLC Headquarter Landmark / Hapsitus Model Space Imaging

 based, Lebanese architect firm Hapsitus has presented us their work for the BLC Headquarter Landmark high rise design competition in . Follow after the break for more images of their winning proposal for this highly visible project.

BLC Bank  began a new departure in 2007 with a different administration, an impetus that gave rise to rapid growth and imposed the need for a new headquarters. The competition design brief required a building that would be a landmark in the urban texture of .

The presence of the existing building at the corner of the site was an enigma. It occupied a key corner position of the site, and was required by the client to be incorporated within a new design. With the ‘landmark’ concept as a driving force, Hapsitus proposed a solution created by the cantilevering of a new structure above the existing structure to make an urban gate addressing the city.

http://www.archdaily.com/152601/blc-headquarter-landmark-hapsitus/

July 30, 2011

Qingdao Science and Technology City | KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten

 

 

 Qingdao Science and Technology City / KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten Courtesy of KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten

Qingdao Science and Technology City / KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten Courtesy of KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten

Qingdao Science and Technology City / KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten Site Plan 01

 

SP Jürgen Engel Architekten were awarded first place in the international competition for the Qingdao Science and Technology City the company’s design for the approx. 600-hectare site in the north of the port city of China.  The primary objective of the project was to create a sustainable urban living space for the 100.000 inhabitants, in which a high quality of life with ecological equilibrium is achieved.  Come back after the break for more about this project.

The layout of the city is designed as a sustainable development with diverse facilities that prioritizes pedestrian traffic and public transport, contains a rainwater collection and recycling system, and creates the requisite conditions for a green city worth living in. This, of course, includes architectural design that is highly efficient in terms of energy use and distribution with today’s sustainability criteria as a guide.  Different qualities with regard to open space such as the setting on the river, the park, as well as apartments and workplaces close to outdoor areas ensure a high quality of life in the new district.

The design by  for the area is characterized by a compact center and four mixed-usage quarters (residential, work, shopping, leisure ). An approx. 125-hectare area of greenery extending along the river from north to south across the entire planning area forms the backbone of the new development. The compact urban center is concentrated in structure and will be brought to life through the businesses, restaurants, and cultural facilities in it. Prestigious high-rises that are visible from afar will mark the center. Furthermore, each quarter will also boast its own (district) center, which the inhabitants will be able to reach on foot, and which have all requisite facilities. Basic institutions, such as an international school, a hospital etc., will be located in one of the quarters but will be for the use of all inhabitants.

The urban planning concept defines living quarters for the various groups of inhabitants, e.g., less developed, so-called “city garden areas” for families and residential high-rises with studios and apartments for singles and working people. Generally speaking, medium-height buildings (five storeys), with flexible floor plans and interior courtyards dominate. This form of development keeps things on a human scale while at the same time, through the concentration, enabling a certain urban flair.  The central park opens out to the south and north, with in the middle two boulevards intersecting it from east to west, connecting the new district with the rest of the city. In the north the Qingdao Science and Technology City will adjoin an existing highway, separated from it by the perimeter of the park.

Architects: KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten
Location: Jiao-Zhou, Qingdao
Developer: Beijing Winland Real Estate Co Ltd & Local Government Jiao-Zhou/Shandong
Land Size: 600 hectares
GSA: 6,200,000 sqm
Date: July 2011, 1st prize

http://www.archdaily.com/152997/qingdao-science-and-technology-city-ksp-jurgen-engel-architekten/

July 30, 2011

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena | Estudio Barozzi Veiga

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Auditorium and Congress Palace Infanta Doña Elena / Estudio Barozzi Veiga © Julien Lanoo

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Situation Situation

Section Section

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Section Section

 

Architects: Estudio Barozzi Veiga
Location: Águilas, 
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 10,200 sqm
Photographs: Julien Lanoo

The project is a natural response to the particular stimulus, offered by the location. On one hand the need to respect the urban tissue that growths inside, on the other, the one’s to preserve the expressive hue of the natural landscape.

It is through from this contrast, that we define and articulate tensions which allows the project to organize itself while a coherent response to the constraints of place. The building is a dialectic reflection, simple but at the same time strong, between the urban artificiality and the organic naturalness.

Thus, the building results in a large mass, shaped in function of the tensions that proceeds from the different character of the spaces surround it. Tangent to the town, the facades are clean, orderly and paused, while tangent to the sea, the facades translate the surrounding space and the configuration offered by the landscape and geography, through large and concave surfaces, that provides a direct and intensive relation with the surrounding natural environment.

http://www.archdaily.com/153898/auditorium-and-congress-palace-infanta-dona-elena-estudio-barozzi-veiga/

 

 

July 30, 2011

Gerrit Rietveld Academy | Benthem Crouwel Architekten

Gerrit Rietveld Academy / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

Gerrit Rietveld Academy / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

Gerrit Rietveld Academy / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

Gerrit Rietveld Academy / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

Gerrit Rietveld Academy / Benthem Crouwel Architekten © Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

Site Plan Site Plan

Site Plan Site Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Section Section

Section Section

Section Section

South Facade South Facade

North Facade North Facade

East & West Facades East & West Facades

 

Architects: Benthem Crouwel Architekten
Location: Amsterdam, 
Project Year: 2004
Project Area: 6,500 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Benthem Crouwel Architekten

The Rietveld Academy of Art has been expanded with a studio building of nine storys, including the basement. Its north facade, which overlooks the old building, is fully transparent so that the studios are flooded with light. By contrast, the south side facing the street is opaque from the first story upwards, stressing the openness of Rietveld’s own building beyond.

All facades, sides included, are clad with 16,000 square tiles in pressed Czech glass, specially produced for the new wing. The audiovisual rooms assemble along the mute south side, with the exhibition area and other high-profile spaces occupying the glazed ground floor. The interior is a neutral grey and white except for the stairs which sport the Rietveld colors red, blue and yellow.

http://www.archdaily.com/147637/gerrit-rietveld-academy-benthem-crouwel-architekten/

 

July 30, 2011

Le Quartier Concordia – John Molson School of Business | KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Tom Arban

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Tom Arban

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Marc Cramer

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Eduard Hueber

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Marc Cramer

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Marc Cramer

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Marc Cramer

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Marc Cramer

Le Quartier Concordia - John Molson School of Business / KPMB Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes © Tom Arban

plan © KPMB Architects plan © KPMB Architects

plan © KPMB Architects plan © KPMB Architects

plan © KPMB Architects plan © KPMB Architects

plan © KPMB Architects plan © KPMB Architects

elevation © KPMB Architects elevation © KPMB Architects

elevation © KPMB Architects elevation © KPMB Architects

elevation © KPMB Architects elevation © KPMB Architects

The John Molson School of Business (JMSB) was designed to accommodate faculty, administrators, and undergraduate and graduate students under one roof to foster a community of scholars and the exchange of ideas. It is also the outcome of a winning design competition scheme. The JMSB represents the third building to complete the bold vision to create Le Quartier Concordia – a new vertical campus bringing together Visual Arts, Engineering/Computer Science and Business on two blocks in downtown Montreal to raise the profile of Concordia’s brand.

Architect: Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg (KPMB) Architects with Fichten Soiferman et Associés Architectes (FSA)
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Project Area: 375,000 sqf
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Eduard HueberMarc CramerTom Arban

The design leverages Montreal’s urban and natural geography to inject vibrancy into an underutilized precinct. The JMSB occupies a section of St. Catherine Street, a primary retail arterial, in downtown Montreal. The 17-story building is oriented to capture views of the city’s main natural features, the St. Lawrence River and Mont Royal. The interior topography of stacked atria with interconnecting stairs, lounges and a variety of teaching and gathering spaces, was planned and designed to optimize face-to-face interaction between the students and faculty of JMSB. The concrete loft structure is inherently flexible to facilitate connectivity and change, and the emphasis on quality in materials and detailing further advances goals for long term value.

Described as a ‘green centre,’ in addition to meeting LEED Silver requirements, the JMSB features one of the world’s first combinations of solar heat and power technology integrated into a non-residential building as well as the largest solar-electric installation in Quebec.

Facilitating Outstanding Teaching and Discussion-Based Learning
To provide innovation, flexibility and cutting edge technology in classroom and seminar room design, KPMB and user representatives from JMSB conducted an extensive tour of the top business schools in North America to study classroom typologies and develop templates for JMSB teaching spaces. Unlike Harvard, which is committed to the case study format, JMSB determined it would have a variety of formats in a 60 student per class module to accommodate the diversity of teaching modes to distinguish JMSB’s unique brand of openness and inclusivity. The project also includes the ‘breakout’ or ‘teaching in the round classroom.’ The total of 45 classrooms are each individually equipped with complete AV systems: Crestron control panels, flip-top cable storage compartments, computers, DVD and VHS players, LCD projectors, projection screens, speakers and motion sensor controlled highlighting.

Vibrancy and Cross-disciplinary Exchange
Opportunities for breakout, both formal closed configurations and open casual configurations, are designed and located to intensify a sense of community within the tower format, with an emphasis on creating a hub of activity on the first four floors. The second floor features a ‘floating event room’ suspended in the main atrium, and closed group study areas on the second and third floors provide options for various scales of gathering. The top of the Special Functions room is used as a student lounge and workspace area. Roof terraces are designed as outdoor extensions of offices, study areas and lounge space. The 15th floor has a faculty lounge with terrace and an oval conference room with catering facilities.

Environmental Sustainability
The design was conceived at the threshold of sustainable design and energy reduction emerging as priorities in architecture. At the same time, the Faculty of Business and Administration was also expanding its focus on sustainable issues, and has since established the David O’Brien Centre for Sustainable Enterprise to position Concordia as a leader in business practices that support corporate and social responsibility, and environmental initiatives. Designed as a forerunner to LEED, Concordia, the Faculty and the architects committed early on to establishing the JMSB as a ‘green’ centre. The design meets LEED Silver level requirements.

The John Molson School of Business is also distinguished as the world’s first demonstration of an innovative combination of solar heat and power technology integrated into a non-residential building as well as the largest solar-electric installation in Quebec. It features approximately 300 sq. metres of an innovative photovoltaic-thermal system. It represents the next generation of building design in that it will not only produce energy for its own use, but produce energy for the electricity network. A large energy display in the lobby will allow the public to view the real-time energy captured by the sun and used by the building. Strategic decisions, such as the absence of indoor parking and the integration of an underground tunnel to the Guy Metro station, encourage access by public transit.

Project Team:

-Marianne McKenna (partner-in-charge), Bruce Kuwabara (design partner), Andrew Dyke (associate-in-charge), Glenn MacMullin (project architect), Rob Kastelic, John Peterson, Lucy Timbers, Eric Ho, Paulo Zasso, Andre Prefontaine, Jill Greaves Osiowy, Omar Gandhi, Esther Cheung, Virginia Dos Reis, Lilly Liaukus, Olesia Stefurak, Deborah Wang; FSA-Jacob Fichten (partner-in-charge, Chargé de Projet), Gerald Soiferman (partner, administration), Andrij Serbyn, Benoit Lamoureux, Julie Dionne, Victor Garzon, Artur Kobylanski , Etienne Gibeault, Jessica Cuevas, Patrick Tiernan, Dimitri Koubatis, Martine Lacombe, Eric Jofriet, Marie-Helene Trudeau, Bertrand Marais, Lheila Palumbo
Structural Engineer: Nicolet Chartrand Knoll Limitée
Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: Groupe HBA Experts-Conseils Senc
Code and Safety: Curran McCabe RavindranTechnorm Inc.
Vertical Transportation: Exim
Audio/Visual: Trizart Alliance
IT/Security: Doucet et Associés
Project Manager: Genivar
General Contractor: J.E. Verreault

http://www.archdaily.com/154345/le-quartier-concordia-john-molson-school-of-business-kpmb-architects-with-fichten-soiferman-et-associes-architectes/

July 30, 2011

Vancouver Community Library | Miller Hull Partnership

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

 

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

Vancouver Community Library / The Miller Hull Partnership © Benjamin Benschneider

The new Vancouver Community Library in Vancouver, Washington, designed by The Miller Hull Partnership, recently opened to the public. With an almost 200-foot long, four-story atrium welcoming visitors to this new civic gathering space, the light-filled space features a sculptural concrete stair uniting the library’s five floors. A 50-foot high “Knowledge Wall” installation symbolizes the collection of information and ideas in the building. “The main goal was to create a new center for the community, ” said Adin Dunning, the lead architect for the library project who also grew up in Vancouver. “It was about bringing new users into the library and expanding what the library had to offer. The atrium space connects the program together and differentiates this building from any other building in the city.”

Architect: The Miller Hull Partnership
Location: Vancouver, Washington, 
Project Area: 80,000 sqf
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Benjamin Benschneider

The old library spent almost five decades at a site cut off from the city by the freeway. The new building more than triples the current space (to 80,000 square feet). As part of the urban core of Washington’s fourth largest city, the building serves as the cornerstone of a planned four-block 600,000-square-foot mixed-use development, including a public plaza that will spill out from the library’s atrium to host a series of community events.

In response to the community’s values and in an effort to market the library’s services to the next generation of users, the youngest patrons and families are featured prominently in the building. More than 4,000 square feet of children’s museum-like interactive displays (the largest such installation in the country) provides a focus on early literacy and a (free) place for children and their caregivers to come and build the skills that contribute to learning to read. Additionally, a state-of-the-art (and fully-enclosed) Teen Space was created providing dedicated computers, lounge seating, monitors for gaming, as well as an audio/ video system designed to allow teens to bring their own music into the space.

To facilitate community dialogue and discussions, the library includes both indoor and outdoor meeting and presentation spaces. All of these areas are available for community use, including a large roof deck with commanding views to the Columbia River and Mount Hood beyond.

The Vancouver Community Library was designed for long-term flexibility and adaptability as libraries change over time. Large open floor areas and a flexible raised access floor, containing mechanical and electrical systems, allow for easily rearranged spaces in the coming years and contribute to the overall sustainable design goals and projected LEED Gold certification. The use of natural daylight was a key design strategy, and the narrow building and arrangement of shelves maximizes north and south light. Carefully sized overhangs and the strategic use of clear and shaded glass (both a stainless steel mesh shade and ceramic frit) control heat gain and glare.

As the role of the library changes, including the evolution of how we consume books and media, the Vancouver Community Library stands out as the library of the future — anticipating that we cannot and do not know what to expect, but designed to adapt and respond when that future (and the next future) arrives.

http://www.archdaily.com/154732/vancouver-community-library-the-miller-hull-partnership/