Archive for July, 2011

July 31, 2011

Sainsbury Laboratory | Stanton Williams

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Site Plan Site Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Floor Plan Floor Plan

Section Section

Detail Detail

Sainsbury Laboratory / Stanton Williams © Hufton+Crow

Architect: Stanton Williams
Location: Cambridge, 
Client: The University of Cambridge
Main Contractor: Kier Regional
Civil and Structural Engineer: Adams Kara Taylor
Building Services Engineer: Arup
Landscape Architects: Christopher Bradley-Hole Landscape and Schoenaich Landscape Architects
Project Area: 11,000 sqm
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Hufton+Crow

Cambridge University Botanic Garden was conceived in 1831 by Charles Darwin’s guide and mentor, Professor Henslow, as a working research tool in which the diversity of plant species would be systematically ordered and catalogued. Completed in December 2010, the Sainsbury Laboratory develops Henslow’s agenda in seeking to advance understanding of how this diversity comes about. Its design was therefore shaped by the intention that the Laboratory’s architecture would express its integral relationship with the Garden beyond.

The Sainsbury Laboratory, an 11,000 sq.m. plant science research centre set in the University of Cambridge’s Botanic Garden, brings together world-leading scientists in a working environment of the highest quality. The design reconciles complex scientific requirements with the need for a piece of architecture that also responds to its landscape setting. It provides a collegial, stimulating environment for innovative research and collaboration. The building is situated within the private, ‘working’ part of the Garden, and houses research laboratories and their associated support areas. It also contains the University’s Herbarium, meeting rooms, an auditorium, social spaces, and upgraded ancillary areas for Botanic Garden staff, plus a new public café.

The building as a whole is rooted in its setting. There are two storeys visible above ground and a further subterranean level, partly in order to ensure efficient environmental control, but also to reduce the height of the building. The overall effect is strongly horizontal as a result. Solidity is implied by the use of bands of limestone and exposed insitu concrete, recalling geological strata and indeed the Darwinian idea of evolution over time as well as the permanence which one might expect of a major research centre. At the same time, however, permeability and connections – both real and visual – between the building and the Garden have been central to its conception.

The building’s identity is established externally by the way in which it is expressed and experienced as a series of interlinked yet distinct volumes of differing height grouped around three sides of a central courtyard, the fourth side of which is made up of trees planted by Henslow in the nineteenth century. The internal circulation and communal areas focus upon this central court, opening into it at ground level and onto a raised terrace above in order to provide immediate physical connections between the Laboratory and its surroundings.

Further visual connections are created by the careful use of glazing in the building. At ground level, extensive windows provide views of the courtyard and the Garden beyond, allowing these internal areas to be read as integral elements of the outdoor landscape. The first floor is also largely glazed. Its windows are screened by narrow vertical bands of stone that imbue the elevation with a regular consistency, behind which the pattern of fenestration could potentially be altered in response to future requirements.

Related to the conception of the building in terms of its landscape setting is the way that its internal areas are connected by a continuous route which recalls Darwin’s ‘thinking path’, a way to reconcile nature and thought through the activity of walking. Here the ‘thinking path’ functions as a space of reflection and debate.

It is intended to promote encounters and interaction between the scientists working in the building, and between them and the landscape. With glazed windows facing the court on one side and internal windows offering glimpses of the laboratories on the other, it operates as a transitional zone between the top-lit working areas at the centre of the building and the Botanic Garden itself. In this respect, the ‘path’ reinterprets the tradition of the Greek stoa, the monastic cloister, and the collegiate court, all of which were intended to some extent as semi-outdoor spaces for contemplation and meetings. As a result, past, present, and future are connected. The work of the laboratories will seek to understand the plant diversity that is glorified by the arrangement of the historic Botanic Garden in which it is set and which, though pleasant to visit, continues to function as a working space devoted to groundbreaking research.

http://www.archdaily.com/154728/sainsbury-laboratory-stanton-williams/

July 31, 2011

Westraven, Utrecht | cepezed architects

In a world fixated on the sustainable possibilities of new construction, the far greater environmental benefit of upgrading our existing building stock is often ignored. Westraven indicates what is possible if we address this issue.
– Antony Wood, CTBUH 2009 Awards Juror, CTBUH

Figure 1. Building exterior at night.

Location
Utrecht
Completion
1977
Height
85.1 m (279ft)
Stories
23
Primary Use
Office

Owner/Developer
Government Buildings Agency
Design Architect
cepezed architects
Structural Engineer
ABT
MEP
Grontmij Technical Management
Contractor
Construction Combination Westraven
Other Consultants
DGMR

The Westraven Office Complex in Utrecht, the Netherlands, is a combination of a renovated existing building and a new extension for the use of several divisions of the Dutch Department of Public Works. The program includes office space, conference facilities, a national meeting center, a communications center, and a “future center” named LEF for the Department of Public Works. This existing 85-meter (279-foot) tall construction has been radically renovated and reorganized, and a stretched out four-story podium has been designed around the base of the building. Various functions and facilities are based in large, open spaces in the podium, which are inviting for both meeting places and casual encounters. Much attention has been devoted to obtaining perfect equilibrium between low energy consumption and an optimum working climate. The architecture, technical installations and construction physics are fully integrated, which significantly contributes to the overall sustainability of the complex.

The Original Westraven

Westraven is an area to the South of the centrally situated Dutch city of Utrecht, located between the Amsterdam-Rhine Canal and the intersection of two major motorways, the A2 and A12. It was built in the early 1970s, utilizing a so-called jack-block system, which at the time was a cutting edge construction technique of British invention. This method required that the roof had to be constructed immediately after the foundations and basement were completed. Once the roof was completed, the core, which was made out of prefabricated concrete blocks, was constructed. This means that the entire unit was jacked up to create the space needed for a new layer of blocks and the top floor.

Figure 2. Existing high rise tower

As a result, the construction of the building was gradually elevated at a rate of two floors every three weeks.

Regardless of its revolutionary construction, Westraven received a generally negative critical response, which over the years only became stronger. One reason was the strong winds at the main entry which frequently hindered people and an alternative entry had to be used frequently. Also, the monolithic office block appeared distant and the working conditions inside were below par. The substandard climate control and a dark, stuffy atmosphere also played an important role in this negative criticism.

Because of the negative feedback, but also its central location, it was decided that the building was to be renovated and that it would be expanded to accommodate additional divisions of the Departments of Public Works. In addition to improving climate and the working environment, the new complex had to be open and transparent while also reflecting a certain prominence in the city. Moreover, Westraven had to set an example as a landmark of sustainability.

Opening up

The tower has been stripped to its concrete skeleton, which has been completely reused. Five large voids, of 6 meters (19.7 feet) wide and 5 meters (16.4 feet) deep, were created by removing floor segments of three successive floors, alternatively along the western and eastern façades. Now users no longer enter a dark and nondescript space when they exit the lifts at the core of the tower. Instead, they are met with an abundance of light and splendid panoramas over the Utrecht area. This not only improves spaciousness and scale, it also helps users to orientate themselves. Moreover, because of the newly created voids, the different office floors are interconnected, which contributes to both internal communication and spatial diversity.

Figure 3. Transparency and daylight in the lobby

From the outside, the voids are large rectangles of solar-control glazing, which immediately grabs  attention because it visually stands out amidst the horizontal rhythm of the rest of the façade. As such, they serve as an important identifying element of the building.

The new thermal façades are made of floor-to-ceiling glass. This not only improves the views and the amount of daylight into the offices, but it also ensures that the occupants will always move towards light when they pass through the hallways. The interior arrangements are fully flexible, comprised of different types of rooms using a partitioning system that is largely transparent as well.

Textile Skin

In order to facilitate natural ventilation, façade panels are operable. This has been made possible because the tower has been given a second skin, which eliminates possible inconvenience caused by the wind.

At the time of the preliminary design, the idea was that this outer facade would be made out of silk-screened glass, but during development the architect came up with the idea of a light-weight and consequently more cost-effective skin of Teflon-coated and open-weave fiber-glass textile.The soft turbulence behind the textile would neutralize the forces of the wind, so that the cavity between the textile and the thermal façade would be relatively tranquil and would enjoy a constant supply of fresh air. As a result, it would become possible to ventilate the offices directly with fresh air from the outside without any wind pressure problems. But there would also be another important advantage as the textile skin would also function as a sun shade without impeding the views.

Figure 4. New textile skin

The façade screen was inspired by textile applications in horticulture and is extremely light-weight in comparison to other outer façade solutions. At Westraven, the textile is attached to steel balusters by means of aluminum tubes, sharing the existing construction with the window-cleaning equipment.
Because such a solution has never been attempted before, the façade screen has comprehensively been tested against a large number of technical and functional criteria. These showed that the screen reduces the forces of wind and the sun adequately, but it is also sufficiently transparent and translucent. The colorfast fabric is unaffected by water, grease and dirt, is resistant to the weather, fungus, rust and insects, and is easily cleaned if necessary. Moreover, the screen does not flutter or vibrate and has been extensively tested to address the potential icing issues of the system.

The translucence and transparency can be attributed to a combination of factors; the difference between the light intensities inside and outside, the color and degree of reflection of the textile, and the angle of the sun all play a role. In addition, the distance of the textile to the building, the mesh-size, and the thread thickness of the fabric in relation to the resolution of the human eye are also relevant factors. Because the screen is so thin, good views remain possible across a very wide angle.

Both the Government Buildings Agency and the Department of Public Works went along with the textile skin, but opted for alternation of the fabric with strips of glass at eye level. Because the textile façade has no sound-insulating properties, the building has an outer façade of glass on the north side, which is closest to the motorway.

Mechanical Installations

To further improve the interior climate, all stories have been equipped with climate ceilings. Since the construction was erected using the jack-block system, it was designed to be as light as possible at the time. Therefore, the floors were relatively thin and had been reinforced with concrete beams. The spaces in between these beams were perfect for accommodating climate-control units suitable for both heating and cooling the building by pumping hot or cold water, respectively, through the pipes. For Westraven, the supplier customized the units so that several other components, such as the sprinkler system, intercom speakers and light fittings could also be integrated; thus contributing to a tidy, clear and visually unobstructed atmosphere.

Figure 5. Section through offices showing junction of tower and low rise structure and double skin façade

Podium

New low-rise sections have been added on either side of the tower. This added 24,000 square meters (258,334 square feet) of space to the existing 27,000 square meters (290,626 square feet) in the tower. These extensions have a V-shaped floor plan with rounded edges and are enclosed by a conservatory made of transparent material.

The sections are linked by an intermediate zone, with a large entrance area and two indoor gardens, while their hallways form an extension of the entrance. As a result, the ensemble, as a whole, appears as an indivisible unit in which the transition from old to new is hardly perceptible.
The structure of the extension is nearly all steel and has been dimensioned as slender as possible for both aesthetic and sustainability reasons: a slender construction of steel provides both lucidity to the building and reduces the use of material. Moreover, because of its relatively low weight and its excellent thermal conductivity, it absorbs and emits warmth faster than the more traditional and heavier concrete structure. As a result, less energy is being used for heating and cooling.

Sustainable Climate Concept

As mentioned, much attention has been devoted to obtaining perfect equilibrium between low energy consumption and an optimum working climate. For this purpose, a sustainable climate concept has been developed. The high degree of transparency of the design, for example, is not only based on architectural and aesthetical principles, but also by maximizing the use of daylight so less artificial lighting is needed. Also, a dynamic lighting system has been installed, which automatically adapts to the color and intensity of the natural light available.

Figure 6. Diagram of the building’s climate zones

Four different climate zones have been developed in order to adjust the climate concept to the actual day-to-day use of the building. The offices and workspaces are provided with full service climate control facilities. The floors of the new office wings have been rendered thermally active by means of a water network system that has been cast in the concrete slab components of the floors. Through this network, the structure is kept at a constant temperature. In the long term, this system uses less energy than an ongoing alternation of heating up and cooling down.

Since each of the conservatories is used for completely different functions (such as the restaurant, gatherings or workshops), the standards for these particular areas are less demanding. The bulk of these enormous spaces are heated by return air passing through the edge of the office floors.

At the ground level, this is complemented by floor heating. Since the conservatories serve as a buffer between the new office wings and the direct influences of the weather outside, the demands upon the office façades are relatively low. Therefore, an indoor partitioning system could be used for these, which saves considerably on construction costs. Perforated panels in the façades also contain sound insulation and can be opened, which allows for extra ventilation through the atrium.

During the warmer periods, an opening is created in the conservatories through a sun screen system for which the same fabric has been used as applied in the greenhouse industry. When the temperature rises, the screens automatically come down. The warmth is retained in the cavity between the screen and the façade and is naturally ventilated. The same technique is used in order to obtain the warmth entering through the transparent roofs between the office wings. An additional cooling installation is integrated into the floor.

Figure 7. New extensions at podium level

Recognition

The Energy Performance Coefficient (EPC), which is a figure used in the Netherlands to measure the energy efficiency of a building, was 33% better than required by the Dutch Buildings Decree for the tower and even 50% better for the podium. Westraven has won the Daylight Award for its exquisite balance between the use of daylight, artificial lighting and other architectural aspects and was granted the Dutch Construction Award with much praise for its sustainability on all levels. Recently, Westraven has been shortlisted for the Prime Property Award 2010, which is a European prize for sustainable real estate investment.

The Westraven was recognized as the Best Tall Building Europe Finalist in the 2009 CTBUH Awards Program.

http://www.ctbuh.org/TallBuildings/FeaturedTallBuildings/WestravenUtrecht/tabid/2464/language/en-US/Default.aspx

July 31, 2011

Meatpacking District Tower, New York | Morris Adjmi Architects

‘Less is More’ says New York Landmarks Commission of Morris Adjmi design

After three attempts, architect Morris Adjmi’s four-storey glass addition to a 1938 moderne style market building in New York’s Meatpacking District was approved Tuesday by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

The approved design, which will see reductions in the number stories and the floor-to-floor heights over the initial seven storey proposal, is considerably smaller. The reduction in the building size was in response to demands from the neighbourhood, specifically the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, which serves as an advocate for sensitive development in the area.

“We are glad the advocacy over the last couple of year has resulted in the size of the proposal being reduced significantly” said Andrew Berman, the executive director at the Society. “However, we still have a fundamental concern of turning buildings in historic districts into pedestals for larger developments.”

The building, located at 837-843 Washington Street, is in the heart of the district and enjoys high visibility. It is cattycorner to The Standard Hotel and visible from the High Line.

Sharon McHugh
US Correspondent

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17170

and read it here from architect’s website:

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the design for 837 Washington Street in New York’s Gansevoort Market Historic District. The design, a 4-story glass and steel torqued addition sitting within a 2-story Moderne style brick meat market building, was hailed for its use of materials, appreciation of its industrial past and relation to its urban context. LPC Chairman Robert Tierney declared that MA Architects ‘set a very high bar’ for design in the area.

Twisty MePa Tower Finally Approved by Landmarks Commission

 

 

July 31, 2011

Hangzhou Gateway | JDS

JDS designs 15-story gateway tower featuring offices, restaurants and roof garden

The concept of the building is to create a gateway that is neither closing-off or dividing the city. The 15-story tower features offices, restaurants, post office, a terraced roof garden and a sunken passage that leads through a shopping centre.

The rooftop terraces offer generous views to the distant nature while the stone louvers provide a sustainable solution to the office conditions. The building will become the gateway for the Gongshu District and an icon for the urban transformation of the old industrial neighbourhood.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17174

July 31, 2011

King’s Reach Tower, London | KPF

International architecture firm, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) has won planning consent has been granted for its scheme for the redevelopment of King’s Reach Tower on London’s South Bank for developer CIT Group. KPF’s design for King’s Reach retains and transforms the existing 1970s tower and T‐shaped podium building, originally designed by Richard Seifert, to provide a mixed‐use development incorporating residential, retail, office accommodation, and an enhanced public realm.

Located on a prominent site on London’s riverside, the revitalisation and remodeling will contribute to the ongoing regeneration of the South Bank. The design creates a new and exciting space for the city, opening up routes though the site at ground level, animating the streetscape with integrated retail frontages, and providing high‐quality residential and office space.

By creating a new route through the heart of the scheme, doubling the retail around the perimeter of the building, and relocating plant and support spaces below grade, the ground plane of the tower is significantly altered. The existing T‐shaped podium will be reconfigured, with the cores relocated and three new floors created. At the first floor level a new landscaped garden will create a buffer between the office and the existing residential building, and a new roof garden at the ninth level, for the new residents, gives views across London. Within the tower the upper floors, levels 11 to 36, will be converted from office use to 173 residential apartments.

The vision for the development is a simple retained structure which does not erase the memory of the 1970s building but adds a new layer of renewal and adaptation. The treatment of the facades and variety in the use of materials accentuates the verticality of the building and also combines concrete, glass, light metal and warm wood defining new spaces whilst creating an intimate scale.

KPF’s design targets a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating. Reusing the concrete structure is anticipated to save in excess of 6,000 tonnes of CO2 while a number of energy efficiency measures are being used, including a highly effective heat recovery system, low energy lighting systems, high efficiency water cooled chillers, a heat store to reduce peak loads, and provision for linking in the future to district heating and cooling schemes. Replacing the façade will also result in a reduction of approximately 72% of the current annual heating and cooling demand.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=17164

July 31, 2011

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office | Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers site plan 01

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers plan 01

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers plan 02

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers elevation 01

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers elevation 02

 

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers elevation 03

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers section 01

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers section 02

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers diagram 01

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers diagram 02

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office / Tomoon Architects and Engineers Courtesy of Tomoon Architects and Engineers

The new office building of The Korea Teachers Pension Head Office was established to bring the unification of three bodies for the stability and efficiency of educational pursuits: Teachers, The Korean Teachers Pension Head Office and the country.  Tomoon Architects and Engineershave designed this facility with these three organizations in mind to achieve this goal in Naju,.

The podium that acts as the entrance to the building is an extension of the urban axis that extends the urban context of Naju into the offices.  This move accentuates the visual recognition of the urban landmark as an intrinsic part of the city.  The building stands at the intersection of two axes, configured to the street that offers the greatest abundance of sunlight and ventilation.

The main entrance is placed through the open square in the east of the site, where the landscape is well harmonized with the water. The lower levels accommodate a promotion hall, customer service room, multi-functional all and sports facilities, in connection with the outdoor space known as the harmony court and Green Culture Slope in the south. The higher levels are vertically arranged to satisfy both independence and continuity of the business facilities based on security. The continuous volume of the lower levels is transformed in lines and sections within the tower and becomes a part of the Eco Smart Skin. Architect: Tomoon Architects and EngineersLocation: Naju,  Project architect: Yeol Park Design team: Heesan Gwak, Youngjoo Kim, Junghyo Woo, Seunghyun Lee, Jaeho Jin Project Area : 10,919 sqm Gross floor area : 11,136.5 sqm Landscape area : 2,308.88 sqm Floor Area Ratio : 87.4% Usage :Office for Headquarter Structure : Steel+Reinforced Concrete Floor : 13 Floors and B1Competition Year: 2011 Status : Construction Documentation Phase.

http://www.archdaily.com/149412/the-korea-teachers-pension-head-office-tomoon-architects-and-engineers/

 

July 31, 2011

Milanofiori Housing Complex | OBR

 

 

Project Description from the Architects:

The Milanofiori housing complex is part of the master plan by Erick van Egeraat characterized by a series of functions (offices, hotels, restaurants, cinemas, leisure, residences) that define together a cluster whose elements appear to follow the characteristics of the surrounding landscape creating a public park as the extension of the existing forest. The design seeks the symbiosis between architecture and landscape, so that the synthesis of artificial and natural elements could define the quality of living and the sense of belonging by the inhabitants.

The interface between the building and the garden becomes the field where interaction between man and environment takes place. This interface is defined by the “C” form of the complex which encompasses the public park, and by the porosity from interior to exterior that characterizes all 107 apartments.

The two facades are designed differently: the one facing the street outside is more urban, and the  one towards the inner park is more organic.

The design of the urban facade stimulates a sense of belonging thanks to the composition of white frames which identify separately the units. These frames include vertical wooden panels of different widths which can slide across the frames and control the inner light as necessary.

The organic facade overlooking  the garden features double glazed bioclimatic greenhouses.

The co-planarity between the glass of the greenhouse and the glass guardrail covering the string-course  creates an effect where the shape of the construction and the background merge and reverse their roles constantly, producing kaleidoscopic effects overlapping the reflection of the public garden outside with the transparency of the private garden inside.

The geometry of the building is shaped by translation of the upper levels in line with positions of optimum solar exposure and by tapering of the external terraces in order to increase introspection among residents. The winter garden has a double value: an environmental value in providing a buffer zone which allows  thermal regulation, and an architectural value in allowing extension of the interior living space towards the exterior landscape (and vice versa) permitting different uses from summer to winter.

Through the overlap of different natural layers (the public park, the open terraces and the winter gardens) the project seeks a kind of a holism of nature, where various personal interactions of these natural layers create an intensive landscape that is directly and personally customized by each resident.

In line with ever changing developments in contemporary living, the porosity of the architecture makes Milanofiori residential complex an evolving organism, in perpetual change, preferring the dynamic exchange between architecture and nature and stimulating the interaction between man and environment.

The Milanofiori project investigates new ways of contemporary living by developing three themes.

Nomadic and sedentary. Contemporary life brings each of us to live a house as a place where you come from and where you come back to, in a continuous alternation of time and space.

This means that sedentary and nomadic attitude coexists in our every day living experience.

To express this duality it is not enough to think just in terms of housing types that meet the most varied requirements of all possible users. It is needed instead a paradigm shift that lies in reversing the direction of the discussion: from the house as an object to the inhabitant as the subject.

Living in the garden. Breaking free from the presence of the hypertrophic “house”, the dwelling is thought more as the expression of the site as a whole, rather than a physical place. This is not simply blurring the distinction between inside / outside, but finding thecontinuum in which space and time are unified in one entity that cannot be separated. To do this we need to think of an opportunity: the garden. In the garden space and time are unified, they become continuous, recovering – evoking – the essential meaning of living in the sense of “taking care”.

From collective complex to “polyvalent-interconnected system”. The project involves a series of open spaces for social interaction in synergy with other parts of the cluster. In this sense, the typical user lives an “interconnected life”, with multiple possibilities of movement even within the same cluster. We try to overcome the concept of “Unity” (d’Habitation) in favor of a polyvalent system that overcomes the typical nuclear family separation between housing and workplace imposed by the industrial civilization, towards new models of mutual relations, trade and transversality

Project Details:

Project title: MILANOFIORI

OBR design team: Paolo Brescia e Tommaso Principi, Chiara Pongiglione, Francois Doria, Laura Anichini, Silavia Becchi, Antonio Bergamasco, Paolo Caratozzolo Nota, Giulia D’Ettorre, Julissa Gutarra, Leonardo Mader, Elena Mazzocco, Margherita Menardo, Paolo Salami, Izabela Sobieraj, Paula Vier, Francesco Vinci, Fabio Valido, Barbara Zuccarello

Project team: OBR S.r.l., Favero & Milan Ingegneria S.p.A., Studio Ti S.r.l., Buro Happold Ltd, Vittorio Grassi

Site surveyor: Favero & Milan Ingegneria S.p.A., Alessandro Bonaventura

Project management: P&P S.r.l., Luigi Pezzoli

Client: Milanofiori 2000 S.r.l., Gruppo Cabassi

Location: Assago, Milano, Italy

Dimensions: site area 30,000 sqm, built area 27,400 sqm (107 apartments)

Contractor: Marcora S.p.A. – Cile S.p.A.

Chronology:
2005 Design competition (1st prize)
2005 Preliminary design
2006 Definitive project
2007 Construction documents
2010 Realized

Award:
2010 European 40 Under 40, Madrid
2011 Leaf Awards, Residential Building of the Year finalist, London

All images courtesy of OBR.

http://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/milanofiori_housing_complex_by_obr

 

July 31, 2011

Xi’an Expo 2011 Officially Opens

aerial2 Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

guangyun-entrance1 Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

greenhouse-night1 Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

greenhouse-birdview Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

flowing-gardens-overview2 Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

creativity-pavilion4 Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

creativity-pavilion3 Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

creativity-pavilion1 Plasma Studio and Huashang Newspaper

The Xi’an Expo 2011 has officially opened and, as expected, the international horticultural event has attracted a staggering 200,000 in just the first weekend! We’ve been covering the Expo beginning with Plasma Studio + GroundLab’s conceptual design, and we have been featuringupdates about the project over the course of the last few months.  The Expo embodies the idea of transformation as the site was formerly a sandpit where the water was severely degraded during the 1980s.   Efforts over the past two decades have restored the ecosystem and now the Expo is able to demonstrate what can be accomplished through the use of the most advanced technology, ideas, and materials.  As we reported earlier, the 37 ha complex includes three buildings that are interconnected with a dynamic landscape of unfolding paths and networks of water, circulation and foliage.

More images after the break.

“By leaving behind the obvious typological and historical references to Xi’an’s past, this project is seeking a contemporary authentic expression of China’s current and future ambitions, adding an entirely new layer to the Millenial tapestry of Xi’an. By the same token, Flowing Gardens explores a new syncretic balance between urbanism and landscape with universal relevance. The traditional subordination of ground and landscape by buildings has been reversed to offer a unique symbiotic experience,” explained the architects.

International Competition: 1. Prize, 2009
Project: 2009-2011
Opening: April 28th 2011
Completion: March 2011

Client: Chan-Ba Ecological District
Architecture: Plasma Studio, BIAD
Landscape Design: GroundLab, LAUR Studio, Beijing Forestry University
Engineers: John Martin and Associates, Arup

http://www.archdaily.com/133184/update-xian-expo-2011-officially-opens/

July 31, 2011

Xi’an World Horticultural Expo | Plasmastudio + Groundlab

 

http://aa-landscape-urbanism.blogspot.com/2011/04/xian-expo-by-plasmastudio-and-grounue.html

 

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http://aa-landscape-urbanism.blogspot.com/2009/03/xian-world-horticultural-expo-won-by.html

 

July 31, 2011

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre | Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

First Floor Plan First Floor Plan

First Floor Plan First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan Second Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan Fourth Floor Plan

Fifth Floor Plan Fifth Floor Plan

Longitudinal Section Longitudinal Section

Longitudinal Section Longitudinal Section

Longitudinal Section Longitudinal Section

Cross Section Cross Section

North Elevation North Elevation

East Elevation East Elevation

South Elevation South Elevation

West Elevation West Elevation

Architects: Henning Larsen Architects
Locations: Reykjavik, Iceland
Client: Austurnhofn TR – East Harbour Project Ltd.
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 28,000 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

Situated on the border between land and sea, the Centre stands out as a large, radiant sculpture reflecting both sky and harbour space as well as the vibrant life of the city. The spectacular facades have been designed in close collaboration between Henning Larsen Architects, the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson and the engineering companies Rambøll and ArtEngineering GmbH from Germany.

The Concert Hall and Conference Centre of 28,000 m2 is situated in a solitary spot with a clear view of the enormous sea and the mountains surrounding Reykjavik. The Centre features an arrival- and foyer area in the front of the building, four halls in the middle and a backstage area with offices, administration, rehearsal hall and changing room in the back of the building. The three large halls are placed next to each other with public access on the south side and backstage access from the north. The fourth floor is a multifunctional hall with room for more intimate shows and banquets.

Seen from the foyer, the halls form a mountain-like massif that similar to basalt rock on the coast forms a stark contrast to the expressive and open facade. At the core of the rock, the largest hall of the Centre, the main concert hall, reveals its interior as a red-hot centre of force. The project is designed in collaboration with the local architectural company, Batteríið Architects.

http://www.archdaily.com/153520/harpa-concert-hall-and-conference-centre-henning-larsen-architects/