Archive for June 21st, 2011

June 21, 2011

A SPACE OF LIGHT | Lebbeus Woods in collaboration with Christoph a. Kumpusch

(above) The Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods in collaboration with Christoph a. Kumpusch, in the Raffles City complex in Chengdu, China, by Steven Holl Architects.

The Light Pavilion is designed to be an experimental space, that is, one that gives us the opportunity to experience a type of space we haven’t experienced before. Whether it will be a pleasant or unpleasant experience; exciting or dull; uplifting or merely frightening; inspiring or depressing; worthwhile or a waste of time, is not determined in advance by the fulfillment of our familiar expectations, because we can have none, never having encountered such a space before. We shall simply have to go into the space and pass through it, perhaps more than once. That is the most crucial aspect of its experimental nature, and we—its transient inhabitants—are experimentalists in full partnership with the space’s designers. Each of our experiences will be unique, personal.

Set within a more known three-dimensional geometry and framed by it, the Light Pavilion exerts its differences. Most apparently, the elements defining it do not follow the known, rectilinear geometry of its architectural setting. The columns supporting stairs and viewing platforms obey a geometry defined by a dynamic of movement. Their deviation from the rectilinear grid releases its spaces from static stability and sets them in motion, encouraging visitors to explore.

The structural columns articulating the Pavilion’s interior spaces are illuminated from within and in the twilight and night hours visibly glow, creating a luminous space into which the solid architectural elements appear to merge. This quality is amplified by the mirrored surfaces enclosing the Pavilion, which visually extend its spaces infinitely. We might speculate that this new type of space stands somewhere between traditional architecture and the virtual environments of cyberspace, a domain we increasingly occupy in our homes and workplaces, but in the Light Pavilion with more emphasis on the physical than the mental or the virtual.

From distances across the city, the Pavilion is a beacon of light for the Raffles City complex. From within the buildings, and especially from the large public plaza between them, the glowing structure radiates subtly changing color symbolizing different holidays and times of day, month and year.

The space has been designed to expand the scope and depth of our experiences. That is its sole purpose, its only function. If one needed to give a reason to skeptics for creating such experimental spaces in the context of this large urban development project, it would be this: our rapidly changing world constantly confronts us with new challenges to our abilities to understand and to act, encouraging us to encounter new dimensions of experience.

Lebbeus Woods

Christoph a. Kumpusch

.

(below) Development of The Light Pavilion’s design:

Recent construction photograph:


Light and color studies:

LW and CaK

http://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/a-space-of-light-2/

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June 21, 2011

SLICED POROSITY BLOCK | Steven Holl

Chengdu, China, 2007-2012

PROGRAM: five towers with offices, serviced apartments, retail, a hotel, cafes, and restaurants
CLIENT: CapitaLand Development
BUILDING AREA (SQUARE): 3,336,812
STATUS: construction phase

The ‘Sliced Porosity Block’ will be located just south of the intersection of the First Ring Road and Ren Min Nan Road. Its sun sliced geometry results from minimum daylight exposures to the surrounding urban fabric prescribed by code. Porous and inviting from every side, five vertical entrances cut through a layer of micro-urban shopping before leading to the elevated public ‘Three Valley’ plaza. A great urban terrace on the scale of Rockefeller Center, this multi-level plaza in the center of the complex is sculpted by stone steps, ramps, trees, and ponds and caters to special events or to a casual afternoon in the sun. Here the public space parallax of overlapping geometries in strict black and white is supercharged by color that glows from the shops positioned underneath the plaza.

The three generous ponds on the plaza are inspired by a poem by Du Fu (713-770), in which he describes how ‘Time has left stranded in Three Valleys’. (Du Fu was one of ancient China’s most important poets, who spent a part of his life in Chengdu). These three ponds function as skylights to the six-story shopping precinct below. Residing on voids in the facades of the sculpted blocks three pavilions are designed by Steven Holl (history pavilion), Lebbeus Woods (high tech pavilion), and Ai Wei Wei (Du Fu pavilion).

The ‘Sliced Porosity Block’ is heated and cooled geo-thermally and the large plaza ponds harvest recycled rainwater while the natural grasses and lily pads create a natural cooling effect. High-performance glazing, energy-efficient equipment and the use of regional materials are just a few of the other methods employed to reach the LEED gold rating.
   

CREDITS

architect
– Steven Holl Architects
Steven Holl, Li Hu (design architect)
Roberto Bannura (associate in charge)
Lan Wu (project architect, Beijing)
Haiko Cornelissen, Peter Englaender, JongSeo Lee (project architect, New York)
Christiane Deptolla, Inge Goudsmit, Jackie Luk, Maki Matsubayashi, Sarah Nichols, Manta Weihermann, Martin Zimmerli (project designer)
Justin Allen, Jason Anderson, Francesco Bartolozzi, Guanlan Cao, Yimei Chan, Sofie Holm Christensen, Esin Erez, Ayat Fadaifard, Mingcheng Fu, Forrest Fulton, Runar Halldorsson, M. Emran Hossain, Joseph Kan, Suping Li, Tz-Li Lin, Yan Liu, Daijiro Nakayama, Pietro Peyron, Roberto Requejo, Elena Rojas-Danielsen, Michael Rusch, Ida Sze, Filipe Taboada, Ebbie Wisecarver, Human Tieliu Wu, Jin-Ling Yu (project team)

associate architects
– China Academy of Building Research
Hong Jin, Wang Zhenming, Lu Yan (project team)

MEP and fire engineer
– Ove Arup & Partners

LEED consultant
– Ove Arup & Partners

structural engineer
– China Academy of Building Research
Liu Junjin, Zhu Huosheng (senior engineer)

quantity surveyor
– Davis Langdon & Seah (DLS)
Hu Ping, Sun Ying (deputy manager)

traffic consultant
– MVA
Michael Chiu (director)
Kent Liang (project manager)
– MVA Hong Kong ltd

June 21, 2011

THE NEW ROYAL PLAYHOUSE | Lundgaard & Tranberg

The new Royal Danish Playhouse is an effective ‘theatre-machine’ that takes form as a pronounced, yet respectful completion of the surrounding city.

The building consists of three compositional elements:

The oak-clad promenade, a public walk floating on thin columns over the water, gives access to the foyer with its panoramic views of the harbour and historic skyline.

The scene building, containing the auditorium and three scenes, echoes the material character of the harbour front with rustic brickwork and copper-clad tower.

The expansive and unifying roof level contains personnel facilities and gives spectacular views in all directions through varying nuances of green glass.

The dark, elongated brick used throughout the building is, like the red chairs of the auditorium, specially designed and developed for playhouse by the office.

Project Facts

  • Address: Sankt Annæ Plads 36, DK-1250 Copenhagen K
  • Acoustics: Gade & Mortensen A/S
  • Area: 21.000 m²
  • Client: Det Kongelige Teater
  • Client Advisor: Moe & Brødsgaard A/S, Erik Møllers Tegnestue
  • Photographer: Jens Lindhe
  • Engineer: COWI A/S
  • Competition: 2002 – 1st prize
  • Contact info: Katrine Thorsen, KATH@kglteater.dk
  • Prizes: The association for preserving the beauty of The Capital City,
    Diploma 2007
    The Danish lighting Award 2008
    RIBA European Award 2008
    The Nordic Lighting Award 2008
    Copenhagen Municipality 2008
    Sustainable Concrete Prize 2009

 

http://www.ltarkitekter.dk/en/projects/7

 

June 21, 2011

Kö-Bogen | Studio Daniel Libeskind

Kö-Bogen / Daniel Libeskind © Archimation

Kö-Bogen / Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind

Kö-Bogen / Daniel Libeskind © Archimation

Several hundred guests joined  in a ceremony last Friday as he laid the foundation stone of  the Kö-Bogen building along with ’s Lord Mayor Dirk Elbers, investor Kurt Zech of Zech Group, and project developer Stefan H. Muehling.  The stainless steel foundation stone, designed by Libeskind, will be visibly integrated into the facade of the building.

The new 432,300 sqf mixed use building is scheduled for completion in 2013 will house both office and retail space in downtown .  The design of Kö-Bogen intends to naturally blend landscape into the building space through geometry, permeated cuts in the facade, the green courtyards, and green roof system.   All of these elements are ‘part of a new environment that bridges urban space with park space’.

The Kö-Bogen project will join two city blocks with one continuous roof line, forming a unified space for walking, shopping and working. The building will also create a connected space between the Schadowplatz and the Hofgarten, the central park in Düsseldorf.

Kö-Bogen is made up of both straight and curved geometry. The straight lines are meant to reflect the city context, matching the building line on the Koenigsallee. The curved lines, which maneuver within and around Kö-Bogen’s courtyards, create more fluid connections with the pedestrian environment.

http://www.archdaily.com/144823/ko-bogen-studio-daniel-libeskind/

June 21, 2011

Westpark Bochum | Archwerk Generalplaner KG

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Peter Lippsmeier

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Peter Lippsmeier

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Peter Lippsmeier

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Peter Lippsmeier

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

Westpark Bochum / Archwerk Generalplaner KG © Archwerk - Sascha Völzke

aerial view aerial view

ground floor plan ground floor plan

plan 01 plan 01

plan 02 plan 02

plan 03 plan 03

plan 04 plan 04

elevation elevation

section section

 

Architects: Archwerk Generalplaner KG
Location: 
Project area: 1,850 sqm
Project year: 2004 – 2005
Photographs: Peter LippsmeierArchwerk – Sascha Völzke

The IG Metall [Metalworkers’ Trade Union] JAHRHUNDERTHAUS headquarters lies very close to town centre in the Westpark on Alleestrasse. The draft envisages two parallel blocks running north – south, connected by a transparent hall. The east wing contains 9 storeys and on the west side the top two floors project outwards by approximately 4.40 metres. The west wing contains 4 storeys (a 2-storey high assembly room (divisible), the catering area on the 2nd floor, and the seminar area on the 3rd floor). Access to the building is by way of a glass-roofed hall with a path from the Alleestraße (main entrance) via a steel-structured, four-level stairway to the Westpark. The difference in height of the terrain (approx. 7.00 m) is made both visible and useable in the hall by four stepped, steel platforms. The floor plan enables a number of variable uses to be made due to the combination of restaurant, foyer and assembly rooms.

On the ground floor (at Alleestrasse level) connected to the hall there is a divisible assembly room, an Internet venue, and a youth room. The office areas on the upper floors are accessed via lifts from the hall. On the 2nd floor (at the level of the Westpark, roughly + 7.00 m), in the west wing there is a catering establishment open to the public. It and its terrace face onto the Westpark and have here an additional, separate entrance.

The building is designed with flexible office use in mind and can be laid out as group offices, as a double-loaded corridor with cubicles or also as an open-plan office. The floors are easily divisible and can be leased flexibly (3.00 metre room height). The basement houses a conventional underground car park with 86 parking spaces with ramp access to Bessemerstrasse.

The exterior appearance is defined by clinker masonry with a perforated façade or, in the case of the inner side looking onto the glass-roofed hall, by an aluminium and glass facade. The perforated façade contains stove-enamelled aluminium windows. The facades of both blocks which look inwards onto the reception hall are of glass. The hall’s load-bearing structure is made of steel. The roofs are flat. The glass-roofed hall has a roof composed of overlapping glass panels with a suspended, movable, textile sunshade (greenhouse-type shade netting).

http://www.archdaily.com/144208/westpark-bochum-archwerk-generalplaner-kg/