Archive for June 12th, 2011

June 12, 2011

LAKESHORE EAST APARTMENTS | bklarch

The latest sign that Chicago’s building freeze is beginning to thaw is a nearly 50-story, crystalline residential tower planned for River North. Designed by Brinistool, Kerwin, and Lynch (BKL), the minimalist tower will feature smooth glass facades on the east and west sides, and deep balconies—flush with the building—on the north and south sides. “The building continues the Wacker Drive streetwall, so it’s a very visible face of Lakeshore East,” said Thomas Kerwin, a principal at BKL. The six-foot deep balconies will have glass balustrades and run the entire length of the rental apartments. The all glass sides feature tinted and fritted glass—the frit will mask the structure behind—creating nearly seamless-looking facades. The approximately 650,000- square-foot, 500-unit building will also have a planted roof and, atop a retail base, a pool.

The latest sign that Chicago’s building freeze is beginning to thaw is a nearly 50-story, crystalline residential tower planned for River North. Designed by Brinistool, Kerwin, and Lynch (BKL), the minimalist tower will feature smooth glass facades on the east and west sides, and deep balconies—flush with the building—on the north and south sides. “The building continues the Wacker Drive streetwall, so it’s a very visible face of Lakeshore East,” said Thomas Kerwin, a principal at BKL. The six-foot deep balconies will have glass balustrades and run the entire length of the rental apartments. The all glass sides feature tinted and fritted glass—the frit will mask the structure behind—creating nearly seamless-looking facades. The approximately 650,000- square-foot, 500-unit building will also have a planted roof and, atop a retail base, a pool.

Alan G. Brake

 

Lakeshore East Apartments

Architect: Brinistool, Kerwin, and
Lynch with Loewenberg Architects
Developer: Magellan Development
Location: Chicago
Completion: 2013

http://archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=5405

 

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June 12, 2011

Center for Global Conservation | FXFOWLE

Bronx, New York

An office building in the Bronx Zoo seems as natural to the site as the surrounding parkland and accommodates multiple programs with minimal resources. Staring out the window is part of the job description.

By Laura Raskin

Center for Global Conservation

The Center for Global Conservation was inflected to save two specimen trees. Employees often sit on the patio surrounded by the nature preserve setting.

Center for Global Conservation

An intensive green roof slopes from the third floor to a wet meadow and provides necessary egress. Native grasses, flowers, and shrubs thrive on its path.

Center for Global Conservation

Located at the northern edge of a clearing, the CGC’s form, sun shading, and ventilation help reduce energy consumption and maximize occupants’ comfort.

Center for Global Conservation

A vantage point on a staircase to the third floor provides a view of the main gathering space and library. An outdoor patio extends the gathering space.

Center for Global Conservation

The main entrance to the CGC is next to the staff kitchen. A moveable Cumaro wood screen can obscure views into or out of the dining area. Large rock outcroppings anchor both ends of the building.

Center for Global Conservation

Center for Global Conservation

Center for Global Conservation

Center for Global Conservation

Center for Global Conservation

Employees on their lunch break at the Center for Global Conservation (CGC) recently paused to observe wild turkeys roaming in front of the building. In the northwest corner of the Bronx Zoo’s 265 acres of New York City parkland, this display isn’t a rare occurrence. Nor is the sight of Inca terns swooping in the seabird aviary across from the CGC headquarters. Muskrats and goldfinches visit, too. Perhaps these creatures continue to treat the turf as their own because the rectangular, elongated three-story building — which achieved LEED Gold Certification in 2009 — seems as natural to the site as the two rock outcroppings it bridges.

The CGC, designed by FXFOWLE, houses several Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) programs. WCS operates the largest network of wildlife parks in the world, including the Bronx Zoo, New York Aquarium, Central Park Zoo, Queens Zoo, and Prospect Park Zoo, and operates over 500 conservation programs in more than 65 countries. Until the new headquarters was completed in 2009, WCS employees were scattered in buildings across the Bronx Zoo. FXFOWLE, which had previously renovated the zoo’s Lion House in 2008, consolidated various programs with diverse needs at an unused edge of the park. After looking at various configurations, the firm designed the building to intrude as little as possible on the landscape, even inflecting it to save two trees. WCS employees now benefit from chance encounters. “It’s really changed our relationship. Proximity is everything,” says Susan Chin, vice president of planning and design and chief architect for WCS.

In mild weather, employees eat and work outside on the generous terraces. This was the hope, says FXFOWLE senior partner Sylvia Smith. “Rather than give everyone a private office, we created good workspaces and conference rooms and then extended the building with the outdoor space,” she says, pointing to a patio that is the same size as the staff dining room. “We did a lot of pairing, trying to blur the line.” When employees sit outside in front of the building they find themselves in the middle of a marshlike valley thick with native grasses.

Park visitors pass close to the private building, but it is set back in the landscape, creating the sense that the CGC is in the middle of the woods, not New York City. A berm built into the natural landscape frames a promenade that guides visitors to its entrance — they are welcome to use its outdoor dining spaces and explore the property.

Smith led a recent tour of the building that began on the ground floor. A glass and poured-in-place concrete entrance leads to a flight of stairs and the real arrival space — the second floor’s combined lounge and library — where windows look out to Fordham Road and the New York Botanical Garden beyond. FXFOWLE wanted occupants to feel framed by the landscape, says Smith. The main conference room, located to the south of the lounge, is an elegant example of this design principle, with a raised floor, clean detailing, and a cantilevered roof that extends the room into the woods.  Working with ornithologists at the CGC and the New York Audubon Society, the firm designed two floor-to-ceiling insulated glass walls made of a type of glazing that birds see as opaque. To humans, the glass looks pleasantly and subtly pinstriped. The CGC is in a migratory path, and the conference room is in the most wooded corner, making this a necessary measure. Rectangular red sandstone panels line the back of the conference room. Salvaged from the renovation of the 1903 Lion House, they are a reminder of place and history. In other areas, cleared trees from the site were milled and repurposed for trim.

On all three floors, bathrooms, copy rooms, and other support spaces are clustered at the off-center core. Private offices face north, while open, flexible office spaces face south. Approximately 140 people currently work in the building and there is room for more. “Within a fairly compact footprint, it doesn’t feel constrained,” says Smith of the private offices, thanks to minimal furniture that can be easily rearranged. Large windows on the northern and southern facades, as well as glazing in the private offices out to the hallways, allow light to penetrate the depth of the building. A window punctuating the westernmost edge of the building shows a view of a gas-fired 400 kW micro-turbine power system that supplies 100 percent of the building’s electricity. Waste heat from the micro-turbines is used for heating and cooling the CGC, and for domestic hot water.

Another important component — just as seamlessly integrated — is the sloping intensive green roof that doubles as egress. It begins on the third floor next to an outdoor patio and continues to ground level. Native grasses, flowers, and shrubs nearly obscure the outline of a walking path. During the tour, Smith and Chin casually pulled out overgrowth while chatting about gardening. Knowing that many green roofs fail because of leaks, the FXFOWLE team conducted comprehensive water testing on the CGC’s roof. Louvers made of locally grown black locust striate the southern facade of the building, adding a weathered aesthetic to the glass and concrete. Smith notes that black locust is one of the hardest woods and is used elsewhere in the park. The louvers mimic a moveable Cumaro wood screen that helps shade the staff dining room.

Chin says she hears repeatedly from occupants and visitors that they love the building. It’s the kind of feedback that the animals in the exhibits she designs can’t give. “These [outdoor] seats are filled in good weather. People bring their laptops out. It’s actually getting used the way we hoped it would,” she says. “I feel like we grew up a little when we came here.”

Architect
FXFOWLE
22 West 19 Street
New York, NY 10011
212-627-1700

Location:
The Bronx Zoo
2300 Southern Boulevard
Bronx, NY 10460

Completion Date: June 2009

Gross square footage:
Building gross floor area: 35,146 square feet
Building footprint area: 15,493 square feet
Total conditioned square footage: 33,000 square feet

Construction cost: $29 million

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/Building_types_study/Office_Buildings/2011/CGC-Bronx.asp

June 12, 2011

Riverside Museum | Zaha Hadid Architects

ZHA aerial_Riverside Museum_pM_1

ZHA aerial_Riverside Museum_pM_2

ZHA aerial_Riverside Museum_pM_3

ZHA aerial_Riverside Museum_pM_4

ZHA aerial_Riverside Museum_pM_5

ZHA_Riverside Museum_pM

ZHA_Glasgow_01Helene Binet_pM

ZHA_Glasgow_05Helene Binet_pM

ZHA_Glasgow_07Helene Binet_pM

ZHA_Glasgow_08Helene Binet_pM

ZHA_Glasgow_09Helene Binet_pM

ZHA_Glasgow_12Helene Binet_pM

ZHA_Glasgow_13Helene Binet_pM

ZHA_Glasgow Riverside_Helene Binet_pM 1

ZHA_Glasgow Riverside_Helene Binet_pM 2

ZHA_Glasgow Riverside_Helene Binet_pM 4

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_South_Night

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_North Facade_001

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Site Plan

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Ground Floor plan

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_First Floor plan

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Elevations

ZAHA_Riverside Museum_pM_Sections

The historical development of the Clyde and the city is a unique legacy; with the site situated where the Kelvin flows into the Clyde the building can flow from the city to the river. In doing so it can symbolise a dynamic relationship where the museum is the voice of both, linking the two sides and allowing the museum to be the transition from one to the other. By doing so the museum places itself in the very context of its origin and encourages connectivity between its exhibits and their wider context.

The building would be a tunnel-like shed, which is open at opposite ends to the city and the Clyde. In doing so it becomes porous to its context on either side. However, the connection from one to the other is where the building diverts to create a journey away from the external context into the world of the exhibits. Here the interior path becomes a mediator between the city and the river which can either be hermetic or porous depending on the exhibition layout. Thus the museum positions itself symbolically and functionally as open and fluid with its engagement of context and content.

Building

The building is conceived as a sectional extrusion open at opposing ends along a diverted linear path. The cross-sectional outline is a responsive gesture to encapsulating a wave or a ‘pleated’ movement. The outer pleats are enclosed to accommodate the support services and black box exhibits. This leaves the main central space to be column-free and open.

Circulation

Circulation is through the main exhibition space. Openings are envisaged in the roof and walls as appropriate. It is perceived that there should be views out of the exhibition space. These would allow the visitors to build up a gradual sense of the external context, moving from exhibit to exhibit. All openings would be solar controlled so that total black out could be achieved when required. At the end, with a view of the Clyde and the Kelvin, is the café and corporate entertainment space. These also allow access and overflow into the open courtyard. The end elevation is like the front elevation with an expansive clear glass façade. It has a large overhang to reduce solar exposure to the building interior. It will allow expansive views up and down the Clyde.

Landscape

The landscape is designed to direct the activities surrounding the building. A ring of varying stones slabs creates a shadow path around the building. On the west side the hard surface progresses to a soft landscape of grass to create an informal open courtyard space. A line of trees will be added alongside the existing ferry quay to reduce the exposure of this area to prevailing winds. Along the south side and the east, shallow water pool features are used to give continuity with the river at quay level.

Project credits / data

Project: Riverside Museum
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Year: 2004 – 2011
Program: Exhibition space, cafe, retail, education
Total Area: 11 000 m²
Exhibition Area: 7000 m²
Site Area: 22,400 m²
Footprint Area: 7,800 m²
Materials: Steel Frame, Corrugated Metal Decking, Zinc Cladding, Glass-reinforced gypsum interior surfaces

Client: Glasgow City Council

Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects | http://www.zaha-hadid.com/
Project Director: Jim Heverin
Project Architect: Johannes Hoffmann
Project Team: Achim Gergen, Agnes Koltay, Alasdair Graham, Andreas Helgesson, Andy Summers, Aris Giorgiadis, Brandon Buck, Christina Beaumont, Chun Chiu, Claudia Wulf, Daniel Baerlaecken, Des Fagan, Electra Mikelides, Elke Presser, Gemma Douglas, Hinki Kwon, Jieun Lee, Johannes Hoffmann, Laymon Thaung, Liat Muller, Lole Mate, Malca Mizrahi, Markus Planteu, Matthias Frei, Michael Mader, Mikel Bennett, Ming Cheong, Naomi Fritz, Rebecca Haines-Gadd, Thomas Hale, Tyen Masten
Competition Team: Malca Mizrahi, Michele Pasca di Magliano, Viviana R. Muscettola, Mariana Ibanez, Larissa Henke

Services: Buro Happold [Glasgow, UK]
Acoustics: Buro Happold [Bath, UK]
Fire Safety: FEDRA, Glasgow
Cost Consultants: Capita Symonds
Project Management: Capita Symonds
Photographers: Helene Binet (construction & roof), Zaha Hadid Architects (aerial view)

+ All images and drawings courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects

http://plusmood.com/2011/05/riverside-museum-zaha-hadid-architects/

here see more pis from archtracker:

ZH-GRM-p

ZH-GRM-2

ZH-GRM-3

ZH-GRM-4

ZH-GRM-5

ZH-GRM-6

ZH-GRM-7

ZH-GRM-8

ZH-GRM-9

ZH-GRM-10

ZH-GRM-11

ZH-GRM-12

ZH-GRM-13

ZH-GRM-14

ZH-GRM-15

http://www.archtracker.com/glasgow-riverside-museum-zaha-hadid/2011/06/

and from architect’s website:

Glasgow, Scotland 
2004–2011


Aerial Photography © Courtesy of Hawkeye Aerial Photography


PROGRAM:

Exhibition space, cafe, retail and education

CLIENT:
Glasgow City Council

AREA:
Total Area: 11000 m²
Exhibition Area: 7000 m²
Site Area: 22400 m²
Footprint Area: 7800 m²

CONCEPT:
The historical development of the Clyde and the city is a unique legacy; with the site situated where the Kelvin flows into the Clyde the building can flow from the city to the river. In doing so it can symbolise a dynamic relationship where the museum is the voice of both, linking the two sides and allowing the museum to be the transition from one to the other. By doing so the museum places itself in the very context of its origin and encourages connectivity between its exhibits and their wider context.

The building would be a tunnel-like shed, which is open at opposite ends to the city and the Clyde. In doing so it becomes porous to its context on either side. However, the connection from one to the other is where the building diverts to create a journey away from the external context into the world of the exhibits. Here the interior path becomes a mediator between the city and the river which can either be hermetic or porous depending on the exhibition layout. Thus the museum positions itself symbolically and functionally as open and fluid with its engagement of context and content.

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, AUGUST 2010:


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, APRIL 2010:


Construction Photography © Zaha Hadid Architects

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, JUNE 2009:


Construction Photography © Zaha Hadid Architects


Aerial Photography © Courtesy of Hawkeye Aerial Photography


Construction Photography © Zaha Hadid Architects

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY, FEB 2009:


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet

COMPUTER RENDERS:


North Aerial View, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects


South Aerial View, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects


North Elevation, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects


Side Elevation, Render © Zaha Hadid Architects

DRAWINGS:


Diagram © Zaha Hadid Architects


Ground Floor, Drawing © Zaha Hadid Architects


Elevations, Drawing © Zaha Hadid Architects


Sections, Drawing © Zaha Hadid Architects

VIDEO:

Video © Zaha Hadid Architects

ARCHITECT:
ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS
PROJECT DIRECTOR: Jim Heverin
PROJECT ARCHITECT: Johannes Hoffmann
PROJECT TEAM: Achim Gergen, Agnes Koltay, Alasdair Graham, Andreas Helgesson, Andy Summers, Aris Giorgiadis, Brandon Buck, Christina Beaumont, Chun Chiu, Claudia Wulf, Daniel Baerlaecken, Des Fagan, Electra Mikelides, Elke Presser, Gemma Douglas, Hinki Kwon, Jieun Lee, Johannes Hoffmann, Laymon Thaung, Liat Muller, Lole Mate, Malca Mizrahi, Markus Planteu, Matthias Frei, Michael Mader, Mikel Bennett, Ming Cheong, Naomi Fritz, Rebecca Haines-Gadd, Thomas Hale, Tyen Masten
COMPETITION TEAM: Malca Mizrahi, Michele Pasca di Magliano, Viviana R. Muscettola, Mariana Ibanez, Larissa Henke

CONSULTANTS:
SERVICES: Buro Happold (Glasgow, UK)
ACOUSTICS: Buro Happold (Bath, UK)
FIRE SAFETY: FEDRA, (Glasgow, UK)
COST/PROJECT MANAGEMENT: Capita Symonds

http://www.zaha-hadid.com/cultural/glasgow-riverside-museum-of-transport

June 12, 2011

Student Residence in Paris | LAN Architecture

Student Residence _LAN_pM 3

Student Residence _LAN_pM 2

Student Residence _LAN_pM 1

Student Residence _LAN_pM 4

Student Residence _LAN_pM 5

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Student Residence _LAN_pM 10

Student Residence _LAN_pM 3D

Student Residence _LAN_pM site plan

Student Residence _LAN_pM ground floor

Student Residence _LAN_pM 5th floor

Student Residence _LAN_pM section

Student Residence _LAN_pM elevation

Student Residence _LAN_pM typical

Student Residence _LAN_pM detail

Student Residence _LAN_pM facade detail

French architects LAN (Local Architecture Network) recently has completed 5 buildings complex of student accommodation located in Paris, 18 Arrondissement.

The driving idea guiding our project stems from the challenge of responding to the necessity for urban integration and creating optimum comfort for the residence’s occupants in a convivial and intimate environment.LAN

images courtesy LAN Architecture | Photo by Julien Lanoo

The context
The project for a student residence was considered in the context of the urban fabric of the La Chapelle district in Paris and its role in its evolution. The plot is on the corner of rue Philippe de Girard and rue Pajol in the 18th arrondissement, close to the ZAC Pajol, an ambitious redevelopment of former railway yards, on which social, cultural and sports amenities are currently being created.

The district is a very heterogeneous mixture of Haussmannian residential buildings, factories and workshops, and therefore has a richness and wide diversity of situations unusual within Paris itself.

The street and the courtyard
The project is composed of several buildings, whose volumes and voids depend on the context. On the street, three six-storey volumes are separated by two rifts providing access to the residence and vertical circulation.

The heights of the buildings at the back of the plot vary according to neighbouring buildings. In the middle, a spacious courtyard is lit by a rift in the south building, an extension of an existing void.

The courtyard, the heart of the project, provides access to the various buildings and defines their interrelationship. A 15 x15 metre square, it ensures sunlight for all the rooms and acts as a kind of green lung.

The materials
The strategy of creating a duality between street and courtyard was pursued in the choice of materials. The facades, instead of imposing a single image on the project, participate in creating the varying atmospheres of the spaces they envelop and delimit.

The buildings on the street are clad in dark, slate-coloured brick, while the buildings around the courtyard are clad with larch planking with folding louvred shutters in front of the windows and balconies. The facade along the entry passage is also clad with larch and announces the feeling of the space within. All the ground and wall surfaces in the courtyard are clad with the same light-coloured, flexible material, normally used for sports areas and playgrounds.

The choice of materials was dictated by technical and architectural concerns. Our research was guided by a desire for durability and the sober, refined and classical nature of our project.

The circulations
Generally speaking, the empty spaces in the courtyard and circulations could be said to be ‘junk space’ in that they are by-products of the design of the buildings. The project’s ambition was to give these spaces so much quality that they create a genuine ‘plus’ for residents. The exterior spaces, interacting with the communal spaces and acting as a buffer between private spaces, are not merely for circulation but provide the conviviality our project seeks to create. As these spaces were not part of the project specifications, their uses can be defined and developed by residents.

The specifications
The brief specified the construction of a student residence of around 150 rooms, communal spaces, administrative premises and a caretaker’s apartment, with RIVP acting as project manager for the CROUS, which will run the residence.

As one enters the residence via the rift on the left, one successively discovers the reception spaces, the administrative premises (on the corner of the street and the passageway), the communal facilities and the study and leisure areas around the courtyard.

The 143 rooms have three different typologies. Students have furnished rooms with an average surface area of 18m², with a bathroom and a kitchen area. The view of the courtyard creates a calm atmosphere conducive to concentration and study. The desks are always located near an outside view in order to benefit from natural lighting. Ten rooms were specially designed for people with reduced mobility.

Energy performance
The project complies with the “Habitat and Environment” label’s VHEP specifications. A combination of compactness, treatment of the envelope, and solar heat coupled with high-performance ventilation and heating (urban heating and solar panels) creates pleasant and comfortable accommodation. The concrete structure, insulated on the outside with 12 cm of mineral wool, brick or wood cladding and highperformance double-glazed fittings, provides efficient thermal insulation.

In winter the buildings retain their interior heat, and in summer their exterior insulation reduces solar and internal overheating, while inertia enables the capture of daytime heat and its retention during the night.

Urban Integration
The site’s strategic position at the junction of several streets in a bustling Paris district channelled our research towards a lively façade providing views into the heart of the block and encouraging appreciation of this inner space.

The two vertical rifts and the ground-floor transparency created by the bicycle park draw attention inwards and define this project emulating traditional buildings in Paris’s former inner suburbs.

Continuity
The project is developed in a double scale perspective: one is the street’s scale and the other is the building courtyard’s one, respectively in a vertical and in an horizontal volumetric system. The urban strategy focalize on contextualising the best the project into the existing landscape, extending the voids of the suburb’s tissue in aim to not make interfering the new construction on the habitual lightening of the neighbourhood.

Transparences
This communal space is related directly to the public space outside by the vertical rifts in the block on the street side. The transparency this creates strengthens the link between the plot’s exterior and interior and attracts attention to the activity in the courtyard.

Circulations
The circulation system is very legible: the four vertical circulations are located at the plot’s four corners. All circulations are lit naturally so that the landings can act as meeting places.

Common spaces
The exterior (common spaces) corridors retain an ambiguity with regards to their usage. They are infact conceived not solely as distributors but rather as collective spaces where social gatherings could occur.

Bricks
The elevation facing the street is cladded with slate colored bricks. The nuance and the texture of the surface, as well as the façade’s composition contribute to the over whole dynamic effect.

Wood
The elevations facing the interior courtyard are cladded with thin vertical wood panels. Same facade treatment continues in front of the openings of the windows, where the grid becomes shutters. Which gives a strong unity to the whole courtyard elevations.

The rooms
Our prime concern in the design of the students’ rooms was to create sunny accommodation that is easy to live in and personalise.

+ Project credits / data

Project: Construction of a 143-room student residence
Project manager: RIVP
Location: 21 rue Pajol and 65 rue Philippe de Girard, Paris 18, France
Budget: 8M € HT
Project area: 3,950 m²
Delivery: February 2011
Team: LAN (architects), Franck Boutté (HEQ consultant), LGX Ingénierie (HVAC, main contractor)
Project leaders: Sebastian Niemann, Venezia Ferret
Photographer: Julien Lanoo

http://plusmood.com/2011/06/student-residence-in-paris-lan-architecture/