Archive for April, 2011

April 23, 2011

The Northwest Maritime Center | Miller Hull Partnership

The mission of the Northwest Maritime Center is to engage and educate people of all generations in traditional and contemporary maritime life, in a spirit of adventure and discovery. As the first LEED™ Gold non-proft waterfront center in Washington State, the new community and education facility was recently completed. The project is divided into two buildings – one housing the educational programs including a boat shop, classrooms, and a replica pilot house. The other building promotes the rich maritime heritage of the community with a chandlery (retail space), small vessel storage, exhibit and information gallery, community meeting rooms, and office spaces for maritime partner organizations. The buildings surround a paved public plaza designed to not only provide a link between the NWMC education pier, jetty, public boardwalk and the buildings, but also house major community events and ensure public shoreline access in perpetuity. A second level balcony connects the two buildings while providing great views to Port Townsend Bay and the Cascade and Olympic mountain ranges.

As an organization committed to promoting and preserving maritime heritage, industry, skills, and culture, one of the primary goals of this project was not only to protect but to actually improve and restore the waters of the Puget Sound. From energy use reduction to habitat restoration and material selection – all aspects of impacts were considered by the client and the design team. A community-based planning process more than 10 years in the making, the design team focused on making sound sustainability-focused planning decisions early that helped ensure that, as technology has evolved, the design has been able to effectively respond and adapt.

http://www.millerhull.com/html/nonresidential/nwmaritime.htm

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

Northwest Maritime Center / Miller Hull © Nic Lehoux

pedestrian context pedestrian context

pier sunlight diagram pier sunlight diagram

site location site location

Architects: Miller Hull Partnership
Location: 
Structural Engineer: Quantum Consulting Engineers
Owner/Developer: Northwest Maritime Center
General Contractor: Primo
Landscape Architect: GGLO
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

As a nonprofit organization committed to promoting and preserving a rich maritime heritage, on-the-water programs, and nurturing the art and craft of wooden boats, the Northwest Maritime Center was designed not only to protect but to actually improve and restore the waters of the Puget Sound. From energy use reduction to habitat restoration and material selection–all aspects of sustainability were considered by the client and the design team.

Located in  the Northwest Maritime Center, truly reflects its surrounding community. The center recently achieved  Certification, and was designed by .  Follow the break to read more about this project, along with additional photographs and drawings.

The site of the Northwest Maritime Center was formerly a bulk oil terminal for over eighty years. To clean up this critical waterfront property on  Bay, more than 2,400 tons of contaminated soil was removed and properly disposed and the old pier that supported barges loaded with oil was removed.

The new pier, the hub of the center’s on-the-water programs, was designed to minimize shadows over prime eelgrass habitat. Construction utilized innovative materials such as reflective panels and grating, and included a voluntary planting of more than 8,000 shoots of new eelgrass to restore fragmented eelgrass beds in the bay. Students and volunteers from the community assisted scientists and divers in the restoration process. Eelgrass plays a vital role in a shoreline’s ecosystem as it is the nursery grounds for many fish and shellfish species. The first water source heat exchanger plates were installed in Puget Sound under the new pier to utilize the temperature of water to efficiently heat and cool the buildings.In a unique public/private partnership, access to the shoreline, the center’s second level walkways, as well as the waterfront boardwalk, were deeded to the city in perpetuity, making the outdoor spaces a gathering place for both visitors and full-time residents of . In addition, the maritime center partnered with the city in a pilot project for development of a low impact development (LID) pedestrian streetscape. This included the installation of raingardens to control and treat stormwater due to the proximity of Puget Sound. The center also worked with the city to establish the first Transportation Demand Management Plan in the city to reduce vehicle trips and parking congestion, and provide ample bike storage and outlets for electric cars.Other energy use reduction strategies included abundant natural daylight and ventilation achieved through operable clerestory windows running the length of the buildings which minimized the need for artificial lighting. Furthermore, 100 percent of the center’s power derived from Puget Sound Energy is from the utility company’s “green power” program, thereby reducing the center’s energy load on the city’s power grid. One element that was not installed due to funding constraints was a solar system to reduce electrical usage. However, the center is primed and wired for solar panels to be installed on the roof if funding becomes available at a future date.“A community-based planning process more than 10 years in the making, we ensured the Northwest Maritime Center’s two buildings were compatible with the other historic structures in’s National Landmark Historic District,” said Craig Curtis, partner at Miller Hull and the lead designer of the project. “The two buildings, constructed of over 60% of FSC certified wood, occupy a prime location at the end of Water Street, at the transition between the old brick buildings of the late 1890’s and the adjacent Coast Guard clapboard buildings at the Point Hudson Marina, which were constructed in the 1930′s.”A move toward  certification was conducted at the later stages of the design process. “The intent was always to build a sustainable building,” said Curtis. “However, a donor learned that the project would easily qualify as a certified building under the LEED program.” The Martin/Fabert Foundation stepped forward to support the campaign’s additional costs to incorporate other sustainable elements that would help it achieve  certification

“Every sustainable project needs a champion and given the center’s mission, sustainability goals, and prime location on Puget Sound, it was a wise investment on our part,” said Lisa Martin. “We strongly believe that a sustainable building is key to ensuring the health of the center and its programs for future generations.”The  specializes in award-winning design for public works buildings that actively engage their communities. Miller Hull’s built work spans a wide range of project types such as interpretive, community and nature centers, museums, city halls and public administration buildings, libraries, schools, higher education facilities, mixed use buildings, laboratories, corporate offices, condominiums and small residences. The  is the recipient of the National Firm Award from the American Institute of Architects.

http://www.archdaily.com/95326/northwest-maritime-center-miller-hull-partnership/

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April 23, 2011

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center | Miller Hull Partnership

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center / Miller Hull Partnership © Nic Lehoux

plans plans

diagram diagram

diagram diagram

sun sections sun sections

The LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center designed by the Miller Hull Partnership is a  certified wastewater treatment plant and recently named a COTE 2011 Top Ten Green Project.

The design challenge for the project included renovating the existing administrative and laboratory building, and the creation of a new four-story Regional Services Center to house administrative offices, an emergency operations center, and boardroom, and an education center with interpretive exhibits and a classroom.

Architects: Miller Hull Partnership
Location: 
Landscape Architects: Murase Associates
Renderings: 
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

“The new facility is a tangible example of the sustainable principles that guide the LOTT organization and fuel their efficient operations and education programs,” said Scott Wolf, partner at Miller Hull.

While most wastewater treatment plants around the country are separated from their communities by a chain link fence, LOTT actively engages the public. Class A reclaimed water, produced at the treatment plant, is water that has been used and then cleaned to high quality standards so it can be returned to the community for irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial and manufacturing, and many other uses.  Benefits include wastewater and water supply management, and environmental enhancement such as using reclaimed water for wetlands restoration or streamflow augmentation.

The reclaimed water for LOTT’s new facility is used for a pond surrounding the center, for irrigating the grounds and the building’s green roof, and for toilet flushing inside the building.

Designed with a contemporary, industrial aesthetic, the building is meant to complement its surroundings, while the structure’s height acts like an iconic symbol for the neighborhood. The facility is coordinated with other projects planned in the area, including a new Hands on Children’s Museum—also designed by Miller Hull—currently under construction, and the East Bay Public Plaza.

“This new building portrays all the good things about community stewardship,” said Robert Hull, one of the founding partners of Miller Hull. “It’s no longer just a sewage treatment plant. It becomes the new public face of LOTT in the community.”

A water fountain sculpture resembling a large cup pours reclaimed water into the pond and creates a visual and audible signal to the public, symbolically returning the treated reclaimed water to the community for reuse. The water in the pond moves slowly around the front of the building to the east. The edges of the pond are lined with plants, and a smaller pond within the larger water feature supports water lilies. The pond’s water is recycled, requiring minimal make-up water to sustain the pond. Two walkways were constructed over the pond leading people to the building entrances.

Other sustainable elements of the project include reused timbers from a port warehouse that was demolished near the site. The energy use for the project is 50 percent less than of a typical building resulting in significant cost savings over its lifetime. Natural light in the office spaces reduces or eliminates the need for artificial lighting during most of the day. Lastly, external louvers control sunlight and minimize solar gain which further reduces the need for air conditioning.

http://www.archdaily.com/128516/lott-clean-water-alliance-regional-services-center-miller-hull-partnership/

April 23, 2011

Chris Bangle | BMW DESIGN CHIEF 1992-2009

http://www.chrisbangleassociates.com/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTYiEkQYhWY&feature=related

April 23, 2011

Saab PhoeniX Concept | Jason Castriota

http://newsroom.saab.com/news/news/saabphoenixconceptthefutureisalreadyhere.5.741c75ab12da7f448807ffe685.html

http://jasoncastriotadesigns.com/

April 20, 2011

Veer Towers | Murphy/Jahn

“The use of color, the relative lean of the buildings and the exquisitely detailed façade give these towers a powerful dynamism.” – Antony Wood, CTBUH 2010 Awards Juror, CTBUH

Location
Las Vegas, USA
Completion
2010
Height
137 m (449 ft)
Stories
37
Primary Use
Residential

Owner/Developer

MGM Mirage Design Group
Architect
Murphy/Jahn
Associate Architect
Adamson Associates
Structural Engineer

Halcrow Yolles
MEP Engineer 
WSP Flack + Kurtz
Contractor
Perini Corporation
Tishman Construction

Veer Towers takes on the challenge of building a sustainable, all glass tower in the desert environment of Las Vegas through its exquisitely detailed facades. The highly practical solution of protecting the facades with a series of horizontal louvers is executed in such a way that it adds vibrancy and interest to the buildings and, when combined with the use of colored glass and the countering leaning of each tower, creates a playful and dynamic addition to the city.

Planning
Part of the CityCenter complex in Las Vegas, Veer Towers attempt to blur the boundaries between the public and private realm while maintaining a delicate balance between becoming an integral part of the city and also giving the buildings and space a unique and iconic character. Active and vibrant at all times, Veer Towers builds on the values of the traditional city combined with emblematic spaces and structures to create a new urban typology. In approaching the design of the towers, the context was viewed not as a historical background to build upon but rather the framework to establish a new order and create an icon.

The underlying design and planning strategy was to regenerate Las Vegas through a new symbol at its core, just like the Guggenheim did in Bilbao; the Pompidou did in Paris, or the SONY Center in Berlin.

Figure 1. Entry at night

The manifesto for the project was to exhibit urban responsibility, pay attention to the building’s performance in terms of function and systems, use advanced and available technology, accept the aesthetic of construction and elevate it to a level of art, be sensible towards energy and ecology through the use of natural resources like daylight and fresh air combined with minimal technical equipment and maximization of user comfort.

The Veer Towers lean at 5 degrees in opposite directions. The residential uses float above the Retail and the 80′ tall lobbies which allow the buildings to appear both robust and delicate. There is no reflective glass, Veer will be the First truly transparent building in Las Vegas; given the context, that alone represents a great technological and even cultural challenge.  Staggered panels of clear and fritted yellow glass animate the facades and give the complex a welcome shot of color while horizontal louvers give shade from the desert sun.

Structure
The load-bearing structure is a simple and repetitive system with a Z-shaped central core. The cores of both towers are strategically positioned on each building footprint in order to minimize gravity overturning effects, and they continue vertically up the entire building height. While all interior columns rise straight vertically, the tower columns on the north and south building elevations are inclined to follow the lean of the towers.

The south façade of the main building lobbies are expressed with slender 48” and 54” diameter concrete columns free standing for over 80’ in height and inclined to articulate the lean of the towers. Due to space constraints and the requirement to maximize usable lobby space by minimizing column dimensions, composite column construction was utilized.

The architectural design of the main lobby for the Veer Towers required a unique solution to the heating, cooling and ventilation due to the distinctive nature of these spaces. Each lobby is a multi-level space with a large expanse of glass on the south façade. The glass façade is almost 80ft in height and provides large quantities of natural light to the lobby and large solar heat gains and heat losses in winter. After studying the space loads and using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis it was determined that the best solution for conditioning the space efficiently was a radiant floor system using chilled and heating water with displacement ventilation providing the required outside air ventilation and supplemental cooling/heating. A radiant cooling surface allows the space temperature to be higher than traditional all-air design solutions reducing energy consumption while maintaining occupant comfort.

Figure 2. Sections. Each tower leans 5 degrees in opposite directions.

Heating and cooling of the apartments, meanwhile, is provided by vertical fan coil units. The use of natural air and light is maximized throughout the building. Horizontal sun screen blades provide shading on the east, south and west facades and reduce the energy consumption while minimizing the technical equipment requirements and maximizing occupant comfort.

The façade of Veer is perhaps the most visible sustainable element. The extensive use of High performance Low-E coating glazing maximizes the introduction of day lighting and views to the outside which, in conjunction with the use of exterior shades and a 57% ceramic frit in 50% of the building’s envelope, provide all the shading to control and reduce the solar loads. Although the fixed shading devices and high performance glass control the solar heat gain, they were not sufficient on their own to meet the project goal to exceed ASHRAE 90.1-1999 by 20%.

Figure 3. Facade detail

Other energy efficient strategies, such as  high efficiency central plant and cogeneration systems combined with high performance envelope were implemented within the Veer Towers and the wider City Center campus to achieve a building that exceeds ASHRAE 90.1-1999 by 37.6%.

The use of construction waste management techniques, materials locally or regionally produced and manufactured, recycled materials and wood certified products, result in a significant reduction in environmental impact. Storm water filtration systems controlled flow drainage and the use of storm water for irrigation and grey water systems contribute to water conservation, save utility charges and reduce impact on natural resources. In 2009, as a key component to City Center, Veer received LEED Gold certification by the USGBC.

Conclusion
Responsible uses of appropriate technologies provided an expressive means to realize this project in a sustainable way. The design solution strives for simplicity and dynamism, reinforcing the iconic character of the whole complex. City Center is in fact generating “tissue” to develop true city fabric. Veer Towers is urbanistically significant, formally simple and elegant, technologically advanced and environmentally responsible.

Figure 4. Tower base

http://ctbuh.org/TallBuildings/FeaturedTallBuildings/VeerTowersLasVegas/tabid/2177/language/en-US/Default.aspx

April 16, 2011

Why GAP matters for architects!

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

section 02 section 02

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Marcel Lam

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Rocco Design Architects

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Rocco Design Architects

Guangdong Museum | Rocco Design Architects

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Marcel Lam

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Marcel Lam

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Marcel Lam

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Almond Chu

Guangdong Museum / Rocco Design Architects © Rocco Design Architects

plan 01 plan 01

plan 02 plan 02

plan 03 plan 03

plan 04 plan 04

plan 05 plan 05

Architects: Rocco Design Architects
Location: 
Design Team: Rocco Yim, William Tam, C. M. Chan, Derrick Tsang, Christopher Wong, Ricky Wang, Lucia Cheung, Grace Lin, Ivan Chui, Christina Chan, Amber Wang
Project area: 41,000 sqm
Project year: 2004 – 2010
Photographs: Almond ChuMarcel Lam

The Guangdong Museum is one of four major cultural landmark buildings for the new financial hub in Zhujiang Xincheng (Pearl River New Town) of  Ltd. was announced winner of an international invited competition in May 2004 and was subsequently appointed as design architect of the project. The five-storey museum has a total floor area of approximately 67,000 square metres.

Conceived as an Objet d’Art at a monumental scale, an allegory to the impeccably and intricately sculpted antique Chinese artefact, such as a lacquer box, an ivory ball, a jade bowl or a bronze tank, which collects and reflects treasures of the times. The new museum is not only designed to house a great variety of fascinating objects of treasure, it is also in itself designed as a treasured object of great fascination that contemplates to become an identifiable cultural icon, giving the visitors a memorable tour and experience of the local provincial history and traditional wisdom as well as contributing to the appreciation and enhancement of cultural identity of the city.

The Museum’s spatial arrangement takes its inspiration from the legendary concentric ivory balls carving. Each carving slices through the box and reveals different layers and varying degrees of tranparency within the interiors, forming interesting spatial patterns and luring visitors through its exhibits inside. The interweaving of interior space pockets also reveal the intricate relationship between the visual and physical connections and separation of the atrium corridor, the individual exhibition halls and the back-of-house service areas. This deliberate arrangement not only reinforces the clarity and coherance of the treasure-box concept, but also allow flexibility in planning and operation of all the exhibition spaces. In addition, each of the main exhitbition halls are punctured with random alcoves of dynamic spatial geometry. Filled with natural light and served as visual breakouts to the outside, they are also transitions between the exhibition halls which offer visitors initmate and well-balanced resting spaces.

The overall treatment of the main façade is also based on the analogy of ivory ball. Using materials such as  panels, fritted glass and GRC panels, each elevation is uniquely designed with different geometric voids recessed into the building mass. In order to achieve a smooth transition between the museum and the adjoining landscape, an undulating landscape deck is introduced underneath the elevated museum box, metaphorically symbolizing a silk cloth unwrapping a much treasured piece of artwork.

http://www.archdaily.com/127122/guangdong-museum-rocco-design-architects/

April 16, 2011

A Room Over the Sea | Studio Zero85

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

A Room Over The Sea / Studio Zero85 © Sergio Camplone

plan plan

elevation elevation

http://www.archdaily.com/126209/a-room-over-the-sea-studio-zero85/

April 16, 2011

Chase Manhattan Plaza | SOM

LA p163 detail | © SOM

P150 SOM | Erich Locker

P152 SOM | Ezra Stoller © Esto

P155 SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P156 SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P161 SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P160 SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P159B SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P159A SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P158B SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P158A SOM | © Alexandre Georges

P157 SOM | © George Zimbel

LA p162 elevation | © SOM

LA p161 plan | © SOM

P151&7 SOM | Erich Locker

Known for their innovation and economy in design, SOMs Chase  Plaza in the Financial District of Lower  displays SOMs architectural language on efficiency and its relationship with the public realm.  Completed in 1961, the 60 story skyscraper by Gordon Bunshaft of  is a coming of age story for Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill presence as an [inter]national leader of corporate architectural design that evokes efficiency and functionality.

Situated on Liberty Street, the Chase  building bridges two commercial properties between Nassau Street and Williams Street in Lower .  Rising 813 feet above the bustling streets of , the building is an exemplary project on efficiency where the slender tower only occupies 30% of the 2.5 acre site.  In effect creating one of the largest privately owned public spaces in  that are intended to create an oasis to relieve the congestion and density within the city.

Following in the footsteps of many prolific architects that have designed buildings for ’s dense urban fabric,  places the public space as a high priority in the design of the building just as Mies van der Rohe and Raymond Hood had done previously.

By allocating the majority of the allowable space to the public realm, the building is not solely become restricted to such tight constraints, rather the proportion of built to unbuilt space gives the Chase  building an iconic presence at the heart of the Financial District that becomes a central focal point for commerce and recreational activities to converge in one location.

The design of the Chase  building is relatively straightforward – slender tower with a repeated typical floor plan that optimizes efficiency and functionality on every level that allows for a completely flexible interior.

Echoing on the Inland  Building by Bruce Graham and Walter Netsch from SOMs Chicago office, the Chase  skyscraper places the columns on the exterior of the building while situating the core offset from the center to designate areas of spatial efficiency and flexibility. The offset core allows for offices to be placed on the northern part of the building while the south side of the building can be designed for flexible desk use and more collective gathering/work spaces.

The entire project over exaggerates efficiency and flexibility required for modern business in 20thCentury corporate America.

In terms of materiality, the Chase  building employed the most readily available and economic materials that were present at the time of construction.  The building is clad in anodized along with a  and  façade system.  The building was telling of how the International Style was creeping into American architecture.

The Chase  building is one of many examples from  that began to show the firms presence in modernism in corporate America where economy does not solely relate to a monetary value, but a temporal value where time is the ultimate factor in efficiency, flexibility, and corporate prosperity.

Architect: SOM

Team: J. Walter Severinghaus, Gordon Bunshaft, Alan Labie, Roy Allen, Jacques Guiton
Location:  City, 
Photographs: © 
References: SOM

http://www.archdaily.com/127371/ad-classics-chase-manhattan-plaza-som/

April 16, 2011

National Museum of American Jewish History | Ennead Architects

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

National Museum Of American Jewish History / Ennead Architects © Halkin Photography LLC

drawings 01 drawings 01

drawings 02 drawings 02

drawings 01 drawings 01

Architects: Ennead Architects
Location: , PA, 
Design Principal: James Polshek
Management Partner: Joseph Fleischer
Senior Designer: Robert Young
Project Manager: Joshua Frankel
Project Architect for Construction: John Lowery
Project Team: Aran Coakley, Matthew Dionne, Erkan Emre, Mazie Huh, Aileen Iverson, Dean Kim, John Lowery, Craig McIlhenny, Maura Rogers and Jordan Yamada
Project area: 100,000 sqf
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Halkin Photography LLC

The most recent addition to the iconic buildings of Independence Mall in  is one dedicated to illustrating the American Jewish experience. The National Museum of American Jewish History (NMAJH) designed by  opened in November 2010. Adjacent to Independence Mall, the museum overlooks such attractions as Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell and the National Constitution Center. Built at a cost of $150 million by  construction management firm Intech Construction, the five-story, 100,000-square-foot space includes 25,000 square feet of exhibit space, an 85-foot-tall atrium and a 200-seat theater. The terra cotta and glass building is topped out with a beacon of light meant to symbolize themes of faith and patriotism.

The striking exterior of the museum reflects a trend in cultural centers to incorporate warm, natural materials with high performance facades. The sole aesthetic elements of the NMAJH are accomplished with glass curtain wall and terra cotta rainscreen by Shildan Inc. While limiting the number of materials used creates an air of simplicity, the sophistication of the design is anything but.

An intricately designed “box” clad with 15,000 square feet of terra cotta appears suspended within the glass curtain wall. This geometric figure is softened with rounded edges and corners. Curved baguettes interwoven with a scalloped design, a pattern custom-developed by Shildan, run the length of the surface. Terra cotta baguettes serve as sunscreens, shading the windows from the glare of the Market and Fifth Street elevations.

The modern aesthetics harmonize with the surrounding brick of old city . The terra cotta’s natural burnt red hues blend with the historic structures of the Mall while the glass curtain wall signifies transparency and openness between the museum and visitors to the Mall. Guests standing between the terra cotta and the glass curtain wall are offered a panoramic view of some of the most important buildings in American history.The building envelope provides additional benefits ideal for the preservation of artifacts and for creating an energy-efficient public space. Developed in Europe in the last half of the twentieth century, Shildan’s terra cotta back-ventilated and pressure-equalized rainscreen system is emerging as the system of choice for meeting the International Building Code and ASHRAE 90.1 building performance requirements.U.S. construction has traditionally used either a masonry back-up wall or steel studs faced with exterior sheathing. A metal support system is attached to that substructure and the exterior material is then clad to the support system. To prevent air and water from entering the building, the exterior material is caulked with sealant. The major drawback is that high winds and HVAC can create pressure differential between the exterior and interior wall. This can suck water into the wall cavity when it is raining or humid. Sealed buildings cannot equalize this pressure so moisture becomes trapped creating a short-lived wall and the possibility of mold and mildew.

http://www.archdaily.com/126333/national-museum-of-american-jewish-history-ennead-architects/

April 10, 2011

MyZeil Shopping Centre in Frankfurt on the Main | Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

In its dimensions and in what it has to offer, the new mall »My Zeil« exceeds anything one has seen in Germany hitherto. What’s more, the expressive architecture matches the things on offer. In a spectacular, expressive manner, the facade curves conically inwards. Only when viewed from the front, however, does the tapering funnel reveal its true form, namely an opening through the entire building that allows a view of the sky to the rear. These grand gestures are continued internally. Another horn-shaped glazed funnel extends down from the roof through four storeys to the entrance level. It not only serves to bring natural lighting into the depths of the building; it also froms part of the load-bearing structure, which is in the form of a freely shaped lattice shell.

Architects: Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas, Rome

Concept/Editing: Andreas Christoph Schmidt
Camera: Holger Schüppel, Schmidt & Paetzel Fernsehfilme GmbH by order of the Goethe-Institut, 2010