Archive for April 30th, 2011

April 30, 2011

Hoogambacht | Locus Architecten

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

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Architects: Locus Architecten (previously Hendriks Schulten Architecten) – Gert-Jan Hendriks, Ted Schulten
Location: 
Project area: 8,700 sqm
Project year: 2003 – 2010
Photographs: Kees Hummel

Hoogambacht forms a powerful combination of living in the park and shopping centre of the neighborhood. A sturdy urban building block with the tower as a landmark. The apartments above the shops benefit from the peaceful green courts.

In between HI Ambacht and Zwijndrecht you can find the new district De Volgerlanden, with an oval-shaped park in the centre. The shopping centre is part of the border of this park. The building has its own character, with the tower as a landmark for the neighborhood. The building houses 6800 m2 of retail, a parking garage for 536 cars and 147 apartments.

Above the commercial ground Floor, the dwellings are situated in a S-shaped volume, meandering around the two green courts. The courts each open up to a different side, one orientated towards the park and the other facing the residential street on the northern side of the block. In this way as many dwellings as possible have a view at the park.

The volume reacts to the varies borders. The front side faces the park and had the greatest height. Towards the northern end the height declines, to adjust to the scale of the opposing dwellings. Here the building had a smaller scale, more green and open. The building is one architectonical composition of big and small elements and components, build in cheerful red brickwork.

http://www.archdaily.com/130241/hoogambacht-hendriks-schulten-architecten/

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April 30, 2011

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College | Ennead Architects

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Aislinn Weidele/Ennead Architects

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Located at the east entrance to the  campus, the new Gateway Center is emblematic of the College’s commitment to a more accessible education for residents of Westchester County and to an American college experience for the many recent immigrants seeking to improve the quality of their lives. Its design was inspired by this vision, and the building is intended as a physical embodiment of the word gateway: an entrance or means of access. Sited to take advantage of the natural beauty of the campus landscape, the Gateway Center is a threshold to the College and an initial expression of campus identity. Building and site are unified to form a sustainable daylit environment. Combining references to the campus’ architectural legacy and state-of-the-art technology, the building creates a unique educational crossroads and a defining center for campus life.

Architect: Ennead Architects
Location: Westchester Community College, 
Project Team: Susan Rodriguez FAIA (Design Partner), Timothy Hartung FAIA (Management Partner), Joanne Sliker AIA (Project Manager), John Zimmer AIA (Project Architect/Design), Patrick Golden AIA (Project Architect/Construction), Harry Park, Craig McIllhenny AIA, Mimi Madigan, Paul Keene AIA, Charles Brainerd AIA, Maura Rogers, Kyo-Youn Jin, Yekta Pakdaman-Hamedani, Mathew Bissen AIA, Saem Oh, Charmian Place, Joerg Kiesow, Dan Stube AIA
Structural Engineer: Leslie E. Robertson Associates
MEP Engineer: Thomas Polise Consulting Engineer
Landscape Architect: Towers | Golde
Lighting: Susan Brady Lighting Design
Graphics: H Plus Incorporated
Acoustics / AV / Telecom: Cerami & Associates
Geotechnical/Civil: Langan Engineering & Environmental Services
Construction Manager: STV
Project Area: 70,000 sqf
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Jeff Goldberg/Esto, Aislinn Weidele/

Two academic wings embrace a landscaped courtyard and are connected by a multi-story transparent glass gateway pavilion that serves as the lobby and welcome center. The composition is punctuated by an illuminated tower at the southeast corner of the site. In response to greater student diversity, the program includes spaces for the international student community to support their transition to American culture. Likewise a growing demand for professional training from area businesses sponsored the inclusion of spaces to provide business instruction to the local workforce. The building’s Gateway Pavilion houses the Welcome Center and International Student Office and is the main public interface for visitors to the building and the campus overall. In addition, a number of general use classrooms accommodates the increasing enrollment at the College. The remaining components of the program include shared gathering and assembly spaces intended to foster communication among the building’s users.

The two-story structure to the south houses the language program, general classrooms and faculty offices. The three-story structure to the north houses general classrooms and faculty offices of the business and fashion program. The Gateway unifies the two wings of the building.

Building materials were selected both to integrate with the existing fabric of the campus and to distinguish a new signature building for the College. Fieldstone is used at the base of the building to connect with the historic buildings on campus, while offices and classrooms, cantilevered over a base of structurally glazed walls, are clad in zinc. The atrium is wrapped in an aluminum and glass curtain wall assembly supported by a modular system of exposed structural steel elements, which results in a column-free space and a daylit and transparent environment. The custom-designed brise soleil on the Gateway Center’s south-facing courtyard facade allows building inhabitants undisrupted views of the campus and beyond while optimizing natural daylight and limiting glare.

Sustainable design principles informed the design from the overall siting and massing strategy to the integration of energy-efficient systems and the detail development and selection of materials. The building has achieved  Certification. Sustainable highlights include: minimizing site disruption through integrating the building into the natural topography and preserving existing trees on site; maintaining a vegetated open space around the building to reduce stormwater run-off and heat island effect while providing natural habitat for flora and fauna and a stormwater system that captures and treats runoff in four bio-retention basins before discharging it to the campus-wide stormwater system. Additionally, water efficiency is achieved through the use of native and adaptive plant species, eliminating the need for irrigation. Within the building, low-flow fixtures save at least 30% over conventional plumbing fixtures, a savings of over 95,000 gallons of water each year.

The building’s solar orientation and exterior fenestration enhance daylight within the building. Operable windows throughout contribute to the indoor air quality. A high performance exterior envelope mitigates heat gain and reduces energy consumption with custom-designed sun screens on the south façade of the north wing and Low E glazing throughout. Locally quarried stone is a featured material of the building. High performance mechanical systems, lighting controls and glazing will save over 30% of fossil fuel and electricity consumption annually. Waste management during construction achieved a 90% recycling rate. A carbon dioxide monitoring system provides feedback on the ventilation system. Access to public transportation is adjacent to the site. A comprehensive building signage program will educate occupants and focus on features described above that have been incorporated into the project.

http://www.archdaily.com/131156/the-gateway-center-westchester-community-college-ennead-architects/

April 30, 2011

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais | Hugo Kaici & Felix de Montesquiou

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

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Architects: Hugo Kaici & Felix de Montesquiou
Location: 
Photographs: Courtesy of  & 

The city of , located at only 42km of the British coast, is the hottest spot of illegal migration in. When Sarkozy closed the Sangatte immigrant center a year ago, we decided to react on the subject, in a very ironical and cynical way. This is when we decided to design an illegal immigration base.

As we always wanted to work on the German bunkers on the French coast, we decided to reverse the idea of the Atlantik Wall, built to prevent the allies army from getting in, to facilitate the migration of those wanting to reach England.

This idea is reinforced by the fact that the site we choose was one of the most fortified by the Germans.This is why the infrastructure is disguised as a abandoned bunker.

Our company, NEMO (for Northern Europe Migrants Organisation) is meant to undertake the business of illegal immigration from the Kurdish mafia, monopolizing the sector in a very brutal and inhuman way.

The architecture is minimal, the services provided in the infrastructure are only those we thought essential to a migrant in transit. But at the same time we tried to incorporate details to humanize this very brutal building

We wanted to play with the confusion between the true and the false; although the idea is totally mad and unrealistic, we tried to stage the project into reality. We used photo realistic renders, and  an ultra commercial approach.

And we went even as far as depositing a building permit (that was immediately thrown back to our faces). This is why the program is at the same time minimal ( absolutely no superficial function) and grandiose (monumental structure in the cliffs of the North of 

In our very realistic / cynical / commercial approach, we simulated a business plan for this illegal company, and created a website to advertise the infrastructure, and to book your illegal immigration ticket.

http://www.archdaily.com/131101/illegal-immigration-base-in-calais-hugo-kaici-felix-de-montesquiou/

April 30, 2011

NBHW Fire Station | LIAG Architects

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

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Architects: LIAG Architects
Location: 
Project area: 11,815 sqm
Project year: 2006 – 2010
Photographs: Bernard Faber

The building is characterised by a complex structure, partly the result of the necessary close proximity of the fireman’s rooms to the depot in a volume that must conform to stringent town planning conditions.

A design was chosen that runs from its abutment with the council offices up towards the railway tracks, rising to a height of about 20 metres, thereby accentuating the entrance to the city centre. The highest point of the design is removed as far as possible from the council offices. The council wished for a high point marking the entrance to the city of .

There is parking on the roof, out of sight of the ground floor. The visible strong slanting line on the front and back of the building forms the access ramp for the parking.

Energy Neutral Building

LIAG and the municipality of  joined forces in an ambitious plan for a sustainable and energy efficient building. The municipality of  has the policy that all its buildings must perform 20% better than the applicable legal norms.

Aside from a balanced choice in materials with attention for environmental impact in manufacturing and recycling, use has been made of building elements that due to their size and detail can easily be reused and fit within the vision of ‘Cradle-to-Cradle’ building. In this way all the windows of the offices are one size and a high degree of repetition of elements has been chosen in the façade. Many of these elements can easily be reused at the end of their current useful life-cycle.

Use is made of underground thermal energy storage (UTES) to achieve a pleasant and comfortable indoor climate using a minimum of energy. In order to further utilize this system the parking deck is used as a solar collector. Water hoses will be built into the parking deck to pump water heated by the sun into the ground so that cold water can be pumped up to be used to cool in summer, and warm during winter, the building of 8,500 m2 gfa and the adjoining council offices of 12,500 m2 gfa. This system means that a new boiler is not required for the 8,500 m2 of additional functions. All energy required by the fire station and the Brijder care centre for addicts will come from the UTES installation. Additionally the UTES system can be used to keep the parking deck ice-free in winter.

This building design actually works as an energy/climate plant with general functions for the municipality of .

http://www.archdaily.com/131644/nbhw-fire-station-liag-architects/

April 30, 2011

The Ice Cubes | Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

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Architects: Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects
Location: 
Design Team: Jun Mitsui, Yukinobu Nakano, Kentaro Hayashi, Jim Lambiasi, Kazumasa Toku, Naoko Morimoto, Shigeki Irie, Ei Ishiyama
Project area: 3,060 sqm
Project year: 2006 – 2008
Photographs: Naoomi Kurozumi

This project was commissioned by a Hong Kong-based developer for whom we previously designed two high-end retail projects (in Akasaka and Omotesando). The site constraints, including sky-openess factor (tenku-ritsu) and sun/shadow requirements were very restrictive. Careful calculations were done to arrive at the best balance of forms while satisfying the regulations and achieving the maximum FAR. By developing the formal strategy as a series of interlocking cubes, we were able to massage the complicated building envelop shape into a dynamic composition.

This strategy solved not only the complex building form but also gave the freedom of adjusting the forms according to the additional building programs and structural considerations.

An important design requirement was for the cubes to appear feather light and thin. We performed careful studies to make the structure and insulation look as thin as possible. The cube surfaces are covered with a baked ceramic frit pattern on the outer-most surface of the glazing. By doing so, a pure-white cube expression can be achieved. Had the frit been applied on an inner surface, the color of the cubes would have been greenish due to the green tint of the glass. All necessary technical studies for maintenance and durability of the outer-most surface frit pattern were resolved with the manufacturer who was then able to provide a ten year warranty.

The resulting image is silky and feathery which attracted the main tenant H&M, a Swedish apparel company who values the high-impact design.

http://www.archdaily.com/130781/the-ice-cubes-jun-mitsui-associates-architects/

April 30, 2011

De Beers Ginza Building | Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

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Architects: Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects
Location: 
Design Team: Jun Mitsui, Jim Lambiasi, Kazumasa Toku
Project area: 4,022 sqm
Project year: 2005 – 2008
Photographs: Naoomi Kurozumi

Ginza is one of the most famous commercial districts even in the world. Marronnier Street is a gracious, active street lined with creatively designed buildings. The DE BEERS Ginza Building design is intended to reflect the sophisticated Ginza streetscape and fit appropriately into this dynamic context.

In the process of the design, the first image that came to mind was a twisting form of light in motion. A ribbon of light coming out of the earth sparkles in the atmosphere as an aurora with ever-changing color and form. The DE BEERS Ginza building representing gracious light like aurora was felt most appropriate for the site.

The fluid and flexible form of the building was also inspired by the beauty of the female outline. The sparkling light on the surface of the gently curved form of the building subtly suggests the shimmering reflection of diamond. This was the aesthetic essence of the DE BEERS Ginza building design.

The expression of the curtain wall varies continuously as it ascends and as it reflects the ever-changing appearance of the sky. The exterior surface of the building reflects the sunlight and Ginza city lights in a subtle way and the impression of the façade as time passes. On the exterior of the building, specially-finished stainless steel pipes are horizontally laid-out creating sparkles of light throughout the surface of the building.

Throughout history, the Ginza district has been an incubator for design trends reflecting the changing times. I hope that the DE BEERS Ginza building becomes an integral part of Ginza history. Its design is intended to reflect the excitement and importance of Ginza’s ever-changing appearance.

http://www.archdaily.com/130799/de-beers-ginza-building-jun-mitsui-associates-architects/