Archive for April 9th, 2011

April 9, 2011

Herzog de Meuron’s Triangle Tower Design Raises Eyebrows in Paris

Herzog de Meuron's Triangle Tower Design Raises Eyebrows in Paris © Herzog de Meuron

Herzog de Meuron's Triangle Tower Design Raises Eyebrows in Paris © Herzog de Meuron

The 590ft (180m) proposed  design labeled ‘Triangle Tower’, has been in the spotlight over recent weeks after the cross-party council approved the tower’s protocol agreement. Opposing the recent approval, Green party members are eager to share their thoughts commenting that the “colossal” project is “yet another office block” according to party member Yves Contassot.

The controversy over the 40-story steel and glass building surely was anticipated; the French capital has had a 30+ year drought of buildings over 121ft. In 1977 a ban was put into place, shortly after the completion of the 689ft Tour Montparnasse, because Parisians feared that the city center would lose its existing urban fabric to skyscrapers similar to the Montparnasse.

To most Parisians the Montparnasse’s over exaggerated proportions and lack of character have left an uneasy feeling for future skyscraper development. Many citizens are not opposed to high-rise development, such as Olivier de Rohan Chabot member of Safeguard of French Art, however he has concerns, “Look at the Montparnasse Tower; it has crushed the hotel des Invalides (housing Napoleon’s tomb). The monument was built to be grandiose. But what has it become? A dwarf. The tower ridicules it. In this sense, it’s a veritable attack on the beauty of the capital” (as stated Le Figaro newspaper).

To put the project a bit more into context, the location for ‘Triangle Tower’ is near the Porte de Versailles which is home to an expansive exhibition centre.  The Eiffel Tower at 1,072ft still will dominate the  skyline and has 482ft on the proposed ’s ‘Triangle Tower’. Also to take into consideration are the buildings currently under construction in the business district of La Défense, west of the capital, some of Europe’s highest skyscrapers (Lighthouse, Signal and Hermitage Plaza towers).

Architects  were commissioned for the project which plans on utilizing both wind and solar power to generate energy. Its shape would “limit the shadow on neighbours” stated Jacques Herzog co-architect, continuing, “one mustn’t think of it as a tower. It’s more like a topography a vertical city.”

The Mayor of , Bertrand Delanoë, is strongly backing the project which is in his opinion “emblematic of ’ aura and dynamism”.  Anticipated to create 5,000 jobs according to local officials, the mixed-use ‘Triangle Tower’ will combine street level shopping with offices, a conference hall, and panoramic restaurant above.

If the ‘Triangle Tower’ is able to make it through all of the red-tape it will face it will require an estimated 535m euros and will have a tentative completion date of 2017.

Source: The Telegraph

http://www.archdaily.com/125099/herzog-de-meurons-triangle-tower-design-raises-eyebrows-in-paris/

 

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April 9, 2011

Housing in Leiden | SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/

Architects: SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ – Leen Borst, Mark Snitker
Location: 
Client: Municipality of 
Design team: Andrea Alvarez, Milos Dimitrijevic, Janfrans van der Eerden, Brigitte Kwa, Rudy Davi, Zsuzsanna Nagy
Contractor: Du Prie Bouw en Ontwikkeling
Structural engineer: Pieters bouwtechniek Haarlem
Project year: 2007 – 2009
Photographs: Roos Aldershoff, Dennis Sies

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Roos Aldershoff

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Dennis Sies

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Dennis Sies

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Dennis Sies

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Dennis Sies

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Dennis Sies

Housing Project In Leiden / SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/ © Dennis Sies

site plan site plan

floor plan 01 floor plan 01

floor plan 02 floor plan 02

floor plan 03 floor plan 03

floor plan 04 floor plan 04

3d section 01 3d section 01

3d section 02 3d section 02

In Roomburg SNITKER/BORST/ARCHITECTEN/  intended to make a repetitive housing project with a larger ceiling height and a spatial section. These qualities are not often seen in this segment of the housing market. The office does research into the possibilities to create larger ceiling heights, especially in apartment buildings. The research consists of the analysis of realized projects and the development of new spatial models.

The project is part of the new residential area Roomburg in . The houses are situated along the Octavialaan, which is the northern border of the subarea ‘Landscape’. This is the last stage in the development of Roomburg. The façade wall is 400 meters long and it is divided into three blocks.

The project in Roomburg contains 48 single-family houses with a floor space that varies between 158 and 175 m2. The project consists of five housing types with alternating terraces. A subtle linking of these five housing types results in a vivid façade with rhythm, relief and sculptural expression.

The cubist architecture from the twenties and thirties of Dutch architects like J.J.P. Oud, Jan Wils and J.B. van Loghem was a reference for the project. The project has a small relief in the plinth and a more expressive relief in the upper structure. The plinth and the upper structure are made in two kinds of brickwork. They are separated by a zone of windows and prefabricated elements on the first floor. The façade recedes from the building line and the top floor terraces provide for extra space and light in the street.

The houses have a split-level floor on the first floor. The split-level generates a living room with a ceiling height of 3,4 meter. Also the rooms on the first floor at the street side have larger ceiling heights. The split level floor creates a spatial staircase that makes the daylight fall into the heart of the house.

http://www.archdaily.com/122223/housing-in-leiden-snitkerborstarchitecten/

April 9, 2011

Oxbow Field Station | Eduard Epp & University of Manitoba Student

Architects: , Matt Cibinel, Michael Chan, Taren Wan, Elaine Pang, Thilini Samarasekera, Richard Chiang, Jen Rac, Scott Dean, Alex Needham
Location: 
Cost: $5,300.00 CDN
Project year: 2010
Photographs: 

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

Oxbow Field Station / Eduard Epp © Eduard Epp

drawing 01 drawing 01

drawing 02 drawing 02

drawing 03 section

The Oxbow Field Station was realized in the context of a Sustainable Design Studio offered by the Department of Architecture, under the direction of Professor , together with a group of 9 under / graduate design students. The project was conceived to: provide a studio space for site meetings and fieldwork; serve as ‘an instrument’ to measure on-site habitability, and; establish a compelling sense of place for the future artist’s colony. The initial survey work and design began in September and its construction was completed by mid-December 2010.

The field station site is located on the Uiniversity of  (UM), Faculty of Agriculture Point Lands. The 130 acre landscape is distinctly agricultural, surrounded by a pastoral river bottom forest along the banks of the Red River. The field station site is subject to seasonal on-site flooding and from the Red River should it crest the site’s perimeter levee.

The building site and building floor plate were determined after finding an abandoned structure on the Point Lands. Only the  base remained and it was partially reconstructed as the ‘foundation’. It also provided some 8 feet between the flood prone land and the field station studio. A canoe will be used to access the field station should significant flooding occur.

Project building materials were sourced according to salvaged, reclaimed (repurposed), or new. These include concrete, , steel, plastic and glass: 80% salvaged and / or reclaimed and; 20% new materials. Approximately 90% of the materials were produced locally or regionally.

With a clear idea of the building materials available, a collaborative studio design process followed to yield the final design. The on-site  trellis frames were disassembled and milled. These were used on the approach, the ladder wall, and the building envelope. A salvaged cottage deck provided the interior floor and the rooftop observation deck. Some 200 salvaged fluorescent light covers provided exterior cladding on the south and west elevations to provide diffuse light to the field station interior. Cottage windows, dating from circa 1910, were reclaimed to provide clear fenestration along the east and north elevations.

The Oxbow Field Station studio measures approximately 14 ft. x 14 ft. Together with a rooftop viewing deck the building stands some 20 ft. above grade. A ladder wall connects the on-grade platform, studio and rooftop deck. The building is comprised of new  frame construction built upon a post and beam structure. The building skin, the floor surfaces, the deck railing, and so on are constructed with salvaged and reclaimed materials.

The project cost totaled $5,300.00 CDN (average cost of $9.00 / sq. ft. gross). All of the labor was provided by the students with some assistance from members in the Faculty of Agriculture, the Faculty of Architecture, and the UM Physical Plant.

This project was made possible with the support of:

University of 

  • Administration, Ass.VP., Mr. Alan Simms
  • Physical Plant: Mr. Werner Volke

Faculty of Architecture: Dean Ralph Stern

  • Department of Architecture: Prof. Frank Fantauzzi
  • Workshop and CAST: Mr. Keith Millan, Mr. Rick Finney

Faculty of Agriculture

  • Department of Plant Science: Dr. Peter McVetty, Ms. Martha Blouw, Mr. Ian Brown, Mr. Bob Terhorst

External Financial Support

  • Raymond SC Wan Architect Inc.
  • Cibinel Architects Ltd

http://www.archdaily.com/123877/oxbow-field-station-eduard-epp-university-of-manitoba-students/

April 9, 2011

Barcelona Airport New Terminal | Ricardo Bofill

Architect: Ricardo Bofill, Taller de Arquitectura
Location: 
Client: AENA
Gross Floor Area: 525,000 sqm
Date of Completion: 2009
Photographs: Courtesy of 

_MG_8838_9_7_tonemapped Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

_MG_1831_28 Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

_MG_3533.defish_set1 Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

_MG_9921_2_autoOK Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

_MG_6818best Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

_MG_6664 Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

_MG_9095_6_4_tonemappedBIS Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

090526-13(0037) Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

090526-24(0097) Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

IMG_2984 Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

IMG_2990 Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

IMG_2996 Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

IMG_3000 Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Abflugsebene 3: Flugsteig Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Abflugsebene 3: Halle Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Abflugsebene 3: Ausblick Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

DEST3159 color Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

sketch bofill Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Ebene 5: Parkhaus Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Abflugsebene 3: Abblick Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Project for the South terminal at  Airport consisting of two buildings under a single roof containing check-in and boarding activities on different levels. The new terminal is expected to handle up to 25 million passengers a year through its 49 fingers, a TGV station and connections to the railway and the new subway line.

http://www.archdaily.com/124997/barcelona-airport-new-terminal-ricardo-bofill/

April 9, 2011

Richard Meier | New W Hotels in Mexico

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Santa Fe, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Santa Fe, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Santa Fe, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Santa Fe, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Santa Fe, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Santa Fe, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Santa Fe, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

W Santa Fe - site plan W Santa Fe - site plan

W Santa Fe - section W Santa Fe - section

W Santa Fe - sections W Santa Fe - sections

W Santa Fe - ground floor plan W Santa Fe - ground floor plan

W Santa Fe - 5th floor plan W Santa Fe - 5th floor plan

W Santa Fe - 8th floor plan W Santa Fe - 8th floor plan

W Santa Fe - 12th floor plan W Santa Fe - 12th floor plan

W Santa Fe - elevation W Santa Fe - elevation

W Santa Fe - elevation W Santa Fe - elevation

W Santa Fe - elevation W Santa Fe - elevation

W Santa Fe - elevation W Santa Fe - elevation

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai © Vize.com

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai © Vize.com

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai © Vize.com

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai © Vize.com

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai © Vize.com

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai © MeyerDavis Studio

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Richard Meier Designs New W Hotels in Mexico W Retreat Kanai Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

W Retreat Kanai - site plan W Retreat Kanai - site plan

W Retreat Kanai - site plan W Retreat Kanai - site plan

W Retreat Kanai - site section W Retreat Kanai - site section

W Retreat Kanai - sections W Retreat Kanai - sections

W Retreat Kanai - ground floor plan W Retreat Kanai - ground floor plan

W Retreat Kanai - first floor plan W Retreat Kanai - first floor plan

W Retreat Kanai - second floor plan W Retreat Kanai - second floor plan

W Retreat Kanai - third floor plan W Retreat Kanai - third floor plan

W Retreat Kanai - elevation W Retreat Kanai - elevation

W Retreat Kanai - elevation W Retreat Kanai - elevation

W Retreat Kanai - elevation W Retreat Kanai - elevation

W Retreat Kanai - elevation W Retreat Kanai - elevation

W Retreat Kanai - elevation W Retreat Kanai - elevation

W Retreat Kanai - elevation W Retreat Kanai - elevation

W Retreat Kanai - elevation W Retreat Kanai - elevation

’s office recently shared with us renderings and drawings for his latest work – two new W Hotels. These projects mark a first for Meier within the hospitality industry in Latin-America, which are located in  City and on the Riviera Maya with completion dates scheduled for 2013 and 2014. The hotels, W Santa Fe and the W Retreat Kanai, are the first collaboration between Starwood and Meier who will be assisted by Migdal Arquitectos. Further details, drawings, and renderings.“I believe these two modern structures, each with their own sense of space and identity, will be a welcome addition to the beautiful modern architecture being built in  today. As our first foray into hospitality in Central America, we couldn’t be working with a better company or brand,” said . “While I have designed hotel interiors and currently have two hotels in construction in China and Italy, I have never designed one from the ground up in Latin America, and I am grateful to our clients ALHEL and GIM Desarrollos and to the hotel operator Starwood for coming to us with this opportunity. I have always been impressed with W Hotels for their creative and contemporary approach to design, which I feel will be complimentary with our modern, contextual and timeless architecture.”

W Retreat Kanai is the centerpiece of the Kanai Resort which includes four hotels and a Beach Club. Kanai is located on a natural reserve in ’s magnificent Yucatan coast line. The 180-room hotel is spread out over 183 hectare of lush mangroves and pristine beaches. It has unparalleled accommodations, state of the art leisure, spa and fitness facilities, two restaurants and three bars. The dramatic forms of the architecture are incised into the site and the hotel floats on a carpet of mangroves against the infinite horizon of sea and sky. Building and landscape flow into one another, as meandering gardens and courtyards, sinuous pools and waterworks intersect with brilliant terraces and foot paths that seamlessly connect indoor and outdoor spaces.

Guest rooms have unobstructed views toward the sea and have been developed as continuous living areas, with the interior space continuing to an exterior deck furnished with lounge seating, cocktail bar, exterior tub and shower. The decks are enclosed by retractable privacy screens and sun shading louvers. The hotel interiors are being designed by the New York based firm Meyer Davis Studio.

The W Santa Fe is part of Liberty Plaza, a mixed-use building complex comprised of three 15-story towers on the periphery of  City. It is a unique urban setting, overlooking a natural reserve with views of the  City valley and surrounding mountains and volcanoes. The W Hotel Sante Fe is the centerpiece of a new business district, and hopes to be an attraction to both travelers and businessmen. A series of guestroom and public terraces with views to the city start at ground level and climb the façade, as landscaped green gardens in dialogue with the undisturbed green valley beyond. The lobby and lower level public amenities include a bar and living room, two restaurants, a nightclub and a medium-sized conference facility. A grand stair connects these public functions and appears as the sculptural centerpiece of the dramatic multi-story lobby. The upper public floors house fitness and spa facilities and a semi covered rooftop swimming pool and bar with exceptional views. The hotel interiors are being designed jointly by  based Edmonds International and New York based KrauseSawyer.

Liberty Plaza will be one of the first  accredited developments in  City, incorporating efficient systems of energy and water consumption, managing site and materials, and enhancing user comfort in an environmentally conscious manner.
Abraham Metta and Fredy Helfon, the developers who are also trained architects said:
“As architects we have always admired ’s architecture above any others and always hoped for an opportunity to invite him to participate in a project worthy of his art. With beautiful sites and a great program for both projects, we felt these were up to his reputation and with great honor he accepted to participate in both.

We are sure Liberty Plaza, a Mixed Use Development in the city’s newest financial district of City will be an icon with two corporate office buildings and the best hotel brand we could ever had for the area: a Starwood’s W. With Richard’s clean and modern style, this will be a sure success”

In regards to the W Retreat Kanai Riviera Maya project, Mr. Metta and Mr. Helfon added:
“Having a breathtaking 135 acre site with a beautiful seafront of more than a mile and only four hotel sites for roughly 600 rooms required the best firms both in resort architecture as well as Hotel operators. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity which we did not want to waste. We were very careful to select Park Hyatt, St. Regis and Auberge Resorts and the design teams with different proposals. But the one that really stands out for its presence and strong concept is the W Retreat by  which is unlike anything we have seen for a Resort before. Elegant and sensible, it is beautifully integrated with the privileged nature of the site. We are very excited with the W-Meier combination, and very confident we made right choices”

Both hotels are owned by co developers ALHEL and GIM Desarrollos of .

http://www.archdaily.com/124849/richard-meier-designs-new-w-hotels-in-mexico/

 

 

 

April 9, 2011

esolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses | Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Architects: Richard Meier & Partners Architects
Location: 
Project year: 2003 – 2013
Photographs: Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of 

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © DBOX

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © DBOX

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © DBOX

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © DBOX

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © DBOX

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © DBOX

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © DBOX

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

In Progress: Jesolo Lido Condominium – The Beach Houses / Richard Meier & Partners Architects © Guido Ranieri Da Re courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

site plan site plan

plan 01 plan 01

plan 02 plan 02

plan 02 plan 02

plan 03 plan 03

plan 03 plan 03

elevation 01 elevation 01

elevation 02 elevation 02

elevation 03 elevation 03

The  Project will be a landmark beachfront destination intended to draw guests to its residential and hotel components. The project is being completed in three phases.Phase 1 is The  Village, a three-story condominium complex completed in 2007. The low-rise, residential Village consists of two parts: a long bar building containing 23 apartments with retail on ground floor, facing a plaza that serves as the “heart” of the intervention, and houses arranged along either side of a swimming pool and park space.Phase 2 is a 10-story seafront condominium currently under construction and scheduled to be completed in 2011. It consists of 69 apartments and is topped by 5 two-storey penthouse units with private terraces and pools. The project has been designed as a light and airy building with open staircases and shaded terraces on all elevations with extensive views of the beach and the Mediterranean Sea. A private spa and outdoor pools in a secluded garden on the ground floor complement the exclusive ambiance of the project.Phase 3 consists of a hotel property with rooms and elaborate wellness facilities with access to pools on the ground floor and a direct connection to the beach. The project is currently in design development phase.

http://www.archdaily.com/124231/in-progress-jesolo-lido-condominium-%E2%80%93-the-beach-houses-richard-meier-partners-architects/

April 9, 2011

Indoor Swimming Pool in Toro | Vier Arquitectos

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

Indoor Swimming Pool In Toro / Vier Arquitectos SLP © Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

first floor plan first floor plan

ground floor plan ground floor plan

level -1 floor plan level -1 floor plan

elevation elevation

section section

Architects: Vier Arquitectos SLP – Antonio Raya, Cristóbal Crespo, Santiago Sánchez, Enrique Antelo
Location: , Zamora, 
Project area: 2,441 sqm
Project year: 2004 – 2010
Photographs: Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez

The building comes out as a result of the proposal submitted to a public competition called in 2004 by the City of .

This building tries to incorporate a new piece in the city, assuming the representative image the building must show according to its public nature, being able to fit in with dignity and, far as possible, becoming a part of the architectural legacy of the town. Not in a position of prominence, but assuming the suggestions of an environment enriched with history and tradition.

By this way, the municipal swimming pool wants to be an austere building that, without abandoning the contemporary architectural language, knows how to give expressive continuity to the ´s patrimonial bequest.

The special design of the pool lies in the special role that the use of rammed earth acquires in its construction, developing its representative image.

Through the definition of bearing walls and exterior cladding to be built in rammed earth, the pool is conceived as a closed space to the outside, focusing on the texture of the walls, its form and composition that enhances the expressive conditions we consider suitable for solving the required image and program in the urban environment where it is located.

The pool protects itself from external climatology and from non-desirable views, thanks to that rammed earth perimeter wall. Over this wall, the roofs of the changing rooms’ emerge, suggesting the vegetation of inner courtyards. The scale and layout of the building, the texture of the walls and their colour, even freed from ornamental elements, follow compositive guidelines, present in the monumental architecture of .

The closed and severe look of the building contrasts with the image that appears as soon as we trespass the threshold. The different areas in which the program is divided receive natural light and ventilation through a series of interior courtyards that also allow the visual control of the buildings, making them transparent or opaque, as suitable. Moreover, they facilitate the passive support to the heat regulation, allowing the natural ventilation from shade areas. The main volume, which contains the swimming pool basin, must possess a strict control of its climate conditions. For this reason, the exchange with other areas is reduced to the maximum and treated as an autonomous volume regarding the rest of the complex.

http://www.archdaily.com/124418/indoor-swimming-pool-in-toro-vier-arquitectos/

 

 

April 9, 2011

A New Student Learning Centre for Ryerson University | Snøhetta and ZPA

A New Student Learning Centre for Ryerson University by Snøhetta and ZRPA Courtesy of Ryerson University

A New Student Learning Centre for Ryerson University by Snøhetta and ZRPA Courtesy of Ryerson University

A New Student Learning Centre for Ryerson University by Snøhetta and ZRPA Courtesy of Ryerson University

A New Student Learning Centre for Ryerson University by Snøhetta and ZRPA Courtesy of Ryerson University

A New Student Learning Centre for Ryerson University by Snøhetta and ZRPA Courtesy of Ryerson University

A New Student Learning Centre for Ryerson University by Snøhetta and ZRPA Courtesy of Ryerson University

Today Ryerson University announced the design of a new Student Learning Centre for their campus. Designed by Snøhetta in collaboration with Zeidler Partnership Architectsof , the 155,463sqf Student Learning Centre will feature a transparent glass skin that will provide varying light qualities within the interior spaces. Sustainable practices have also been incorporated into the design with 50% of the roof intended to act as a green roof and plans for the building to be  compliant. Construction on the building is expected to begin late this year, with a targeted completion date of Winter 2014. More about the new Student Learning Centre including renderings.The eight-storey Student Learning Centre boldly marks Ryerson’s new face on Yonge Street. It will feature a dazzling glass facade, a welcoming elevated plaza, a bridge to the existing library and a range of academic, study and collaborative spaces for Ryerson’s students, faculty and staff. Yonge Street frontage will feature destination retail at and below grade, creating a prominent commercial facade.“I am thrilled to present the first look at the inspirational design of our new Ryerson University Student Learning Centre,” said Levy. “The new Student Learning Centre will have a powerful impact on student learning, life on campus and the community. It’s a transformative, bold development and an important step forward in city building. We are very excited about what the Student Learning Centre will mean for Ryerson and for .” With links to the existing Library building, the Student Learning Centre will offer a variety of creative and inspiring learning environments and spaces. Every floor will have its own personality – some will be open and interpretive with flexible furniture and terraces while others will be densely filled with enclosed study rooms for groups of four to eight people. Space will be available for independent, quiet study and contemplation. With full digital support and accessible academic services, the Student Learning Centre will foster learning success and help promote a culture of collaboration and creativity among Ryerson students.

“The Student Learning Centre will provide bright, open, technologically rich, barrier-free spaces for individual and collaborative study that will accommodate our students’ different learning styles and our faculties’ different teaching practices,” said Alan Shepard, Provost and Vice President Academic, Ryerson University. “It will provide our students with a welcoming, accessible, digitally connected space that is ready to adapt and accommodate new technologies, developments and services.” “The Student Learning Centre is one more step in realizing the vision established in the Ryerson master plan to wholly integrate the university’s campus with the city’s urban fabric,” said Tarek El-Khatib, Senior Partner, Zeidler. “The building will contribute to the retail and pedestrian life in the area and set the tone for ongoing revitalization in this historic commercial neighbourhood. A generous and inviting, entry plaza will gently draw both students and the general public up and into this new vertical community setting the standard for future development in the area.”

“The notion that learning is a static, solitary activity is outmoded,” said, Craig Dykers, principal architect and co-founder, . “While it remains important to find places of introspection, it is also vitally important to create places where people can more actively seek knowledge, where social connections can intertwine and where all forms of activity, quiet and loud, can find a suitable home. The design of the Student Learning Centre is foremost about providing these new and diverse functions. “The Student Learning Centre will be a very special place where ideas are shaped and dreams come true. It will be a destination of choice for undergraduate and graduate students alike.”

Support for the project from the Government of  has been vital. “The Student Learning Centre would not be possible without the Government of ’s investment of $45 million that was announced in 2008,” said Julia Hanigsberg, Vice-President, Administration and Finance, Ryerson University. “The government of ’s transformative contribution represents more than just putting money into a building; it is creating a world-class facility that will touch thousands of Ontarians – our students, faculty, staff – for generations to come.”

http://www.archdaily.com/125552/a-new-student-learning-centre-for-ryerson-university-by-sn%C3%B8hetta-and-zrpa/

 

April 9, 2011

Galleria Centercity | UNStudio

01_Christian Richters_4172-008 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Christian Richters

02_Christian Richters_4172-018 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Christian Richters

03_Christian Richters_4172-064 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Christian Richters

04_Christian Richters_4172-057 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Christian Richters

05_Christian Richters_4172-059 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Christian Richters

06_Centercity_Cutural_Kim Yong-kwan_21 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Kim Jong-Kwan

07_Centercity_Kim Yong-kwan _01 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Kim Jong-Kwan

08_Centercity_Kim Yong-kwan_03 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Kim Jong-Kwan

09_Centercity_Kim Yong-kwan_12 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Kim Jong-Kwan

10_Centercity_Kim Yong-kwan_47 ©  UNStudio. Photographed by Kim Jong-Kwan

Double layer facade Double Layer Facade ©  UNStudio

Facade concept Facade Concept ©  UNStudio

Knot Axon Knot Axonometric ©  UNStudio

Our friends from UNStudio have shared their latest 66,000 square meter Galleria in ,, with us.  The Galleria attempts to re-define the traditional typology of such a place, as changing societal norms in Asia have led supermarkets to operate as “social and semi-cultural meeting places,” according to Ben van Berkel.   As a result, the project blends the functional aspect of a large scale commercial store, while placing emphasis on maintaining a sense of public space for social and cultural aspects.

The strength of the Galleria lies in the project’s analysis of the users as the architecture is based on observations of current behavioral tendencies in large commercial spaces.   According to, particularly in South East Asia, department stores serve a highly social function; people meet, gather, eat, drink and both shop and window shop in these venues. The department store is no longer solely a commercial space, it now offers the architect the opportunity to build upon and expand the social and cultural experience of the visitor. If today we are seeing the museum as a supermarket, then we are also now seeing the department store as a museum.

To add cultural aspects to the building, the Galleria  also includes an art and cultural center, while a food court and specialty supermarket constitute another distinct destination within the building, which is simultaneously integrated with the overall design strategy.The interior derives its character from the accumulation of rounded plateaus on long columns. The repetition of curves, enhanced by coiled strip lighting in the ceilings of the platforms, gives the interior its distinctive character. Four stacked program clusters, each encompassing three storeys and containing public plateaus, are linked to the central void. This organisation propels a fluent upstream flow of people through the building, from the ground floor atrium to the roof terrace. As the plateaus are positioned in a rotational manner in space, they enable the central space to encompass way finding, vertical circulation, orientation and act as main attractor of the department store. The spatial and visual connections within the space are designed to generate a lively and stimulating environment, in which the user is central.From the exterior, the Galleria boasts a dynamic double layered facade intended to stimulate use experience.  The skin is articulated in a trompe l’oeuil pattern of vertical mullions making the building vertually scale-less as the structure provides no hint as to how many stories it contains. On the inside, this play with scale and dimension is continued in a way that is at least as radical as the outside. Upon entering, the department store is revealed as a layered and varied space which encourages investigation and unfolds  as you move through and up the building.  ”The most interesting thing to me about the effect of the Galleria  is that, because of the organisation of the atrium and the moiré treatment of the facade, Illusions are created which result in the seeming alteration of scales and the creation of double images. No image is permanent in this building,” added van Berkel.The media facade will be the largest illuminated surface of its kind.  The strategy for the building enclosure consists of creating an optical illusion. During the day the building has a monochrome reflective appearance, whilst at night soft colours are used to generate waves of coloured light across the large scale illuminated surface. The lighting design was developed in parallel with the architecture and capitalises on the double layered facade structure. Computer generated animations specially designed by  are incorporated into the lighting design and refer to themes related to the department store, such as fashion, events, art and public life.

Project Information:

Galleria Centercity, , South-Korea

Client: Hanwha Galleria Co. LTD

ARCHITECT: , Amsterdam

Design team: Ben van Berkel, Astrid Piber with Ger Gijzen, Marc Herschel and Marianthi Tatari, Sander Versluis, Albert Gnodde, Jorg Lonkwitz, Tom Minderhoud, Lee Jae-young, Woo Jun-seung, Constantin Boincean, Yu-chen Lin

Interior: Ben van Berkel, Astrid Piber with Ger Gijzen, Cristina Bolis and Veronica Baraldi, Lee Jae-young, Felix Lohrmann, Kirsten Hollmann, Albert Gnodde, Martijn Prins, Joerg Lonkwitz, Malaica Cimenti, Florian Licht, William de Boer, Eelco Grootjes, Alexia Koch

EXECUTIVE ARCHITECT/ SITE SUPERVISION/ LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: GANSAM Architects & Partners, Seoul, Korea

Design team: Kim Tai-jip, Han Ki-young, Nam Myung-kwan, Yoon Chang-bae, Park Seong-beom, Kwon Na-young, Nam Young-ho

Interior: Lee Seung-youn, No Se-hyo, Ryu Hee-won, Na Min-hee

CONSULTANTS: Façade Consultant: KBM Co. LTDLight Designer: a.g. Licht, Bonn, Germany; Content Programmer: Lightlife, Berlin/Cologne, Germany; Way-finding Designer: Geerdes Ontwerpen, Delft, Netherlands; Visuals: , Amsterdam and rendertaxi, Aachen; Structural Engineer: Kopeg Engineering; Electrical Engineer: Ilshin E&C; Mechanical Engineer: Sahmwon MEC; Civil Engineer: CG E&C

CONTRACTORS: Main Contractor: Hanwha E&C Co. LTD; Façade contractor ILJIN UNISCO, Korea; Interior Joong Il, Won Intertech, Artifort, Gawon, Creid, Hanmi, Sangwon S&D, and Daehye

PROJECT DETAILS: Location: 521-3 Buldang-dong, Seobuk-gu, , Chungcheongnam-do, Korea

Program: Department Store with parking garage, supermarket and food court, restaurants, kids’ café, VIP lounge, art center and cultural center and roof top terraces

Site Area: 11,235m2

Building Area: 7090 m2

Gross Floor Area: 110,530.73m2

Building Coverage: 63.30%

Floors: 6 below grade, 10 above grade

Structure: Steel-concrete composite columns, floor: steel structure with concrete slab.

 

http://www.archdaily.com/125125/galleria-centercity-unstudio/

April 9, 2011

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” | s y m b i o s i s design

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design model 01

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design sketches 01

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design sketches 02

 

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design plan 01

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design plan 02

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design plan 03

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design plan 04

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design plan 05

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design section 01Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design section 02

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design detail 01

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design model 02

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design model 03

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design model 04

Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts “RSICA” / s y m b i o s i s design model 05

ocation: 
Project name: Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts (RSICA) ­
Program: Film School with 160 seat screening room, media Library, 2 large sound stages, set stage, equipment storage rooms, green room, camera lab, smart classrooms, animation lab, edit and audit suites, hovering Café’, administration building and staff residences, in addition to a luxurious 80 room Boutique Hotel
Client: Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts (collaboration with The University of Sothern California school of Cinematic Arts and The royal Film Commission)
Project team: Khalid Nahhas, Ramiz Ayoub, Faiha Katbi, Lina Asa’d, Dina Hadaddin, Onur Lambaz
Structural Engineer: s y m b i o s i s designs ltd., Omega Consulting Off.
Electrical & Mechanical Engineer: Spectrum Mep Consulting Engineers Off.
Media/Audio/Visual Consulting Services: Sand Hill Media, Berkeley, CA
Acoustical Consultant: Newson Brown Acoustics LLC, Santa Monika, CA
Land Area: 20,200 sq. m
Built-up Area: 30,000 sq. m
Project year: 2008
3D images: Courtesy of s y m b i o s i s  designs ltd.

The Red Sea Institute of Cinematic Arts (RSICA) designed by s y m b i o s i s design was completed in 2008.  It is an architectural and spatial interpretation of the explorative and creative process of film-making and producing, designed specifically to encourage reflection on oneself and observation of the world outside oneself.The architecture of the school is an explorative and didactic ground-scape environment capturing deduced emulations of the layers that make up film.  The building stages different conditions that allow the student to understand a great measure of intangibles or often immeasurable notions and conditions that are best understood intuitively through experience.In order to claim the majority of the property to landscape, many functions were pushed to sub-grade levels, in turn, giving a non abrasive sculptural disposition of buildings above. The landscape theme is a minimalistic one and where oasis are introduced as sub-grade light wells, rocks from the Rum desert are staged as mystical elements and reflective pools capture sun rays and passing clouds above. Sharing the campus with the main RSICA complex is a luxurious boutique concept hotel offering a unique experience about film and film-making with a film museum connecting back to the film school, and state-of-the-art three screen public cinemas on the other side of the campus.

Light as a matter

Natural light conditions are exploited in the buildings creating ranges between washed out and intense.  The lighting is staged to allow students the opportunity to observe the nature of light.  Light showers down on many areas and often in intense slices through sculptural skylights.

Shadows as matter

Like light, shadows are enhanced as a matter in a variety of form; dark areas percolate both still and moving shadows while other forms cast vivid and textured ones.

Dynamic Motion

The building forms descend into the ground and ascend out and over the ground creating paths and spaces in flux, roaming, and encouraging motion from different unconventional vantage points to allow students to explore spatial paradigm shifts necessary to understanding and planning scenography.

Sound as a matter

Natural raw sounds of winds and breezes, of still water and the rain, of different footsteps, are captured through basic pipe channels from distant staged points to secluded ones for students to appreciate sound matter even when they are not near its sources.

Introspective domain

Many smaller areas fold inwardly unto themselves creating places of detachment in the form of dwelled-in niches necessary for students to silently explore their own minds – the introspective domain.  Imagination demands many walk-through rehearsals in the mind where reality can be stretched beyond the conventional and towards the magical.

Exchange domain

Great films are a byproduct of collaborative and synergetic team effort.  Most circulation spaces and open outdoor ones are articulated to become social and celebratory domains where conversations and exchange of ideas are not only welcomed but enhanced and promoted.

Layering

Like montage in filming, different spaces and building forms were juxtaposed as single layers; however the student can perceive different compositions from different points depending on their position in space.  Long visual axes inlayed with a variety of compositional elements are staged as Forced Perspectives offering the students explorative grounds of visual montage.

Studio Tectonics

The entire campus building celebrates the studio building typology as an active production place, and as a generally raw building by exposing most electrical and mechanical elements such as duct work and large lighting fixtures; as well as echoing tools and instruments of the profession such as speakers and hovering steel cat-walks.  The building will be a transparent technical blueprint to the students.

Film Making Chronology

The building facilities that entail preparatory and technical works in the pre-production, production and post-production chronology are laid out in plan in a clear sequence.  Not only students, but also visitors, will be able to clearly read the sequence of film making in actual plan, especially where some functions are exposed through transparency to circulation areas.

http://www.archdaily.com/124343/red-sea-institute-of-cinematic-arts-%E2%80%9Crsica%E2%80%9D-s-y-m-b-i-o-s-i-s-design/