Archive for April, 2011

April 30, 2011

Hoogambacht | Locus Architecten

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

Hoogambacht / Hendriks Schulten Architecten © Kess Hummel

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Architects: Locus Architecten (previously Hendriks Schulten Architecten) – Gert-Jan Hendriks, Ted Schulten
Location: 
Project area: 8,700 sqm
Project year: 2003 – 2010
Photographs: Kees Hummel

Hoogambacht forms a powerful combination of living in the park and shopping centre of the neighborhood. A sturdy urban building block with the tower as a landmark. The apartments above the shops benefit from the peaceful green courts.

In between HI Ambacht and Zwijndrecht you can find the new district De Volgerlanden, with an oval-shaped park in the centre. The shopping centre is part of the border of this park. The building has its own character, with the tower as a landmark for the neighborhood. The building houses 6800 m2 of retail, a parking garage for 536 cars and 147 apartments.

Above the commercial ground Floor, the dwellings are situated in a S-shaped volume, meandering around the two green courts. The courts each open up to a different side, one orientated towards the park and the other facing the residential street on the northern side of the block. In this way as many dwellings as possible have a view at the park.

The volume reacts to the varies borders. The front side faces the park and had the greatest height. Towards the northern end the height declines, to adjust to the scale of the opposing dwellings. Here the building had a smaller scale, more green and open. The building is one architectonical composition of big and small elements and components, build in cheerful red brickwork.

http://www.archdaily.com/130241/hoogambacht-hendriks-schulten-architecten/

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April 30, 2011

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College | Ennead Architects

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Jeff Goldberg/Esto

The Gateway Center, Westchester Community College / Ennead Architects © Aislinn Weidele/Ennead Architects

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Located at the east entrance to the  campus, the new Gateway Center is emblematic of the College’s commitment to a more accessible education for residents of Westchester County and to an American college experience for the many recent immigrants seeking to improve the quality of their lives. Its design was inspired by this vision, and the building is intended as a physical embodiment of the word gateway: an entrance or means of access. Sited to take advantage of the natural beauty of the campus landscape, the Gateway Center is a threshold to the College and an initial expression of campus identity. Building and site are unified to form a sustainable daylit environment. Combining references to the campus’ architectural legacy and state-of-the-art technology, the building creates a unique educational crossroads and a defining center for campus life.

Architect: Ennead Architects
Location: Westchester Community College, 
Project Team: Susan Rodriguez FAIA (Design Partner), Timothy Hartung FAIA (Management Partner), Joanne Sliker AIA (Project Manager), John Zimmer AIA (Project Architect/Design), Patrick Golden AIA (Project Architect/Construction), Harry Park, Craig McIllhenny AIA, Mimi Madigan, Paul Keene AIA, Charles Brainerd AIA, Maura Rogers, Kyo-Youn Jin, Yekta Pakdaman-Hamedani, Mathew Bissen AIA, Saem Oh, Charmian Place, Joerg Kiesow, Dan Stube AIA
Structural Engineer: Leslie E. Robertson Associates
MEP Engineer: Thomas Polise Consulting Engineer
Landscape Architect: Towers | Golde
Lighting: Susan Brady Lighting Design
Graphics: H Plus Incorporated
Acoustics / AV / Telecom: Cerami & Associates
Geotechnical/Civil: Langan Engineering & Environmental Services
Construction Manager: STV
Project Area: 70,000 sqf
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Jeff Goldberg/Esto, Aislinn Weidele/

Two academic wings embrace a landscaped courtyard and are connected by a multi-story transparent glass gateway pavilion that serves as the lobby and welcome center. The composition is punctuated by an illuminated tower at the southeast corner of the site. In response to greater student diversity, the program includes spaces for the international student community to support their transition to American culture. Likewise a growing demand for professional training from area businesses sponsored the inclusion of spaces to provide business instruction to the local workforce. The building’s Gateway Pavilion houses the Welcome Center and International Student Office and is the main public interface for visitors to the building and the campus overall. In addition, a number of general use classrooms accommodates the increasing enrollment at the College. The remaining components of the program include shared gathering and assembly spaces intended to foster communication among the building’s users.

The two-story structure to the south houses the language program, general classrooms and faculty offices. The three-story structure to the north houses general classrooms and faculty offices of the business and fashion program. The Gateway unifies the two wings of the building.

Building materials were selected both to integrate with the existing fabric of the campus and to distinguish a new signature building for the College. Fieldstone is used at the base of the building to connect with the historic buildings on campus, while offices and classrooms, cantilevered over a base of structurally glazed walls, are clad in zinc. The atrium is wrapped in an aluminum and glass curtain wall assembly supported by a modular system of exposed structural steel elements, which results in a column-free space and a daylit and transparent environment. The custom-designed brise soleil on the Gateway Center’s south-facing courtyard facade allows building inhabitants undisrupted views of the campus and beyond while optimizing natural daylight and limiting glare.

Sustainable design principles informed the design from the overall siting and massing strategy to the integration of energy-efficient systems and the detail development and selection of materials. The building has achieved  Certification. Sustainable highlights include: minimizing site disruption through integrating the building into the natural topography and preserving existing trees on site; maintaining a vegetated open space around the building to reduce stormwater run-off and heat island effect while providing natural habitat for flora and fauna and a stormwater system that captures and treats runoff in four bio-retention basins before discharging it to the campus-wide stormwater system. Additionally, water efficiency is achieved through the use of native and adaptive plant species, eliminating the need for irrigation. Within the building, low-flow fixtures save at least 30% over conventional plumbing fixtures, a savings of over 95,000 gallons of water each year.

The building’s solar orientation and exterior fenestration enhance daylight within the building. Operable windows throughout contribute to the indoor air quality. A high performance exterior envelope mitigates heat gain and reduces energy consumption with custom-designed sun screens on the south façade of the north wing and Low E glazing throughout. Locally quarried stone is a featured material of the building. High performance mechanical systems, lighting controls and glazing will save over 30% of fossil fuel and electricity consumption annually. Waste management during construction achieved a 90% recycling rate. A carbon dioxide monitoring system provides feedback on the ventilation system. Access to public transportation is adjacent to the site. A comprehensive building signage program will educate occupants and focus on features described above that have been incorporated into the project.

http://www.archdaily.com/131156/the-gateway-center-westchester-community-college-ennead-architects/

April 30, 2011

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais | Hugo Kaici & Felix de Montesquiou

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

Illegal Immigration Base In Calais / Architecte D.E.S.A © Architecte D.E.S.A

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Architects: Hugo Kaici & Felix de Montesquiou
Location: 
Photographs: Courtesy of  & 

The city of , located at only 42km of the British coast, is the hottest spot of illegal migration in. When Sarkozy closed the Sangatte immigrant center a year ago, we decided to react on the subject, in a very ironical and cynical way. This is when we decided to design an illegal immigration base.

As we always wanted to work on the German bunkers on the French coast, we decided to reverse the idea of the Atlantik Wall, built to prevent the allies army from getting in, to facilitate the migration of those wanting to reach England.

This idea is reinforced by the fact that the site we choose was one of the most fortified by the Germans.This is why the infrastructure is disguised as a abandoned bunker.

Our company, NEMO (for Northern Europe Migrants Organisation) is meant to undertake the business of illegal immigration from the Kurdish mafia, monopolizing the sector in a very brutal and inhuman way.

The architecture is minimal, the services provided in the infrastructure are only those we thought essential to a migrant in transit. But at the same time we tried to incorporate details to humanize this very brutal building

We wanted to play with the confusion between the true and the false; although the idea is totally mad and unrealistic, we tried to stage the project into reality. We used photo realistic renders, and  an ultra commercial approach.

And we went even as far as depositing a building permit (that was immediately thrown back to our faces). This is why the program is at the same time minimal ( absolutely no superficial function) and grandiose (monumental structure in the cliffs of the North of 

In our very realistic / cynical / commercial approach, we simulated a business plan for this illegal company, and created a website to advertise the infrastructure, and to book your illegal immigration ticket.

http://www.archdaily.com/131101/illegal-immigration-base-in-calais-hugo-kaici-felix-de-montesquiou/

April 30, 2011

NBHW Fire Station | LIAG Architects

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

NBHW Fire Station / LIAG Architects © Bernard Faber

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Architects: LIAG Architects
Location: 
Project area: 11,815 sqm
Project year: 2006 – 2010
Photographs: Bernard Faber

The building is characterised by a complex structure, partly the result of the necessary close proximity of the fireman’s rooms to the depot in a volume that must conform to stringent town planning conditions.

A design was chosen that runs from its abutment with the council offices up towards the railway tracks, rising to a height of about 20 metres, thereby accentuating the entrance to the city centre. The highest point of the design is removed as far as possible from the council offices. The council wished for a high point marking the entrance to the city of .

There is parking on the roof, out of sight of the ground floor. The visible strong slanting line on the front and back of the building forms the access ramp for the parking.

Energy Neutral Building

LIAG and the municipality of  joined forces in an ambitious plan for a sustainable and energy efficient building. The municipality of  has the policy that all its buildings must perform 20% better than the applicable legal norms.

Aside from a balanced choice in materials with attention for environmental impact in manufacturing and recycling, use has been made of building elements that due to their size and detail can easily be reused and fit within the vision of ‘Cradle-to-Cradle’ building. In this way all the windows of the offices are one size and a high degree of repetition of elements has been chosen in the façade. Many of these elements can easily be reused at the end of their current useful life-cycle.

Use is made of underground thermal energy storage (UTES) to achieve a pleasant and comfortable indoor climate using a minimum of energy. In order to further utilize this system the parking deck is used as a solar collector. Water hoses will be built into the parking deck to pump water heated by the sun into the ground so that cold water can be pumped up to be used to cool in summer, and warm during winter, the building of 8,500 m2 gfa and the adjoining council offices of 12,500 m2 gfa. This system means that a new boiler is not required for the 8,500 m2 of additional functions. All energy required by the fire station and the Brijder care centre for addicts will come from the UTES installation. Additionally the UTES system can be used to keep the parking deck ice-free in winter.

This building design actually works as an energy/climate plant with general functions for the municipality of .

http://www.archdaily.com/131644/nbhw-fire-station-liag-architects/

April 30, 2011

The Ice Cubes | Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

The Ice Cubes / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

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Architects: Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects
Location: 
Design Team: Jun Mitsui, Yukinobu Nakano, Kentaro Hayashi, Jim Lambiasi, Kazumasa Toku, Naoko Morimoto, Shigeki Irie, Ei Ishiyama
Project area: 3,060 sqm
Project year: 2006 – 2008
Photographs: Naoomi Kurozumi

This project was commissioned by a Hong Kong-based developer for whom we previously designed two high-end retail projects (in Akasaka and Omotesando). The site constraints, including sky-openess factor (tenku-ritsu) and sun/shadow requirements were very restrictive. Careful calculations were done to arrive at the best balance of forms while satisfying the regulations and achieving the maximum FAR. By developing the formal strategy as a series of interlocking cubes, we were able to massage the complicated building envelop shape into a dynamic composition.

This strategy solved not only the complex building form but also gave the freedom of adjusting the forms according to the additional building programs and structural considerations.

An important design requirement was for the cubes to appear feather light and thin. We performed careful studies to make the structure and insulation look as thin as possible. The cube surfaces are covered with a baked ceramic frit pattern on the outer-most surface of the glazing. By doing so, a pure-white cube expression can be achieved. Had the frit been applied on an inner surface, the color of the cubes would have been greenish due to the green tint of the glass. All necessary technical studies for maintenance and durability of the outer-most surface frit pattern were resolved with the manufacturer who was then able to provide a ten year warranty.

The resulting image is silky and feathery which attracted the main tenant H&M, a Swedish apparel company who values the high-impact design.

http://www.archdaily.com/130781/the-ice-cubes-jun-mitsui-associates-architects/

April 30, 2011

De Beers Ginza Building | Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

De Beers Ginza Building / Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects © Naoomi Kurozumi

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Architects: Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects
Location: 
Design Team: Jun Mitsui, Jim Lambiasi, Kazumasa Toku
Project area: 4,022 sqm
Project year: 2005 – 2008
Photographs: Naoomi Kurozumi

Ginza is one of the most famous commercial districts even in the world. Marronnier Street is a gracious, active street lined with creatively designed buildings. The DE BEERS Ginza Building design is intended to reflect the sophisticated Ginza streetscape and fit appropriately into this dynamic context.

In the process of the design, the first image that came to mind was a twisting form of light in motion. A ribbon of light coming out of the earth sparkles in the atmosphere as an aurora with ever-changing color and form. The DE BEERS Ginza building representing gracious light like aurora was felt most appropriate for the site.

The fluid and flexible form of the building was also inspired by the beauty of the female outline. The sparkling light on the surface of the gently curved form of the building subtly suggests the shimmering reflection of diamond. This was the aesthetic essence of the DE BEERS Ginza building design.

The expression of the curtain wall varies continuously as it ascends and as it reflects the ever-changing appearance of the sky. The exterior surface of the building reflects the sunlight and Ginza city lights in a subtle way and the impression of the façade as time passes. On the exterior of the building, specially-finished stainless steel pipes are horizontally laid-out creating sparkles of light throughout the surface of the building.

Throughout history, the Ginza district has been an incubator for design trends reflecting the changing times. I hope that the DE BEERS Ginza building becomes an integral part of Ginza history. Its design is intended to reflect the excitement and importance of Ginza’s ever-changing appearance.

http://www.archdaily.com/130799/de-beers-ginza-building-jun-mitsui-associates-architects/

April 28, 2011

Campus Commons-SUNY NP | ikon.5

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Evening view of Commons from plaza deck illustrating the structural tube stress skin
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

View of Campus Commons from main campus entry
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

View of Commons illustrating its transparency and internal scholar mezzanine
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

View of Commons illustrating the planar forms of the assembly
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

View of Commons from main campus pedestrian pathway
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Illuminated interior allows structural tubes to be seen in silhouette and student activity during evening
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Interior of informal gathering area
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Interior of scholar mezzanine overlooking the Catskills
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Interior of informal gathering area looking towards existing student union building
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

View of suspended mezzanine above informal gathering space
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Dramatic up-lighting structural stress skin
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

View from existing student union building into Campus Commons
© Peter Mauss/Esto 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Site plan
© ikon.5 architects 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Floor plan
© ikon.5 architects 

Campus Commons - SUNY NP                  (ikon.5 architects)

Sustainability diagram
© ikon.5 architects 

Architect’s statement

Objective:

The State University of New York at New Paltz needed to expand its 1970 Student Union building by providing informal gathering spaces for students. The existing Student Union building was designed as an isolated cellular office building and did not have space for student collaboration or congregation. In addition, the University wished to change the overall appearance and presentation of the existing building which conveyed an uninspired institutionally functional appearance at the gateway to the university.

Solution:

The Campus Commons project at The State University of New York is a steel and glass ‘winter garden’ addition to an existing 1970 student union building. The Campus Commons in filled and spanned over an existing underutilized exterior courtyard, transforming the exterior space into a vibrant interior university living room. The Campus Commons houses a large space for informal gathering, multi-purpose meeting rooms, food court, student ID offices, bookstore, entertainment center and meeting rooms.

Inspired by the regional landscape of the Catskill Mountains, the form and shape of the Commons is abstracted from the Shawangunk ridge, a local internationally known rock climbing palisade that can be seen from the site and is a unique and special physical characteristic of the University’s location. In order to span over the existing courtyard with a column free enclosure for future flexibility, we designed a structural tube stress skin system that created the angular forms of the pavilion that metaphorically references the Shawangunk ridge. Uniform 4 inch square structural tubes shop fabricated in large planar sections were erected on site like a giant origami assembly and sprayed with intumescent paint to achieve the required fire rating. The erection of the entire enclosure was complete in less than two weeks. In order to resist the dead load and wind uplift on the roof, a 1” diameter stainless steel cable with 2” down rods were utilized to transform the stress skin on the horizontal roof plane into a truss. Ceramic fritted glass was placed on top of the stress skin to create the enclosure. The pattern of the ceramic frit is an abstracted digitized version of the tectonic plates of the Shawangunks. The final solution creates an exciting Campus Commons as a steel and glass ‘palisade’ set between two existing concrete brutalist buildings that transforms the entry gateway experience to the State University of New York at New Paltz with structural expressiveness.

The Commons is designed to achieve a LEED Silver certification by day light harvesting and views, radiant heating and cooling, recyclable materials and photo optic lighting controls.

Details/Credits

  • Project name: Campus Commons – SUNY NP
  • Location: New Paltz, New York, United States
  • Program: University student center housing multi-purpose meeting rooms, student ID offices, TV/game lounge, food court, informal commons, email stations, information, scholar’s study mezzanine, group study rooms
  • Area: Cite area: 5,400 sf • Built-up area: 22,000 gsf • Addition: 12,000 sf • Renovation: 10,000 sf
  • Year: Completion: September 2010
  • More details: Cost of Construction: $10 million
  • Client: State University of New York at New Paltz
  • Project by: ikon.5 architects
  • Team: Principal designer: Joseph g. Tattoni, AIA • Design Team: Ben Petrick, Joseph G. Tattoni, Shawn Daniels
  • Others: Contractor: Niram Construction
  • Text: Courtesy of ikon.5 architects
  • Images: Courtesy of ikon.5 architects
April 26, 2011

Vancouver Convention Centre West | LMN + DA with MCM

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © Nic Lehoux

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN/Studio

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN/Studio

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN/Studio

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN + DA with MCM © LMN

Situated on ’s waterfront with spectacular views of mountains, ocean, and parks, the Convention Centre West is designed to bring together the natural ecology, vibrant local culture, and built environment, accentuating their interrelationships through the architecture. Opened in April 2009, the Convention Centre West expansion facility triples the total square footage and functional capacity as well as completes the development of the public realm on the waterfront.

Seattle-based LMN, in collaboration with -based Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership and DA Architects & Planners, designed the Vancouver Convention Centre Westas a compelling vision of what a civic building can be—a celebration of people and place and a model of sustainability. The project achieved LEED®  Platinum certification, the first convention center to gain such recognition in the world, and recently received a COTE 2011 Top Ten Green Project Award.

Architects: LMNDA Architects & PlannersMusson Cattell Mackey Partnership (MCM)
Location: , British Columbia, 
Project Owner: BC Pavilion Corporation (PavCo)
Project Area: 1.2 million sqf
Project Year: 2009
Renderings and Drawings: /Studio
Photographs: Nic Lehoux

In 2010, the  Convention Centre West will serve as the international broadcast and media center for the XXI Olympic & Paralympic Winter Games. Housing the more than 7,000 media who will be broadcasting live to millions of viewers across the globe, the new facility will be a powerful visual ambassador of the Pacific Northwest region’s commitment to sustainability.

“It is an honor to be recognized at the national level by what many consider to be the top award program for sustainable design excellence,” notes  Design Partner Mark Reddington, FAIA. “The  community’s commitment to sustainability allowed us to develop a rich and diverse integration of the building program, natural ecology, local culture and urban context, and weave them together into a unified vision of sustainability.”

The central design challenge was to create and integrate a 22-acre development program at the intersection of the urban realm and the shoreline and marine habitat. The design approach creates a community experience that is simultaneously a building, an urban place, and an ecosystem.

Noted as the world’s first LEED® Platinum convention center, The VCCW was recognized for its leading design strategies resulting in significant improvements to the greater community and sustainable elements such as:

• A six-acre living roof that is the largest in . Hosting some 400,000 native plants and grasses as well as 240,000 bees, the green roof acts as an insulator to mediate the exterior air temperature, contributes to the building’s stormwater utilization, and integrates with the waterfront landscape ecosystem. Honey produced by the bees is used in the centre’s kitchen.
• Design strategies that achieve a 73% reduction in potable water consumption by low-volume flush and flow fixtures and zero potable water use for irrigation due to an onsite wastewater treatment plant that treats 100% of the greywater and blackwater.
• A sea water heat pump system that takes advantage of the constant temperature of adjacent seawater to produce cooling for the building during warmer months and heating for the building in cooler months.
• An underwater habitat skirt or artificial reef that is part of the centre’s foundation, providing new habitat for barnacles, mussels, seaweed, starfish, crabs and various marine species.
• Over 130,000 square feet of new walkway/bikeway and public space that connects across the site, extending ’s waterfront park system, enhancing the public access to the water’s edge and new public plazas, festival spaces and informal gathering areas.
• With an ultra-clear structural glass skin on all sides, extensive daylight and views set up an extroverted, community-friendly relationship with the life of the city and the waterfront and maximize the use of natural daylight in the building’s public spaces.
• Radiant flooring is used in the bulk of the program spaces, creating superior air circulation without significant energy use. Prefunction areas benefit from an advanced system of air diffusers, interlaced in an air swirl pattern above the ceiling members. The west facade of the building also includes operable windows and doors with dampers at the roof soffit, allowing natural ventilation under appropriate conditions.

Project Program
• 223,000 square feet of exhibition hall • 60,000 square feet of meeting rooms • 55,000 square feet of ballroom • 95,000 square feet of retail space
• 400,000 square feet of walkways, bikeways, public open space and plazas

Additional Credits:

Project Manager: VCCEP Ltd. (Stantec Consulting)
Contractor: PCL Construction Enterprises
Civil Engineer: Sandwell Engineering Inc.
Electrical Engineer: Schenke/Bawol Engineering Ltd.
Landscape Architect: PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc.
Marine/Foundation Consultant: WorleyParsons Westmar
Mechanical Engineer: Stantec Consulting
Structural Engineer: Glotman Simpson Consulting Engineers and Earth Tech () Inc.
Acoustic Consultants: Arup Acoustics and Daniel Lyzun & Associates
Audio Visual: Sparling
Barrier Free: Barrier Free Design
Building Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd.
Building Envelope Consultant: Morrison Hershfield
Civil Engineer: Sandwell Engineering Inc.
Commissioning Authority and Mechanical Commissioning Agent: KD Engineering Co.
Communications Consultant: The Pace Group
Cost Consultant: BTY Group
Design/Development Manager: K. Grassi Project Development Ltd.
Environmental Consultant: EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
Ethics Advisor: Carol Roberts
Facility Operations Consultant: Buckley-Christison International LLC
Fire Protection Engineer: GHL Consultants Ltd.
Geotechnical Engineer: Golder Associates
Horticultural & Ecological Consultant: Rana Creek Habitat Restoration
Food Service Consultant: William Caruso & Associates
Materials Engineer: Levelton Consultants
Parking and Traffic Engineer: Bunt & Associates Engineering Ltd. and ND Lea Consulting Ltd.
Project Management: Stantec Consulting
Public Art Consultant: Public Art Management
Quality Management Consultant: Levelton Consultants Ltd.
Retail Consultant: Urbanics Consultants Ltd.
Revenue Maximization: Bell-Irving Grauer Enterprise Corporation
Security Advisor: 3Si Risk Strategies
Signage & Wayfinding Consultant: Gottschalk & Ash
Specialty Lighting Consultant: Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design
Structural Engineer: Glotman Simpson Consulting Engineers and Earth Tech () Inc.
Surveyor: Butler Sundvick & Associates
Sustainability Coordinator: Sustainability Solutions Group
Telecommunications Consultant: RADA Technology Consulting Inc. Olympic Associates
Vertical Transportation Consultant: John W Gunn Consultants Inc.
Wind Consultant: DFA Engineering

http://www.archdaily.com/130373/vancouver-convention-centre-west-lmn-da-with-mcm/

April 24, 2011

Richard Meier’s Sunday Routine – Designing Collages

Richard Meier, the architect, works on a collage at his Upper East Side apartment.

By ELISA MALA | Published: April 1, 2011

The professional portfolio of Richard Meier, 76, the Pritzker Prize-winning architect, includes dozens of geometric designs spanning decades and continents. On Sundays, he contributes to another body of work, using scraps of found paper to create collages, a collection of which will eventually appear in a book. Mr. Meier lives in a duplex on East 72nd Street and owns a house in East Hampton, N.Y. ELISA MALA

RISE AND SHINE, MAYBE Usually somewhere around 8 or 8:30. Well, it depends on the weather. If it’s still gray and unpleasant-looking, maybe I’ll stay in bed until 9. I usually have just coffee, with milk and sugar.

TO THE PARK When the weather permits, I go to Central Park and sit on the bench for a couple of hours, watch the people go by and read a lot of newspapers and books. I read “A Life of Picasso,” by John Richardson. There are three volumes, and I can’t wait until the next one is published. I read “Off the Wall: A Portrait of Robert Rauschenberg,” by Calvin Tomkins, which was a terrific book. Occasionally, I see an old friend or someone I know, and we’ll stop and talk. That’s always nice.

REGULAR SEAT I sit in the same seat. There’s a row of benches on the north side as you go into the park from East 72nd Street — it’s kind of in the middle. The sun hits that area until at least 4 or 4:30. When the sun goes down, I leave. If I get hungry, I go home.

SMOKE A CIGAR? Not anymore. Not since Mayor Bloomberg banned it with his new law.

AVOIDING THE KITCHEN I just heat something up — whenever I cook, I burn it. Sometimes I just wait and have dinner. For sushi, it’s Sushi of Gari.

MUSICAL INTERLUDE I listen to classical music, read and do collages. I have a variety of different composers. Besides Beethoven, I listen to BrahmsBartok, Bernstein and Mahler. I listen to them on CDs. Just this morning, I was talking to someone who wanted to get me an iPod. It can be white or black — I hope it’s not a color!

BITS OF INSPIRATION Whatever I have at hand, whatever I pick up: cards, tickets, photographs, things I cut out of magazines, things people give me, business cards, invitations. Whatever passes through my hands during the day, I kind of put in an envelope. It finds its way into a collage, sometimes years later.

SCRAPBOOKS I sometimes do them in blank-paged books, A4-sized Sennelier’s. I’m doing a book of collages with Rizzoli, with my friend Massimo Vignelli. Between collecting the stuff and working it out, I spend an hour and a half on each collage, and sometimes finish six or seven or eight in a night.

SPECTATOR SPORT I like the New York teams. I’m both a Jets and a Giants fan, and I like to watch the Knicks.

SUMMER SWIMS In the summer, I will go to the Hamptons. Every day when I am there, I go swimming, usually in Georgica Beach. I freestyle. Everyone should know how to swim: someone threw me in the pool and said, “Swim!”

TAKING NOTES Years ago, I used to work on Sundays. I stopped going to the office on Sundays right around the time that we finished the Getty Center. Now, I jot down notes on what I need to do on Monday.

BEDTIME I try to stop by midnight, but sometimes I’ll go to bed at 2 a.m. I try to sleep seven or seven and a half hours a night. If I could, I would like to have more than one Sunday a week.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/03/nyregion/03routine.html?ref=richardmeier

April 24, 2011

Social housing tower in Plaza Europa, Barcelona | Roldan + Berengué, arqts

Project Data:
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Type: Housing – Residential
Architects: Roldan + Berengué, arqts – www.roldanberengue.com
Collaborators Architecture: Vicenc Sanz and Zana Bosnic
Promoter: Institut Catala Del Sol | INCASÒL
Project Date: February 2005
Construction Start: October 25th 2007
Construction End: May 19th 2010
Total Build Up Area: 10.312,98 m2
Total Build Up Area – Apartment Units: 7.660 m2
Apartment Units: 75 units | 49 units of 3 bedrooms S.U. 69m2 | 25 units of 2 bedrooms S.U. 56m2 | 1 residence of 7 bedrooms S.U. 196m2
Commercial: 1unit S.C. 280,11m2
Parking: 82 units S.C. 2.660,65m2
Budget: 7.912.000 € | 767 €/m2
Photos: Jordi Surroca

The tower E.I.O.5 is a project of social housing promoted by INCASOL and it is located in a new central zone known as Plaça Europa (Europa Square).
The Europa Square, according to Albert Viaplana’s Project, it is shaped as the last nude in Llobregat’s direction of the squares sequence that, approximately each kilometer, marking the Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes.

The urban model of the Europa Square is a generous public space opened to each side of Gran Via which concentrates, with other buildings, 26 towers of tertiary and residential uses, publics and privates, between 15 and 20 floors. Tower 5 is located in the farthest crown from the Gran Via which runs half- undergrounded.

For all the buildings of this last ring, most of them public housing promoted by different clients, distribution laws in the master planning fix a maximum floor dimension of 24×24 m, as well as height in which should be located the first floor structure (slab) and the crowing point of the towers.The piece we had built was an object of public client’s competition in February 2005. In our proposal, rescaling the tower according to its position as a piece in the limit with the consolidate fabric of Hospitalet trying to visualize with the building a movement between Europa Square and the blocks of 5 floors that form the surrounding.
Grouping together floors from 3 to 3, the image of the tower, perceived in some kind of cinematographic long plan, could approximate to a building of 5 floors of height. Consequently the scale of the windows, according to that law of grouping them, is also transforming in frames of 10 meters height and different thickness. In order to be more accurate, the facade and windows, this last ones with a sequential number and modulated in pieces with similar dimensions to a door (0.8 x 2,10 m), succeeding in different planes with a depth that range between 50 cm and 1,2 meter and emphasises the concept of big inverted tribunes. In each section of the tower the first floor of every serial of 3 is a balcony.

As some of the images in a “short plane” we have done for the competition show us, this frames avoid vertigo impression because between the interior and the outside of the apartment there is always an intermediate element: balconies, jambs, or the lintels of this big holes.

The election of the elements for the facade’s assembly has been done paying attention to a comparative study of several constructive solutions which evaluated the origin of already recycled materials, its natural origin and the capacity for being recycled at the end of its useful life. Likewise, was also valuated the expense of fabrication energy and the recovered politics of the surplus energy generated during the production process.
Materially, the facade is constructed with a 8 mm thick HPL pannels hanging of hidden structure of recycled aluminium perfiles. Black frames are made of 4mm thick aluminium composite panels which brings equal resistance with a lower weight per m2 to any other material with the same features.
Synthetically, all materials used in the tower’s construction are 100% recyclable and specifically the ones used in the facade come from a 65% and 100% already recycled materials.The tower is set in floor plan as two towers with T form circulation corridor and two scales in the extremes across the one illuminates the interior in the circulation zone. Every tower has two apartments of 69 m2 in the extremes and one of 56 m2 in the central position. Totally, the program is of 75 units.
In this Project, the apartment unit’s distribution begins in the 14th floor and keeps descending so the compacted residential volume from the superior floor releases a space of 3 levels height with a T form in the access. This piece, generous in volume and “sober” in measures and finishing materials, in its longest dimension it ends being a street with accesses in the extremes and has unusual dimensions for the building’s entrance hall of usual public housing buildings.

We think that big frames of the facades as well as the space of the entrance hall, work like intermediate spaces of relation, shaping the community scale, between the individual and private scale of the houses and the public city scale.

INNOVATION CRITERIA:
1 – Facade disposition in two planes through “inverted tribunes”: apartments with THREE SOLAR ORIENTATIONS and crossed ventilation
2 – NATURAL OR RECYCLED (85%) and RECYCLABLE (100%) materials and production cycles that incorporate cost-saving measures and energy use
3 – PREINDUSTRIALIZED facade systems, “dry” construction
4 – VENTILATED FACADE with total elimination of thermal bridges
5 – very austere materials assembled in UNCONVENTIONAL ways

Independent systems are used at different levels of the facade, without interference between them:
A-MODULE OF PREFABRICATED WINDOW: lacquered steel sub-frame , aluminum window frames with thermal bridges break + chambered glass + aluminum shutters, placed from floor to ceiling (inside plane)
B- VENTILATED FACADE of large format black aluminum composite panels, (sides)
C- VENTILATED FACADE of large format 8 mm HPL panels , with a hidden structure of recycled aluminum 4 mm thick, which provides equal strength with a weight per square meter than any other material with the same qualities (Exterior plan)
D-LATTICE formed by fixed brise-soleil of same material, placed in aluminum special extrusion profiles for the system to control graduate orientation and spacing of the slats (Externally)

The criteria for selection of materials of the facade are:
1 – ASSEMBLY: facade materials have been used at their maximum size possible to optimize both time and material assembly efficiency, to control the effect of cuttings on the global scale of the building.
2 – SUSTAINABILITY: A comparative study has been made to evaluate recycled materials, their merits, natural origin and the ability to be recycled at the end of their useful life. Furthermore, it has also been evaluated the amount of energy waste and the recovery policy of surplus energy generated during the production process.
HPL (High pressure laminate) PANELS “FUNDERMAX NT Exterior”
Thickness 8 mm, format 4,1×1,85 m
Quantity: 2,410 m2, 27 TM
Properties: lightness, strength, variety of formats, minimal shrinkage, fast installation, minimal maintenance, heat and sound insulation, moisture protection
Composition: 65% natural fiber (40% of which is recycled), 35% synthetic material
Life cycle: 25% recycled source, 65% natural origin. 100% recyclable
CO2 emission: 6,000 kg/m3 (23,000 kg/m3 steel, aluminum 37,000 kg/m3)
Energy recovery: 95% of energy recovered in the production and for heating of buildings in the vicinity of the factory

– ALUMINIUM COMPOSITE PANELS “ALUCOBOND”
Thickness 4 mm; format 6×2 m
Quantity: 2,690 m2, 15 TM
Properties: lightness, strength, bending rigidity, a variety of formats, rapid installation, minimal maintenance, thermal and acoustic insulation, low thermal expansion
Life cycle: 90% recyclable
CO2 Emission: 15,000 kg/m3
Weight / rigidity required: 5.5 kg/m2 (for the same rigidity is required: aluminum 8.9 kg/m2, 11.7 kg/m2 in fibrocement, 18.7 kg/m2 in steel)

– ALUMINIUM PERFILES
Quantity: 10 TM
Properties: light weight, corrosion resistance, bending stiffness, a variety of formats, low thermal expansion
Lifecycle: 100% recycled and recyclable
Savings in raw material consumption: 1TM = 5 TM recycled aluminum bauxite
Energy savings in production: 95% from the primary aluminum

http://architecturelab.net/social-housing-tower-in-plaza-europa-barcelona-by-roldan-berengue-arqts-16206/