Archive for March 26th, 2011

March 26, 2011

Blackfriars Road by ALLFORD HALL MONAGHAN MORRIS

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

  • Project Details
  • Completion: 2013
  • Cost: £61 Million
  • Clients: Great Portland Estates Plc

Terminating the vista from the south end of Blackfriars Bridge is the crystalline form of this 17,600sqm office building wrapped in a fluid pinstripe glass skin. This simple extruded parallelogram has then been cut away in three planes: to the north to create a façade to the river, to the base to create an increased public realm, and to the roof to create a sky room. Retail units are placed at the base to animate the enlarged street and a new residential building is located to the south in the area of the site compressed by rights of light considerations.

Project Credits:

Project Manager: Jackson Coles

Structural Engineer: AKT

Services Engineer: Watermans Building Services

Cost Consultant: Davis Langdon

Planning Consultant: Montagu Evans

Acoustic Consultant: Alan Saunders

Rights Of Light Consultant: Anstey Horne

Party Wall Consultant: Malcolm Hollis

Transport Consultant: TPP

Sustainibility Consultant: Environ UK

CGI’s: Smoothe

http://www.ahmm.co.uk/projectDetails/73/Blackfriars-Road?image=1

 

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March 26, 2011

Antorcha Bicentenario | José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez

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The bicentennial torch, designed by  and , is inspired by the mural depicting the social struggle of Mexican independence by Jose Clemente Orozco in which the leader of the independence, Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, leading the insurrection by tightly grasping a flaming torch. The structure manifested from this image by the architect is a 45-meter tall element emphasizing the main entrance into , México.The monument consists of a 10-meter tall concrete volume, followed by a 35-meter steel structure made of one hundred rings, which is interspersed with one hundred voids and marked by two hundred scars. The shadow that will be projected on them will produce optical negatives. At night, the sculpture will be a great urban lamp, illuminating the environment through its presence and enlightening the city of its symbol. The scars mark the journey to independence.A light path is drawn from the bottom of the monument to the top, linking land, object and sky in producing a perpetual flame that stands for Mexican Independence and the country’s future projected to infinity.

The bicentennial torch is a tribute to the heroes who fought for independence and granted the people a homeland, illuminating the ideals of freedom and sovereignty. The torch begins at a base made of mud, stones and undergrowth and proceeds in a trajectory of man-made materials through toil and effort, making its way to the sky in an unending projection of the Mexican people’s desire for unity.

Architect:  
Location: , México.
Name of the project: “Antorcha Bicentenario” (“bicentennial torch”)
Architectonic and lightning design:  / Abdiel Miranda Rodríguez / Isaí Padilla Aguirre / Eduardo Muñoz de la Torre / Claudia Pérez Campos
Landscape Design: 
Project Leaders: 
Project Team: Abdiel Miranda Rodríguez / Gilberto Isaí Padilla Aguirre / Eduardo Muñoz de la Torre / Claudia Pérez Campos
Structural project: Jorge Lucio Lerma Carmona
Project year: 2010

 

March 26, 2011

New Acropolis Museum | Bernard Tschumi

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Location: Athens, 
Associate Architect: ARSY
Architects Team: ; Architect and Lead Designer Joel Rutten; Project Architect, Adam Dayem, Aristotelis Dimitrakopoulos, Jane Kim, Eva Sopeoglou, Kim Starr, Anne Save de Beaurecueil, Jonathan Chace, Robert Holton, Valentin Bontjes van Beek, Liz Kim, Daniel Holguin, Kriti Siderakis, Michaela Metcalfe, Justin Moore, Joel Aviles, Georgia Papadavid, Allis Chee, Thomas Goodwill, Véronique Descharrières, Christina Devizzi
ARSY Team: Michael Photiadis; Principal, George Kriparakos, Nikos Balkalbassis, Philippos Photiadis, Jaimie Peel, Niki Plevri, Maria Sarafidou, Makis Grivas, Elena Voutsina, Manoulis Economou, Anastassia Gianou, Miltiadis Lazaridis, Dimitris Kosmas
Structure: ADK and ARUP
Mechanical and Electrical: MMB Study Group S.A. and ARUP
Civil: Michanniki Geostatiki and ARUP
Acoustics: Theodore Timagenis
Lighting: ARUP, London
General Contractor: Aktor
Project Area: 21,000 sqm
Project Year: 2003-2009
Photographs: Courtesy of  Architects

Site

Located in the historic of Makryianni district, the Museum stands less than 1,000 feet southeast of the Parthenon. The top-floor Parthenon Gallery offers a 360-degree panoramic view of the Acropolis and modern Athens. The Museum is entered from the Dionysios Areopagitou pedestrian street, which links it to the Acropolis and other key archeological sites in Athens.

Program

With 8,000 square meters (90,000 square feet) of exhibition space and a full range of visitor amenities, the Acropolis Museum tells the story of life on the Athenian Acropolis and its surroundings by uniting collections formerly dispersed in multiple institutions, including the small Acropolis Museum built in the 19th century.

The rich collections provide visitors with a comprehensive picture of the human presence on the Acropolis, from pre-historic times through late antiquity. Integral to this program is the display of an archeological excavation on the site: ruins from the 4th through 7th centuries A.D., left intact and protected beneath the building and made visible through the first floor. Other program facilities include a 200-seat auditorium.

Principal Design Features

Designed with spare horizontal lines and utmost simplicity, the Museum is deliberately non-monumental, focusing the visitor’s attention on extraordinary works of art. With the greatest possible clarity, the design translates programmatic requirements into architecture.Light: The collection consists primarily of works of sculpture, many of them architectural pieces that originally decorated the monuments of the Acropolis, so the building that exhibits them is a museum of ambient natural light. The use of various types of  allows light to flood into the top-floor Parthenon Gallery, to filter through skylights into the archaic galleries, and to penetrate the core of the building, gently touching the archeological excavation below the building.Circulation: The collection is installed in chronological sequence, from pre-history through the late Roman period, but reaches its high point (literally and programmatically) with the Parthenon Frieze. The visitor’s route is therefore a clear, three-dimensional loop. It goes up from the lobby via escalator to the double-height galleries for the Archaic period; upward again by escalator to the Parthenon Gallery; then back down to the Roman Empire galleries and out toward the Acropolis itself.

Organization: The Museum is conceived as a base, a middle zone and a top, taking its form from the archeological excavation below and from the orientation of the top floor toward the Parthenon.

The base hovers over the excavation on more than 100 slender  pillars. This level contains the lobby, temporary exhibition spaces, museum store, and support facilities.

The middle (which is trapezoidal in plan) is a double-height space that soars to 10 meters (33 feet), accommodating the galleries from the Archaic to the late Roman period. A mezzanine features a bar and restaurant (with a public terrace looking out toward the Acropolis) and multimedia space.

The top is the rectangular, -enclosed, skylit Parthenon Gallery, over 7 meters high and with a floor space of over 2,050 square meters (22,100 square ft). It is shifted 23 degrees from the rest of the building to orient it directly toward the Acropolis. Here the building’s  core, which penetrates upward through all levels, becomes the surface on which the marble sculptures of the Parthenon Frieze are mounted. The core allows natural light to pass down to the Caryatids on the level below.

http://www.archdaily.com/61898/new-acropolis-museum-bernard-tschumi-architects/