Archive for March 15th, 2011

March 15, 2011

EPA Region 8 Headquarters | ZGF Architects

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

EPA Region 8 Headquarters / ZGF Architects © Robert Canfield

The new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8 Headquarters building sits on an urban brownfield that formerly housed a U.S. Postal Annex. This  rated design is the result of a challenging design process that sought to integrate a contemporary, high-performance, secure, and environmentally sensitive building into one of ’s most important historic and civic districts. A key program goal was to assimilate the new facility into the urban fabric in a way that strengthens and enhances the quality of the historic neighborhood in which it is located, while establishing the building as a landmark in its own right. As a Federal building, the structure also had to meet strict Department of Homeland Security requirements, resulting in a Level 4 facility.Architects: Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects, LLP
Location: 1595 Wynkoop Street 
Developer/Design builder/Architect of Record: OPUS Northwest, LLC
Project Area: 292,000 sqf
Project Year: 2007
Photographs: Robert Canfield

The building used a wide variety of sustainable materials including, corn-based fabric and wheatboard, recycled glass tile, recycled-content carpets, recycled steel, cork floors, bamboo wall panels and doors made with rice hull cores. In sum, more than 89% of the wood-based materials and products used in the building are certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council’s Principles and Criteria.Additionally, fly-ash was used in the concrete portions of the building and regional materials – those manufactured, produced or harvested within 500 miles of the building – were used for more than 50% of the structure’s manufactured materials. Construction waste was also reduced, with as much as 80% of the total waste generated was recycled or diverted from local landfills.Scarcity of water in  makes it a precious resource. With the help of experts from the EPA, the design team demonstrated to local authorities the effectiveness of “ecoroofs” as a means of both removing pollutants from stormwater and reducing the rate and quantity of stormwater runoff. The result is the first “green” roof in  used to manage stormwater.Populated with native, drought-tolerant plant species that minimize irrigation requirements, the 20,000 square foot vegetated roof covers three terrace levels and treats stormwater while reducing the urban heat-island effect of the building.Variations of a glazed curtain-wall system were designed for the different facades – the sunward (southeat and southwest) façades were designed with horizontal exterior sunshades and a system of internal light shelves designed to cut glare and solar gain. The windward façades (northeast/northwest) have a series of exterior vertical shades to cut glare from low-angle summer sun while simultaneously harvesting diffused light from the clear North Sky. The net result, 75% of workstations receive significant daylight.In addition to serving as a great “room”, the EPA building’s atrium was also developed to enhance the building’s office spaces by providing light from both sides of the office floor plates instead of from the building’s perimeter alone. However, due to the atrium’s depth and aspect ratio, directing light into the atrium proved to be a unique design challenge-a challenge that was compounded by budget constraints and a tight building schedule.Seeking an alternative to conventional, and generally more expensive reflective devices like mirrors, and needing a solution that could be easily and economically installed, the ZGF design team began to study how light could be directed down into the atrium most effectively. A large-scale physical model was used on a heliodon (an artificial sun) to examine the possibilities.The ultimate design solution needed to do two jobs simultaneously; reflect light down into the atrium and shield the office occupants on the atrium’s upper floors from the glare of direct sun, the reflector system would need to hang below the glass skylight instead of stand above it. The design solution required a parabolic shape (in section profile) in order redirect light hitting it from various angles into a fairly uniform downward direction. The reflectors needed to be deeper at their lower, outer corners due to the atrium geometry, resulting in a distinct “butterfly” shape being applied to the reflectors.

http://www.archdaily.com/119458/epa-region-8-headquarters-zgf-architects/

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March 15, 2011

Red Building | Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Red Building / Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of StudioAMD

Red Building / Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of StudioAMD

Red Building / Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of StudioAMD

The new addition to the Pacific Design Center in , which spans 40 years of design and construction, is the Red Building by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. The first phase of the three-part composition is the Blue Building was completed in 1975 by Cesar Pelli when he was Partner for Design at Gruen Associates. The Green Building and an outpost for the Museum of Contemporary was added in 1988. The Red Building is a programmatic addition to the showrooms and museum of the first two structures.

Located on a 14-acre site, the buildings are organized around an outdoor plaza. The Red Building is the most dynamic of the composition which already includes the six-story Blue Building that houses showrooms and office space, and the nine-story Green Building which contains a film theater and conference center. The new addition alters the site, creating a more defined public outdoor space. It will house 400,000 square feet of office space and parking for 1,500 cars.

The Red Building is composed of two curved, sloping towers atop seven levels of parking. The six-story West Tower slopes inward against the Hollywood Hills to the north. The eight-story East Tower continues the gesture, curving upward and culminating in a high point to the east. A seventh-floor courtyard planted with palm trees is located between the two towers. The walls facing the Palm Court will be of the same technology as the red walls, but will be of white glass to give the courtyard a light, ethereal quality. The courtyard will offer views if Hollywood Hills to the north and the other building of the Design Center.  Like the previous two Pacific Design Center buildings, the Red Building will be clad in glass. While the glass of the earlier buildings was opaque, the façade of the Red Building includes both transparent and fritted glass. To create a taut, all-glass appearance, the red glass is held in its aluminum frames with silicone.

Architects Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects
Location Melrose Avenue and San Vicente Boulevard, 
Client Cohen Brothers Realty Corporation
Area 400,000 (office), 400,000 square feet (parking)

http://www.archdaily.com/119118/red-building-pelli-clarke-pelli-architects/

March 15, 2011

Engineering 5 Building | Perkins+Will

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

Engineering 5 Building / Perkins+Will © Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

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Architects: Perkins+Will
Location: 
Project area: 154,000 sq. ft.
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Lisa Logan Architectural Photography

he University of ’s Engineering Five building marks the first phase of a major expansion to the Faculty of Engineering and a dramatic new showcase for its innovative work. The six storey structure consolidates previously dispersed departments with four stories of departmental labs, classrooms and offices above a two storey Student Design Centre (SDC). The SDC is conceived as a “daylight factory” where instructional space and design studios overlook high concrete framed work bays and shops supporting the fabrication and display of student projects.The building is clearly articulated as having two spatial systems whereby the main public routes and the SDC are highly transparent and read in contrast to a fritted glass facade whose volumetric illusion abstracts the scale and form of the departmental floors. A six storey atrium with a unique LED lit feature stair unites the various levels and ties into the social gathering spaces for each of the departments. A foil to the Eng 5′s taught. prismatic shell, the curvilinear glazed bridge facilitates the movement of people, equipment and machinery over the campus ring road and a regional rail line.

Project Scope

At 150,000 SF, Engineering 5 marks the first phase of a major expansion for ’s top ranked Engineering faculty. The project accommodates four floors of departmental labs, offices and classrooms above a two storey student design centre housing work bays, design studios, meeting rooms, student machine shops, engine test labs and a large computer commons. The design anticipates a major addition in 2013.

Inspiration

The design for Engineering five presents a highly abstract composition where patterns of pedestrian movement and the principal public spaces are read in contrast to the seamless graphic illusion created by an innovative ceramic frit application. The Central Atrium and the stair within it are designed to encourage movement between floors and the interaction of the various departments. Clad in a perforated acoustic metal panel and ribbed with fissures of LED light, the stair simultaneously performs circulation, lighting and acoustic duties within the six storey space.The building’s lower two floors are dominated by the student design centre – a suite of robustly structured, flexible spaces that offer infinite creative potential to student teams. Conditions of extreme transparency and overlook make the SDC the showcase of the building.

Context

The University of  was substantially developed in the 1960s as a bucolic garden campus. Successive infill has clouded the original vision and until recently, the Engineering Faculty occupied a warren of congested spaces, at odds with the Faculty’s innovative programs. ENG 5 and its planned expansion mark the first realization of a strategic master-plan that commands a parcel of land to the east of the Campus ring road. Through its facade, its planning and its siting, ENG 5 defines a new era of expansion while uniting it with the existing campus.into a coherent public realm. ENG V and the space it shapes simultaneously define a new era of expansion and unite it to the existing campus.

Sustainability

Although, the client elected not to pursue LEED certification, the building is designed to achieve a high degree of sustainability.

http://www.archdaily.com/118949/engineering-5-building-perkinswill/