Archive for March 12th, 2011

March 12, 2011

B9 Bridge Telekom | Schlaich Bergermann und Partner

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

B9 Bridge Telekom / Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner © Thomas Mayer

Architects: Schlaich Bergermann Und Partner
Location: 
Client: Deutsche Telekom AG
Project area: 72 sqm
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Thomas Mayer

The new Telekom Bridge is an elegant concrete structure that connects the company ́s buildings on both sides of the road in one sweeping gesture. The elevation of the bridge is defined by the clearance space required by the light-rail. Thus, the walk-way leads at clearance height through the tree tops along this highly frequented but beautiful tree- lined boulevard with multiple hinged supports along the way.

Abut- ment points, where the bridge is supported on bearing plates to place it on the ground, occur on both sides of the road. On each face side, set against the bridge, there are elevators that stand as soli- taries to delineate the structure. Hanging underneath the bridge are folded steel stairs that mark the connecting paths to the buildings. A lighting concept with interactive elements sets the stage for the dynamic, filigree architecture of this bridge.

http://www.archdaily.com/117960/b9-bridge-telekom-schlaich-bergermann-und-partner/

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March 12, 2011

Monarch Place | Randy Brown Architects

Monarch Place / Randy Brown Architects © Farshid Assassi

Monarch Place / Randy Brown Architects © Farshid Assassi

Monarch Place / Randy Brown Architects © Farshid Assassi

Monarch Place / Randy Brown Architects © Farshid Assassi

Monarch Place / Randy Brown Architects © Farshid Assassi

Monarch Place / Randy Brown Architects © Farshid Assassi

Monarch Place / Randy Brown Architects © Farshid Assassi

Following Randy Brown Architects’ previous success with strip malls, the firm designed Monarch Place as another effort to address what they see as inescapable products of the suburban lifestyle. As the architect and developer Brown’s design addresses both the high-design needs of the tenants and the bottom line of his development company, Quantum Quality Real Estate.

Architect: Randy Brown Architects
Location: 72nd Street and Hwy 370, 
Team Project: Randy Brown, Steve Mielke, Dirk Henke
Civil Engineer: E&A Consulting Group
Electrical Engineer: CEI
Structural Engineer: InfraStructure Inc.
Photographs: Farshid Assassi

The goals for project were to catch people’s attention as they drive by, create a public outdoor space, and organize tenant signage on the building.  used the idea of a billboard as a conceptual starting point. The billboard presents the “commercial company name” to people in their cars. The billboard’s structural steel pieces, skin and lighting were incorporated into the building design. This building type is replacing the barns, which once stood on the site. We created the transparency of an old barn by designing a “skin wrapper” built from galvanized metal studs, perforated metal panels and corrugated steel.

http://www.archdaily.com/115764/monarch-place-randy-brown-architects/

March 12, 2011

Oscar-von-Miller Tower | Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

Oscar-von-Miller Tower / Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects © Henning Köpke

plan 01 plan 01

plan 02 plan 02

section section

Architects: Deubzer König + Rimmel Architects
Location: 
Structural engineer: Barthel & Maus Beratende Ingenieure GmbH
Project area: 90,5 sqm
Project year: 2006 – 2010
Photographs: Henning Köpke

As seen in the site map, the Oskar von Miller Tower has its oval ground plan aligned in east-west direction; two cubic bodies are inserted into the building from the south, the entrance on the ground floor with its two large sliding doors, above that the measuring box. This is for meteorologists to maintain the facility and evaluate the measurement results. Access is additionally possible via a spiral staircase on the east side.

The weather tower consists of horizontally stacked glass rings, which are staggered by measurement levels (5, 10, 20, and 35m) with four booms pointing north, south, east, and west. The top measurement level is arranged vertically as a single measurement point.

The shells’ ground plan shape consists of the geometric addition of two ellipses.

In the west vertex of the buildings’ cubature contains the only geometric point which is consistently vertical. Apart from that, the rings continuously narrow from the bottom to the top.

The instruments are fastened to the booms on sledges, so that they can be pulled into the inside of the tower for maintenance and testing.

The necessary length of the measurement booms was checked by using a model in the wind tunnel of the TU Munich and the institute for aerodynamics, thus guaranteeing that the cubature of the tower does not interfere with the climatic measurements due to aerodynamic turbulence.

Access to the various maintenance levels is provided via a lift in the west core.

http://www.archdaily.com/117798/oscar-von-miller-tower-deubzer-konig-rimmel-architects/

 

 

 

 

March 12, 2011

Jean Nouvele’s 100 11th Ave in NY

IMG_0228-bw2 © Paul Clemence

cityview_insnow © Ateliers Jean Nouvel

IMG_0476-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0460-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0458-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0289-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0277-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0256-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0251-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0241-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0215-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0214-bw1-b © Paul Clemence

Photographer Paul Clemence shared with us some photos of 100 11th Ave, a residential tower in Chelsea by Jean Nouvel.

This building is almost complete, and it has a strong presence from across the river, or when seen from the High Line. I remember that a month ago, I was looking at it from the High Line and a lady next to me said “how old is that building?”. Despite the fact of its high tech curtain wall, using 1647 different window panels, the building looks ancient, almost like a left over from the old waterfront.

The variation of the windows is not only on their size, but also the inclination and the glass tint, giving this building a unique facade.

http://www.archdaily.com/38137/jean-nouveles-100-11th-ave-in-ny/

 

 

March 12, 2011

City Shortens Nouvel’s 53rd Street Tower

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A few weeks ago, we shared ’s design for 53 West 53rd Street, a 1,250 foot project that would dominate the site.  Reactions to the project were different across the board as some felt the tower would push  forward in the architectural world, whereas others did not agree with the scale or aesthetic of the project.  As we previously mentioned, Nouvel’s project had a long way to go before construction, and this week, as Nicolai Ouroussoff reported for the New York Times,  it seems that the City Planning Department has decided to shorten the proposed tower by 200 feet.

Conceived as a giant spire, the tower’s sleek silhouette and proportions, “particularly the exaggerated relationship between its small footprint and enormous height” would have certainly left an impression on the Midtown skyline.  The top of the tower, with its three uneven peaks, seems to have caused most of the problem.  Ms. Amanda Burden, the city planning commissioner, said that the top did not meet the aesthetic standards of a building that would compete in height with the city’s most famous towers.  Ms. Burden explained,  ”Members of the commission had to make a decision based on what was in front of them,” she said. “The development team had to show us that they were creating something as great or even greater than the Empire State Building and the design they showed us was unresolved.”

The project was not fully developed, as the “three peaks were too symmetrical, which gave them a slightly static appearance.”  Nouvel would have needed to clearly address such design issues, yet some argue that the Pritzker winner is fully capable of doing so.  The new height restriction will also account for a loss of 150,000 square feet.  This loss of space could lead to “cuts in the design budget, which could mean cheaper materials and more cramped interiors.”

The project is still getting a lot of attention in , and across the architectural world as some are bitterly against the project whereas others are in support of it.  As Nicolai Ouroussoffconcluded, “…now, one of the most enchanting skyscraper designs of recent memory, may well be lost because some people worry that nothing in our current age can measure up to the past. It is a mentality that, once it takes hold, risks transforming a living city into an urban mausoleum.”

http://www.archdaily.com/34972/city-shortens-nouvels-53rd-street-tower/

 

March 12, 2011

Ghost 7 | Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

plan plan

Ghost 7 / Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects © Jamie Steeves

The Ghost Architectural Laboratory is the research facility of Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects Limited. It is an education initiative designed to promote the transfer of architectural knowledge through direct experience – project-based learning taught in the master-builder tradition – with emphasis on issues of landscape, material culture, and community. For two weeks every summer builders, students, engineers, architects, and professors converge on Mackay’s property to partake in a design/build intership. The one featured here is Ghost 7, the first permanent Ghost project.

Project description, images, and drawings after the break.

Architect: Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects Limited
Location: 
Project Team: Brian MacKay-Lyons, Talbot Sweetapple, Peter Blackie
Structural: Campbell Coumeau
Builder: Gordon McLean, Warren Mcally
Project Area: 2,000 sqf
Project Year: 2006
Photographs: Jamie Steeves

Ghost 7 provides lodging for future Ghost participants—an optimistic vision of longevitiy for the project and for the site. While offering refuge in the landscape, Ghost 7 is a perforated, less-defensive version of the archetypal courtyard form of habitation. As a result, the landscape percolates through the scheme. The siting geometry is drawn from the structural grid of the Ghost 5 project opposite.

The four resulting structures can be described both as cabins and as pavilions. They are cabins by way of their limited size (720 sqf) and their modest means; they are pavilions by their ambition to create a rich range of spatial experience within a modernist free plan within the landscape. The series of Ghost 7 buildings, with tight spaces between, is based on the precedent of a collection of a particular, yet typical, group of closely space Nova Scotian fish sheds.

In the manner of Louis Kahn, the parti consists of a “servant box,” wrapped by a larger “served shed.” The servant box contains the sleeping areas, bathroom, kitchen, mechanical services, and balcony; the served shed houses the gathering space. The box is a finished and heated retreat clad in vertical boards while the shed remains raw and unheated and clad in eastern white shingles four inches to the weather.

The post foundations result in a minimum impact on the land. Prefabricated built-up wood trusses the loads into the foundations. The envelope consists of a rough-sawn wood two-by-four stud frame. The metal roofing is corrugated Galvalume.

http://www.archdaily.com/119109/ghost-7-mackay-lyons-sweetapple-architects/