Archive for March, 2011

March 29, 2011

Eduardo Souto de Moura wins Pritzker Architecture Prize 2011

Photo by Augusto Brázio

Burgo Tower in Porto, Portugal – Photo by Luis Ferreira Alves

1994-2002. House in Serra da Arrábida, Portugal – photo by Luis Ferreira Alves

2005-2009 Paula Rêgo Museum – Cascais, Portugal – photo by Luis Ferreira Alves

Portuguese Architect Will Be Presented the 2011 Pritzker Architecture Prize in Washington, D.C.

Eduardo Souto de Moura, a 58 year old architect from Portugal, is the jury’s choice for the 2011 Pritzker Architecture Prize, it was announced today by Thomas J. Pritzker, chairman of The Hyatt Foundation which sponsors the prize. The formal ceremony for what has come to be known throughout the world as architecture’s highest honor will be in one of Washington, D.C.’s finest classical buildings, the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium.
In announcing the jury’s choice, Pritzker elaborated, “This marks the second time in the history of the prize that a Portuguese architect has been chosen. The first was in 1992 when Alvaro Siza was so honored.”
The purpose of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, which was founded in 1979 by the late Jay A. Pritzker and his wife, Cindy, is to honor annually a living architect whose built work demonstrates a combination of those qualities of talent, vision and commitment, which has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture. The laureates receive a $100,000 grant and a bronze medallion.

 

Pritzker Prize jury chairman, The Lord Palumbo, spoke from his home in the United Kingdom, quoting from the jury citation that focuses on the reasons for this year’s choice: “During the past three decades, Eduardo Souto de Moura has produced a body of work that is of our time but also carries echoes of architectural traditions.” And further, “His buildings have a unique ability to convey seemingly conflicting characteristics — power and modesty, bravado
and subtlety, bold public authority and a sense of intimacy —at the same time.”

As a student, Souto de Moura worked for Alvaro Siza for five years. Since forming his own office in 1980, Souto de Moura has completed well over sixty projects, most in his native Portugal, but he has designs in Spain, Italy, Germany, United Kingdom and Switzerland. The projects include single family homes, a cinema, shopping centers, hotels, apartments, offices, art galleries and museums, schools, sports facilities and subways.

His stadium in Braga, Portugal was the site of European soccer championships when it was completed in 2004, and gained high praise. Nearly a million and a half cubic yards of granite were blasted from the site and crushed to make concrete for the stadium. Precise explosions of a
mountain side created a hundred foot high granite face that terminates one end of the stadium. Souto de Moura describes this coexistence of the natural with the man made construction as good architecture. In his own words, “It was a drama to break down the mountain and make concrete from the stone.” The jury citation calls this work, “…muscular, monumental and very much at home within its powerful landscape.”

Another of his projects, the Burgo Tower, completed in 2007, constructed in the city where he lives and works, Porto, Portugal, is described by the jury as, “…two buildings side by side, one vertical and one horizontal with different scales, in dialogue with each other and the urban landscape.” Souto de Moura commented that “a twenty story office tower is an unusual project for me. I began my career building single family houses.”

Souto de Moura has designed numerous residences, one of which, House Number Two built in the town of Bom Jesus, was singled out by the jury for its “uncommon richness throughout the subtle banding in the concrete of its exterior walls.” Souto de Moura’s comments on the project: “Because the site was a fairly steep hill overlooking the city of Braga, we decided not to produce a large volume resting on a hilltop. Instead, we made the construction on five terraces with retainer walls, with a different function defined for each terrace– fruit trees on the lowest level, a swimming pool on the next, the main parts of the house on the next, bedrooms on the fourth, and on the top, we planted a forest.”

Another project in his native city, Porto, is the Cultural Center completed in 1991, which the jury describes as “a testament to his ability to combine materials expressively.” He used copper, stone, concrete and wood.

A convent and monastery in a mountainous terrain near Amares, Portugal, called Santa Maria do Bouro was a project for Souto de Moura from 1989 to 1997, in which he converted the centuries old structure into a state inn. He recalls the walls were over four feet thick. Originally built in the 12th century, the jury declares in their citation that Souto de Moura “has created spaces that are both consistent with their history and modern in conception.”

Souto de Moura, in describing another of his projects, has said, “After the painter Paulo Regio chose me as her architect, I was lucky to be able to choose the site. It was a fenced off forest with some open space in the middle. On the basis of the elevation of the trees, I proposed a set of volumes of varying heights. Developing this play between the artificial and nature helped define the exterior color, red concrete, a color in opposition to the green forest. Two large pyramids along the entrance axis prevent the project from being a neutral sum of boxes.” The Paulo Regio Museum completed in 2008, is cited by the jury as “both civic and intimate, and so appropriate for the display of art.”

Often described as a “Miesian architect,” the jury acknowledged this influence with the words, “He has the confidence to use stone that is a thousand years old or to take inspiration from a modern detail by Mies van der Rohe.”

Upon learning that he was being honored, Souto de Moura had this reaction: “When I received the phone call telling me I was to be the Pritzker Laureate, I could hardly believe it. Then I received confirmation that it was actually true, and I came to realize what a great honor this is. The fact that this is the second time a Portuguese architect has been chosen makes it even more important.”

The distinguished jury that selected the 2011 Pritzker Laureate consists of its chairman, The Lord Palumbo, internationally known architectural patron of London, chairman of the trustees, Serpentine Gallery, former chairman of the Arts Council of Great Britain, former chairman of the Tate Gallery Foundation, and former trustee of the Mies van der Rohe Archive at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and alphabetically: Alejandro Aravena,
architect and executive director of Elemental in Santiago, Chile; Carlos Jimenez, professor, Rice University School of Architecture, principal, Carlos Jimenez Studio in Houston, Texas; Glenn Murcutt, architect and 2002 Pritzker Laureate of Sydney, Australia; Juhani Pallasmaa, architect, professor and author of Helsinki, Finland; Renzo Piano, architect and 1998 Pritzker Laureate, of Paris, France and Genoa, Italy; and Karen Stein, writer, editor and architectural consultant in New York. Martha Thorne, associate dean for external relations, IE School of Architecture, Madrid, Spain, is the executive director of the prize.

In addition to the previous laureates already mentioned, the late Philip Johnson was the first Pritzker Laureate in 1979. The late Luis Barragán of Mexico was named in 1980. The late James Stirling of the United Kingdom was elected in 1981, Kevin Roche in 1982, Ieoh Ming Pei in 1983, and Richard Meier in 1984. Hans Hollein of Austria was the 1985 Laureate.
Gottfried Böhm of Germany received the prize in 1986. Robert Venturi received the honor in 1991, and Alvaro Siza of Portugal in 1992. Christian de Portzamparc of France was elected Pritzker Laureate in 1994. Frank Gehry of the United States was the recipient in 1989, the late Aldo Rossi of Italy in 1990. In 1996, Rafael Moneo of Spain was the Laureate; in 1997 the late Sverre Fehn of Norway; in 1998 Renzo Piano of Italy, in 1999 Sir Norman Foster of the UK, and in 2000, Rem Koolhaas of the Netherlands. Australian Glenn Murcutt received the prize in 2002. The late Jørn Utzon of Denmark was honored in 2003; Zaha Hadid of the UK in 2004; and Thom Mayne of the United States in 2005. Paulo Mendes da Rocha of Brazil was the Laureate in 2006, and Richard Rogers received the prize in 2007. Jean Nouvel of France was the Laureate in 2008. In 2009, Peter Zumthor of Switzerland received the award. Last year, two Japanese architects were honored, partners Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA, Inc.

The field of architecture was chosen by the Pritzker family because of their keen interest in building due to their involvement with developing the Hyatt Hotels around the world; and because architecture was a creative endeavor not included in the Nobel Prizes. The procedures were modeled after the Nobels, with the final selection being made by the international jury with all deliberations and voting in secret. Nominations are continuous from year to year with hundreds of nominees from countries all around the world being considered each year.

The site for this year’s ceremony, the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium was erected between 1932 and 1934, and is part of a large nine-building office complex called the Federal Triangle. At the time of its construction, it was the largest government owned assembly space in the city, and considered as one of the most magnificent settings for government ceremonies. It was designed by San Francisco based architect Arthur Brown, Jr. Originally called the Departmental Auditorium, it was renamed in 1987, the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium.

http://architecturelab.net/03/eduardo-souto-de-moura-wins-pritzker-architecture-prize-2011/

 


March 29, 2011

Burgo Tower | Eduardo Souto de Moura

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG Burgo Tower © Fernando Guerra FG + SG

Portuguese architectural photographer Fernando Guerra FG + SG shared with us a photo set of the Burgo Tower (2007), designed by the 2011 Pritzker laureate Eduardo Souto de Moura.

The building, located in , was described by the Pirtzker jury as “…two buildings side by side, one vertical and one horizontal with different scales, in dialogue with each other and the urban landscape.” Souto de Moura commented that “a twenty story office tower is an unusual project for me. I began my career building single family houses.”

http://www.archdaily.com/122965/burgo-tower-eduardo-souto-de-moura/

March 26, 2011

Blackfriars Road by ALLFORD HALL MONAGHAN MORRIS

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

Blackfriars Road

  • Project Details
  • Completion: 2013
  • Cost: £61 Million
  • Clients: Great Portland Estates Plc

Terminating the vista from the south end of Blackfriars Bridge is the crystalline form of this 17,600sqm office building wrapped in a fluid pinstripe glass skin. This simple extruded parallelogram has then been cut away in three planes: to the north to create a façade to the river, to the base to create an increased public realm, and to the roof to create a sky room. Retail units are placed at the base to animate the enlarged street and a new residential building is located to the south in the area of the site compressed by rights of light considerations.

Project Credits:

Project Manager: Jackson Coles

Structural Engineer: AKT

Services Engineer: Watermans Building Services

Cost Consultant: Davis Langdon

Planning Consultant: Montagu Evans

Acoustic Consultant: Alan Saunders

Rights Of Light Consultant: Anstey Horne

Party Wall Consultant: Malcolm Hollis

Transport Consultant: TPP

Sustainibility Consultant: Environ UK

CGI’s: Smoothe

http://www.ahmm.co.uk/projectDetails/73/Blackfriars-Road?image=1

 

March 26, 2011

Antorcha Bicentenario | José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez

Antorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (1) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (2) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (3) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (4) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (5) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (6) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (7) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (8) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (9) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (10) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (11) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (12) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (13) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (14) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (15) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (16) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (17) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (18) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (19) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (20) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (21) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (22) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (23) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (24) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (25) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (26) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (27) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (28) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (29) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (30) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (31) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (32) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (33) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (34) Courtesy of José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández MartínezAntorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (35) elevation 01Antorcha Bicentenario / José Pareja Gómez and Jesús Hernández Martínez (36) section 01

The bicentennial torch, designed by  and , is inspired by the mural depicting the social struggle of Mexican independence by Jose Clemente Orozco in which the leader of the independence, Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, leading the insurrection by tightly grasping a flaming torch. The structure manifested from this image by the architect is a 45-meter tall element emphasizing the main entrance into , México.The monument consists of a 10-meter tall concrete volume, followed by a 35-meter steel structure made of one hundred rings, which is interspersed with one hundred voids and marked by two hundred scars. The shadow that will be projected on them will produce optical negatives. At night, the sculpture will be a great urban lamp, illuminating the environment through its presence and enlightening the city of its symbol. The scars mark the journey to independence.A light path is drawn from the bottom of the monument to the top, linking land, object and sky in producing a perpetual flame that stands for Mexican Independence and the country’s future projected to infinity.

The bicentennial torch is a tribute to the heroes who fought for independence and granted the people a homeland, illuminating the ideals of freedom and sovereignty. The torch begins at a base made of mud, stones and undergrowth and proceeds in a trajectory of man-made materials through toil and effort, making its way to the sky in an unending projection of the Mexican people’s desire for unity.

Architect:  
Location: , México.
Name of the project: “Antorcha Bicentenario” (“bicentennial torch”)
Architectonic and lightning design:  / Abdiel Miranda Rodríguez / Isaí Padilla Aguirre / Eduardo Muñoz de la Torre / Claudia Pérez Campos
Landscape Design: 
Project Leaders: 
Project Team: Abdiel Miranda Rodríguez / Gilberto Isaí Padilla Aguirre / Eduardo Muñoz de la Torre / Claudia Pérez Campos
Structural project: Jorge Lucio Lerma Carmona
Project year: 2010

 

March 26, 2011

New Acropolis Museum | Bernard Tschumi

New Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects © Courtesy of Bernard Tschumi ArchitectsNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects site planNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects first floor planNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects third floor planNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects third floor planNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects sectionNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects exploded axoNew Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects sketch 01New Acropolis Museum - Bernard Tschumi Architects sketch 02Architects: Bernard Tschumi Architects
Location: Athens, 
Associate Architect: ARSY
Architects Team: ; Architect and Lead Designer Joel Rutten; Project Architect, Adam Dayem, Aristotelis Dimitrakopoulos, Jane Kim, Eva Sopeoglou, Kim Starr, Anne Save de Beaurecueil, Jonathan Chace, Robert Holton, Valentin Bontjes van Beek, Liz Kim, Daniel Holguin, Kriti Siderakis, Michaela Metcalfe, Justin Moore, Joel Aviles, Georgia Papadavid, Allis Chee, Thomas Goodwill, Véronique Descharrières, Christina Devizzi
ARSY Team: Michael Photiadis; Principal, George Kriparakos, Nikos Balkalbassis, Philippos Photiadis, Jaimie Peel, Niki Plevri, Maria Sarafidou, Makis Grivas, Elena Voutsina, Manoulis Economou, Anastassia Gianou, Miltiadis Lazaridis, Dimitris Kosmas
Structure: ADK and ARUP
Mechanical and Electrical: MMB Study Group S.A. and ARUP
Civil: Michanniki Geostatiki and ARUP
Acoustics: Theodore Timagenis
Lighting: ARUP, London
General Contractor: Aktor
Project Area: 21,000 sqm
Project Year: 2003-2009
Photographs: Courtesy of  Architects

Site

Located in the historic of Makryianni district, the Museum stands less than 1,000 feet southeast of the Parthenon. The top-floor Parthenon Gallery offers a 360-degree panoramic view of the Acropolis and modern Athens. The Museum is entered from the Dionysios Areopagitou pedestrian street, which links it to the Acropolis and other key archeological sites in Athens.

Program

With 8,000 square meters (90,000 square feet) of exhibition space and a full range of visitor amenities, the Acropolis Museum tells the story of life on the Athenian Acropolis and its surroundings by uniting collections formerly dispersed in multiple institutions, including the small Acropolis Museum built in the 19th century.

The rich collections provide visitors with a comprehensive picture of the human presence on the Acropolis, from pre-historic times through late antiquity. Integral to this program is the display of an archeological excavation on the site: ruins from the 4th through 7th centuries A.D., left intact and protected beneath the building and made visible through the first floor. Other program facilities include a 200-seat auditorium.

Principal Design Features

Designed with spare horizontal lines and utmost simplicity, the Museum is deliberately non-monumental, focusing the visitor’s attention on extraordinary works of art. With the greatest possible clarity, the design translates programmatic requirements into architecture.Light: The collection consists primarily of works of sculpture, many of them architectural pieces that originally decorated the monuments of the Acropolis, so the building that exhibits them is a museum of ambient natural light. The use of various types of  allows light to flood into the top-floor Parthenon Gallery, to filter through skylights into the archaic galleries, and to penetrate the core of the building, gently touching the archeological excavation below the building.Circulation: The collection is installed in chronological sequence, from pre-history through the late Roman period, but reaches its high point (literally and programmatically) with the Parthenon Frieze. The visitor’s route is therefore a clear, three-dimensional loop. It goes up from the lobby via escalator to the double-height galleries for the Archaic period; upward again by escalator to the Parthenon Gallery; then back down to the Roman Empire galleries and out toward the Acropolis itself.

Organization: The Museum is conceived as a base, a middle zone and a top, taking its form from the archeological excavation below and from the orientation of the top floor toward the Parthenon.

The base hovers over the excavation on more than 100 slender  pillars. This level contains the lobby, temporary exhibition spaces, museum store, and support facilities.

The middle (which is trapezoidal in plan) is a double-height space that soars to 10 meters (33 feet), accommodating the galleries from the Archaic to the late Roman period. A mezzanine features a bar and restaurant (with a public terrace looking out toward the Acropolis) and multimedia space.

The top is the rectangular, -enclosed, skylit Parthenon Gallery, over 7 meters high and with a floor space of over 2,050 square meters (22,100 square ft). It is shifted 23 degrees from the rest of the building to orient it directly toward the Acropolis. Here the building’s  core, which penetrates upward through all levels, becomes the surface on which the marble sculptures of the Parthenon Frieze are mounted. The core allows natural light to pass down to the Caryatids on the level below.

http://www.archdaily.com/61898/new-acropolis-museum-bernard-tschumi-architects/


 

March 24, 2011

TWO CITIES, FOUR ARCHITECTS

Two cities on the Persian Gulf, Doha and Abu Dhabi are the settings for vast construction projects, including major new museums designed by some of the world’s most celebrated architects.

I.M. PEI

spoke about the simple geometric forms that make up his Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, and he described the clarity of the desert sunlight as a central influence.

MUSEUM OF ISLAMIC ART, DOHA

FRANK
GEHRY

is building a branch of the Guggenheim that is 12 times the size of its New York headquarters. He spoke of an intuitive design approach.

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, ABU DHABI

NORMAN
FOSTER

is designing the Zayed National Museum in Abu Dhabi. His project is built on Saadiyat Island, and he talked about history as a guide to sustainable structures in a hot environment.

ZAYED NATIONAL MUSEUM, ABU DHAB

JEAN
NOUVEL

has projects in both cities. His branch of the Louvre in Abu Dhabi is covered by a huge dome. His other project, in Doha, is the National Museum of Qatar. It was inspired by the shape of local sand roses.

LOUVRE, ABU DHABI; NATIONAL MUSEUM, DOHA

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/27/arts/design/museums.html?ref=design#nouvel

 

 

 

 

March 24, 2011

The Wave | Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects Courtesy of Henning Larsen Architects

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects section 01

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects section 02

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects diagram 01

The Wave / Henning Larsen Architects diagram 02

The Wave in  designed by Henning Larsen Architects is a new unique housing that embraces the sculptural and organic forms to become a new landmark for the city. It takes advantage of both its location and the views it offers, while equally challenging the existing architecture of the area and its program as a housing complex.The distinctive building has been selected as winner of the prestigious Civic Trust Award. The Awards were presented at an official ceremony in People’s History Museum on March 4 in Manchester. ”The Wave demonstrates how Danish architects are responding to global trends without sacrificing the practicality or well-crafted detailing that have long been a signature of the Danes”, the British reviewer Michael Webb wrote in the architecture magazine Mark in February 2011.  won the project in an invited competition in 2005 with the real estate company Bertel Nielsen as the client. Until now, two of the award-winning waves have been completed while the last three are expected to rise in the nearest future.The characteristic form and material of the housing allows it to be a constantly changing landscape element. During the day the white waves are reflected in the sea and at night the characteristic profile will look like illuminated multi-coloured mountains. It both mimics the landscape and sets itself apart by changing its appearance with the weather and time of day.he Wave is inspired by and derives its form from the characteristics of the area: the fjord, the bridge, the town and the hills. The clear and easily recognisable signature of the building connects the residential area with the sea, the landscape and the town.

http://www.archdaily.com/120948/the-wave-henning-larsen-architects/

March 23, 2011

Guosen Securities Tower | MVRDV

Guosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboTP 485 Guosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ ZhuboGuosen Securities Tower / MVRDV Courtesy of MVRDV+ Zhubodiagram 01 diagram 01diagram 02 diagram 02diagram 03 diagram 03he new headquarters building for the Guosen Securities Corporation in , is to be the new symbol for the dynamic corporation that needs to be energy efficient and a pleasurable working environment in the new century. The Guosen Securities Tower by MVRDV is a project driven by the creation of good views and direct daylight for every worker in a compact floor plan of 1849m2 where no workplace is further than 11 meters away from the façade. Stacking these floors leads to a 204 meter tall tower with a square floor plan and an elegant, slender volume.he edges of each floor plate have been folded down with an angle of 35 to 55 degrees creating shadow for the floor below and reducing the cooling demand of the building. Large glass fronts connect these louvers, offering the office workers excellent views of the surrounding cityscape. The louvers vary in size according to the orientation; on the north side they are small whilst at the south side they are larger. The angle of the louvers allows for the addition of solar cells and reduces the energy demand of the building by 33 %. The louvers are also used for water collection to feed the grey water circuit. A lengthy water pipe system runs invisibly through the façade collecting the heat of the solar cells to heat up water.

Despite being functional, the louvers also create an identity for the tower which resembles a giant Chinese lantern. At the collective parts of the building the louvers are lifted to allow for a larger glass front. The main entrance, the restaurant, the conference centre are clearly recognizable and offer double ceiling heights.

he building fits seamlessly into the urban surrounding; all sides of the ground floor have a commercial plinth or glass facades that connect inside and outside. The low rise volume next to the tower holds a shopping centre and a conference centre. Underneath the building a tunnel offers pedestrian access to a nearby metro station. At the top of the tower, the double high executive lounge is situated. The façade has been opened to create a panoramic view towards Hong Kong Bay.  On two places in the tower, both in the top and in the lower section, two collective double height spaces have been created. They are designed as small amphitheatres that can be used for conferences and gatherings. They have terraced seating that allow for uninterrupted views over the city.

Architects : MVRDV
Location : 
Number + name : Guosen Securities Tower
Sketch Design : 09-2010 to 10- 2010. 2 months
Client : Guosen Securities LTD.Co
Program : Guosen headquarters offices and retail
Size : – 68.000m² offices, 12000m² retail
Design team : Winy Maas, Jacob van Rijs and Nathalie de Vries with Wenchian Shi, Nacho Velasco, Wenhua Deng, John Tsang, Sanne van der Burgh and Mateusz Mastalski
Co-architect : Zhubo, 
Advisors / consultants Structure : Arup, 
Model : Zhubo
Artist Impressions/3D modeling : + Zhubo

http://www.archdaily.com/120783/tp-485-guosen-securities-tower-mvrdv/

March 21, 2011

Pennsylvania Convention Center | tvsdesign

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign Courtesy of tvsdesign

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign Courtesy of tvsdesign

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign Courtesy of tvsdesign

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign Courtesy of tvsdesign

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign Courtesy of tvsdesign

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign Courtesy of tvsdesign

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign plan 01

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign plan 02

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign plan 03

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign plan 04

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign plan 05

Pennsylvania Convention Center / tvsdesign section 01

This project by tvsdesign is an addition to and rehabilitation of ’s historic 1893 Reading Train Shed. As the centerpiece of the  Convention Center, the terminal building, Grand Hall, meeting rooms, ballroom and farmer’s market will be joined by a new modern convention center that weaves the style, scale and rhythm of the historic architecture with the new addition.With the goal of integrating this large expansion into the urban context,  worked with the City Planning Commission, Department of Streets, Redevelopment Authority, Industrial Development Corporation and City and State Historic Commissions to help design the site to expand the City Center as an extension of the project. The solution presents a dramatic new North Broad Street facade, while reinforcing the City’s important Avenue of the Arts initiative.The expansion of the center onto Broad Street will revitalize the original building while setting a contemporary, forward-looking design theme to define the center’s new presence on Broad Street. The internal organization of the buildings establishes a grand public concourse that is transparent from the street, linking the city life to the activities within the building.

The renovated 100 year old train shed is the connection between ’s famous Market Street and serves as the formal entrance and primary focal point of the entire facility. A 30,000 sf ballroom and several meeting rooms are positioned in the north end of the shed, with the remaining space forming a majestic 50,000 sf grand hall for civic, private and convention activities. The floor of the grand hall is a patterned terrazzo with stainless steel rail embeds in the original track locations. Both the ballroom and the grand hall feature the original arched roof structure in lieu of new ceilings for the canopies of these one-ofa-kind spaces. The Reading Train Shed is the oldest long-span roof structure in the world, and its preservation and revitalization has helped this area of the city grow, securing the future of the cultural landmark with a new use.

Architect: tvsdesign
Associated Architect: Vitetta Group, Inc
Location: 
Client:  Convention Center Authority
Project area: 1,250,000 gsf convention center; 440,000 sf exhibit halls; 90,000 sf meeting space; 33,000 sf ballroom
Date opened: 1994
Services provided: Full architectural and interior

http://www.archdaily.com/120015/pennsylvania-convention-center-tvsdesign/

March 21, 2011

Art Stable | Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig ArchitectsArt Stable / Olson Kundig Architects Courtesy of Point32

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects Courtesy of Point32

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

Art Stable / Olson Kundig Architects © Tim Bies/Olson Kundig Architects

art door elevation art door elevation

hinge detail hinge detail

The seven-story, five unit adaptive live-work space is designed for residents who want to both live and work in the city. Art Stable, is situated on a plot of land previously housing horse stables. A recipient of the 2010  Citation Honor Award, the urban infill project features large art doors, manually operable by a custom-designed hand wheel and hinge. The 80′-5″ hinge terminates at a rotating davit crane on top of the building.

A collaboration between architect, client, engineer, builder, and fabricator resulted in a hinge mechanism that opens 8 foot tall by 12 foot long steel clad doors on all seven levels. The vertically stacked art doors face the alley side of the building and provide a great ease in moving large materials and/or art pieces into and out of each unit.

Architects: Olson Kundig Architects
Location: 
Design Principal: Tom Kundig, FAIA
Managing Principal: Kirsten R. Murray, AIA
Project Manager: Kudo-King, AIA LEED AP (Construction Documents and CCA) and Jim Friesz, AIA LEED AP (Schematic Design through Design Development)
Project Architect: Jeff Ocampo, LEED AP
Project Team: Sky Lanigan, LEED AP, Wing-Yee Leung, LEED AP, Ming Yuan
Graphics: Kevin Scott
Project Area: 25,556 sqf
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of Point32, Tim Bies/

The custom-designed hinge and art doors are located on the east facing alley-side of the building. Users can open their art door up to 75 degrees by turning a large hand wheel. The wheel connects to a threaded rod which goes through the building envelope and connects to a sliding pivot bolt fastened to the movable portions of the hinge on the exterior of the building. The threading on the rod and the oversized wheel ensures that each 2,250 pound door can be opened easily and held open at the desired angle. The crane can then be used to pick up objects from the alley and raise them up and into the unit, or remove objects from the unit.

Steel framed windows measuring 8 feet tall by 8 feet long are supported on a second similar hinge. Views on the west side of the building provide resident with just the right amount of drama – the city and Cascade mountains beyond.

The use of concrete, steel and glass draws upon the warehouse typology of the transitional industrial neighborhood. Each unit has an average 11’ ceiling height and floor-to-ceiling window walls. Interior build-outs will be determined by each unit’s owners, who will also be able to punch windows into the north façade of the building, providing a personalized balance between privacy and transparency. On the street side of the building, oversized hinged windows also open, allowing for cross-ventilation.

Sustainable Features

• A geothermal heat pump system runs in loops through the augercast structural pilings of the building’s foundation. This is the first time this system has been used in the US.
• In-floor radiant heating and cooling
• Natural ventilation
• Can accommodate future use of solar/photovoltaic technology
• Flexibility of space anticipates the possibility of non-residential use

Consultants:
Civil Engineering: Coughlin Porter Lundeen
Structural Engineering: DCI – Engineers
Mechanical Engineering: PAE Consulting Engineers
Code Consultant: Kinsman Code Consulting
Energy Consultant: Patrick Hayes
Envelope: RDH Group
Acoustical: BRC Acoustics & Technology Consulting
Geotechnical: ZZA Terracon
Gizmo Engineering Consultants: Turner Exhibits, Inc
Foundation Drilling: Kulchin Foundation Drilling Company
Contractor: Exxel Pacific General Contractors
Mechanical Contractor: Hermanson Company, LLC
Developer: Point32

Art Stable Hinge
Architects: 
Design Principal: Tom Kundig, FAIA
Managing Principal: Kirsten Murray, AIA
Project Manager: Kevin Kudo-King, AIA LEED AP
Project Architect: Jeff Ocampo, LEED AP
General Contractors: Exxel Pacific Construction
Design Collaborators and Construction Oversight: Matt Stodola and Nick Miller
Design Collaborators and Fabricators: All New Glass
Engineering Consultants: Turner Exhibits, Inc

http://www.archdaily.com/91356/art-stable-olson-kundig-architects/