Archive for February 19th, 2011

February 19, 2011

THE ANGEL BUILDING | ALLFORD HALL MONAGHAN MORRIS

London, February 9, 2011 – The Angel Building is the re-invention of an unloved early 1980’s commercial building located on one of London’s historic focal points where City Road and St. John Street meets Pentonville Road and bustling Islington High Street. Now a restrained piece of enlightened modern architecture, the Angel Building was once an unsightly and problematic building, significantly set back from both streets with a poorly resolved landscaped area separating it from the pavement. The deteriorating fabric had not aged well, and was unpopular with the local population who felt it detracted from its surroundings.

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Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) brief was to devise a working environment that was aesthetically compatible with the rest of the building, but flexible enough to show potential tenants the exciting possibilities of the space. The Angel Building provided the perfect opportunity for AHMM and Derwent London to build on ideas and experience of delivering contemporary design, integrated with older architecture, to provide an identifiable high quality office space.

Whilst the external cladding, services and internal finishes of the existing building had reached the end of their life, the reinforced concrete structure proved to be sufficiently robust and with suitable floor-to-floor heights (approximately 3.7m) to make retaining and reusing it a possibility.

Further analysis of the embodied energy contained within the structure suggested reuse was essential. Avoiding the demolition and disposal of the structure, and construction of a new replacement resulted in immense CO² savings, which contribute to the inherent sustainability of the development. In-situ concrete also has the advantage of high thermal mass which, in tandem with a displacement ventilation system, can be utilised to cut the amount of energy required to keep the building cool.

The build-time for the project was also substantially reduced by reusing the structure, and overall cost savings are also significant. These benefits easily outweighed the added complexity of co-ordinating structure and services which often proved challenging for the design team.

A new fifth floor of offices space has been added. To make it less prominent, it has been recessed behind roof terraces and clad in a pure white facade of structural glazing.

In total the new building has added about 9,200m². The result is an essentially new building, with 40 per cent more useful floorspace, which retains and extends the structural frame of the old one.

Practice Description

At Allford Hall Monaghan Morris we make buildings that are satisfying to use and beautiful to look at; an architecture that is defined by the experience of users who should be able to understand and use each building with ease and enjoyment.  We design very different buildings, for very different people to use in very different ways and, since our early days in the late 1980s, we have grown from four to over one hundred and fifty people and our budgets from a few thousand to tens of millions of pounds. The practice has won numerous awards for it’s projects and has twice been shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize; in 2009 for Kentish Town Health Centre and in 2008 for Westminster Academy.

Official name of the project : The Angel Building
Location : 407 St John Street , London, EC1V 4AB
Cost: £72M
Gross Internal Area: 357,625sq ft
Net Internal Area: 264,363sq ft
Contract Type: Two Stage Design & Build
Project end date: 6th September 2010

Project Team

Client: Derwent London
Architect: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris
Structural Engineers: Adams Kara Taylor
Project Manager: Buro Four
Cost Consultants: Davis Langdon
Property Agents:Pilcher Hershman / CBRE
Service Engineers: Norman Disney & Young
Landscape Architects: J&L Gibbons
Fire Consultant: Norman Disney & Young Fire
Main Contractor: BAM
Approved Inspector: Islington Building Control
Acoustic Consultant: Sandy Brown Associates
Planning Consultant: DP9
CDM Co-ordinator: Jackson Coles
Party Wall Surveyor: GIA
Transport Consultant: Colin Buchanan
Graphic Designers: David Hillman
Rights of Light Consultant: GIA
Lighting Consultant: GIA Equation

Trade Contractors:
Getjar (Concrete)
Scheldebouw (Cladding)
Rowen (Structural Steel)
Facilitas (Roofing)
AWJefferies (Architectural Metalwork)
Antron (Security)
Kent Commercial (Drylining)
Andrews Tile (Terrazzo Floor)
Astec (Atrium Screens)
Vector Foilteck (ETFE Roof)
Houston Cox Eastern (WC Fit-out)
J Browne (Landscape)
Benchmark (Joinery)
Skanska Rashleigh Weatherfoil (M&E)
Kingpan (Raised Floors)
Otis & Evans Turner (Lifts)

Allford Hall Monaghan Morris Team Members:
Simon Allford, Steve Smith, Wade Scaramucci, Ian McArdle, Berta Willisch, Big Hoffmann, Petr Kolacek, Ivana Sehic, Anika Koenig, Jack Ayre, Nadine Hadamik, Ana Corrochano, Tamsin Landells, Leo Mader, Leo Mayol, Marion Clayfield, Leif Henning, Goh Ong, Glen O’Gloughlin, Barbara McGarry, Clemmie Seymour, Jonathan Hall, Paul Monaghan, Peter Morris, + MODELSHOP

For more information:
www.ahmm.co.uk

http://www.v2com.biz/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=847:the-angel-building-par–by-allford-hall-monaghan-morris&catid=35:projetsarchitecture&Itemid=142

 

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February 19, 2011

28 SOCIAL HOUSING UNITS IN COURBEVOIE | KOZ ARCHITECTES

An innovative project

Paris, November 11, 2010 – In 2007, Groupe 3F and the Courbevoie Town Council launched a competition for a social housing project on the last remaining plot in the urban development zone of Les Fauvelles. The instructions given to the teams were as follows: « the project must present new approaches for social housing in densely occupied urban settings». Our proposal was selected over those offered by SOA Architectes and LAN Architecture.

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The right response to the right question
From the start, the exercise involved defining the intrinsic qualities of individual housing, with a view to adapting them to collective living. Four such qualities seemed to us to be essential:

Quality of use
Flexibility is the key strength of individual housing: you do as you please in a house, and you feel fully “at home”. You can change how you use bedrooms and living areas as your family grows, and depending on the lifestyle and hobbies of each family member: the spare room becomes a nursery when a new child is born, a small bedroom is converted into an office, a growing teenager moves into the bedroom next to the living room because he prefers to be separate from the sleeping area used by the rest of the family, a wall is knocked down to make an open-plan kitchen, you can put a green house in the garden or play music in the garage.

You can walk around it
Being able to walk around the outside of a house gives people a particular sense of belonging. But circumnavigability also involves the presence of various kinds of external features: front lawns, courtyards, gardens, terraces, etc.

A house is supposed to be unique
It looks different from the others; you can recognize it when you look down the street; you can point it out. It is individual, and it also has an individualizing effect that strengthens one’s sense of belonging

In a house, you have neighbours
Your neighbours remain for a long time, and with them you gradually form bonds: you chat over the hedge, you do each other favours, your children play together. Neighbours build a relationship of mutual trust.

Once this initial exercise had been carried out, our aim was now to apply these 4 cardinal virtues of the individual house to a collective housing project. The building forms part of the urban development zone called Les Fauvelles in Courbevoie, a stone’s throw from the skyscrapers and frenzied activity of the La Défense business district. All around, the 12-storey residential buildings in the Faubourg de l’Arche development zone form both a skyline and an urban clearing. Behind it stands a building belonging to a French car manufacturer.

The project consists of two units with rather undefined outlines, further blurred by the criss-crossed green strengthening rods that have been used as sculptural guardrails for the various walkways and loggias. Opting for two buildings instead of one enabled us to increase the surface area of the façades, to give an enhanced feeling of transparency, to ensure a variety of orientations and views, and also to get closer to the more intimate qualities of use and scale characteristic of individual houses. Both units are built on a sculpted base and stand out against the sky like a pair of funny giants reaching out to each other.

1. Quality of use
The key feature is that flats with at least 4 rooms have a white cantilevered cube affixed apparently at random to the façade. This contains a room “plugged into” the living room whose use can change according to the desires and changing size of the family unit. Its partition wall is not load-bearing and can be removed with the agreement of the owner (and who knows, maybe in 50 years the tenants will have become the owners). This extra room gives the living space flexibility and elasticity.

All the flats have a triple aspect and living rooms all have two aspects; most are corner rooms. All rooms including bathrooms have natural light. Underfloor heating has been used, and the wood and aluminum window surrounds are fully watertight. Every flat has its own loggia, an outside space that has a ready-made screen (reminiscent of the reed screens often used on balconies in France) for added privacy: the space can be used as a greenhouse, a conservatory, a DIY workshop, a fitness area, etc. This freely usable space can be used in a similar way to a basement, an attic or a courtyard: features that are generally characteristic of individual houses.

2. Circumnavigability
Private walkways run round the apartments and are directly accessible from all rooms, including the bedrooms and kitchen. This means you can walk round your ‘house’, take strategic shortcuts, play hide-and-seek, and play tricks on people. Access to each apartment is via a wide suspended open-air landing that affords views of the entire volume of the living space. This means that the building has a number of different exterior spaces (loggias, balconies, and landings), which increase the usable surface area and give residents the impression of living in the open air, with uninterrupted vistas of western Paris.

3. Individualisation
Each flat is instantly recognizable from outside; the buildings have different outlines, volumes appear loosely structured, and the stepped, irregular shapes have an almost random feel.

4. Neighbourliness
Behind the design of these residential units lies a firm belief in sociability. Each landing serves two units (except on the first floor, which is given over to small flats) hoping that they will extend their social life on the concrete boardwalk that gives access to the staircases and hosts a flower shop and a small scale kindergarten ; landings are very large (10 sq m, three times the usual size) and thus can easily be used in a variety of ways. Because they are set well back, any items placed on the landings will not affect the integrity of the la facade or the building’s overall appearance.

KOZ

KOZ architectes was founded in 1999 by Christophe Ouhayoun and Nicolas Ziesel, both of whom:
– graduated from the Paris-Belleville School of Architecture ;
– lived in the USA when they were children;
– are well-versed in 3D imagery and urban cultures;
– and are completely at home in the debate about managing climate change priorities in the urban environment.

KOZ is a founding member of the PLAN01 Architects Collective, created in 2001 with the Atelier du Pont, Bocabeille-Prégo Architectures and Philéas agencies. With PLAN01 they founded PLAN02, an in-house eco-design engineering office providing real time feedback and orientations for social and environmental responsibility in their projects.

KOZ creates non-typical, friendly and sensitive buildings that redefine public spaces and emphasize the diversity of their uses. KOZ champions architecture that is aware of context and creates surprise and “added value” in terms of function, by making use of residual areas that are easily adapted to stimulate the imagination of local residents, users and visitors.

KOZ regularly carries out wide ranging assignments, including project management, site management, auditing, signage, and furniture Work is organised in accordance with the tenets of precision and autonomy, placing value on skill and creativity. The team is made up of 8 to 12 persons – architects, computer graphics designers, liaison officer and manager. Everyone is involved in information coordination and participation in decision-making throughout the project.

KOZ makes good use of the synergy and experience of the PLAN01 agencies in a 600 sq m workspace on the Paris Right Bank.

Client
Groupe 3F
159 rue Nationale
75638 Paris Cedex 13
Chef de Projet :Stéphanie Demeure dit Latte

Architects
KOZ architectes / member of the collective Plan01
Christophe Ouhayoun – Nicolas Ziesel
89 rue de Reuilly
75012 Paris
contact@koz.fr
project manager :
Elsa Junod

Cotraitants
Structure: EVP Ingénierie
fluides: Cferm
Economist: Cabinet Ripeau
Acoustic: Peutz
Sustainability: Bio-concept

Localisation
Zac des Fauvelles,
75-83 avenue de l’Arche
ilot B 23
92 400 Courbevoie – France

Entreprises
Gros oeuvre: KILIC
Ravts: Fernandes
Facade: Fernandes
Frame: Bourgogne couverture
Etanchéité: SAS
Windows opening: S.T.B.A
C.M.B.
Walls: FARIA
Floor / paintings: DE SOUSA
Metal work: Atelier De Pierre
Services: A.C.P.C
Electricity: Paternoster
Lift: OTIS

Schedule
Concours: mai 2007
Construction time: 20 month
Completion: septembre 2010

Project
28 housing units

Surfaces
Floor area housing: 2 378,00 m2
Floor area retail: 440 m2
28 housings: 8 F2, 10 F3, 7 F4, 3F5
28 parking places

Cost
4 356 734,66 € HT
housing: 3 806734,66 €
retail: 550 000,00 €
No demolitions

Key points
The complex comprises 28 apartments, a shop, a business premises and a basement for parking. Reinforced concrete structural system. Coloured high-density laminated panels. Rain-water collection, planted roof, heated flooring, external wood/aluminium joinery, loggia and private walkways for all apartments.

Environmental quality
THPE RT2005: 70 kwh/m2/year; systematic exterior insulation, including parapet; thermal bridge breakers; heated flooring; natural lighting of all rooms and stairwells; double or even triple orientation, corner living room; maximization of glazed surfaces; air permeability tested in accordance with Effinergie requirements.

For more information:
www.koz.fr

http://www.v2com.biz/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=748:28-logements-sociaux-a-courbevoie-28-social-housing-units-in-courbevoie-par–by-koz-architectes-france–france&catid=35:projetsarchitecture&Itemid=142

 



February 19, 2011

Residential Building In Slovenia | Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

Residential Building In Slovenia / Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni biro d.o.o. © Peter Krapež

ground floor plan ground floor plan

5th floor plan 5th floor plan

6th floor plan 6th floor plan

wide site plan wide site plan

longitudinal section longitudinal section

cross section cross section

axometrics axometrics

Architects: Ravnikar Potokar Arhitekturni
Location: Majske poljane, 
Competition Designers: Vojteh Ravnikar, Matjaž Bolčina, Nika Grabar, Ernest Milčinovič, Teja Savelli, Jure Zavrtanik
Design Group: Vojteh Ravnikar, Robert Potokar, Marjan Starič, Petra Slukan
Structural Engineering: Primorje d.d.
Mechanical Installations: Pinss d.o.o.
Electrical Installations: Elita i.b. d.o.o.
Contractor: Primorje d.d.
Investor: Majske poljane d.o.o.
Project area: 8,200 sqm
Project year. 2007 – 2010
Photographs: Peter Krapež

In line with the Decree on the Location Plan for the site along the railway station in , Phase 2.a of the construction encompasses the construction of three 11-storey tower blocks, beneath which the construction of an underground garage is foreseen on the entire site of this phase.

The site of residential building; Tower Block C is located in the future building complex of the residential area Majske Poljane along the railway station in . Within this phase of construction, three tower blocks will be erected along Prvomajska Street.

Architectural Design

The architectural design of Tower Block C is derived from the competition design, as outlined in the study submitted to the competition in 2002 (which was subsequently awarded first prize in the competition) and in the adopted Decree on the Location Plan. The basic idea lies in the layering of two storeys by displacing their floor plan – the elementary square of the floor plan is moved around the vertical core thus creating overhangs on which terraces are placed. The vertical line of the residential tower is cut up and transformed into horizontal layering, providing the tower with the necessary dynamics.

The common vertical building height with a ground floor and ten storeys also includes a gallery on the ground floor, while the 10th floor houses duplex flats. The ground floor and gallery are intended for public use, for various service providers and office activities, and for grocery stores and other shops, while the upper floors are intended as flats (the tenth floor features two-storey duplex flats). The building has two basements intended for technical or maintenance facilities, storage rooms belonging to the flats and parking spaces for cars.

http://www.archdaily.com/111496/residential-building-in-slovenia-ravnikar-potokar-arhitekturni/

 

 

 

February 19, 2011

New Student Quarters For Boston University Tony Owen Partners & Silvester Fuller Architect

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

New Student Quarters For Boston University / Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects © Tony Owen Partners, Silvester Fuller Architects

elevation elevation

section section

plan plan

We recieved the new student quarters for Boston University by Tony Owen Partners andSilvester Fuller Architects at 15-25 Regent Street, . It is a unique design using fissures to provide maximum solar access to bedrooms as well as natural ventilation throughout the building.

The eight-level, environmentally-efficient building can accommodate up to 164 students in a style to which scholars are not usually accustomed. It also has three lecture halls, a library, an Internet lounge, a rooftop terrace with a timber deck and an adjoining fully-equipped communal kitchen, plus cafe.

Three years ago Boston University saw the need to improve accommodation and facilities for its visiting students, who pay around $17,000 for the semester. The design concept was by Silvester Fuller and was development through to completion by . Construction was by Ceerose Pty Ltd.

Arup Partners provided the environmental analysis. The design uses large canyon-like slots in the façade which allow sunlight and ventilation to penetrate deep into the building and into each room.

The windows in these slots have a rhomboid shape to maximise efficiency, and deliver a bold architectural façade which is illuminated at night through an ever-changing light show.

The end walls of the slots are made from glass louvres that are seven stories high, and the building also contains a seven-storey glass louvred atrium. “Air is drawn through the voids and passes through the building like gills, allowing the building to breathe naturally,” said Owen.

“East-facing operable louvres on each level further help to lower ambient temperatures by drawing in fresh breezes.

“The design allows more light and ventilation into each bedroom, provides good views, and would be a sensible ‘blueprint’ for city planners to consider in their quest for ways to increase residential density in the CBD without compromising comfort.”

Tony Owen is at the forefront of three-dimensional digital architecture, and best known for Moebius House in Dover Heights as well as the

futuristic eliza apartment building in Elizabeth Street under construction, also by Ceerose. Owen has a further 40 or so local projects in the pipeline, all of which explore complex shapes, fluid geometries and environmental initiatives.

http://www.archdaily.com/110896/new-student-quarters-for-boston-university-tony-owen-partners-silvester-fuller-architects/

 

 

 

 

 

February 19, 2011

Macarena Cybercentre | Mediomundo

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

Cibercentro Macarena / Mediomundo © Fernando Alda

situation plan situation plan

plan 01 plan 01

plan 02 plan 02

plan 03 plan 03

section section

Architects: Mediomundo
Coauthors: MOG- Arquitectos
Location: 
Project area: 410 sqm
Project year: 2009 – 2010
Photographs: Fernando Alda

Surrounded by eight-floor buildings and taking up an obsolete esplanade which previously was a basketball court, ‘Macarena Social – CyberCentre’ rests in this place generating a small access garden, which together with a porch vinculated to a cafeteria and a multipurpose room, are offered as a wi-fi neighbours’ meeting and leisure room.

Over these spaces, a volume lined with red lacquered sheet risen up. It is a simple and overwhelming piece where computer classrooms, workshops and offices are placed. It creates a singular view, focal point in this district area. The flat roof is offered as a terrace to hold events and as river viewing point, retrieving this way, the occupied free space, to be used differently by neighbours.

http://www.archdaily.com/110721/macarena-cybercentre-mediomundo/

February 19, 2011

Weekend House on Lake Superior | Julie Snow Architects

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

Weekend House on Lake Superior / Julie Snow Architects © Peter Kerze

floor plan floor plan

The Weekend House on Lake Superior consists of two black volumes that extend toward the distant horizon.  Arranged on a platform that rests just above the ground, the home is reduced to a few essential elements, a main house and a small studio.  Designed by Julie Snow Architects it is a wood post and beam structure with a super-insulated floor, roof and walls.

Architects: Julie Snow Architects, Inc.
Location: North Shore of Lake Superior, 
Design Principal: Julie Snow, FAIA
Project Team: Jennifer Charzewski, Matthew Kreilich, AIA, LEED AP
Project Area: 1,024 sqf
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Peter Kerze

The presence of the lake is pervasive throughout the house. A long simple white table runs parallel to the lake. A narrow vertical tower encloses the fireplace. A row of cabinets along the north wall conceals the complexities of daily life. The house provides a serene connection to a beautiful, rugged landscape. Concealed by trees in the summer, the black boxes slip into the winter landscape of black and white tree trunks.

Hot water piping is attached to LVL’s that span the 16’ dimension of the house. After, the cavity is filled with a non-toxic expanding insulation. Similarly, walls have 5.5” of solid insulation; the roof is similarly filled. The narrow profile aluminum windows are argon filled. They are supported on a steel ledge allowing the window sill and head to extend below the floor and above the ceiling, enhancing an uninterrupted connection to the exterior. The exterior panels are back-ventilated pre-drilled Skatelite, a material designed for skate board ramps. These diagrams were developed for a graduate architecture studio course to convey the value of understanding sequential construction and detailing in three dimensions. The simple form of the house is precisely detailed to reduce cost, maintenance and environmental impact.

The house works with the climatic conditions along the north shore: very cold but sunny winters, temperate long shoulder seasons, and hot summers cooled by lake breezes and cool nights. The house is heated with dual fuel boilers and in-floor hot water heat distribution. During the week the house is kept at a minimum 40º. The design employs passive heating and cooling. The black exterior, south facing glass and the black floor are so effective in passive heating that the house temperature can rise well above 70º on cold sunny winter days, even when the outdoor temperature is -30º, without raising the system’s demand temperature. Arriving late on a winter’s night the air temperature can be easily brought up to a comfortable level by building a fire in the heat circulating fireplace. In the summer, sliding glass doors provide cool breezes off the lake, in which water temperatures rarely rise above 55º.

Concern for the water quality in the Great Lakes has resulted in the 2010 negotiation to amend The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between Canada and the US. Winter melt runoff from the Sawtooth Mountains behind the site is filtered by patches of designated wetlands and sheet drain across the rocky, rugged shoreline ultimately reaching the lake. The project was designed to minimally disturb the natural movement of water on the site by elevating the house just above grade. The house is built on wood piers with a small 12’ x 16’ foot print mechanical/storage space below the kitchen and bath.

http://www.archdaily.com/112277/weekend-house-on-lake-superior-julie-snow-architects/

 

February 19, 2011

HEAD OFFICE OF QUEBECOR | CARDINAL HARDY / LE GROUPE ARCOP ARCHITECTES EN CONSORTIUM

Montreal, January 19, 2011 – At the crossroads of Old Montreal, the Cité du multimédia, and the Quartier international de Montréal, Quebecor’s new head office is set in an architectural context punctuated by different eras. Formed of a four- and five-storey limestone-clad base that blends with the horizontality and materiality of Rue Notre-Dame, topped by a glass-wall tower that dialogues with the adjacent towers, the twenty-one-storey building is harmoniously wedded with a dense and relatively complex urban fabric. Seen from Victoria Square, the tower’s sharp, atypical silhouette matches the urban landscape. With façades both anchored to the past and turned toward the future, this architectural composition has brought balance, harmony, coherence, and relevance to a deconstructed street corner and contributes to the urban renaissance of this sector of downtown Montreal.

http://www.v2com.biz/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=836:siege-social-de-quebecor-head-office-of-quebecor-par–by-cardinal-hardy–le-groupe-arcop-architectes-en-consortium&catid=35:projetsarchitecture&Itemid=142

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A full program linked to major constraints
In 2006, Groupe Quebecor inc. decided to expand its head office at 612 Rue St-Jacques and erect a building befitting its leadership position in the communications sector. The original building, dating from 1962 and first constructed for Crédit Foncier Franco-Canadien, had undergone major renovations in the late 1990s, notably with regard to the important electro-mechanical elements, and the curtain-wall envelope had been completely redone.

The present project involves an expansion of 170,000 square feet, spread over 19 storeys and two mechanical storeys, with the south side abutting the existing 13-storey building.

The client wanted an economical, simple project, in a context of performance, long-term value, and quality. The original mandate required volumetry and exterior finishes that were perfectly integrated with the architecture of the existing building and its environment, as well as a tasteful, understated workplace promoting the wellbeing of employees, including the entrance hall and the areas occupied by upper management. As the project evolved, it was suggested, among other things, that the crown of the building be exploited by creating prestigious spaces that were entirely open and flexible, to take full advantage of the spectacular views of the city. It was also advised that a green roof system be installed for the wellbeing of the building and the employees.

Using the concepts of
recycling and integration

To achieve this project, three conditions seemed essential to the architects: the concept had to reconnect the building to the urban context and environment in every sense; the team had to adopt refined approaches to urban design and project management; and the project had to be accomplished based on the quality of the design and the materials.

Quebecor’s new building was conceived with a concern for conservation and consolidation. The idea of making full use of the structure of the existing building by grafting a second building in continuity with it was the beginning of a long series of principles that led the architects to think about their project around the concepts of recycling and reinterpretation of the existing architectural elements. This dynamic of linking the two projects is very perceptible in the façade, in which volumes of glass, stone, and masonry stretch vertically, meeting or extending to the top. It is also very visible in the interior, as most of the materials used on the façade penetrate into the circulation spaces within the building, providing a subtle connection between the two buildings.

On the ground floor, this idea is conveyed by the creation of a new entrance hall that takes advantage of the relocation of the old parking-access ramp. Thus, a new two-storey-high public passageway crosses the block from one side to the other, connecting Rue Notre-Dame to Victoria Square. In its centre, a reception area formed of a long furniture wall of black granite faced with glass directs the public toward the vertical circulation and services spaces. Designed for users, this element of the furniture integrated with the architecture accentuates the effect of horizontality, transparency, and airiness of the passageway. On the upper storeys, levels of circulation are created connecting the new circulation levels with the older ones by going through the black masonry wall on the south side, which has been opened up. This link is conveyed by a living and elegant architectural detail: completely glazed passageways on fourteen storeys that interconnect the volume of ebonite black masonry, in which the new building’s elevators are hidden, with the halls and stairways of the existing building. While the light reflects on the glazed surface of the linking nodule, the low-emissivity film on the glass reflects a rose-violet light onto the party-wall masonry, which warms the entire area. On the last seven storeys, a stairway rises above the glass volume to appear cantilevered over the new black-masonry wall, animating the vertical circulations on the main façade of the building.

The materiality of the new building is in continuity with the existing building, endowing the grouping with homogeneity of colour and texture. Both technological and organic in the landscapes that it generates, the skin of the building relates to the adjoining façades by the height of the floors, which respects those of the basilaire and existing storeys, notably on Rue Notre-Dame. The uniformity of materials responds to a concern for the project’s urban integration by deliberately adopting a scale and typology similar to those of adjoining buildings, while having a language on the façade that is both contemporary and simple and highlights that of the old architecture through a play of contrasts. Limestone, black granite, glass, and aluminum are used to create a neutral-coloured link between neighbouring buildings with their variety of materials.

Permeability of spaces:
horizontal and vertical

The ground-floor spaces blend through an open area while being clearly defined. They communicate with each other visually and physically and are attached to the vertical circulation areas and the public passageway that are the pillar of the project. This spatial strategy offers cross-views from Rue Notre-Dame toward Victoria Square, contributing a horizontal fluidity. On the upper storeys, the spaces are designed for maximization of ventilation and functionally adequate natural light.

Within the building, the architects wanted to emphasize the verticality of the project by highlighting the volume of the stairway on a number of storeys, while giving it a theatrical aspect heightened by the use of glass panels and occasional lighting on either side of the stairway. This specific lighting horizontally covers the entire exposed part of the windowed connection. In the evening, the glass stairway, free of all adjacent buildings, forms a luminous signature that makes the building stand out on the south side of the square and is also visible from Boulevard René-Lévesque above. The grouping becomes very perceptible, bringing animation and interest, while offering a glimpse of the activities taking place inside.

On the building’s 19th floor, the spaces as a whole having been treated with a concern for horizontal permeability, allowing a completely unencumbered view and giving everyone the opportunity to take full advantage of breathtaking views of downtown, Old Montreal, and the river. When visitors emerge from the elevator, they are somehow projected into the void with a view over Victoria Square and the towers of downtown opposite. The immense multifunctional hall that takes up a large part of the 19th floor is equipped with acoustic separators integrated into the ceiling, which descend as needed and enable the hall to be modulated into one, two, or three spaces. The height under the ceiling is 14 feet, and the volumetry and structure of the building’s crown have been deliberately left visible. This hall also has is well equipped technologically for multimedia presentations and offers natural and artificial modulable light through opaque and translucent blinds that rise or descend.

Simple actions, synonymous
with sustainability and accessibility

The decision to group all of a firm’s employees in a single workplace with adjacent public transit was the first principle followed with regard to the project’s sustainable development and accessibility. Then, the façade of the basilaire on Rue Notre-Dame is composed of St-Marc limestone, a local stone, prefabricated, then transported and installed on site. This construction technique considerably reduces cost and energy use, while increasing the speed of fabrication and installation of the façade materials. Finally, all of the windows were calibrated and sized according to orientation to take advantage of solar energy and avoid overheating. The architects paid particular attention to the quality and quantity of natural light penetrating into the building, organizing open-plan office areas as close as possible to the periphery where natural light is abundant.

The designers initially thought of project’s evolution. Originally, they included a number of green roofs to reduce the heat-island effect and manage rainwater. Although the idea was set aside due to budgetary constraints, it remained with the owner, who finally gave it the go-ahead as the project was being completed. Located on the north tower at the fifteenth storey, the project’s green roof, the highest in Quebec, is overhung by six storeys of the south tower and is accessible from the elevator lobby on the 15th storey. With downtown Montreal as a backdrop, the concept is in harmony with the composition of the tower. Very visible from the building, this garden in the sky retains rainwater, reduces urban heat islands, improves the lifespan of the waterproofing membranes, and encourages biodiversity. Finally, all of the spaces in the project were designed, from the beginning, as obstacle-free and universally accessible environments, so that people with temporary or permanent disabilities can move through the building, benefit from the greatest autonomy possible, and work in complete freedom and safety.

With all these details included in the design and execution, thanks to specific choices made by the architects, the Quebecor project respects a very defined urban context, while offering innovations and architectural quality that are highly appreciated by the workers and citizens who use the building.

For more information:
www.cardinal-hardy.ca

 

February 19, 2011

LOGEMENTS ZAC DU GRAND LARGE NEPTUNE | AGENCE NICOLAS MICHELIN & ASSOCIÉS – ANMA

The Zac du Grand Large-Neptune in Dunkerque got a special mention, Equerre d’argent, at the Moniteur Architecture Awards.

Paris, February 11, 2011 – Designed along the principle of sustainable development, the district conjugates different types of building and proposes public spaces on a diversity of scales. The Grand Large district lies in a special urban context: between the city and the sea, between seaside resort aesthetic and port aesthetic, and between residential and communal. It prolongs the overall strategy of the Neptune project, launched in 1991, which aims to orient the city back towards the docks. This transformation of the urban centre has already been broadly achieved. The Grand Large district marks the start of the second phase of Operation Neptune, which now focuses on sustainable development.

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The 216 dwellings of the first phase bear witness to the ecological dimension that has been adopted for a district that will ultimately house 8000 to 1000 dwellings. The district’s strategic urban plan is based on the principles inspired by Agenda 21, notably in terms of its social (diverse social mix), environmental (rainwater management, renewable energies) and economic aspects (flexible products and operational phasing). 

The Grand Large district is particular in that it conjugates different types of building and proposes public spaces on diverse scales: the semicircular park with its individual houses, the quay with gabled buildings, the buildings with planted terraces, the U-shaped gardens at the heart of individual lots. This diversity in the constructions and the social mix generates a lively neighbourhood in which the landmarks benefit from original perspectives: the view of the Grand Large Hotel from Rue Degans, the green opening towards the planted ramparts, and the views of the singular buildings from the quaysides. The Grand Large district is designed along the principles of sustainable development and features wind protections and rainwater management via roof valleys and the park. The buildings are designed to be energy-efficient. Priority is given to pedestrians, with motor traffic limited to the access roads to the buildings. Only Avenue des Bordes is treated as an urban boulevard, with side lanes reserved for residents.

Architects: Agence Nicolas Michelin & Associés – ANMA, Nicolas Michelin, Michel Delplace, Cyril Trétout
Project managers: Christel Giron, Hélène Méhats (competition), Christel Giron (competition and urban studies), Fanny Rozé (architectural studies)
Contracting authoruty client: CUD, Agur, S3D
Developers: Nexity, Palm Promotion, Beci.
Social housing authorities: Le Cottage Social des Flandres, La Maison Flamande
Site: ZAC du Grand Large-Neptune in Dunkirk
Schedule: Competition: 05/2005
Studies: 03/2007-2010
Delivery: 09/2010
Project type: Master plan of a 1000-dwelling district. Construction of 216 dwellings (phase 1)
Misssion type: Complete mission
Cost of architectural work: €22,250,000 (+VAT) [value as of 03/2005]
Surface area: Master plan: 16 ha
Constructions: 21,000 m2 GIA
Structural engineering: Batiserf Ingénierie
Fluid engineering: Espace Temps
Economist: Bureau Michel Forgue
Perspective art: Artefactory
Photographer : Stéphane Chalmeau

For more information:
www.anma.fr

http://www.v2com.biz/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=849:logements-zac-du-grand-large-neptune-par–by-agence-nicolas-michelin-a-associes–anma&catid=35:projetsarchitecture&Itemid=14

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February 19, 2011

Bay Adelaide Centre | WZMH Architects

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

Bay Adelaide Centre / WZMH Architects © Tom Arban

location plan location plan

curtain wall detail curtain wall detail

typical floor plan typical floor plan

ground floor plan ground floor plan

west elevation west elevation

rooftop elevation rooftop elevation

section section

public art public art

Architects: WZMH Architects
Location: 333 Bay Street, 
Client: Brookfield Properties
Architect team members: Carl Blanchaer, Jay Bigelow, Robert Sampson, Nicola Casciato, Paul Brown, Arnold Zaragoza, Bill Brown, Janet Nowakowski, Len Abelman, Mike Lukachko, James Machin, Federico Butac, Roby Ocampo, Greco Lavilla, Iwona Fido, Tino Augurusa
Structural Engineer: Halcrow Yolles
Mechanical Engineer: The Mitchell, Partnership Inc.
Electrical Engineer: Mulvey+Banani, International Inc.
Landscape Architect: Dillon Consulting
Interior Designer Base Building: 
Contractor: EllisDon Corporation
Other specialist consultants: Lighting Artist – James Turrell
Project area: 111,000 sqm
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Tom Arban

Similar in scale to the surrounding bank towers, the 51 storey Bay Adelaide Centre Tower, completed in January 2010, is located on the western edge of a development site that occupies 2 city blocks, in the financial core of the City of . The project contains over 111,000 m² of rentable class-AAA office space and includes over 3,700 m² of below-grade retail space linked to the downtown’s PATH system. The new tower is the first phase of a three tower complex, with an urban plaza at its heart. Over ½ acre in size, the urban plaza, constructed as part of the first phase of the project provides a public amenity suitable for casual enjoyment or major events.

Located on Bay Street, the tower is set back from the street to respect the datum created by the cornice lines of historic buildings along the street known as the “Bay Street Canyon”. Contributing to the canyon, the re-constructed facade of the National Building built in 1926, designed by Chapman and Oxley, is seamlessly integrated into the design of the new tower.

At the corner of Bay and Adelaide Streets the highly transparent main building lobby, with walls clad in classic Statuario marble and Makore wood, engages passersby. At night, the illuminated lobby becomes a “beacon” at the corner of Bay and Adelaide Streets. A significant Public Art installation by lighting artist James Turrell faces Adelaide Street.

Below grade, a retail concourse, the “missing link” of the city’s underground path system, completes the route from Union Station to Eaton Centre. A unique  walkway within the plaza and escalators in the office lobby provide daylight to, and orientation for, the path below.

Legacy Contribution

The project is a modernist building inspired by and paying homage to, the distinctive character of the architecture of ’s Financial Core. More transparent than any other in the downtown, the tower is a pristine  prism clad in clear vision  and spandrel panels with ceramic frit. The glazing is supported by four sided structural silicone within a channel surround creating a sense of lightness and delicacy for the building skin.

At the top of the tower the curtain wall extends beyond the roof to become a series of “sails” that create a distinctive silhouette on the city skyline. The floors and the plaza are clad in a “carpet” of Brazilian Ipanema granite expressing a modernist sensibility for spatial continuity from inside to out.

Respecting the formality of the tower the plaza’s design is simple, comprised of a central lawn framed by planting beds of natural grasses with seating benches and two double rows of Ginko trees.

Contribution to a sustainable development

The largest LEED® Certified Core and Shell Gold high-rise office building to be completed in, the Bay Adelaide Centre is highly energy efficient and is estimated to have cost savings of 47% as compared to the MNECB.

Business goals

The project provides flexible, efficient, cost effective space to meet the needs of a variety of tenant types. Strategies have also been implemented in the design to provide a more secure working environment. Sustainable energy conservation measures will reduce operating costs for tenants.

http://www.archdaily.com/111517/bay-adelaide-centre-wzmh-architects/


 

 

 

 

February 19, 2011

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson | bcj

http://www.bcj.com/