Archive for February 15th, 2011

February 15, 2011

Temporary Vistitors Center | ASL, London/GB and Strauss Architekten

Abu Dhabi/ VAE
TEMPORARY VISITORS CENTER
Abu Dhabi/ UAE
2009 – 2010
CONCEPTUAL DESIGN TO TENDER DOCUMENTS
Client
Abu Dhabi Culture & Heritage
Architect
ASL, London/GB and
Strauss Architekten,Stuttgart/ Germany
General contractor
Nüssli, Hüttwilen/ Schweiz
Photos
Kudy Reuteler, Hüttwilen/ Switzerland; TEC
Description
A temporary exhibition and information center for visitors has been designed in the Abu Dhabi historical city. The building consists of two independent sections that are linked by a bridge. According the local conditions and the client’s special requests the engineers specified a steel skeleton in combination with steel composite floors and piled foundations.



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http://www.german-architects.com/teuffel-engineering-consultants/

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February 15, 2011

Leavitt Residence, Chicago, Illinois | The Miller Hull Partnership

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Photos © Marty Peters

An existing three-story 1920s mercantile building located in Chicago’s Bucktown neighborhood is extensively renovated into a house that incorporates dramatic new design gestures while maintaining a respect for the original building.

Design concept and solution:
The architects inserted an expansive window wall that extrudes upward and flows over the roof to create a highly transparent penthouse. The window wall provides a connection to a private yard, a valuable asset in such a dense urban setting. The existing eastern facade of the heavy, timber-framed, brick-clad building was unstable and had to be replaced, so the architects aimed to replicate the rhythm of the existing columns on that side, while also announcing a Modernist influence at the second level. Mirroring the triangular footprint of the building, a three-story, three-sided atrium is at the heart of the home, giving way to massive timber staircases surrounded by cedar and glass. The original beams and exposed brick juxtapose the modern Arclinea kitchen, echoing the same tension between old and new that’s created by the steel-and-glass window-wall addition.

 

Total construction cost:
$1.9 million

 

People

Architect
The Miller Hull Partnership
Columbia-Sixth Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
p) 206-682-6837
f) 206-682-5692

Dave Miller, FAIA, The Miller Hull Partnership

Architect of record
Studio Dwell Inc
Architects + Planners
Mark Peters, AIA
1732 West Hubbard Avenue, Suite 1B
Chicago, Illinois 60622
O. 312.666.4601
F. 312.6664602

Engineer:
Fisher & Partners Structural Engineers
1732 W Hubbard Street
Chicago Il 60622

General contractor:
Ranquist Development

Photographer:
Marty Peters

Renderer:
Miller Hull

CAD system, project management, or other software used:
AutoCad, Sketch-up

Products

Structural system:
Heavy Timber

Exterior cladding
Masonry:
Pre-existing brick walls

Wood:
Stained Western Red Cedar

Roofing
Built-up roofing:
Modified Bit

Windows
Aluminum:
Fleetwood

Glazing
Glass:
Fleetwood

Doors
Entrances:
Fleetwood Aluminum Store Front
Metal doors:
Industrial Metal Finish Doors

Hardware
Locksets:
Schlage

Hinges:
Schlage

Pulls:
Hafele

Security devices:
Honeywell

Cabinet hardware:
Hafele

Interior finishes
Cabinetwork and custom woodwork:
Arclinea Chicago

Paints and stains:
Benjamin Moore China White

Floor and wall tile:
Stone Source Tile (bath) Random Width White Oak (all other areas)

Lighting
Interior ambient lighting:
Lightolgy

Downlights:
Juno

Exterior:
Bega

Controls:
Lutron

Conveyance
Elevators/Escalators:
Mid American

Plumbing
Grohe
Hans-Grohe
Dornbracht

 

http://archrecord.construction.com/residential/featured_houses/2011/02/leavitt_residence.asp

February 15, 2011

Fulbright Building Addition | Marlon Blackwell Architect

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect Courtesy of Marlon Blackwell Architect

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect Courtesy of Marlon Blackwell Architect

Fulbright Building Addition / Marlon Blackwell Architect Courtesy of Marlon Blackwell Architect

Respecting the quality of the original design of the building, as well as concerns from the community, the structure has remained relatively untouched. The generating idea or theme for the design of the renovation and additions to the Fulbright Building  is a ‘ship in a bottle’, defining the juxtaposition and materiality of the new interior spaces in relation to the existing steel structural grid and a new custom glass infill storefront system that wraps the upper floor of the building.

Architects: Marlon Blackwell Architect
Location: 
Photographs: Timothy Hursley

The Fulbright Building was built in 1962 to house the  Public Library and remained the Library’s home until the Library moved to a new facility in 2004. The 25,300 square foot building was originally designed by  native and noted architect, Warren Seagraves. An addition to accommodate ADA requirements was built in the early 1990’s by Hailey Amirmoez Associates Architects. The building has now been converted into professional office space by .

The 1990s addition – a double height space with a stair and handicap ramp – was converted into a large conference room, with a lounge area, wrapped in continuous maple plank on the floor and lower walls and serving the building tenants as well as community groups. An acoustical ‘shroud’ clad in black zinc panels is suspended above the conference and lounge area, and fills most of its upper volume – it is a figure encased in a mostly glass room. The shadow-like zoomorphic figure of the ‘shroud’ acts as an art piece with a public presence seen through the glass from Dickson Street. Lighting on and in the ‘shroud’ at night further enhances its sculptural effect.

The new storefront wrapping the building has been subtly manipulated to play with the reading of the building. It has a seemingly random pattern of translucent and transparent glass that allows views into and from the office spaces while still providing the interior occupants controlled privacy from the street. The glass skin was used as a way to frame and present from within strategically placed accent colors on the interior office walls. These, then, register as blocks of color from the street without actually providing colored exterior building materials, and can be changed as easily as painting an interior wall. The final manipulation of the storefront is in the actual location of the glass, glazing at both front and back locations in the frame. This is a delicate articulation that provides a depth to the system which becomes apparent as you get closer to the building, adding another, more intimate dimension, in the reading of the entire building.

The upper floor of the building is full of light from the exterior glass windows and from skylights that were cut into the existing roof. The original lower floor was more basement-like, with little exterior glass due to the north and part of the east walls being retaining walls. To make the lower floor more marketable to tenants, as well as more enjoyable, holes were cut in the upper floor slab below each of the skylights and staircases dropped into them. These staircases become light wells that open up the lower floor with double height space enhancing the spatial quality of the leaseable areas. The tenant spaces are essentially organized in a vertical stacked layout, with each tenant having two levels of office space.

Two additions were added to the building during the remodel, bringing the square footage to almost 29,000 square feet. The first is a 2,040 square foot extension of the upper floor to the east. The elevated nature of this addition allows for covered parking areas below. It also created the opportunity for an exterior grand entry stair from the covered parking area and lower sidewalk to the upper floor, which acts as a spatial joint between the existing building and the new. The stair is illuminated from above by a continuous slot in the roof that allows sunlight to pour down through the steel bar grate that wraps the steel stair. The bar grate is painted a vibrant orange which enhances the intensity of the light and shadow play that occurs at the stair throughout the day.

The second addition of 1,500 square feet, known as the ‘fishbowl’, is a formerly exterior space that was once used as a drop off area by the library. It is under an existing upper floor office space. A slab was poured below and butt- glazed glass walls were installed to wrap the space on three sides to create a seemingly barrier free transition between the interior and exterior space. Adjacent to this new interior space is an exterior brick-paved courtyard which will, when completed, have a fountain and landscaping.

This project was intended to revitalize and preserve the civic quality of a historically and architecturally significant  building, while inserting a modern and dynamic office atmosphere; extending the fundamental dignity of the building and providing its past with a future.

http://www.archdaily.com/110934/fulbright-building-addition-marlon-blackwell-architect/

 


February 15, 2011

Centre des Sports Belair | Auer+Weber+Assoziierte

Luxembourg
Project Centre des Sports Belair, Luxembourg
Completion 04 / 2010
Gross area 7.270 sqm
Cubature 45.500 cbm
Costs € 25,0 Mio.
Photography Roland Halbe, Stuttgart

Description The new buildings integrate into the terrain´s slope, cleverly benefitting from the topography. They are clearly shaped volumes over a connecting base, which allows access to both parts of the building and provides a generously landscaped terrace.

The upper floors are transparent and fitted with vertically structured, fix sunshades made of aluminium and equipped with an additional antiglare device. This layer allows for efficient shading and glare protection as well as solar gains during winter. Perspectives and views, the connection to the exterior are maintained.
The roofs of the dug-in basement floors are intensively overgrown, at some exact points skylights shed daylight into certain areas.

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http://www.german-architects.com/auer-weber-assoziierte-stuttgart?lang=en-gb

February 15, 2011

ESO Hotel | Auer+Weber+Assoziierte

Taltal
Project ESO Hotel at Cerro Paranal, Chile
Completion 2002
Gross area 12.000 sqm
Building costs € 11,0 Mio.
Photography Roland Halbe, Stuttgart
Description The European Southern Observatory (ESO) operates the Very Large Telescope (VLT) on the Cerro Paranal, a mountain in the northern part of the Atacama desert in Chile. The VLT is the world’s most powerful earthbased telescope. Beneath the summit, at a height of some 2,400 meters, lies the hotel for the ESO scientists and engineers who work here on a roster system.
For the relatively short time of their stays under extreme climatic conditions – intense sunlight, extreme dryness, high wind speeds, great fluctuations in temperature and the danger of earthquakes – a place has been created far away from civilization where they can relax and rest between the strenuous phases of their work. Reminiscent of an oasis, it provides 120 hotel rooms, a canteen, and lounge areas, as well as a swimming pool, fitness center and library.
The hotel complex fits snugly into an existing depression in the ground, acting as an artificial support wall. It does nothing to impede the breathtaking view over the horizon out to the Pacific Ocean. This emphasis on reflecting nature sets the hotel in direct and deliberate contrast to the high-tech telescope complex atop Cerro Paranal’s summit.
A single element of the hotel’s structure is visible above the horizon: a slightly raised dome comprising a steel skeleton that measures 35 meters in diameter. It rises up above the central lounge area and creates a formal counterpart to the telescope’s enormous concave mirrors.
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http://www.german-architects.com/auer-weber-assoziierte-stuttgart?lang=en-gb

February 15, 2011

Botanical gardens „Chenshan“ | Auer+Weber+Assoziierte

Shanghai
Project Botanical gardens „Chenshan“ Shanghai, China
Auer+Weber+Assoziierte with Straub+Thurmayr Landschaftsarchitekten, Freising and Valentien+Valentien Landschaftsarchitekten, Wessling
Completion 2010
Area 202 ha
Gross area 73.200sqm
Building costs € 65,0 Mio.
Photography Jan SiefkeDescription The architectural and building components, like the reception building, the nurseries and the research centre, are integrated into the continuum of a band-like garden circle. They sublimate the idea of a garden and within the whole park produce places with unique characters. The important buildings are embedded into the wider areas of the band and become parts of the modelled landscape. With their dynamic forms in both floor plans and elevations as well as their materials changing from concrete as bearer of the landscape level and glass as transparent filling elements, they integrate naturally into the narration of the landscape architecture.
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http://www.german-architects.com/auer-weber-assoziierte-stuttgart?lang=en-gb

February 15, 2011

Central Bus Terminal Munich | Auer+Weber+Assoziierte

München
Project Central bus station (ZOB), Munich
Completion 2009
Gross area 39.400 m2
Gross volume 155.000 m3
Building costs € 65 Mio.
Photography Roland Halbe, Stuttgart

Description The ZOB Munich is developing at a central hub of metropolitan and long-distance trains, in immediate vicinity to the main station. Reshaping the northern fringe of the city towards the tracks it represents, for people coming from the city, a prelude to this new development area. In addition to the requisite traffic facilities providing terminals for 29 long-distance coach services, spaces for commerce, catering and office are being developed.

The coach station´s building volume unites those purposes in an object-like form, its shell having the appearance of a chassis, and becomes the head of the new urban area at the edge of the track field.

The coaches enter and leave on a road separate from the loop for dropping people off and its secondary spaces. A terminal lounge opens to the east towards the generous forecourt. From here, travellers and passers-by enjoy a panoramic view across the wide space of the track system, to the main station, and the city skyline. Above the coach terminals there is a mall with shops and restaurants, and in the basement a discotheque for entertainment and events. The arcade level offers an attractive location for the other purposes and allows synergies with the services featured in the ZOB. Apart from that, it provides effective protection against immissions coming from the traffic area beneath.

The building envelope consists of a durable and maintenance-free metal structure composed of a substructure (ribs) carrying aluminium tubes in regular intervals. This volume, which deliberately comes off against the “urban“ fabric, makes up an impressive mark at the starting point and destination of inter-regional coach and train traffic, reflecting the dynamic nature of those connections and at the same time representing an attractive factor of identification for other uses.

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http://www.german-architects.com/auer-weber-assoziierte-stuttgart?lang=en-gb

 

February 15, 2011

SolarCity Center Linz | Auer+Weber+Assoziierte

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Linz Pichling
Project SolarCity Center Linz
Comletion 2005
Gross area 16.540 sqm
Gross volume 63.800 cbm
Building costs € 28,1 Mio.
Photography Roland Halbe, Stuttgart 

Description Based on a master plan by the architects Norman Foster, Thomas Herzog and Richard Rogers a brand new town for 6.000 inhabitants, which will be powered almost entirely by solar energy, is being established in Linz-Pichling. The highest possible level of compactness, diversity and multipurpose facilities, as well as the development of low-cost municipal housing, also feature in the plans. Gardens for tenants, tranquil areas, children’s playgrounds and spots for communal activities divide up the construction areas and lend them an air of small scale individuality.

Together with a wide access boulevard, the center of this future solar-powered town will form a functional and spatial link between the town’s districts, including various commercial, cultural and general service providers which will be attached as modular elements. A linear supporting frame is being erected in the streets and courtyards to provide transparent roofing. A variety of lighting effects will be created by the use of coated, colored and polished glass, while the roofs of the modules will be used to create solar energy.

The plan is for the central square – a “social magnet” that can be easily reached on foot from all areas – to be the centerpiece of life in the new town.

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http://www.german-architects.com/auer-weber-assoziierte-stuttgart?lang=en-gb

February 15, 2011

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

The Neopharm Office Building / Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office © Friedrike von Rauch

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Architects: Shilo Benaroya Architecture Office
Location: Kiryat Aryeh industrial zone, 
Interior designer: 
Project area: 4,000 sqm
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Friedrike von Rauch

At the renovated of Neopharm office building the play of light draws the eye upwards to the sky lights, while a long view through the depth of the building and across the multiply office spaces reinforces the immediate impression of spatial generosity. Light has been factored in as one more material as it suggests to link between interior spaces and offers clarity in the organization of the plan.

With the aim to create an effective protection against overheating and as a way to deal with the long hot spells in summer a new enclosure system consists of extruded aluminum louver and moveable shutters were added to the building, at the same time, the new façade units both new and old parts. These shutters function as screens to stage-manage sunlight as they climb up and down as a group creating a moveable and playful layer over the facade.

http://www.archdaily.com/109584/the-neopharm-shilo-benaroya-architecture-office/

from architect website:

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http://www.shilobenaroya.com/

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February 15, 2011

Caja De Guadalajara Office Building | Solano & Catalán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

Caja De Guadalajara / Solano & Catalán © Miguel de Guzmán

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Architects: Solano & Catalán
Location: 
Project year: 2008 – 2009
Photographs: Miguel de Guzmán

The building has a tangential position with respect to the city and is part of the first urban development on the far side of the A2 dual carriage way. Originally, the NII, the road connecting Madrid and Barcelona, passed through ’s urban area. As the population increased, the daily and continued use of this road began to cause serious trouble, forcing to build a bypass road in the year 1959. Over time, the road became a dual carriageway, establishing the limit of the urban development for over thirty years. At present, this border has been exceeded again by new tertiary and commercial developments that, after jumping over this main interurban road, have started to conquer the outer edge of the dual carriageway along the southeast perimeter.

At the same time, the City Council approved a bylaw to develop the buildable area allocated to these plots in volumes of up to fifteen stories above ground level, representing a firm commitment of the municipal Corporation for these sectors. From then on, these edge grounds get an extraordinary hegemonic importance as new developments’ axis and begin to influence in order to attract companies, trading firms and financial institutions wishing to operate in the Corredor. This circumstance causes a displacement to the south of ’s traditional city centre and generates a unique and unprecedented façade on one of the most important roads in the country.

The job is born of the free will of CajaGuadalajara. This institution, which is aware of the need to renovate its somewhat outdated and obsolete head office for it to be renewed by other installations in line with the services and facilities required by the current financial environment, decides to move to a better area with greater social meaning and build there a more contemporary and representative office. For that purpose, CajaGuadalajara choose a plot of one of the edge sectors located at the other side of the A2 dual carriageway.

Trying to achieve uniqueness, last-generation technological facilities and environmental sustainability, the building is constructed within the plot, parallel to the dual carriageway, in front of another office tower. Both towers share a unitary pedestal and the space between them is used to build a common square. This platform, facing midday, links the cultural activity of CajaGuadalajara to a varied supply of shops and accessorial services located on the same height and with access from this area.

The aesthetic image of the building is interpreted as a millefeuille tower composed by a grid of horizontal glass panes, and is protected and characterized by a random sequence of horizontal sun breakers. Consequence and result of the fleetingness of a glance from the dual carriageway, it is intended that the building appears as a sculptural building block without scale which is only defined by the shadows produced by the  sheets and where references to both floorslabs and to structural elements disappear.

http://www.archdaily.com/109877/caja-de-guadalajara-office-building-solano-catalan/