Archive for February 8th, 2011

February 8, 2011

Benson & Forsyth wins competition to design Islington towers

Benson & Forsyth has won planning permission for two skyscrapers in north London. The 21-storey towers, which will contain 355 flats, shops and office space, are part of a five-year regeneration project in Islingto

http://www.bdonline.co.uk/news/islington-towers-win-go-ahead/3161825.article

http://www.archdaily.com/56989/benson-forsyth-wins-competition-to-design-islington-towers/

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February 8, 2011

Panter Hudspith creates a new model for dense, quality housing in London’s Southbank

Architects were commissioned in early 2005 to design a new mixed-use residential scheme for a site in London’s regenerating Southbank, near the Tate Modern. Ultimately comprised of 89 flats above ground floor retail units, the brief was to achieve permission for a scheme of very high density. This demanded a building of exceptional architectural and material quality. In a city historically averse to European style apartment living, it also questioned how design might challenge this prejudice.

The development site is triangular in shape, abutting a two-and-a-half storey pub to one corner and a proposed 8-storey hotel along its opposing edge. It was important for the proposed scheme to not read as one large mass. Instead a module of brick ‘boxes’, ranging from one to four stories in height, was employed to give the building a human scale. Two stock type bricks constitute the principal building material used throughout, broken down into these ‘boxes’, piled as high as eight storeys and gradually stepping down to meet the existing pub at the corner. This overall form negotiates between the areas existing and developing scales, while maximising the number of terraces that spill out from individual flats. The massing allows the building to open up the centre of the scheme, creating a first floor amenity area, allowing natural light to penetrate the middle of the site and in turn distribute natural light into the residential properties.

The project demonstrates how a dense residential scheme can provide a model for apartment living that challenges the suburban ideal, and helps establish a vision for a neighborhood as a place for people to visit, live, work, shop and eat. The ultimate effect is a contemporary building whose grain and texture reflect the areas industrial urban history, while promoting an active community in this dramatically changing neighbourhood.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=13180

 

February 8, 2011

House in Melides | Pedro Reis

PEDRO REIS  ARQUITECTOHouse in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

House in Melides - Pedro Reis © FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

situation plan situation plan

level 00 plan level 00 plan

level 01 plan level 01 plan

roof plan roof plan

section section

Architect: Pedro Reis
Location: , Grândola, 
Collaborators: Isabel Silvestre, Tiago Tomás
Landscape: Global2 – Inês Norton
Structure: ARA – Alves Rodrigues & Associados, Lda
HVAC: ACRIBIA – Projectos e Desenho Técnico, Lda
Electricity, telecommunications and security: ACRIBIA: Projectos e Desenho Técnico, Lda
Hydraulic: ACRIBIA – Projectos e Desenho Técnico, Lda
Project Area: 344 sqm
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: FG+SG – , Sergio Guerra

The house in , on the southern Alentejo Coast, by , represents the desire for a holiday house as a getaway from the bustle of a big city. The client made the unusual decision to have an architectural competition between three distinct ateliers, allowing a choice from a wider range of possible solutions. This winning proposal presents a reading of the “drama” of the natural countryside, building it on top of a steep hill relatively protected by the surrounding “rugged topography”.

Inhabiting this site means “founding a place” by means of a “strong geometric imprint”, achieved by two volumes overlapping in the shape of a “cross”. The aim of this dialectic strategy is not just to reduce the “scale and presence” of the construction, but also to “split” the programme into two areas, one more “exuberant” and exposed and the other more “intimate” and contained. If the light upper volume recalls the synthetic image of the modern house, with large glass areas open to the scenic countryside, the “anchored” lower volume, clad with sheets of earth-coloured , pre-fabricated in situ, sits on the ground, giving support and stability to the house. In terms of programmatic organisation, the “suspended” upper volume concentrates the main spaces, defining the “minimum housing unit”, while the lower volume acts as an “expansion zone”, hosting more intimate areas or service areas, allowing increased occupation. The kitchen, as the centre of the home, takes on paramount importance here, acting as the crossing-point for all movements: entering, going through the inside and moving out into the garden, with the long pergola providing shade and a water tank reflecting the pine trees, set under the house into the main bedroom. The experience of this house aims to concentrate on its essence, on being inside and out, on contemplating and lingering, highlighting a enjoyable sense of living, close to the amenities of urban life.

http://www.archdaily.com/108648/house-in-melides-pedro-reis/

http://www.preis.pt/