Archive for January 30th, 2011

January 30, 2011

Housing L’Embellie | Barré Lambot Architectes

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

Housing L’Embellie / Barré Lambot Architectes © Philippe Ruault

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Architects: Barré Lambot Architectes
Location: Rue Jean-Baptiste Corabeuf, 44300 
Collaboration: AREST, ISOCRATE (building services engineering), Denis Rousseau
Project area: 6,084 sqm
Project year: 2007 – 2010
Photographs: Philippe Ruault

The housing project continues and finishes the existing residential area, consisting of:

– The creation of an urban courtyard North / South to organize the site into two blocks and provide continuity in inter-district connecting the two existing ways

– The creation of a public footpath through the operation

– Creating a common courtyard to contain parking spaces and garages needed for the housing

– Construction of a kindergarten, dedicated to the neighbourhood and located at the corner of two streets

– The establishment of “thresholds” or gardens, before all the individual units also avoiding air parking

It is around the urban court that 2 blocks are organized :

– One in the East, Individual rental units are organized on a ground floor and one level. These homes are served by an open courtyard, forming a line from the Urban Court. They all have a West facing garden. The court is used to place the garages in tune with the gardens and provide necessary air space for residents without encroaching on the public domain.

– The other block offers a more complex composition consisting of a residential complex of three small buildings located in the alignment of the “Street of the Embellie” and staging itself to respect the topography of the site. This composition is used to identify each building entrance with large openings in the halls. This residence is organized on a ground floor and two floors with a basement containing all the parking spaces reserved for rental housing. All apartments have an extension on the outside

A public footpath opens in heart of the plot. It offers various courses to residents of the district in the continuity of those already existing on the site.

http://www.archdaily.com/106233/housing-l%E2%80%99embellie-barre-lambot-architectes/

 

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January 30, 2011

New World Center | Frank Gehry

Project team:

Architects: Gehry Partners, LLP
Location:  Beach, 
Design Partner: 
Project Designer: Craig Webb
Managing Partner: Terry Bell
Project Architect: Brad Winkeljohn
Project Manager: Kristin Ragins
Project Team: Curtis Christensen , Dan Sokolosky, Molly Forr, Lisa Cage , Shikha Doogar, Petar Vrcibradic, Leon Cheng, Vartan Chalikian, Armando Solano, Luciana Vidal, Rolando Mendoza
Acoustician: Nagata Acoustics America, Inc
Acoustical Team: Dr. Yasuhisa Toyota Motoo Komoda Kayo Kallas Daniel Beckmann Robert Mahoney, Robert F Mahoney & Associates
Structural Engineering: Gilsanz, Murray, Steficek, LLP
MEPFP Engineering: Cosentini & Associates
Theater Consultant: Theatre projects Consultants
Lighting Designer: LAM Partners, Inc.
Sound & Projection Consultants: Acoustic Dimensions, Sonitus, LLC
Landscape Architect: Raymond Jungles Associates
Civil Engineer: Kimley Horn and Associates, Inc.
Construction Manager: Hines
Performance Hall Seating: Poltrona Frau
Project Area: 100,641 sqf
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Rui Dias-Adios, Tomas Loewy

New World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Rui Dias-AdiosNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Tomas LoewyNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Tomas LoewyNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Tomas LoewyNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Tomas LoewyNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Tomas LoewyNew World Center / Frank Gehry © Tomas Loewy

The New World Center, part of the New World Symphony America’s Orchestral Academy, opened its doors this week. Located in the heart of  Beach, the music education and performance facility is the first purpose-built home for the New World Symphony founded by artistic director Michael Tilson Thomas.

In terms of design the building’s exterior portrays a quiet, almost tamed . The rectangle shaped white building expresses Gehry’s well known bends and folds within its interior – glimpses of which are visible through the main entrance east facade 80 foot high glass curtain wall.

The New World Center joins a wave of new architecture and design in . Playing host to the most important art show in the United States, Art Basel | Miami Beach, and the 2010 National AIA Convention,  has been focusing its efforts on developing a new vibrant city center. Just down the street from the New World Center resides 1111 Lincoln Road designed by Herzog & de Meuron, completed last year. Currently Herzog & de Meuron are also working on the expansion for the  Art Museum.

Beach SoundScape, the public event space designed by the Dutch landscape architecture firm West 8, is located to the east of the New World Center and to the west of the new building is Pennsylvania Avenue Garage, a new 550-car parking structure designed by Gehry Partners, LLP.

From New World Symphony:

New World Symphony, America’s Orchestral Academy, marks a new era for classical music with the inauguration of the institution’s first purpose-built home, an extraordinary new facility in the center of  Beach. Designed by  in close collaboration with the New World Symphony’s founder and artistic director Michael Tilson Thomas, New World Center opens up exciting new possibilities in the way music is taught, presented and experienced and dramatically advances New World Symphony’s mission to provide exceptional professional training for the gifted young music school graduates who are its Fellows.

“The opening of this extraordinary building is the beginning of a wonderful adventure and exploration,” said Michael Tilson Thomas. ”Not only are we marking a new era for this organization and giving our musicians an unrivalled facility in which to learn and achieve their potential, but we are also inviting everyone to experience classical music in a new kind of space—one that is designed to engage and to energize, and that will move people from around the world to think about music in new ways.”

At the heart of New World Center is a flexible and technologically sophisticated 756-seat performance hall, featuring large acoustically reflective “sails” that surround the audience with sound and also serve as video projection surfaces.

Directly adjacent to the 100,641-square-foot building is the new  Beach SoundScape, a landscaped 2.5- acre public space into which New World Symphony will extend its programming. Together, the building and the public space create a dynamic new city center and a geographical “heart” from which civic, cultural, recreational, tourist and leisurely activity will radiate.

Six days of opening festivities will showcase the new building’s remarkable capabilities. Events include the world premiere of a commissioned work for orchestra by acclaimed composer Thomas Adès; video projections within the performance hall, including a new work by filmmaker Tal Rosner and the world premiere of a series of animations developed in collaboration with the University of Southern California (alma mater of Michael Tilson Thomas and ) and its School of Cinematic Arts; outdoor video projections of a new work by Tal Rosner and digital artist C.E.B. Reas; an outdoor wallcastTM of a live concert; the introduction of new concertformats designed to engage and broaden audiences; an architecture symposium; live outdoor entertainment; and fireworks.

stated, “I am very proud of this building, which results from a close working relationship with my lifelong friend Michael Tilson Thomas and brings to life his dream for New World Symphony and the entire world of classical music. I hope the spirit of creative engagement that Michael and I have enjoyed will live on in the building’s spaces. They are designed to encourage young musicians, their mentors and their audiences to try new things, interact in new ways and remain open to new experiences.”

http://www.archdaily.com/107112/new-world-center-frank-gehry/

 

 

 

 

January 30, 2011

Update on Shenzhen Stock Exchange by OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

In Progress: Shenzhen Stock Exchange © OMA

Continuing our coverage of the Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SSE), OMA recently shared the latest photographs of the building while under construction. The building, located in the downtown area of Shenzhen, , is expected to reach completion in April 2011.  The SSE, a new headquarters for ’s equivalent of the NASDAQ, is 132,000 sqm of offices, registration and clearing house, accessory area, securities information company, SSE office area, trading floor and technical operations.  The floating podium design, which is suspended 36 meters over a public plaza, projects 54 meters from the base of the tower.  The building broke ground in November of 2007, Rem Koolhaas along with local government and the officials from the SSE were in attendance.  Check out our previous coverage here.

Follow the break for the latest photographs of SSE.

http://www.archdaily.com/106206/in-progress-shenzhen-stock-exchange/

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January 30, 2011

Neo Solar Power Corporation | J. J. Pan & Partners

Neo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPP

Neo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPNeo Solar Power Corporation / J. J. Pan & Partners © Courtesy of JJPPplan 02 plan 02plan 03 plan 03concept 01 concept 01concept 02 concept 02concept 03 concept 03concept 04 concept 04sketches 01 sketches 01sketches 02 sketches 02

Architects: J. J. Pan & Partners, Architects & Planners (JJPP)
Location:  Science Park, 
Project team: Joshua J. Pan, Chung Tsai Huang, Yi Tai Lin, Shun Lang Wu, Mallet Y.L. Chang, K. J. Lin, I-Fen Chang, Shu Chiao Hsu
Project area: 27,000 sqm
Project year: 2007 – 2009
Photographs: Courtesy of JJPP

The façade takes up the metaphor of transferring light energy to electric power with solar panels to achieve a uniqueness of the contour. The exterior walls are designed as a continuous wave of panels in the concept of “starting-folding-concluding“ to express the design ideas of “undulation, transference.” Half-unit  and aluminum curtain walls are sectioned into 8 trapezoid units, finished with over 350 -cutting patterns. The perimeter of each floor varies with the advancing and recessing surface walls, and the trimming  beam curving with the floor board serves as the fixed end of the curtain walls.The ground floor of this north-oriented building is planned with high-ceilinged foyer and an auditorium, with a staff restaurant curtained with panoramic  walls facing the central green belt. The 2nd to 7th floors are research spaces, and the 8th floor is executive offices. The 5-story plant on the south is built with damping diagonal bracing structure. The heightened basement air raid shelter and garage are planned to meet the parking needs for phase II expansion in the future.To present a clear-cut, light, and transparent look of the building, and to induce greenery indoors, the large  exterior walls of the office building are complemented with movable vertical blinds to shield off light from the north. The alcove spaces formed alongside the exterior wall is employed as R&D discussion and lounging spots, to effectively utilize the irregular spaces.

http://www.archdaily.com/105668/neo-solar-power-corporation-j-j-pan-partners/

 

January 30, 2011

Overview of Energy Modeling

What is an Energy Model?

An energy model is a simulation created with computer software to determine a building’s energy use given specific variables. There are many energy modeling programs (the Department of Energy has indexed nearly 50) that range from free software to highly proprietary software designed for specific types of buildings and thermodynamic conditions. Most models utilize information on building design, envelope, orientation, weather, schedules, controls, and energy-using systems to project comparative energy consumption and costs. While the energy model is not used to predict energy bills, it is used to compare the overall performance of building design versus a baseline approach which meets a common building standard, like the ASHRAE 90.1-2004 Energy Standard. What is even more useful is to compare specific or combined energy conservation measures versus a baseline design. These measures could include changing the building orientation, adding better glazing, improving chiller efficiency, or implementing daylighting strategies. The accuracy of the energy model largely depends on the quality of the data input, which requires the involvement of the architect and the MEP engineer. Once the information is collected the system will produce project comparative energy usage, demand and cost results over an average year.

When to create the Energy Model?

Energy modeling is most useful in the early stages of design. A proactive energy model allows architects, designers and engineers to create solutions rather than solve problems. Once the design of the building has been created in the energy model, it is relatively simple to compare various architectural and engineering energy conservation strategies. Project team members can evaluate preferred design options individually or in combination to determine the impact on energy and consumption and cost.   After each change, the modeler can evaluate the estimated energy use and cost to determine the combination of strategies and technologies will be most effective in reducing energy consumption. A similar approach can be taken with an existing building, but typically it is only useful to evaluate discrete energy conservation measures and not model an entire existing building. the value of an energy model reduces in relation to the stage of the building’s design – so start early!

Who Should Perform the Energy Model?

Choosing the right modeler is a critical key to success! A talented energy modeler typically has experience in building engineering or architectural design and has analyzed many buildings.

The modeling software must also be flexible and powerful enough to model various design scenarios with accuracy and speed. Through our experience, we prefer software that is based upon a DOE-2.2 simulation environment, like eQuest (available free-of-charge at http://www.doe2.com/).

The modeler should be selected for their ability to model appropriate building types and unique energy-saving systems, including daylighting, under floor air distribution, radiant cooling, thermal storage, renewable energy and demand control ventilation. The modeler must also be knowledgeable and comfortable working with members of the design team to help identify new energy-efficient solutions that will meet project goals.

Applications

Currently there are no federal requirements for energy models to verify compliance with building codes. While some states do mandate energy models for new buildings, Arizona is currently on a voluntary basis. This is probably something to look for in upcoming legislation in response to climate change.

In relation to LEED certification, a significant portion of potential points are devoted to energy efficiency (10 of the 69 possible points for New Construction). While an energy model is not required to meet the Minimum Energy Performance Prerequisite, Green Ideas has yet to find an owner that has pursued LEED certification for a new building without performing an energy model.

For buildings over 20,000 SF it is necessary to complete an energy model under LEED-NC v2.2 to earn any of the ten points available under EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance. Each point is awarded for increased energy efficiency relative to the ASHRAE 90.1-2004 baseline model.

An energy model is a powerful tool to help earn LEED certification, but more importantly, it is an indispensable tool for green building design. Energy modeling helps to maximize energy conservation, decrease environmental impact, and generate Life Cycle Cost savings that cover the expense of greening the building in the first place.

Energy Modeling

In March of 2007 the United Nations Environmental Program released the reportBuildings and Climate Change, stating 30-40% of energy worldwide is consumed in what is known as the Life-Cycle (the design, construction, operation and demolition) of a building. This report confirms what many of us in the green building industry already understand; addressing the energy use of the built environment could have the single greatest impact in reducing our energy demands as a society and therefore the negative effects on our environment, economy and well-being.

Of all the stages in the Life-Cycle of a building, the energy used in the operation phase has the greatest environmental impact. Accordingly focusing on this consumption is extremely effective in reducing a building’s overall consumption, yet determining energy use in a building’s operation phase is not always an intuitive process for even the most experienced designers.

In our efforts to reduce operation phase energy use for our clients Green Ideas has found energy modeling as an indispensable design tool and has therefore integrated energy modeling into our service offerings. Energy modeling can help project team members evaluate a variety of energy conservation measures with little resource allocation to determine optimum strategies that maximize both energy and cost efficiency.

Energy Modeler’s role on the Project Team

Green Ideas has significant experience with computer energy modeling to meet LEED and ASHRAE 90.1 Standard requirements. Energy modeling services can either be performed in-house or by our energy modeling partner, Quest Energy Group.

Modeler’ Role

The Energy Modeler’s role in a project requires a close working relationship with the architect, lighting and mechanical designers throughout the design process to ensure an integrated building design. This approach facilitates critical decision-making regarding the impacts of the building envelope, the daylighting and interior lighting systems and the size of the heating, ventilation and cooling equipment. Accordingly, the Energy Modeler’s initial project involvement will occur during the schematic and early design development phase of the project to produce maximum impact. Green Ideas recommends performing energy analysis early enough in the design process to help the design team make design decisions that will affect energy consumption and comfort.

Schematic Design Phase

During the Schematic Design phase, the Energy Modeler will attend a kick off meeting or design charrette with the owner and design team to develop a preliminary list of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) and HVAC system alternatives that will be evaluated for the project. These EEMs typically include alternatives for wall and roof construction, window type and location, natural daylighting opportunities, high-efficiency package unitary equipment, etc.

The Energy Modeler will then develop an hourly computer model of the schematic design using the eQuest software program. Using this model, Green Ideas will develop a minimally compliant (ASHRAE 90.1) model of the facility. This baseline model will serve as the basis for evaluating potential energy efficiency measures and system alternatives. It will also be the basis for determining the number of credits available under LEED EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance. A second meeting will be scheduled with the design team to present the results of the preliminary analysis. The Energy Modeler will provide the design team with the expected overall performance of the facility as well the economic viability (simple payback and life-cycle cost) of each of the energy efficiency opportunities.

Construction Document Phase

At the end of Construction Document phase, the Energy Modeler will reconcile the computer model of the facility to reflect the final building design. At this time, the Energy Modeler will complete the LEED documentation for both EA Prerequisite 2 and EA Credit 1. A final wrap up meeting or conference call will then be scheduled with the design team to share the results.

http://www.egreenideas.com/energy-overview.php

 

 

 

January 30, 2011

ASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects

ASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill TimmermanASU Polytechnic Campus / Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects © Bill Timmerman

The design for the ASU Polytechnic Campus transformed a decommissioned airbase into an inviting pedestrian campus that celebrates the desert landscape and created a new identity for the program. Fourteen acres of asphalt and concrete were removed to transform the site into a desert landscaped mall. Storm water is slowed, captured in detention basins throughout the mall, and used to nourish the landscape. The strategy minimized the load on the existing detention basin and established an indigenous landscape as the heart of the new campus.

Architects: Lake|Flato Architects and RSP Architects
Location: 
Project Team: Ted Flato, FAIA, Andrew Herdeg, AIA, Chris Krajcer, Matt Wallace (), Joe Tyndall, Beau Dromiack, John Williams, Chris Doran, John Grosskopf ()
General Contractor: DPR
Landscape Architect: Ten Eyck
MEP Engineer: Energy Systems Design
Structural Engineer: Paragon
LEED Consultant: Green Ideas
Civil Engineer: Wood Patel & Associates
Acoustics: McKay Conant Brook
AV: Jeremiah & Associates
Cost Estimating: Rider Hunt Levett & Bailey
Fire & Life Safety: Rolf Jensen & Associates
Geotechnical: Speedie & Associates
Lab Consultant: RFD
ADA Consultant: Robert Lynch
Client: Arizona State University
Photographs: Bill Timmerman

By segmenting the program into five buildings, the architects formed four shady courtyards linked by portals and arcades, creating a cohesive pedestrian campus. The three largest buildings turn their sides to the east and west protecting the courtyards and atria from the seasonal monsoons. These shady, open-air atria provide environmentally sensitive social spaces that maximize visibility, daylighting, and the sense of community while minimizing energy usage by significantly eliminating interior conditioned circulation space.Purposeful environmental strategies such as narrow building sections, shading devices and solar orientation allow 90% of the spaces to be effectively daylit, reduce thermal loads and contribute to a LEED Gold rating. Exposed building systems and regional material palette such as locally sourced ground faced block and perforated corrugated weathered steel reinforce the straightforward philosophy of the campus.

http://www.archdaily.com/105604/asu-polytechnic-campus-lakeflato-architects-and-rsp-architects/

January 30, 2011

Durham Consolidated Courthouse | WZMH Architects

Durham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai GilDurham Consolidated Courthouse / WZMH Architects © Shai Gilfloor plan floor plansection sectionwall detail wall detailsection sectionelevation elevationelevation elevationelevation elevationelevation elevationsketch sketchsketch sketchsketch sketchsketch sketchsketch sketch

With its richly patterned cladding of spandrel, clear glass and carefully scaled massing, the Durham Consolidated Courthouse, completed in January 2010, makes a significant contribution to the emerging urban framework of downtown . Its bold, modern vocabulary emphasizes transparency and openness both for users and passersby.

Follow the break for sketches, drawings, and more photographs of the Durham Consolidated Courthouse.

Architects: WZMH Architects
Location: 
Project Team: Carl Blanchaer, Nicola Casciato, Hady Lotfy, Paul Brown, Jamie Lee, Agnes Tong, Dorota Gajewnik, Janet Nowakowski, Sherri Zhang, Emma Qian, Maria Cabrera, Ferah Rahman, Armis Kermanpour, Mark Horwitz, Glen Herglotz
Structural Engineer: Halsall Associates Limited
Mechanical Engineer: The Mitchell Partnership Inc.
Electrical Engineer: Stantec
Landscape Architect: Quinn Design Associates
Interior Designer: Cannon Design
Contractor: PCL Constructors Canada Inc.
Client: Infrastructure 
Project Area: 41,957 sqf
Project Year: 2010
Photographer: Shai Gil

A large outdoor public space, Courthouse Square, is the forecourt to the building entrance. The scale of the main entrance pavilion on the square establishes a sense of dignity, appropriate for the front door of a courthouse.  Providing badly needed space for the Province´s judicial system, this six-story, 40,000 sqm structure houses 33 courtrooms, associated support space and prisoner-holding facilities. For planning efficiency, high-volume functions are located at or close to grade. The public circulation system is highly legible for first time users.

Exhibiting a new typology for a typical courtroom floor, the design has a “back to back” arrangement of courtrooms that results in short walking distances for judges and staff. For participants in court proceedings, the availability of natural light and outdoor views in the courtroom waiting areas will provide some stress relief.The courthouse represents a physical embodiment of our justice system interpreted in a modernist language. Solid building elements serve to express the stability and permanence of the courts. Welcoming to the public, the courthouse elevations are highly transparent, using clear glass with a rich mosaic of white ceramic frit glass panels. The scale of the main entrance pavilion creates a formality and sense of dignity, appropriate for the front door of a courthouse.The project is the first LEED NC Gold Provincial Government Building to be completed. It has a compact plan that minimizes the exterior envelope, contributing to an overall building energy consumption that is 42% less than the Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB).
The courthouse is setback from Carriage Works Road to create a Courthouse Square of significant size that acts as a formal forecourt for the building. Providing over one acre of new landscaped open space, the project gives the City a significant new public amenity. The single public building entry is centrally located on the Square. The building mass parallels the street grid. Building setbacks serve to mediate between the surrounding properties and the large mass of the proposed building: a continuous 10m high street wall creates a strong urban edge and pedestrian scale along Bond Street compatible with the existing adjacent low structures; above the second floor the building steps back. On the west, the main building core is raised to create a visual terminus, looking east from the proposed linear park. At the southeast corner of the site, a column of glass that is illuminated at night creates a strong gateway to downtown .The Durham Consolidated Courthouse’s location and siting establish its significance as a major civic building within an urban community. The site, 3.9 acres in size in downtown , is bounded by Bond Street on the south, Carriage Works Drive on the west, and Division Street on the east. A surface parking lot has been built to the north. A new development that includes a linear pedestrian park is planned to the west. To the south and east there are two and three storey structures.
The project exhibits a new typology for a typical courtroom floor that has a “back to back” arrangement of courtrooms that results in short walking distances for judges and staff. The availability of daylight and views to the outside in the courtroom waiting areas will reduce stress for the participants in court proceedings.

http://www.archdaily.com/105945/durham-consolidated-courthouse-wzmh-architects/

 

 

January 30, 2011

European Central Bank, Frankfurt am Main, Germany by Coop Himmelb(l)au

Coop Himmelb(l)au’s design for a vertical city in Frankfurt, Germany

The location for the new headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt’s Ostend district has the potential of adding a new landmark to the Frankfurt skyline that will be visible at great distances. The starting point for the design of the towers was the urban perspectives of the city of Frankfurt. At a height of around 185 metres, the double tower, with its polygonal shape and east-west orientation, has a striking profile that is visible from all important reference points in Frankfurt’s city centre, as well as from the river Main. Thanks to its form and presence, the double tower will become a characteristic feature of the Frankfurt skyline. The atrium between the office towers becomes a “vertical city”. Through platforms we are creating spaces, plazas and pathways between the towers, just as they exist in a city. The connecting and transferring levels divide the atrium horizontally into three sections of different sizes, with heights ranging from around 45 to 60 metres. These connecting platforms, bridges, ramps and stairs form a network of links between the office towers. They create short paths between the individual office floors in each tower and thus enable larger, interconnected usable office spaces on one or more floors in both towers, thereby also promoting informal communication. This new typology supports a dynamic development of form and enables differentiated office spaces with different panoramic perspectives.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=1508

January 30, 2011

Dalian International Conference Center | Coop Himmelb(l)au

In Progress - Dalian International Conference Center - Coop Himmelb(l)au © Coop Himmelb(l)au

In Progress - Dalian International Conference Center - Coop Himmelb(l)au © Coop Himmelb(l)au

In Progress - Dalian International Conference Center - Coop Himmelb(l)au © Coop Himmelb(l)au

In Progress - Dalian International Conference Center - Coop Himmelb(l)au © Coop Himmelb(l)au

In Progress - Dalian International Conference Center - Coop Himmelb(l)au © Coop Himmelb(l)au

In Progress - Dalian International Conference Center - Coop Himmelb(l)au © Coop Himmelb(l)au

Architects: Coop Himmelb(l)au
Location: 
Design Principal: Wolf D. Prix
Project Partner: Paul Kath (until 2010), Wolfgang Reicht
Project Architect: Wolfgang Reicht
Design Architect: Alexander Ott
Design Team: Quirin Krumbholz, Eva Wolf, Victoria Coaloa
Project Team: Nico Boyer, Liisi Salumaa, Anja Sorger, Vanessa Castro Vélez, Lei Feng, Reinhard Hacker, Jan Brosch, Veronika Janovska, Manfred Yuen, Matthias Niemeyer, Matt Kirkham, Peter Rose, Markus Wings, Ariane Marx, Wendy Fok, Reinhard Platzl, Debora Creel, Hui-Cheng, Jessie Chen, Simon Diesendruck, Yue Chen, Thomas Hindelang, Pola Dietrich, Moritz Keitel, Ian Robertson, Keigo Fukugaki, Gaspar Gonzalez Melero, Giacomo Tinari
Model Building: Nam La-Chi, Paul Hoszowski, Taylor Clayton, Matthias Bornhofer, Katsyua Arai, Zhu Juankang, Lukas Allner, Phillip Reiner, Moritz Heinrath, Olivia Wimmer, Silja Wiener, Katrin Ertle, Maria Zagallo, Logan Yuen, André Nakonz, Arihan Senocak, Rashmi Jois, Sachin Thorat, Marc Werner
3D Visualization: Isochrom.com, Vienna; Jens Mehlan & Jörg Hugo, Vienna
Project Year: 2008-2011
Photographs: Markus Pillhofer

Local Partner: DADRI  Institute of Architecture Design and Research Co. LTD & UD Studio, , P.R. 
Client:  Municipal People’s Government, P.R. 
Structural Engineering: B+G Ingenieure, Bollinger Grohmann Schneider ZT-GmbH, Vienna, Austria & DADRI  Institute of Architecture Design and Research Co. LTD, , P.R 
Acoustics: Müller-BBM, Planegg, Germany; Dr. Eckard Mommerz
Stage Design: BSEDI Beijing Special Engineering Design and Research Institute, Beijing, P.R. 
Lighting Design: a•g Licht, Wilfried Kramb, Bonn, Germany
Audio & Video: CRFTG Radio, Film and Television Design & Research Institute, Beijing, P.R. 
Climatic Design: Prof. Brian Cody, Berlin, Germany
HVAC, Sprinkler: Reinhold A. Bacher, Vienna, Austria & DADRI  Institute of Architecture Design and Research Co. LTD, , P.R. 
Façade: Meinhardt Facade Technology Ltd. Beijing Branch Office, Beijing, P.R. 
Photovoltaic: Baumgartner GmbH, Kippenheim, Germany
General Contractor:  Construction Eight Engineering Division, , P.R. 

Urban Concept

is an important seaport, industrial, trade, and tourism center, located in the southernmost part of the Liaodong Peninsula in the Chinese Liaoning Province.

The city is currently undergoing a wave of transformation on coastal brownfield and reclaimed land which will entirely change the city’s significance within the next decade.

The key developments are:

  • Dislocation of container port out from the dense city area
  • Establishment of international port for cruise ships
  • New urban development on reclaimed land
  • Bridge over the sea bay to connect with the special economic zone

The urbanistic task for the design of the  International Conference Center is to create an instantly recognizable landmark of the above mentioned urban development in . Situated at the terminal point of the future extension of the main city axis, the center will be anchored as its focal point in the mental landscape of the international community.

The footprint of the building on the site is therefore arranged in accordance with the orientation of the two major urban axis which merge in front of the building. The close surroundings are further differentiated with the conference spaces that penetrate the façades, cantilevering and thereby creating a spatially multifaceted building volume.

The various theaters and conference spaces are covered by a cone-shaped roof screen, whose controlled daylight input assure good spatial orientation for the visitors and atmospheric variety.

Architectural Concept

The building has both to reflect the promising modern future of  and its tradition as an important port, trade, industry and tourism city.

The formal language of our project is not pictographic, but associative; it will combine and merge the rational structure and organization of its modern conference center typology with the floating spaces of traditional Asian architecture as well as with a design reminescent of the soft surfaces generated by the forces of the sea.

The project combines the following functions within one hybrid building with synergetic effects of functionality and spatial richness.

  • Conference Center
  • Theater and Opera House
  • Exhibition Center
  • Parking, Delivery and Disposal

A public zone at ground level allows for differentiating accessibility for the different groups of users, with the shopping and exhibition facilities directly connected to the conference center providing dramatic sight axis within the building. The actual performance and conference spaces are situated at +15 m above the entrance hall. The grand theater, with a capacity of 1,600 seats and a stage tower, directly opposite of a flexible conference hall for 2,500 seats, is positioned at the core in the center of the building.

With this arrangement the main stage can be used for the classical theater auditorium as well as for the flexible multipurpose hall. The main auditorium is additionally equipped with backstage areas like in traditional theaters and opera houses. This scheme is appropriate to broaden the range of options for the use of this space: from convention, musical, theater even up to classical opera, with very little additional investment. The main auditorium has the option to get equipped with a flexible floor providing all possible utilization from banquet to parliamentary seating.

The smaller conference spaces are arranged like pearls around this core, providing very short connections between the different areas, thus saving time while changing between the different units. Most conference rooms and the circulation areas have direct daylight from above.

Through this open and fluid arrangement the theater and conference spaces on the main level establish a kind of urban structure with “squares” and “street spaces”, which facilitates on the one hand user orientation within the building by identifiable “addresses”, and on the other hand provides also the required informal meeting places, chill-out and catering zones in between the halls, with view on the outside – an ideal atmosphere for modern conference utilization.

The access to the basement parking garage, truck delivery and waste disposal is located at the southwestern part of the site, thus freeing the front driveway to the entrances from transit traffic. The main entrance from the sea side corresponds to the future developments, including the connection to the future cruise terminal.

Technical, Climatic and Environmental Concept

The focus of the architectural design and project development lies on technology, construction and their interplay. The technical systems have a service function. Like an organism, they fulfil the tasks required for the spatial use of the building automatically, invisibly and silently.

With the  International  Conference Center, these systems work like a hybrid city within a building. For the technical infrastructure of the building this means, that we have to consider a huge amount of people circulating inside the building at the same time, who expect high standards in circulation and comfort as well as a state of the art building with respect to high flexibility, low energy consumption and low use of other natural resources.

Technical areas in the basement supply infrastructure within a rectangular grid, mainly inside the vertical cores. The main task for the conference zone is to provide these areas with sufficient amount of air, maintaining a high level of thermal and acoustical comfort. Therefore the conditioned air will be silently injected into the rooms via an inflated double flooring underneath the seating. Air blowout units inside the stairs will ensure consistent air distribution. Due to the thermal uplift, the heat of the people ascends to the ceiling and is extracted by suction.

Cooling in summer times will be provided by radiant ceiling panels which can additionally be used as radiant heaters in the wintertime.

Besides the mechanical equipment for air supply and exhaust we propose installations for heat energy recovery, so that this energy can be recycled for use inside the building.

One of the major tasks of sustainable architecture is the minimization of energy consumption. A fundamental contribution is to avoid considerable fluctuations in demands during the course of the day. Therefore it is essential to integrate the natural resources of the environment like:

  • Use the thermal energy of seawater with heat pumps for cooling in summer and heating in winter.
  • General use of low temperature systems for heating in combination with activation of the concrete core as thermal mass in order to keep the building on constant temperature.
  • Natural ventilation of the huge air volumes within the building allows for minimization of the mechanical apparatus for ventilation heating and cooling. The atrium is conceived as a solar heated, naturally ventilated sub-climatic area.
  • In the large volume individual areas can be treated separately by additional measures such as displacement ventilation.
  • A high degree of daylight use is aspired both for its positive psychological effect and for minimizing the power consumption for artificial lighting.
  • Energy production with solar energy panels integrated into the shape of the building.

http://www.archdaily.com/105752/in-progress-dalian-international-conference-center-coop-himmelblau/