Archive for January 14th, 2011

January 14, 2011

New residential towers aim to redfine the Las Vegas skyline

Skylines are defined as the ‘fingerprints’ of a city. The nature of the Las Vegas skyline is not read as a profile like Chicago or New York.  Las Vegas is a collage. It is a paradoxical non-city that is memorable.  To address the client’s brief to create a new sustainable urban destination, Murphy / Jahn’s approach to veer° TOWERS established that the context for the project was not to focus on the historical background, but rather to establish a framework for a new order and redefine the image of Las Vegas. Until now, the memory of Las Vegas’ skyline was graphic; the architects’ goal was always to make it urbanistically significant, formally simple and elegant, technologically advanced and environmentally responsible.

The highest ambition of veer° TOWERS lies in the generation of urban life; typologically it is an unexpected program in the Las Vegas Strip’s idiosyncratic context.  Inclined at dramatic opposing angles, veer° TOWERS are defined by simplicity and dynamism, reinforcing their iconic character as the residential focal point of the city centre complex.  With approximately 400 residences in each 37-storey glass tower, veer° fulfilled the clients brief to create a residential hub for their new urban center and to capture the gesture of city living with a rhythmic animated facade. The high-rise residences float between the base, with its retail functions and 80′ tall lobbies featuring public artwork by Richard Long, and the private amenities and outdoor infinity pools on the roof. The buildings are at once robust and delicate. Slender towers that are clad in clear, non-reflective glass, veer° becomes the first truly transparent building in Las Vegas, creating a visual dialogue between the desert and the residents. In a desert climate, that alone represents a great technological and even cultural challenge. Staggered panels of clear and fritted yellow glass cut glare and provide abundant natural daylight, while animating the facades and enlivening the complex with a welcome shot of color. Horizontal louvers on the east, south and west facades create a repetitive texture to the façade that provides shade from the desert sun.

The manifesto for the project was to exhibit urban responsibility, pay attention to the building’s performance in terms of function and systems, use advanced and available technology, accept the aesthetic of construction and elevate it to a level of art. With the support of the client, these fundamental ambitions allowed us to achieve LEED Gold certification by the USGBC despite having the lowest budget, and most technically challenging design in the city centre complex. veer° TOWERS in turn defines city centre as modern and visionary in constructing and open-ended micro urban system that will inform the future growth of Las Vegas.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=15663

 

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January 14, 2011

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects with Croft Pelletier and Menkès Shooner Dagenais architectes associés

© Bernard Fougeres  & Courtesy of Patkau Architects  © James Dow

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects © Bernard Fougeres

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects © Bernard Fougeres

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects © Bernard Fougeres

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects Courtesy of Patkau Architects

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects © James Dow

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects © James Dow

Grand Library of Québec / Patkau Architects © James Dow

January 14, 2011

National Library of France / Dominique Perrault

Photos ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

perrault6 ©Perrault Architecture

perrault4 ©Perrault Architecture

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

Bibliothèque nationale de France ©Yuri Palmin

©Perrault Architecture

perrault7 ©Perrault Architecture

perrault1 ©Perrault Architecture

perrault2 ©Perrault Architecture

perrault3 ©Perrault Architecture

perrault5 ©Perrault Architecture

As an edition to the developing urban project in eastern , the French National Library was built in hopes to be the most modern library in the world. The competition of 1989 that included projects from 244 internationally renowned architects was won by , who was only 36 years old. This project would be the defining design of Perrault‘s career.

Read more about the history of the National Library of  after the break.

Specifically designed for it’s location in the Siene Rive Gauche district, the basic concept is composed of four tall towers that define the boundaries of an esplanade, which is hollowed out of the ground to create a vast forest-garden. The four beacon-like markers with an area measuring up to 350,000 m2 were constructed on a stretch of industrial wasteland, each one comprised of wood, metal, concrete and glass.

They were designed to resemble four open books all open towards one another, to imply a volume and symbolic space. The establishment of the open square gives the notion of accessibility and availability, inviting the public to enjoy the square. It’s semi-industrial approach is obvious at every scale, particularly with the use of stainless steel. Different meshes of the steel are woven into panels to be used as coverings for walls and ceilings, as well as partitions and outdoor plantrooms. The monumental towers are draped in stainless steel, by the application of five meter high panels that are tiled to create the surfaces.

This use of mesh is present on all levels of the building; in the research rooms, the technical ducts are hidden under a ceiling of mesh, which also serves to control the acoustics. In the reading rooms, a similar technique is used more decoratively, creating a wave-like effect across the ceiling. The conference room uses the meshes as stage curtains, the stainless steel falling in folds from the ceiling.An interesting but less obvious aspect of the design is the lack of complete visibility from one side of a large open space to the other. Perrault thoughtfully places shutters, visual screens, grills and meshes, which add intimacy and privacy to different reading spaces. The grid is prevalent in the design, found in the lighting masts of the reading rooms, ceiling-mounted lights, and sheathed in braided stainless steel.

The wire mesh and incorporation of stainless steel mark the extent of the decoration; the project was to give importance to the urban environment and materials. Books fill all the shelves, with more than ten million volumes.

Architect: 
Location: 
Project Year: 1989-1995
References: Jean FavierDominique PerraultMichael Brawne
Photography: Yuri PalminPerrault Architecture

http://www.archdaily.com/103592/ad-classics-national-library-of-france-dominique-perrault/

 

January 14, 2011

Roller Shades FR / Hunter Douglas Contract

1251853339-roller-shades-fr-iii
When selecting  for a project, both beauty and performance are key factors that come into play. Roller Shades, one of Hunter Douglas’ most succesfull products, provides a complete, and elegant, solution for controlling light and glare. Simple and versatile, distinctive yet cost-effective, this line includes scores of decorative and performance fabrics mounted on high-quality hardware, with manual operators or motorization.

For over 80 years, Hunter Douglas Contract has provided architects and designers all over the world with innovative . With major operation centers in North America, Europe, Asia, Latin America and Australia, Hunter Douglas products are available to offices, government buildings, schools and other public institutions all around the world.

 

Roller Shades FR

Key Features

– Wide selection of fabrics – FR rated, light filtering, and more – as well as a variety of fascia and valances
– Chain-drive clutch operating system allows precise control to help ensure a uniform look
– Require little mounting space and are nearly invisible when closed
– Room-darkening fabrics, plus side and bottom channels for A/V applications
– Other options include reverse roll, motorization, and switch/remote control
– Adjustable bottom rod weights allow easy manual adjustment to prevent fabric from telescoping
– Backed by Hunter Douglas Contract limited lifetime warranty

Roller Shades FR

Product Details

Mechanism: Manual continuous loop with clutch, electric motorization.
Fabrics: 25 types & 250 colors (manual), 5 types & 110 colors (motorized), all FR. Openness factors: 0% to 23%
Width: 12″ to 144″ (manual, varies by fabric), 30″ to 144″ (motorized, varies by fabric). Larger sizes available.
Height: 12″ to 120″ (manual), 12″ to 144″ (motorized, may have visible seam). Larger sizes available.
Options: Color-coordinated trims, fascia, top and bottom covers, motorization, 4 clutch sizes, sealed pocket hem bar, dual shades, banded shades, extruded pockets, reverse roll.

Fabric Types

1251152726-fabrictypes

The selector above shows one example from each of the 27 fabric types Hunter Douglas Contract offers. You can go to the official website to see all fabrics available.

Manual Roller Shade Details

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1251152734-manualdetailsii

Motorized Roller Shade Details

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1251152741-motorizeddetailsii

Projects that used this product

Reflections at Bloomington Central / Product used: Motorized Roller Shades FR

1251152761-reflections1 1251152763-reflections2 1251152766-reflections3 1251152768-reflections4

Shanghai Shuguang Hospital / Product used: Roller Shades FR

1251152771-shanghai1 1251152773-shanghai2 1251152775-shanghai3 1251152778-shanghai4

This post is part of our ongoing effort to create a database of architectural products, a useful resource for all architects, with the help of our partners.

Hunter Douglas Contract is a business partner of ArchDaily.

http://www.archdaily.com/33150/roller-shades-fr-hunter-douglas-contract/

January 14, 2011

Club 218 / A4 studio

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio © Tamas Bujnovszky

© Tamas Bujnovszky

Club 218 / A4 studio Site Plan

Club 218 / A4 studio Ground Floor Plan

Club 218 / A4 studio Ninth Floor Plan

Club 218 / A4 studio Ninth Floor Plan

Club 218 / A4 studio Ninth Floor Plan

Club 218 / A4 studio Section

http://www.archdaily.com/102311/club-218-a4-studio/

January 14, 2011

Bridge in Vienna / SOLID architecture

SOLID bridge 12 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 1 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 2 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 3 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 4 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 5 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 6 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 8 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 9 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 10 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 11 © Günter Kresser

SOLID bridge 13 © Günter Kresser

floor plan floor plan

elevation elevation

sections sections

structure axo structure axo

geometry diagrams geometry diagrams

photos © Günter Kresser

Architects: SOLID architecture
Location: 
Project Team: Christine Horner, Christoph Hinterreitner
Structural Engineering: RWTplus ZT GmbH
Client: Österreichische Lotterien GmbH
Competition Year: 2008
Completion Year: 2009
Photographs: Günter Kresser

The bridge is enclosed on all sides and connects the two buildings Rennweg 44 and 46 at the fifth upper floor, 17 metres above the Kleistgasse (in the third  district). The span length of the bridge is 22 metres.

Outward Appearance of the Bridge

In reference to its outward appearance, the bridge adds a third and formally individual element to the two existing buildings dating back to the 1980′s. The fair grey metallic colour of the exterior surfaces of the bridge assimilates with the grey-green colour spectrum of the two already existing building structures.

Large-area glazed sidewalls make the supporting construction of the bridge, which is arranged inside, visible from the outside, and they make the bridge appear light and transparent.

Experiencing the Bridge from the Inside

The interior area of the bridge has its own individual character, independent of the two already existing buildings.

If you cross the bridge, you will experience space that is dominated by the dynamic alignments of the supporting construction and the bottom and top plate. There may also be made out a colour difference between the interior area of the bridge on the one and the existing building structure on the other side. With the exception of the fair grey floor, all surfaces are white.

Extending from the building Rennweg 46, there is created a horizontal plane into the road space, 17 metres above ground level of the Kleistgasse. From this horizontal area, there is presented a wonderful view onto the road space situated beyond and as far as the towers of the Arsenal. Following a bend in the botton plate, a slightly inclined ramp counterbalances the difference in height between the two building structures and leads into the building Rennweg 44.

In ground view, the bridge is tapering from 2.70m down to a width of 2.35m at the middle of the bridge. In combination with the bends in the roof and the bottom plate there is created a bridge structure, which extends across the road space in a rather elegant way; furthermore, its interior area is clearly dominated by the perspective dynamics of the strongly aligned lines.

http://www.archdaily.com/48981/bridge-in-vienna-solid-architecture/

 

 

January 14, 2011

NYork Times Bldg Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden led by  in coordination with, as part of Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FX Fowle Architect’s design team, is considered the heart and soul of the headquarters building. Resting on Manhattan Schist bedrock as the building’s only unexcavated area, the courtyard is experienced by 360-degrees of uninterrupted views from a variety of surrounding public spaces and office spaces above.

Follow the break for further project explanation, drawings and photographs of the Lobby Garden.

Landscape Architects: HM White Site Architects in collaboration with Cornelia Oberlander Architects
Architects: Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFowle Architects
Location: 
Engineer: Thornton Tomassetti
Microclimatic: Ekistics Planning & Design
Lighting: Office for Visual Interaction, Inc
Arborist / Soil Food Web Specialist: Tree Wise Organics
Nurseries: High Ridge Farms Nursery
Landscape Contractor: Kelco Construction Inc
General Contractor: Amec Construction Co
Client: The New York Times Company
Photographs: Aaron Booher and Huei Ming Juang

As a counterpoint to its dense, bustling Times Square neighborhood, the open-air garden’s central building location celebrates a serene fragment of the Hudson
River Valley woodland landscape at the heart of this man-made construct. Microclimatic conditions were measured through 3-D modeling simulations of seasonal solar radiation levels, wind velocity and temperature variations to identify horticultural limitations and inform a carefully calibrated design.

Transected by a singular path highlighting the sculpted topography, an emerald evergreen carpet of sedges and ferns stages the golden autumn display of the Birch trees and a constellation of flowering bulbs in early spring. A layered web of infrastructure knits the garden with the building and the ground while also supporting the development of healthy endemic soil biology to ensure long term sustainability in this manufactured site.

Strict scheduling and coordination in the NY-Metro region were required to hoist each tree weighing 32,000 pounds over the 70-foot building facade into specific
locations and elevations within the courtyard.

Wrapped in a transparent glass veil, the 50-foot tall Birch trees and the undulating carpet of sedges and ferns register a contrasting sculptural relief to the level
plane of the floating garden path and the lobby’s White Oak floor. No matter where one turns, the garden’s woodland sensibilities possess an omni present, drawing attention and sensual connection to changing light and seasonal qualitative.

As event backdrop to the building auditorium, the garden emphasizes themes of transparency, juxtaposition and visual spatial layering against the building’s geo-
metric matrix and the lobby’s bold shades of red and marigold yellow.

Beneath the Paper Birch grove, a lush rolling plane of Berkeley Sedge punctuated with Autumn Fern carpets the shaded understory surface. As viewed from above, advance microclimatic simulation studies accurately predicted the courtyard’s growing conditions and path of solar exposure which informed precise locations for the trees and selections for the deep shade-tolerant understory plantings.

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

The New York Times Building Lobby Garden / HM White Site Architects and Cornelia Oberlander Architects Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

east west section east west section

rendering rendering

model model

garden plan garden plan

garden layering garden layering

model model

 

micro climate study micro climate study

micro climate study

north south section north south section

north south section

site section site section

site section

urban context urban context

urban context

Photos Courtesy of HM White Site Architects

http://www.archdaily.com/102398/the-new-york-times-building-lobby-garden-hm-white-site-architects-and-cornelia-oberlander-architects/

January 14, 2011

Fumihiko Maki 2011 AIA Gold Medal Winner

© Imogene Tudor

In recognition of his contributions to architecture in both theory and practice  was recently named the 2011 AIA Gold Medal Winner. Maki, arguably one of ’s most distinguished living architects, will be honored with the award in New Orleans at the AIA National Convention.

“He has a unique style of Modernism that is infused with an ephemeral quality and elegance which reflects his Japanese origin. What stands out most about Mr. Maki is the consistent quality of his work at the highest caliber and the creation of ineffable atmospheres; his buildings convey a quiet and elegant moment of reflection,” colleague Toshiko Mori, FAIA, said of Maki.

Also noteworthy is ’s close working relationship with each employee. Forty architects, urban planners, and administrative personnel, make up the staff of Maki and Associates, which is the type of working environment where each member is involved in and responsible for all aspects of projects. Maki himself is at the head of each commission and maintains the leadership role through to completion, including construction supervision. Established in 1965 Maki and Associates throughout its 42 years has been based in . Maki studied at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and Cranbrook Academy of Art, but has spent the majority of his life in .

Examples of Maki’s work include:

The Spiral in 
The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, California
The Kaze-No-Oka Crematorium in Kyushu, 
Triad in Nagano, 
The Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Maki is the 67th AIA Gold Medalist and joins a prestigious list including Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Renzo Piano, I.M. Pei, Cesar Pelli, Santiago Calatrava and last year’s recipient, Peter Bohlin, FAIA.

He has received numerous awards including the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1993.

http://www.archdaily.com/102633/fumihiko-maki-2011-aia-gold-medal-winner/