Archive for January 7th, 2011

January 7, 2011

Motorized External Roller Shades by Hunter Douglas

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This month, we would like to introduce Motorized External Roller Shades, a great product from the  line of Hunter Douglas Contract.

Nysan  provide excellent control of glare and thermal gain. ’s high-performance exterior fabrics – including PVC-free GreenScreen® Tek-Screen fabric – remain colorfast, resist damage from water and heat, remain dimensionally stable, and are resistant to rot.  can be controlled by switch or automated control system. Heavy-duty headrails, bottom rails, and side guides are engineered to withstand adverse weather conditions.

Key Features

– Attractive headrail to protect the fabric (and motor) in the raised position.
– Durable roller tube incorporating the motor.
– Heavy-duty brackets, bottom rail, and side guides engineered to withstand adverse environmental conditions.
– Full motorization and automation available for raising, lowering, and adjusting the shade.

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Nysan external roller shades feature

– Very good protection against thermal gain and glare, with performance superior to internal window coverings.
– The ability to retract shades completely when not required.
– A wide variety of fabric colors, opennesses, and options to customize the aesthetics and performance of the shade.
– Integration with intelligent controls makes it possible to create an active shading solution on sun-facing elevations.
– Gravity drop roller shades, which resemble standard interior shades but feature specially designed operating mechanisms and fabrics.

System Description

Nysan  provide excellent control of glare and thermal gain.

A wide range of highly-performance are available. PVC-free GeenScreen® Tek-Screen fabrics are specifically produced for external use and are:

– Colorfast to light
– Resistant to the elements (rain, temperature variations, direct sunlight etc.)
– Dimensionally stable
– Resistant to rot

Fabric Selector

Natte

Satine

 

http://www.archdaily.com/63230/

 

 

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January 7, 2011

Winnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects | LM Architectural Group

Winnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group James Dow / Patkau ArchitectsWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group original libraryWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group original libraryWinnipeg Library Addition / Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group original libraryground floor plan ground floor plansecond floor plan second floor planthird floor plan third floor planfourth floor plan fourth floor planmodel modelmodel modelprogram diagram program diagramsection sectionsection section

Photos © James Dow / 

Centennial Library was originally constructed in 1976 as a three-story building occupying a city block and an adjacent public park. The existing library, constructed of reinforced concrete exposed to the interior and pre-cast panel exterior, felt very disconnected from its surroundings including the park. The addition to the library, which began in 2002 as the winning entry in an invited design competition, includes reorganization and expansion of the collections, reconfiguration of the circulation systems, and creation of new social spaces, as well as renovation of the existing library.

The  Library Addition received a Lieutenant-Governor of BC Medal and
Canadian Architect Award of Excellence. Follow the break for more photographs and drawings.

Architects: Patkau Architects and LM Architectural Group
Location: 
Project Team: Samantha Hayes, Maureen Kwong, Hector Lo, Imke Maron, Tokimi Ota, John Patkau, Patricia Patkau, Christian Schulte, Craig Simms, Yong Sun, Peter Suter (), David Kressock, Ken Duchnycz, Andrew Brimble, Greg Tomaszewski, Lloyd Mymko, Brent Mehyden, Robert Winslow, Ron Kinash ()
Structural Engineering: Crosier Kilgour & Partners Ltd.
Mechanical Engineering: SMS Engineering Ltd.
Electrical Engineering: MCW/AGE Consulting Professional Engineers
Landscape Architecture: Hilderman Thomas Frank Cram
Code: Gage-Babcock and Associates Ltd.
Acoustic: Daniel Lyzun Associates
Media: McSquared System Design Group, Inc.
Signage: Gallop/Varley
Contractor: Manshield Construction
Owner: City of  Library Services, City of  Planning, Property, and Development Department
Project Area: 115,000 sqf (renovation) 45,000 sqf (addition)
Project Year: 2005
Photographs: James Dow

Both the existing library, roughly triangular in plan, and green space stand on a below-grade parking garage.  Expanding the library into the park would have destroyed valuable public green space and required costly foundation reinforcement within the parking garage. An alternative was to extend the library upward. Fortunately, the building had the structural capacity to accept an additional floor, provided it was light in weight; it also needed to be re-roofed. Thus, most of the added space is contained in a new, light, steel-framed fourth floor under a new roof.

Because of severe winter conditions, many of the buildings in downtown  are linked by a continuous interior tunnel and skywalk system. The library is connected to this system by bridges at the second level. An enlarged two-story lobby, created by removing a portion of the second floor, allows the street-level entrance to the library, as well as a gift shop and café within the lobby, to interconnect with the skywalk.

From this urban intersection, patrons are drawn through the building, along an interior “street” animated by displays and bookselling events, and to the park. At the park edge, new public elevators and an elongated system of stairs and reading terraces tie the largely independent existing floors to each other and to the new fourth floor. The glazed wall of this multi-story space opens every level to light, landscape, and city. All public and collections space is accessible from this linear route. The compact footprint of the addition maintains maximum park space, allowing the library to take advantage of its location, while the highly visible, interactive terraces, an interior topography at the scale of the park, generate a radically new identity for the library.

The library is ordered in strips, in a series of zones that run parallel to the window wall and across the long dimension of the space. The strips accommodate the programmatic components of the library in identifiable categories. The first strip is the park, an integral part of all public spaces in the building. The second is all forms of reading—tables, comfortable chairs, and casual seating. Third is low masses, such as reference collections, help desks, and computer stations, and fourth is high masses, such as shelving running in clear sequences. The fifth category comprises rooms: closed reading rooms, offices and meeting rooms, staff areas, service areas, and book handling access. The strips progress from park to interior, from open to enclosed, from low to high, from areas of greatest public access and interaction to areas of privacy and quiet. This spatial order allows all visitors to see and understand the general arrangement of collections and functions whether they approach from elevators or from reading terraces and stairs.

On the new fourth floor, the non-fiction collection is organized as a single run of clearly indexed material. Various subjects within the collection are highlighted by “focus” areas. These exhibit spaces, which are immediately visible at the entrance to the floor, are intervals inserted into the continuity of the collection to emphasize subjects often submerged within the numerical anonymity of the Dewey Decimal system.

http://www.archdaily.com/100632/winnipeg-library-addition-patkau-architects-and-lm-architectural-group/

January 7, 2011

Vancouver Beaty Biodiversity Center by Patkau Architects

Beaty Biodiversity Center and Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory / Patkau Architects © James Dow

The Beaty Biodiversity Center and the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory are located on Main Mall, the central north/south spine of the University of . Together they form a complex of related environmental science functions; a new campus precinct organized around a generous exterior courtyard space which is bisected by new cross-campus pedestrian and bicycle connections.

The principal exhibition space of the museum located within the Beaty Biodiversity Center is a glass “lantern” featuring an enormous skeleton of a Blue Whale creating a public face for the complex towards the Mall.  Follow the break for drawings and photographs.

Architects: Patkau Architects
Location: 
Client: University of British Columbia
Project Year: 2002 – 2009
Photographs: James Dow

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photos © James Dow

The Beaty Biodiversity Center comprises a natural history museum, a large natural history collection, research laboratories and offices with related meeting and support spaces. This 11,500 square meter facility is organized around three sides of the courtyard space, with the Beaty Biodiversity Museum occupying the west side along Main Mall.

The principal exhibition space of the museum is a glass “lantern” within which an enormous skeleton of a Blue Whale is displayed creating a public face for the complex towards the Mall. The extensive natural history collections, located beneath the central courtyard, are accessible directly from this exhibition space. Research laboratories and offices occupy the remaining south and east sides of the project. The laboratories are organized in a regular manner along the east outer edge of the project while the offices and meeting spaces are organized more casually around the courtyard to foster a sense of academic community. An open stair, located on the courtyard edge of the office and meeting spaces threads through the project to vertically interconnect informal social spaces.The Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory is located on the northern side of the courtyard. This 5,150 square meter building consolidates interdisciplinary research groups around an atrium that interconnects the four floors of the building. Social spaces are located adjacent to this atrium to reinforce a sense of academic community and to encourage serendipitous interaction between faculty, students and the various research units. Faculty offices, loft spaces / digital laboratories for the student community and a variety of meeting spaces are located on the upper floors, while the large public rooms are located on the ground floor where they participate in the urban life of the campus.The atrium plays a key role in the sustainable design strategies employed in the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory. Glazed at the top to bring day-light deep into the interior it combines with generous glazing on the north side of the building and photo sensor controls to minimize dependency on artificial lighting. The atrium also acts as a natural ventilation stack that pulls air into the building, eliminating the need for a conventional mechanical ventilation system. On summer nights the building is naturally ventilated to cool the concrete structure, which acts as a radiant cooling surface during the day, eliminating the need for air conditioning for the three upper floors. The Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory is certified .

Beaty Biodiversity Center
Project Team: Tyler Brown, Bradley Cooper, Sebastian Cramer, Michael Cunningham, Christina Gray, Samantha Hayes, Dimitri Koubatis, Maureen Kwong, Michael Leckie, Hector Lo, Ricardo Cuesta Moya, Shane O’Neill, Patrick O’Sullivan, John Patkau, Patricia Patkau, Thomas Schroeder, David Shone, Craig Simms, Peter Suter, Michael Thorpe, Jinyong Yum
Structural: Read Jones Christoffersen Ltd.
Mechanical and Sustainability: Cobalt Engineering
Electrical: Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Laboratory: Maples Argo Architects
Landscape: Phillips Farevaag Smallenberg
Civil: Earth Tech  Inc.
Geotechnical: Trow Consulting Engineers Inc.
Code: Gage-Babcock & Associates
Building Envelope: Spratt Emanuel Engineering Ltd.
Audio Visual: MC2
Construction Manager: Scott Construction

Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory
Project Team: Greg Boothroyd, Michael Cunningham, Joanne Gates, Samantha Hayes, Maureen Kwong, Thomas Lee, Davis Marques, Patrick O’Sullivan, John Patkau, Patricia Patkau, David Shone
Model Makers: Oliver Birett, Anike Duffner, Gregory Graemiger, Julianne Heinrich, Craig Simms, Christian Schulte, Jan Rasche, Tokimi Ota
Structural: Read Jones Christoffersen Ltd.
Mechanica and Sustainability: Cobalt Engineering (formerly VEL Engineering)
Electrical: Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Landscape: R. Kim Perry & Associates Inc.
Civil: Cochrane Engineering Ltd.
Code: Gage-Babcock & Associates
Building Envelope: Spratt Emanuel Engineering Ltd.
Audio Visual: MC2
Construction Manager: Bird Construction

http://www.archdaily.com/100682/beaty-biodiversity-center-and-aquatic-ecosystems-research-laboratory-patkau-architects/


 

January 7, 2011

Mighty building facade beats solar heat with mechanical muscles

Mighty Building Facade Beats Solar Heat With Mechanical Muscles

Decker Yeadon’s prototype for an expanding, contracting architectural skin has promising applications in green-building design.

Architects love saying their buildings have brains. Now, apparently, they’ve got brawn, too. The latest intelligent-building tech from New York architects Decker Yeadon is a mighty, muscle-y structural facade that fights solar heat-gain by flexing its guns.

The Homeostatic Facade System consists of a mess of silvery squiggles — which, to continue the body metaphor here, look a lot like a small intestine — that open and close in response to heat, effectively regulating temperature throughout a building’s interior. The key is something called (steel yourself for the scientific gobbledygook!) a dielectric elastomer that uses electricity to change shape. The electricity deforms the squiggles, expanding them when it’s hot and sunny and contracting them when it’s cold.

 

 

If you read our blog regularly you know that intelligent facades aren’t particularly new. We’ve seen high-rise skins that adapt to the environment at the press of a button and others that manage indoor climates by magically breathing in and out. Generally, though, these facades rely on digital programming, which often fails to deliver on promised energy savings. That might be because the controls themselves are unreliable or because they have to be set by employees who are too lazy or too preoccupied to bother. With Decker Yeadon, the innovation is in the material itself. The Homeostatic Facade System shapeshifts on its own; no computer (or human) required.

 

 

Unfortunately, the facade is just a prototype, so don’t expect to see it pumping away on the latest batch of Chinese super towers — or even at a smaller scale. (As Decker Yeadon’s Martina Decker tells us in an email, it needs to be tested in a mockup architectural setting first.) Still, it’s a promising development in green-building tech. The more muscle you put into a structure — and the less you require of people — the better off for the environment.

 

 

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1662975/mighty-building-facade-beats-solar-heat-with-mechanical-muscles

For more Co. coverage of Decker Yeadon, go here and here.

 

January 7, 2011

Moving Homeostatic Facade Preventing Solar Heat Gain

This prototype system, Homeostatic Facade, is the latest in green building design.  The line maze like facade consists of material that flexes and bends as an artificial muscle fighting solar heat gain by changing shape on its own.   No computer programing or physical adjustments required.  The system regulates a buildings climate by auto responding to environmental conditions and has an advantage over other systems because of its low power consumption and localized control.

Check out the video of the moving Homeostatic Facade following the break.

 

Thanks to Suzanne Labarre’s article “Mighty Building Facade Beats Solar Heat With Mechanical Muscles” over at Fast Company we discovered this prototype for the latest intelligent building technology from Decker Yeadon. The New York based architects focus their design efforts on how they can utilize the most cutting edge material technologies in design applications, offering innovative solutions.

Read Suzanne Labarre’s article at Fast Company

http://www.archdaily.com/101578/moving-homeostatic-facade-preventing-solar-heat-gain/