Archive for January, 2011

January 31, 2011

CHONGQUING SUPER TOWER

2.8 million sft | 260,000 sm  | 456 meters

As a centerpiece of the Tian Di Master Plan, the Chongqing Super High-rise Tower project will provide a synergy of uses, including office, residential, retail and entertainment to bring energy, activity and value to the site. Inspired by the sailing ships that once plied the waters of the surrounding Yangtze and Jialing Rivers, the Chongqing Super High-rise Tower’s lightness and graceful form is expressed both in the simple form of the tower and in adjacent low-rise towers and retail podium.

A central public plaza at the center of the project site, situated between the main tower, retail podium and low-rise residential and office towers, acts as a place of assembly and meeting. Transformable structure gives the ability to provide shelter for events, and elevated platform edges provide a panoramic view of the Jialing River. The ceremonial drop-off and formal entry landscape at the south end of the site are integrated with the central plaza through continued use of paving to soften the edges of the project landscape and allow for emergency vehicle access.

The two smaller towers—a low service apartment block to the east and a mid-rise single use office tower to the west—have been placed on the site so as to minimize cross viewing between each other, and have been scaled to relate to the height of the buildings proposed for the adjacent sites. All three towers employ a similar, but not identical, architectural vocabulary to visually reinforce one another and provide identity to this first phase of development.

The planning and massing of the 4-story retail podium has been conceived to take advantage of the two distinct frontalities on site, again taking influence from the sail form–developed to look almost like a piece of sail cloth blowing in the breeze. The south face of the podium is developed as a continuous street wall, meant to pair with the future development across the street and to provide continuity to the scale of urban fabric. More critically, the podium has been developed with sky-lit atrium/arcades that pass from this south façade through the retail elements to an external, elevated promenade facing the river. This public amenity, raised above the roadway that runs along the river’s edge, will give spectacular views and provide space for a dynamic mix of entertainment, retail, restaurants and cafes.

The curtain wall design aims to instill a sense of movement and lightness, consisting of glass that envelops the curving form of the towers and sloping inwards as they rise adding to the organic feel of the structures. This form also helps to minimize light contamination, as the light hitting the exterior surfaces will be dispersed rather than concentrated. Constructed of repeating 9-meter modules with repetitive patterns of vertically-linked double-story units, the framing emphasizes the double-curved form of the tower and suggests the tension of sails in the wind. The glazing will be of high performance IGUs, with a mildly reflective coating (roughly 20% reflectivity) on the second surface of a lightly tinted glass.

http://www.kpf.com/project.asp?T=14&ID=132

 

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January 31, 2011

Pola Ginza Building by Nikken Sekkei + Yasuda Atelier and The Adaptive Building Initiative and Hoberman Associates

Architect:
Nikken Sekkei + Yasuda Atelier

The Adaptive Building Initiative and Hoberman Associates were commissioned by POLA, a Japanese cosmetics manufacturer, to develop an adaptive shading system for its new showroom building in Tokyo’s Ginza district. This system has been developed in collaboration with design architect Yasuda Atelier and executive architect Nikken Sekkei.

The 14-story building, which opened in October 2009, has 185 shutter mechanisms that are housed within the double glazing of the façade. Each shutter has dimensions of approximately one by three meters, and is made of an acrylic sheet that has been formed into a curved surface.

  • Adaptive Shading Coverage: 3,000 sq. meters
  • Number of operable units: 185
  • Material: Acrylic

http://www.adaptivebuildings.com/pola-ginza.html

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CONCEPT

Pola is one of the highest quality cosmetic companies in Japan.
Placing the great deal of importance on the quality of life, Pola employs the notion of the three beauties- esthetics, fine arts, and gourmet- as the theme for this project.
Following this concept, we took in the key words of “water`, “light`, and “time` for designing the building. “Water` and “light` is the essential element for the shiny fresh skin and “time` leads to the varying image of life.

Pola Ginza Building is a multifunctional building with quite small foot print.
As Ginza is the area of the highest land price in Tokyo, we tried to make most of the space by designing the structure and the other mechanical fixture comprehensively and efficiently.
In addition to the office of the Pola’s head quarter on the middle floors, the Pola’s flagship shop “Pola the Beauty` is on the ground floor that is transmitting the new branding image of Pola toward people walking on the main street of Ginza. On the basement floor is an esthetic salon, the third floor is a free gallery (the annex of the Pola Museum that is well known for its precious private collection of impressionism), and the strictly examined select shops and restaurants on th

e other floors, where people can enjoy esthetics, fine arts and gourmet.

SITE

The site is in the Ginza area where the accumulation of international super brands is engaging people’s hearts and minds. Pola Ginza Building is the leading project in the district where many new developments will take place in the near future.

DOUBLE GLAZING

To give the “varying` and “moving` image to the static structure of “building`, the kinetic polycarbonate panels are adopted between the double grazing along with the LED lighting fixture that can provide any color we want.
The kinetic panels, having variety of scaled patterns that remind us of an image of the cells of life, change their appearance like a breathing life by the mechanical and luminous movement.
They are operated in maximum 14 panels a group by the automatic hinges placed on their tops and the horizontal shaft with rollers that push the panels along their curved profile. Panels and the shaft are not connect directly each other but related indirectly so that the panels move in a deferent timing gradually and escape from the different movement caused by the possible severe earthquake.
The intentionally sparse RGB dots of the LED lighting fixture and the patters of the moving panels are admiring the beauty of life like the dot painting by the impressionist at night time in Ginza.

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

This double glazing façade with kinetic panels has not only the attractive effect toward the Ginza street but also the ecological effect to decrease the thermal disturbance for the building itself.
In summer, kinetic panels receive the sunlight and heated air is discharged from the top by its chimney effect. They improve the effect of sun cut and minimize the interior thermal disturbance. For this purpose, we put windows at the top and openings at the bottom. The window of the top opens and closes automatically in accordance with the temperature inside the double grazing. In winter, the warmed air inside the double glazing works as insulation by closing the top windows. Natural fresh air can be taken in the middle floor by opening the inner sash in spring and autumn. It actualizes comfortable work space without using HVAC equipment. The calculation shows this double glazing system reduces its annual consumption of HVAC energy by 30% compared with the single curtain wall system. The kinetic panels also defuse the sunlight to bring in light deeper inside. By installing the daylight sensor, energy for the artificial lighting is automatically cut back.

http://www.openbuildings.com/buildings/pola-ginza-building-profile-5357.html

 

January 31, 2011

YKKap FACADE with Offices in Tokyo | Singapore | Hong Kong

Green Technology for Sustainability

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Architectural design must practice green building as a necessary element in a sustainable society, and the green building of curtain walls must manage environmental performance and material recycling. Through our experience in Japan’s harsh environmental and climatic conditions, we have earned an edge in environmental technologies. We share that edge, and our understanding of the needs of architectural design, as we collaborate closely with architects. We realize their concepts with curtain wall engineering solutions that encompass all elements of design, procurement, manufacturing, construction, and maintenance, while taking us closer to a sustainable society.

Expertise:

Environmental facades

Recent Building facades are expected to provide interior comfort, a feeling of openness, and in addition to saving energy. YKK AP is developing environmental facades, as a technology able to save energy, while delivering comfort by optimizing the interior environment, and cutting consumption.

In the development process towards a facade design integrated with the building, it is essential to consider how the shading and insulation performance of the openings impacts energy saving and comfort. We will now present four types of environmental facade.

Categories of environmental facades

Low-E glass and internal blinds
  • Blinds are located on the interior side
  • The heat from solar gain is absorbed, reflected by blinds on the interior side, and is radiated from the room.
  • Solar shading property is low.
  • Thermal Insulative property is equal to the glazing.
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.30~0.55 η=approx.
Thermal transmittance
U=1.5 2.4 W/m2 K U=approx.
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind
External blinds type
  • Blinds are located on the exterior side
  • The heat from solar gain is absorbed, reflected by blinds on the interior side, and is radiated from the room.
  • Solar shading property is high.
  • Thermal Insulative property is equal to the glazing.
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.05~0.10 η=approx.
Thermal transmittance
U=1.5 2.4 W/m2 K U=approx.
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind
Mechanically ventilated type
  • This type uses double-pane glass with blinds between the panes, and pass air from the room interior through the cavity by mechanical ventilation.
  • The solar heat absorbed by blinds is removed by mechanical ventilation.
  • Solar shading property is high.
  • Thermal Insulative property is higher than double-pane glass, due to the airflow in the cavity between the panes. (Varies with the air flow rate)
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.15~0.25 η=approx.
(when mechanical ventilation is on.)
Thermal transmittance
U=0.5~1.0(W/m2・K) U=approx.
(when mechanical ventilation is on.)
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind and air flow rate
Naturally ventilated type
  • This type uses double-pane glass with blinds between the panes, and pass air from outside through the cavity by stack effect.
  • The solar heat absorbed by blinds is removed by ventilation.
  • Solar shading property is high.
  • Thermal Insulative property is higher than inner glazing.
Solar heat gain coefficient
η=0.10~0.20 η=approx.
Thermal transmittance
U=1.5~3.5(W/m2・K) U=approx.
*Above values vary with the property of glass and blind

Thermal property of facade and thermal load of perimeter zone

The relation between solar shading/ thermal insulation property of facade and thermal load of perimeter zone can be described as below.

  • Solar shading property is high = Low cooling load and high heating load[Figure 1-(A)]
  • Thermal insulative property is high = High cooling load and low heating load[Figure 2-(C)]

In a warm area such as Tokyo, cooling loads account for the bulk of heating and cooling loads, the superior solar shading property of the facade is effective in reducing thermal loads all year round. It is vital to select the right facade system, with careful consideration of the balance between solar shading property and thermal insulation property, taking the region and orientation into account.

Thermal property of facade and interior comfort

For occupants of the building interior, comfort is important, not just energy saving. To secure comfort in the perimeter zone close to the facade, the temperature of the interior surface of the facade must be maintained at an appropriate level.

<Summer and intermediate season>
When the solar heat raise the temperature of the interior surface. → Room is maintained at an appropriate level but occupants around window feel hot.

<Winter>
When nighttime and cloudy weather fall the temperature of the interior surface. → Room is maintained at an appropriate level but occupants around window feel cold.

*A facade with superior solar shading and thermal insulation property mitigates the impact of the changing exterior environment, reducing changing in the interior surface temperature of the facade to maintain comfort in the interior. Selection of the right facade system is also important for interior comfort as an assessment indicator.

Structural analysis

Besides a esthetic design and functionality as cladding, the curtain walls which form building facades require verification of structural performance values as the exterior walls of structure.

From the basic structure stage, we work through structural analysis simulations to realize the specifics of the facade design image, which is based on the architect’s design, and the performance requirements.

This process is a comprehensive verification of the form, strength and durability of the entire facade to the original components are conducted by our staff teams of design, manufacturing and construction sharing a common understanding.

 

Thermal analysis

Progress in construction and structural analysis techniques in recent years has dramatically expanded the range of expressive techniques available in the surface design of buildings, typified by all-glass facade design. With that progress, it has become important to take action to reduce CO2, against climate change, and reduce running costs at the facility maintenance stage, besides the obvious need to control the indoor thermal environment.
Optimize the indoor environment while minimizing energy consumption – YKK AP is pursuing the technical development of environment-conscious facades as a way to reconcile these conflicting demands.
Alongside design and construction, we also use high-precision thermal environment simulations to verify the development of insolation control, ventilation and other technologies.

Thermal performance from the development of Double-skin facade System, environment-friendly facades, and implementation of basic experiments.

Indoor environment measurement using actual-size mock-up and indoor temperature measurement by thermal images
Environmental measurements for room interiors using actual-size mockups. Measurement of interior surface temperatures using thermal imaging.

In developing double skin systems, we have pursued system optimization through thermal analysis, fluid analysis, actual-size trials and performance assessment.

The building of simulation technology

Heat and fluid flow simulation
Heat and fluid flow simulation
Experiment by outdoor environment examination room
Trial in outdoor environment laboratory
The indoor comfortable evaluation by PMV measurement
Indoor comfort evaluation using PMV

Performance assessment of double-skin systems introduce thermodynamics and fluid mechanics.
The flow of air inside the central air layer, which varies with environmental and physical conditions are analyzed to find the temperature and heat flow of each component, and to predict and assess performance. This is a technology to predict results closer to reality, built through cross-referencing for consistency with data from the basic experimental research.

Development of peripheral technologies

Nagaot measurement in environment・就nemometry in the middle air layer
Flowing sound measurement of the environment / Wind velocity measurement of inner / middle air layer

The double skin system holds a large isobaric space, extending to the outside, so its behavior against weather differs from a normal window system.
The way the wind pressure is divided and borne by the internal and external glass panes when the window is exposed to wind is a major design issue which must be solved.
Beyond thermal performance, experiments on technical developments such as wind pressure and water resistance are also required to develop peripheral technologies.

see the cataloge here:

http://www.ykkapfacade.com/publications/

http://www.ykkapfacade.com/index.html

 

January 31, 2011

Public Space That Doesn’t Suck: Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) TEK Center

Written by  Murrye Bernard

The Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), a firm based in Denmark, Copenhagen, was founded by namesake Bjarke Ingels in 2006 and has been on the architectural community’s radar ever since. BIG’s work is known for being simultaneously playful and socially conscientious. Though many of their projects are situated on dense urban sites, BIG often carves outdoor spaces within the vertical confines of buildings. Their Technology, Entertainment and Knowledge (TEK) Center in Taipei, Taiwan continues this trend. Other notable BIG projects include the Danish Pavilion for the Shanghai Expo 2010 and innovative housing projects such as 8Tallet and The Mountain Dwellings, which feature topographically inspired sections that incorporate terraced roof gardens with sweeping views.

“High-tech” is a phrase that comes to mind when viewing BIG’s animated videos and intricate 3D computer renderings of their designs, but, in some cases, technology provides the premise for the program. BIG recently designed what might be the world’s first multimedia center, the 53,000 m2 (approxiamately 570,487 sq. ft.) Technology, Entertainment and Knowledge (TEK) Building in Taipei, Taiwan. The TEK Building, which was designed as part of a competition, is intended as a site for TEDxTaipei — an annual, independent event inspired by the original Technology, Entertainment and Design (TED) conference. For the remainder of the year, the TEK Building will provide exhibition, conference, and showroom space for other media events and draw the public to visit its restaurants, retail stores, and hotel.

The mixed-use public building will contain an entire pedestrian street’s worth of programming, which has been consolidated, stacked, and coiled to fit within the constraints of a perfect cube measuring 57 x 57 x 57 meters (approximately 187 x 187 x 187 ft.) . The parti is simple and straightforward but sophisticated in articulation. In plan, a circle is hollowed from the center of the cube, and in section this courtyard spirals up toward the sky and punctures the facade in multiple locations, with only minimal planes of glass to serve as railings. The most fascinating feature of the design is that it is possible to enter the building from street level and climb all the way to the roof without actually going inside. This “vertical plaza” will be open for public access 24/7, so hypothetically anyone can walk up from the street at any time.

 

BIG_TEK_Center__Site_Plan

TEK – Technology, Entertainment and Knowledge Building Drawings

Visitors who make the climb all the way to the top of the TEK Building will be rewarded with city views from its roof, which is planted with small trees around the perimeter of its funnel-like form and which will serve as a public amphitheater. Associate Partner Kai-Uwe Bergmann refers to it as the “public suck” because the roof appears to be the victim of a force stronger than gravity. However, the shape serves a higher purpose than aesthetics; the spiraling central space will function as an air-intake and ventilation system for the building, utilizing the chimney effect. The architects worked closely with Arup’s engineers to size and articulate the spiral to maximize air flow.

The building’s energy efficiency will also be boosted by its green roof, and the designers made use of the ground as a thermal mass, which will assist with heating and cooling. The goal, according to Bergmann, was to achieve sustainability in a passive way. By keeping building systems simple, the owners pay less upfront but also save in the long term on maintenance costs. In keeping with the passive design philosophy, the ephemeral exterior design of the TEK Building is comprised of glass andconcrete lamellas, which will provide shading from the sun for interior spaces. These fins also wrap inward to form the steps of the public staircase. From certain angles, the building will appear solid, and from others, each delicate layer will be apparent as in a slice of baklava.

Formally, the building might also draw some comparisons to a subwoofer, but at night its exterior appearance will be transformed by LED lighting. BIG collaborated with realities:United, a consultant from Berlin who specializes in designing multimedia facades around the world, to create the “low-tech but high-impact facade,” according to Bergmann. A series of LEDs, connected to a central server, will be positioned on the underside of the fins so their light will reflect against these surfaces. The facade will display video content, such as promotions for upcoming events at the TEK Building. In more ways than one, the TEK Building provides a view into the future.

 

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_05

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_07

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_06

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_09

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_11

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_08

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_01

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_02

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_03

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_04

BIG_TEK_Center__Image_10

TEK – Technology, Entertainment and Knowledge Building Diagrams

TEK – Technology, Entertainment and Knowldege Building Model

http://buildipedia.com/in-studio/featured-architecture/item/1360-technology-entertainment-and-knowledge-center-tek-cener

January 31, 2011

Pratt’s Myrtle Hall Has Modern Twist by WASA

Slender mixed-use building responds to varying site conditions by merging brick and glass masses.

Myrtle Hall at Pratt Institute

MYRTLE HALL AT PRATT INSTITUTE
RAZUMMEDIA

When a university expansion goes ahead as planned without the usual neighborhood objections and media fallout, that’s almost news in itself. Such is the case with Pratt’s new Myrtle Hall, a multi-use structure housing admissions, studios and offices, that quietly opened to the public on January 10. WASA/Studio A designed the building.

Widely expected to meet the LEED Gold standards, the new sliver of a building crams over 100,000 square feet into its 75 foot by 205 wide plot; the ground floor is filled with retail storefronts.

“If there was ever a site that required two different responses this was it,” said design partner Jack Esterson, referring to a “sea of parking lots” to the south and Fort Greene’s brownstones nearby. “We wanted something that was resolutely contemporary, but responsive,” he said.

The building is a four-story masonry volume intersecting a six-story glass volume. The third and most visible element is large glass cutout with Pratt’s logo etched onto the glass. The cutout reveals a two-story atrium that will function as the school’s art gallery.

Tom Stoelker

 

Myrtle Hall at Pratt Institute

THE FOUR-STORY BRICK FACADE RESPONDS TO NEARBY BROWNSTONES WITHOUT COMPROMISING MODERNITY (ABOVE) AND A TWO-STORY ATRIUM SERVING AS AN ART GALLERY (BELOW).

Myrtle Hall at Pratt Institute

GLASS FACADE WITH SUN-SHADES

THE MERGING OF THE BRICK AND GLASS MASSES

AN INTERIOR STAIR

Myrtle Hall at Pratt Institute

A RECEPTION DESK IN MYRTLE HALL’S LOBBY (ABOVE)
A CORRIDOR OVERLOOKING THE TWO-STORY ART GALLERY
ANOTHER GLASS-LINED CORRIDOR WITH OFFICES

Myrtle Hall at Pratt Institute

EDUCATIONAL SPACE INSIDE MYRTLE HALL (ABOVE) AND AN EXTERIOR VIEW AT DUSK (BELOW).

Myrtle Hall at Pratt Institute

 

 

January 31, 2011

Caja House | Estudio Aire

Caja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire © Leonardo FinottiCaja House - Estudio Aire floor planCaja House - Estudio Aire east elevationCaja House - Estudio Aire north elevationCaja House - Estudio Aire south elevationCaja House - Estudio Aire west elevationCaja House - Estudio Aire section 01Caja House - Estudio Aire section 02Caja House - Estudio Aire section 03Caja House - Estudio Aire section 04Caja House - Estudio Aire section 05

Architects: Estudio Aire / Juan German Guardati, Roman Renzi, Virginia Kahanoff
Location: Funes, Santa Fé, 
Collaborators: Gustavo Sattler, Matias Agostino, Maximiliano Rossini, Damian Plouganou
Project Area: 235 sqm
Project Year: 2004-2007
Photographs: Leonardo Finotti

The project was developed between personal wills and external demands. We enjoy  narrating this process without too much  theory but with architectural responsibility  and enthusiasm instead.

During the first meetings we tried to talk with our clients about architecture itself not specifically a home project. We realised it was our opportunity to develop something different between both parties. We were very enthusiastic for we could  have the possibility of reviewing our architectural repertoire. At the beginning there were no specific orders, which arrived as time passed by and started working together.

We had  feeling to work as a team , sometimes sharing some points of view concerning  design, some others not.

Our clients were much concerned with the issue of privacy and intimacy as regards life in private neighborhoods such as Kentucky, so we considered it important to be able to appreciate from the inside the decisions taken (morphology, geometry, materials, how to manipulate the natural lighting) rather than the criteria used in such spaces so far.

We started working on a criteria based on a central open space . Little by little it became  more radical and the rest of the situations began to subordinate to the yard. We were questioning the modern language leading elements to an almost  primitive instance .The concept of continuous space extends beyond the physical limit of covered surface. The Interior unroofed surface regulates the link with the outside world. One of the faces is an opening with two glass doors. Opening completely enabling to redefine the concept of externality and integrating  the rest of the area.

The water here incorporates the built mass reflexes. The House becomes its own landscape.  Fragmentation in the section cover is another particular moment of thought and analysis which occurs  not only to  fill the interior of light but to establish a link with nature, incorporating the sky.

In general we usually describe our work as a box with a yard inside it denoting a formal will at first place.

However the best is inside,  the richer inner space as a result of it .

With two photographs from outside the story would be resolved, but it would be impossible from the  inside.

The strongest effort was to decide about what not to be done or how to make it simpler .

We came to only four materials. On top  “white” dominates all items, aluminum resolves openings to the inner patio , the metal for the perimeter gates and glass for transparent and translucent cladding. This reduction is the reaction to a need to avoid excessive thinking of achieving simplicity as a concept.

We are satisfied for having being able to provide a contemporary answer leaving aside modern language. Now that the work has been completed we have began to look in time to more distant  examples of it. The colonial House is the first example that appeared. The potential of the yard, the opening  toit,  the gallery, tectonics condition, force walls, the dispossession of ornamentation, the height of the Interior. We are now studying the pompeyana House , which carry this same situations to a more primitive and radical state .  All this working under the concept of modern space.We believe that the contemporary does not have to do with a completely new production or with an indiscriminate repetition of recipes. We are interested in reviewing everything that has already been produced and intervene as little as possible. We have very clear it  is almost ridiculous since our activity lies in filling free spaces . This paradox is which obsessively leads us to focus on the space resulting of it through the manipulation of shapes. We love thinking  that we produce air.

 

http://www.archdaily.com/54746/caja-house-estudio-aire/

January 31, 2011

Dreilinden School Propsteimatte | Lussi + Halter

Architecture photographer Leonardo Finotti shared with us the Dreilinden School Propsteimatte in Luzern, a project by Swiss architects Lussi + Halter.

The 27,000sqm building completed in 2005 has heavy walls that resemble the facades of the local building. A monolithic look from the outside,  yet the interior use of oak wood results on warm spaces suitable for learning environments.

More photos and drawings after the break:

 

http://www.archdaily.com/58395/dreilinden-school-propsteimatte-lussi-halter/

January 31, 2011

Hampden Lane House | Robert Gurney Architect

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

Hampden Lane House / Robert Gurney Architect © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer

axon axon

floor plans floor plans

elevations elevations

elevations elevations

section section

section section

site plan site plan

floor plans floor plans

http://www.archdaily.com/105554/hampden-lane-house-robert-gurney-architect/

January 31, 2011

University of Twente Campus buildings | Arons en Gelauff Architecten

991471943_cp009474 Campagneplein

666793647_cl009354 Calslaan

1950918725_cl009375 Calslaan

806827628_cl009519 Calslaan

1312441127_cl009528-1 Calslaan

1796343541_cl009567 Calslaan

1140007014_cp009421 Campagneplein

1364566669_cp009484 Campagneplein

2045110606_cp009504 Campagneplein

54470208_cp009568 Campagneplein

065CL-100 Model (1) Calslaan ground floor plan

T:�65-CAMPUSUTWENTE�65-500�65CP-500�65CP-550 D (2) (1) Calslaan apartment plan

1116718511_second-floor-plan Campagneplein second floor plan

907646949_ninth-floor-plan Campagneplein ninth floor plan

T:�65-CAMPUSUTWENTE�65-500�65CP-500�65CP-531.dwg 065CP-531 ( Campagneplein elevation

T:�65-CAMPUSUTWENTE�65-500�65CP-500�65CP-570-4 21v (1) Campagneplein detail

http://www.archdaily.com/21556/university-of-twente-campus-buildings-arons-en-gelauff-architecten/

January 31, 2011

Marc Jacobs Tokyo by Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch ArchitectsMarc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

Marc Jacobs Tokyo - Stephan Jaklitsch Architects © Stephan Jaklitsch Architects

basement floor plan basement floor plan

first floor plan first floor plan

second floor plan second floor plan

details 01 details 01

details 02 details 02sketch sketch

A while ago we presented you “Habits, Patterns, Algorithms”, a monograph on Stephan Jaklitsch Architects, a firm with a vast experience in interior design, with hundreds of built works around the world, examples of good usage of materials, and careful attention to detail.

The firm is behind the design of Marc Jacobs stores around the world, and now we got the chance to see a preview of their first ground-up store for the brand, located in Omotesando,, right next to Herzog & de Meuron’s Prada store.

The 3,000sqf project (which already won an Award of Excellence from AIA New York) is a stratified volume, with two dark strips sitting on top of a glass box, acting as a lamp during night.

couple of weeks ago we visited the office to interview Stephan and Mark Gardner (video coming soon!) and got the chance to see some of the facade mock-ups.

http://www.archdaily.com/71823/in-progress-marc-jacobs-tokyo-by-stephan-jaklitsch-architects/