Archive for August 4th, 2010

August 4, 2010

MUST SEE WEBSITE

http://www.ngphoto.com.pt/

Advertisements
August 4, 2010

Axis Viana Hotel / VHM

Section Section

Architectural photographer Nelson Garrido shared with us an amazing set of photos for the Axis Viana Hotel by VHM in Viana do Castelo. This Business & Spa Hotel is an ode to cantilevering, as you can see on the section shown below.

The overlapping stacked volumes generate a series of different perspectives, ranging from a full box in a frontal view, to a complex column when seen from the sides. The 2 lower levels have a concrete structure, with the rest of the boxes resolved in a steel structure sitting on top of it.

Architecture: VHM I Departamento de Arquitectura: Jorge Sodré Albuquerque, Ana Luísa Almeida, José Magno
Coordinator: Jorge Sodré Albuquerque
Team: Isabel Flamínio, Rui Silva, Eduardo Brito, Carlos Sousa, Pedro Couto
Structure: A400
Services: VHM, Gestão e Coordenação de projectos
Landscape: Nuno Viterbo
Construction Management: Vítor Hugo Leal Gomes, Carlos Xavier
Contractor: Europa Arlindo, Scout, Fernando Coelho Unipessoal Lda.
Decoration: Gaston y Daniela
Year: 2003-2008

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido

http://www.archdaily.com/43112/axis-viana-hotel-vhm/

August 4, 2010

Architecture’s Modern Marvels

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2010/08/architecture-survey-slideshow-201008

for example:

Foster likes:

MY CHOICES FOR THE MOST IMPORTANT BUILDINGS, MONUMENTS, OR BRIDGES COMPLETED SINCE 1980:

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain (Frank Gehry)
Menil Collection, Houston (Renzo Piano)
Lloyd’s Building, London (Richard Rogers)
National Assembly Building, Dhaka, Bangladesh (Louis Kahn)
Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur (Cesar Pelli)

MY CHOICE FOR THE MOST SIGNIFICANT WORK OF ARCHITECTURE CREATED SO FAR IN THE 21ST CENTURY:

aint-Pierre, Firminy, France (Le Corbusier)
Large Hadron Collider, Switzerland and France (CERN)

Jean Nouvel likes:

MY CHOICES FOR THE MOST IMPORTANT BUILDINGS, MONUMENTS, OR BRIDGES COMPLETED SINCE 1980:

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain (Frank Gehry)
HSBC Building, Hong Kong (Norman Foster)
Tjibaou Cultural Center, New Caledonia (Renzo Piano)
DeYoung Museum, San Francisco (Herzog & de Meuron)
Barajas Airport, Madrid (Richard Rogers)

MY CHOICE FOR THE MOST SIGNIFICANT WORK OF ARCHITECTURE CREATED SO FAR IN THE 21ST CENTURY:

Scottish Parliament Building, Edinburgh (Enric Miralles)

Cesar Pelli likes:

MY CHOICES FOR THE MOST IMPORTANT BUILDINGS, MONUMENTS, OR BRIDGES COMPLETED SINCE 1980:

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain (Frank Gehry)
Mediatheque Building, Sendai, Japan (Toyo Ito)
Barajas Airport, Madrid (Richard Rogers)
Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur (Cesar Pelli)
Millennium Bridge, London (Norman Foster)

and Rogers goes for:

MY CHOICES FOR THE MOST IMPORTANT BUILDINGS, MONUMENTS, OR BRIDGES COMPLETED SINCE 1980:

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain (Frank Gehry)
Menil Collection, Houston (Renzo Piano)
HSBC Building, Hong Kong (Norman Foster)
Cartier Foundation, Paris (Jean Nouvel)
George H. W. Bush Federal Building, San Francisco (Thom Mayne/Morphosis)

MY CHOICE FOR THE MOST SIGNIFICANT WORK OF ARCHITECTURE CREATED SO FAR IN THE 21ST CENTURY:

Bird’s Nest Olympic Stadium, Beijing (Herzog & de Meuron)

let’s get another one, Vinoli likes:

MY CHOICES FOR THE MOST IMPORTANT BUILDINGS, MONUMENTS, OR BRIDGES COMPLETED SINCE 1980:

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain (Frank Gehry)
Menil Collection, Houston (Renzo Piano)
HSBC Headquarters, Hong Kong (Norman Foster)
Church of the Light, Osaka, Japan (Tado Ando)
Tokyo International Forum, Japan (Rafael Viñoly)

MY CHOICE FOR THE MOST SIGNIFICANT WORK OF ARCHITECTURE CREATED SO FAR IN THE 21ST CENTURY:

Large Hadron Collider, Switzerland and France (CERN)

see the full list here :

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2010/08/architecture-survey-list-201008



August 4, 2010

The G-List

Is the rift between design excellence and environmental performance getting wider?

By:Lance Hosey
For its August issue, Vanity Fair surveyed 90 leading architects, critics, and deans to identify the “greatest buildings of the last 30 years.” Based on 52 replies, the clear winner was Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum, in Bilbao, with 28 votes—nearly three times as many as the runner-up, Renzo Piano’s Menil Collection. As I wrote in my blog on July 6, among the choices was a conspicuous dearth of green buildings, and even the few examples from Piano and Norman Foster, architects known for high performance, are older, less environmentally ambitious works. Sustainability, it seems, is not much on the minds of the architectural elite. While green building has become increasingly popular over the past three decades, the gap between standards of design excellence and of environmental performance could be getting wider.

To test this, I conducted my own poll. I asked 150 green building experts and advocates—including architects, engineers, educators, and critics from the U.S., the UK, Europe, and Asia—to name “the five most-important green buildings since 1980,” using whatever criteria they liked. The first 52 responses (to mirror the VF survey) produced 121 projects, and the 18 that received more than a few votes each offer a glimpse at the canon of sustainable design. If Vanity Fair documented architecture’s A-List, consider this the G-List.

THE G-LIST

Top Green Buildings Since 1980

13 Votes
– Adam Joseph Lewis Center (Oberlin, Ohio), William McDonough + Partners, 2001

11 Votes
– California Academy of Sciences (San Francisco), Renzo Piano Building Workshop, 2008

9 Votes
– Genzyme Center (Cambridge, Mass.), Behnisch Architekten, 2003

7 Votes
– Beddington Zero Energy Development/BedZed (London), ZEDfactory, 2002
– Chesapeake Bay Foundation (Annapolis, Md.), SmithGroup, 2001

6 Votes
– Bank of America Tower (aka One Bryant Park) (New York), Cook + Fox Architects, 2009

5 Votes
– Sidwell Friends School (Washington, D.C.), KieranTimberlake, 2006
– Advanced Green Builder Demonstration (Austin, Texas), Pliny Fisk, 1998

4 Votes
– Dockside Green (Victoria, B.C.), Busby Perkins+Will, 2010
– Omega Center for Sustainable Living (Rhinebeck, N.Y.), BNIM, 2009
– New York Times Building (New York), Renzo Piano Building Workshop/FXFowle Architects, 2008
– Aldo Leopold Legacy Center (Barabook, Wis.), Kubala Washatko Architects, 2007
– Druk White Lotus School (Ladakh, India), Arup, 2005
– Swiss Re Tower (London), Foster + Partners, 2003
– Colorado Court (Los Angeles), Pugh + Scarpa Architects, 2002
– Institute for Forestry and Nature Research (Wageningen, The Netherlands), Behnisch Architekten, 1998
– Commerzbank Headquarters (Frankfurt), Foster + Partners, 1997
– Menara Mesiniaga Tower (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia), Hamzah & Yeang, 1992

Top Green Building Since 2000: California Academy of Sciences, Renzo Piano Workshop (7 votes)

The communities represented by the two surveys appear to have dramatically different tastes or standards. Not one building from the VF list recurs in my survey, and not a single American architect appears on both. Only two—Piano and Foster—do, but with different buildings, and their work here is newer. Each of these architects, as well as Behnisch Architekten, has two projects each in the top 18. (Of all the architects on the VF list, only Foster had more than one project.) These facts appear to confirm the widespread impression that Europe is well ahead of the U.S. in high-performance buildings, a belief expressed by many of the voters.

As with the VF list, respondents also named their choices for the single-best building of the 21st century so far. While Oberlin’s Lewis Center, by William McDonough + Partners, nudged out the California Academy of Sciences in the “since 1980” category, in the “since 2000” category, Cal Academy was the only project to receive more than two votes, garnering seven. (The VF list’s winner in this category, Herzog & de Meuron’s “Birds Nest” stadium, also received seven.) Oberlin didn’t get any nods here, even though it was completed in 2001. Do people think it’s older than it is?

In fact, all but three projects on the G-List were completed in the past decade, and the average age is less than seven years, compared with 17 years on the VF poll. As I wrote in my blog post, the A-List seems riddled with nostalgia. For example, Le Corbusier’s Saint-Pierre church in Firminy, France, built posthumously four years ago, received the second-highest number of votes as the most significant work of this century—even though it was designed in the middle of the previous century. (It was Peter Eisenman’s only nomination in either list.) Do today’s experts long for yesterday’s icons?

By contrast, is the G-List more progressive or forward-looking than the A-List? Despite conventional wisdom, sustainable design was born long before LEED launched 10 years ago; most of its practices are decades old, and its principles are ancient. Yet, the G-List is heavily focused on recent projects, which makes sense for a movement founded on effecting change and improving performance. The highest-rated buildings here barely received half the number of votes that Gehry’s Guggenheim did in VF, and the disparity between the top pick and the rest of the G-List isn’t as dramatic. What this suggests is that the green movement may be motivated more by innovative strategies than by single works. In fact, several people declined to respond, specifically because they felt that highlighting individual projects is misguided; of the search for sustainable buildings, one participant remarked, “There is no such thing—yet.”

Alternatively, perhaps the lack of a large number of votes for one building suggests that the green movement has yet to produce a singular iconic structure, a signal of sustainability. This is not to say that green design hasn’t produced powerful work; if anything, this survey confirms not only that sustainability can be attractive—it could, in fact, produce better places. Having visited most of the top picks in both polls, I can safely say that much of the G-List holds its own against the A-List by any criteria of comparison. The projects by Piano and Foster, the two architects represented on both, are arguably more compelling than their projects in VF. And most of the other projects here, compared with those in VF, are better scaled, more responsive to context, more humane, more comfortable, and possibly more attractive—in other words, better designed. Consequently, while these projects certainly were picked at least partly using rational standards—that is, well-documented performance data for these buildings—they also hold up to scrutiny against more traditional, intuitive standards of taste. Could the G-List make a suitable A-List?

Someday, maybe standards of “good design” and “green design” will match, but we’re not there yet. Not by a long shot.

Survey Respondents
Lucia Athens, City of Austin, Texas
Kate Bakewell, Hart Howerton
Bob Berkebile, BNIM
Dana Bourland, Enterprise Community Partners
Angela Brooks, Pugh + Scarpa Architects
Hillary Brown, New Civic Works
Bill Browning, Terrapin Bright Green
Will Bruder, Will Bruder + Partners
John Cary, Next American City
Rick Cook, Cook + Fox Architects
Randy Croxton, Croxton Collaborative Architects
Betsy del Monte, Beck Architecture
Rick Fedrizzi, U.S. Green Building Council
Thomas Fisher, University of Minnesota College of Design
Pliny Fisk, Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems
Eric Corey Freed, Organic Architect
Kira Gould, William McDonough + Partners
Walter Grondzik, Ball State University College of Architecture and Planning
Brad Guy, Material Reuse
Robert Harris, Lake/Flato Architects
Volker Hartkopf, Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics
Lisa Heschong, Heschong Mahone Group
Michelle Kaufmann, MK Designs
Allison Kwok, University of Oregon Department of Architecture
Mary Ann Lazarus, HOK
Charlie Lazor, Lazor Office
Marc L’Italien, EHDD Architecture
Vivian Loftness, Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture
Ray Lucchesi, Lucchesi Galati Architects
Jason McLennan, Cascadia Region Green Building Council
Kirstin Miller, Ecocity Builders
Steven Moore, University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture
David Orr, Oberlin College
Sergio Palleroni, Portland State University Department of Architecture
Jason Pearson, GreenBlue (formerly)
Susan Piedmont-Palladino, National Building Museum
John Quale, University of Virginia School of Architecture
Jonathan Reich, California Polytechnic State University Department of Architecture
Quilian Riano (via Ed Mazria), DSGN AGNC
Traci Rose Rider, Emerging Green Builders (USGBC)
Anne Schopf, Mahlum Architects
Jennifer Siegal, Office of Mobile Design
Henry Siegel, Siegel & Strain Architects
Alex Steffen, Worldchanging
Susan Szenasy, Metropolis
Rives Taylor, Gensler
Gail Vittori, Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems
Donald Watson, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute School of Architecture
Andrew Whalley, Grimshaw Architects
Dan Williams, Dan Williams Architect
Kath Williams, Kath Williams + Associates
Ken Yeang, Hamzah & Yeang

Disclosure: Lance Hosey is a former director with William McDonough + Partners, but he had no influence on the voting in this survey.

Correction: The original post of this story incorrectly reported the number of votes for Sidwell Friends School. The KieranTimberlake building received five votes, not six. We regret the error.

Top Green Buildings Since 1980

3 Votes
– San Francisco Federal Building (San Francisco), Morphosis, 2007
– National Library (Singapore), Hamzah & Yeang, 2005
– City Hall (London), Foster + Partners, 2003
– 4 Times Square (New York), FXFowle, 1998
– Tjibaou Cultural Center (New Caledonia), Renzo Piano Building Workshop, 1998

2 Votes
– Dell Children’s Medical Center (Austin, Texas), Karlsberger, 2007
– Save The Bay (Providence, R.I.), Croxton Collaborative Architects, 2006
– Solar Umbrella House (Venice, Calif.), Pugh + Scarpa, 2005
– Paper Church (Kobe, Japan), Shigeru Ban, 2005
– World Birding Center (Mission, Texas), Lake/Flato, 2004
– Bundestag (The Reichstag), Berlin, Germany, Foster + Partners, 1999
– GSW Building (Berlin), Sauerbruch Hutton, 1999
– 901 Cherry/Offices for Gap Inc. (San Bruno, Calif.), William McDonough + Partners, 1997
– CK Choi Building (Vancouver, B.C.), Matsusaki Wight Architects, 1996
– Harris “Butterfly” House (Mason’s Bend, Ala.), Rural Studio, 1996
– Furniture House (Yamanashi, Japan), Shigeru Ban, 1995
– Marika Alderton House (Nothern Territory, Australia), Glenn Murcutt, 1994
– Audubon Headquarters (New York), Croxton Collaborative Architects, 1993
– Next 21 (Osaka, Japan), Yositika Utida, et al., 1993
– Magney House (New South Wales, Australia), Glenn Murcutt, 1984
– Gregory Bateson Building (Sacramento, Calif.), Sim Van der Ryn/Calthorpe Architects, 1980

1 Vote
(Note: Two projects that received a single vote are not listed: one because it preceded 1980, the other because there is a lack of information.)

– Combs Point House (Ovid, N.Y.), Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, 2010
– 99K House (Houston), Hybrid/ORA, 2009
– Aqua Tower (Chicago), Studio Gang, 2009
– King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (Thuwal, Saudi Arabia), HOK, 2009
– Kroon Hall, Yale University (New Haven, Conn.), Hopkins Architects, 2009
– Make It Right Housing (New Orleans), various architects, 2009
– Solar Decathlon entry (Washington, D.C.), Darmstadt Technical University, 2009
– Twelve West (Portland, Ore.), Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects, 2009
– VNA Senior Living (Somerville, Mass.), Chia-Ming Sze Architect, 2009
– Vancouver Convention Centre (Vancouver, B.C.), LMN Architects, 2009
– Victorinox Special Edition Airstream (mobile), Airstream & Victorinox, 2009
– 355 11th Street (San Francisco), Aidlin Darling Design, 2008
– Cellophane House (New York), KieranTimberlake, 2008 (temporary)
– European Investment Bank (Luxembourg), Ingenhoven Architects, 2008
– Hostler Student Center (Beirut), VJAA, 2008
– InHaus2, Fraunhofer Gesellschaft (Duisburg, Germany), Unknown, 2008
– Mapungubwe National Park Interpretive Center (South Africa), Lerotholi Rich Associated Architects, 2008
– The Mountain (Copenhagen), Bjarke Ingels Group, 2008
– Shangri-La Botanical Gardens (Orange, Texas), Lake/Flato, 2008
– Solaris (Singapore), Hamzah & Yeang, 2008
– Special #9 House (New Orleans), KieranTimberlake, 2008
– Trail Magic Home (Oberlin, Ohio), Donald Watson/ Joseph Ferut Architects, 2008
– Center for Alternative Technology (Machynleth, Wales), Pat Borer and David Lea, 2007
– Desert Living Center (Las Vegas), Lucchesi Galati, 2007
– Habitat Research and Development Centre (Windhoek, Namibia), Nina Maritz Architect, 2007
– Queens Botanical Garden Visitors Center (Flushing, N.Y.), BKSK Architects, 2007
– Yodakandiya (Sri Lanka), Susi Platt/Architecture for Humanity, 2007
– Community Center (Ludesch, Austria), Hermann Kaufmann, 2006
– Big Dig House (Lexington, Mass.), Single Speed Design, 2006
– Darwin Martin House Visiting Center (Buffalo, N.Y.), Toshiko Mori, 2006
– Hearst Tower (New York, N.Y.), Foster + Partners, 2006
– Heifer International Headquarters (Little Rock, Ark.), Polk Stanley Rowland Curzon Porter, 2006
– Plaza Apartments (San Francisco), Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects, 2006
– Ballard Library (Ballard, Wash.), Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, 2005
– Denny Park Apartments (Seattle), Runberg Architecture Group, 2005
– Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research (Toronto), Behnisch Architekten, 2005
– Folsom + Dore Apartments (San Francisco), David Baker + Partners, 2005
– Heelis, The National Trust Headquarters (Swindon, UK), Fielden Clegg Bradley Studios, 2005
– Federal Environment Agency (Dessau, Germany), Sauerbruch Hutton, 2005
– South Lake Union Discovery Center (Seattle), Miller Hull Partnership, 2005
– ZEO Building (Malaysia), unknown, 2005
– Alder Creek Middle School (Tahoe Truckee, Calif.), Lionakis, 2004
– Artists for Humanity Epicenter (Boston), Arrowstreet, 2004
– Austin Resource Center for the Homeless (Austin, Texas), LZT Associates, 2004
– Grundschule Riedberg (Frankfurt), 4a Architekten, 2004
– Global Ecology Research Center (Stanford, Calif.), EHDD Architecture, 2004
– Seattle Central Library (Seattle), OMA, 2004
– School of Nursing and Student Community Center (Houston), BNIM w/ Lake/Flato, 2004
– Sohrabji Godrej Green Business Centre (Hyderabad, India), Karan Grover and Associates, 2004
– Turtle Bay Pedestrian Bridge (Redding, Calif.), Santiago Calatrava, 2004
– Bren School, UCSB (Santa Barbara, Calif.), Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects, 2002
– IslandWood (Bainbridge Island, Wash.), Mithun, 2002
– Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center (Portland, Ore.), Holst Architecture, 2001
– Phoenix Central Library (Phoenix), Will Bruder + Partners, 2001
– Freiburg Vauban Zero-Energy Housing (Freiburg, Germany), Rolf Disch, 2000
– Eden Project (St. Blazey, UK), Grimshaw Architects, 2000
– Glass Chapel (Mason’s Bend, Ala.), Rural Studio, 2000
– Japanese Pavilion (Hannover, Germany), Shigeru Ban/Frei Otto, 2000
– Taylor House (Bahamas), Frank Harmon Architect, 2000
– EarthCraft House (Atlanta), Southface/Greater Atlanta Home Builders Association, 1999
– Mont-Cenis Training Center (Herne-Sodingen, Germany), Jourda & Perraudin, 1999
– Supershed and Pods (Newbern, Ala.), Rural Studio, 1999
– Fletcher-Page House (Kangaroo Valley, Australia), Glenn Murcutt, 1998
– Marin Country Day School, Learning Resources Center (Corte Madera, Calif.), EHDD, 1998
– Canal City Hakata (Fukuoka, Japan), Jon Jerde, 1996
– Eastgate Centre (Harare, Zimbabwe), Mick Pearce, 1996
– Intelligent Workplace, Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh), Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, 1996
– SMUD Customer Service Center (Sacramento, Calif.), Mogavero Notestine Associates, 1996
– Herman Miller Greenhouse (Holland, Mich.), William McDonough + Partners, 1995
– Simpson-Lee House (New South Wales, Australia), Glenn Murcutt, 1994
– British Pavilion (Seville, Spain), Grimshaw Architects, 1992
– NRDC (New York), Croxton Collaborative Architects, 1990
– Kempsey Local History Museum (Kempsey, Australia), Glenn Murcutt, 1988
– Biosphere 2 (Tucson, Ariz.), Phil Hawes, 1987
– Lovins House/Rocky Mountain Institute (Snowmass, Colo.), Aspen Design Group, 1984
– Mount Airy Public Library (Mount Airy, N.C.), Ed Mazria, 1984
– Ball-Eastaway House (New South Wales, Australia), Glenn Murcutt, 1983
– New Canaan Nature Center (New Canaan, Conn.), Buchanan/Watson Architects, 1982
– Marie Short House (Kempsey, Australia), Glenn Murcutt, 1980
– Daylit Walmart stores (various locations), various architects, ongoing
Top Green Building Since 2000

2 Votes
– San Francisco Federal Building (San Francisco), Morphosis, 2007

1 Vote
– Masdar Headquarters (Abu Dhabi, UAE), Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, 2013 (scheduled)
– NASA Sustainability Base (Mountain View, Calif.), William McDonough + Partners, 2011 (scheduled)
– Dockside Green (Victoria, B.C.), Busby Perkins+Will, 2010
– Bank of America Tower (New York), Cook + Fox Architects, 2009
– Kroon Hall, Yale University (New Haven, Conn.), Hopkins Architects, 2009
– Omega Center for Sustainable Living (Rhinebeck, N.Y.), BNIM, 2009
– The Mountain (Copenhagen), Bjarke Ingels Group, 2008
– Solaris (Singapore), Hamzah & Yeang, 2008
– Sidwell Friends School (Washington, D.C.), KieranTimberlake, 2006
– Druk White Lotus School (Ladakh, India), Arup, 2005
– Federal Environment Agency (Dessau, Germany), Sauerbruch Hutton, 2005
– Solar Umbrella House (Venice, Calif.), Pugh + Scarpa Architects, 2005
– Artists for Humanity Epicenter (Boston), Arrowstreet, 2004
– David l. Lawrence Convention Center (Pittsburgh), Rafael Viñoly Architects, 2003
– Genzyme Center (Cambridge, Mass.), Behnisch Architekten, 2003
– Colorado Court (Los Angeles), Pugh + Scarpa Architects, 2002
– Eden Project (St. Blazey, UK), Grimshaw Architects, 2000

Editor’s Note: We had hoped to report which survey respondents voted for which buildings. However, a number of respondents asked that their votes not be published—an understandable request. Therefore, rather than provide incomplete information, we have chosen to keep all votes anonymous.

Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, William McDonough + Partners, 2001 (13 votes)

California Academy of Sciences, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, 2008 (11 votes)

Genzyme Center, Behnisch Architekten, 2003 (9 votes)

Beddington Zero Energy Development (BedZed), ZEDfactory, 2002 (7 votes)

Chesapeake Bay Foundation, SmithGroup, 2001 (7 votes)

Bank of America Tower (aka One Bryant Park), Cook + Fox Architects, 2009 (6 votes)

Sidwell Friends School, KieranTimberlake, 2006 (5 votes)

Advanced Green Builder Demonstration, Pliny Fisk, 1998 (5 votes)

Dockside Green, Busby Perkins+Will, 2010 (4 votes)

Omega Center for Sustainable Living, BNIM, 2009 (4 votes)

New York Times Building, Renzo Piano Building Workshop/FXFowle Architects, 2008 (4 votes)

Aldo Leopold Legacy Center, Kubala Washatko Architects, 2007 (4 votes)

Druk White Lotus School, Arup, 2005 (4 votes)

ccccccccccccccNorman Foster - Swiss Re Building, London

Swiss Re Tower, Foster + Partners, 2003 (4 votes)

Colorado Court, Pugh + Scarpa Architects, 2002 (4 votes)

Institute for Forestry and Nature Research, Behnisch Architekten, 1998 (4 votes)

Commerzbank Headquarters, Foster + Partners, 1997 (4 votes)

Menara Mesiniaga Tower, Hamzah & Yeang, 1992 (4 votes)

http://www.architectmagazine.com/green-building/web-exclusive-the-g-list-survey-of-architecture.aspx

August 4, 2010

200-Foot-High Green Wall Possibility for Portland Federal Building

By Tim Newcomb

Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building

Home to an expanding light-rail system, a thriving bike culture, a citywide recycling program, and a large number of LEED-certified buildings, Portland, Oregon, has long been known for its green sensibility. So it seems fitting that a government building there may soon be sheathed in a 200-foot-high living wall that would be visible from miles away.

The vegetated facade is part of a roughly $135 million overhaul planned for the Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building.  SERA Architects, a local firm, is working with the General Services Administration on retrofitting the building to make it more energy efficient. The 18-story structure was designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and was completed in 1975.

Work is slated to begin this fall on the renovation, which is being funded by federal stimulus dollars. The overall project calls for a new radiant heating and cooling system, a rainwater harvesting system, and energy-efficient interior lighting. Moreover, shading devices will be added to the east and south facades.

The centerpiece of the plan, however, is the green wall on the building’s west side. While the design is in flux , early schemes show seven movable, vertical “fins” that stretch the length of the building. Planting boxes created from recycled coconut husks would be affixed to a steel framing system. The architects are working with Sharp & Diamond Landscape Architecture, based in Vancouver, on the plan.

Don Eggleston, AIA, president of SERA, says the living wall has aesthetic value, yet also aids greatly in mitigating solar gain. “The original thought was that vegetated fins could help maximize the shading in the hot afternoon suns,” he says. “ We are out to maximize our energy conservation.”

While the green wall has been highly publicized, the project team isn’t confident it will actually happen. Concerns regarding installation costs, possible performance issues, and maintenance have all been raised. “What we don’t want to end up with is in 30 years having to do this all over again,” says Kevin Kampschroer, director of the GSA’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings. If the green wall is nixed, Kampschroer says they intend to employ another shading strategy.

http://ht.ly/24PL6

August 4, 2010

Only CEMENT FACTORY may go for that!

Architects: Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco & Juan Ignacio Muñoz (MGP Arquitectura y Urbanismo)
Location: Yumbo, Valle, Colombia
Collaborators: Alvaro Bohorquez, Camilo Correa, M. Juliana Sorzano
Client: Cementos Argos
Contractor:  Concreto S.A. – Cementos Argos
Constructed Area: 575 sqm
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

In July 2006, the project is the winner of an architectural contest, for the resolution of a “skin” for a technical building containing an self generation electrical plant for cement factory. The Factory wanted to generate also a corporative image with the building. Their purpose became a mutual opportunity to generate an experimentation laboratory of technical possibilities with the material they produce, with very low density concretes. In a parallel way with the technical solution we found a high symbolic value in cultural textures found in the 3 sites the project was built, which had manual work implied, making an industrial building a reference for the local people of each site.

As a result we designed 2 great format prefabricated pieces placed in a way to simulate the textures made by the locals in fibers to fabricate artisanal objects.

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco © Andrés Valbuena

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco first floor plan

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco roof plan

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco elevation 01

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco section 01

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco detail 01

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco detail 02

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco detail 03

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco render 01

Argos, Building for an Electrical Generator at a Cement Factory - Felipe Gonzalez-Pacheco render 02

http://www.archdaily.com/68511/argos-building-for-an-electrical-generator-at-a-cement-factory-felipe-gonzalez-pacheco/?f=featured


August 4, 2010

Riberão Swimming Pools / Pitagoras Arquitectos

Architects: Pitagoras Arquitectos
Location: Ribeirão, Vila Nova De Famalicão, Portugal
Principals: Fernando Seara de Sá, Raul Roque Figueiredo, Alexandre Coelho Lima, Manuel Vilhena Roque
Collaborators: Fernando Torres, Marlene Sousa, Francisco Oliveira, Hélio Pinto
Promotor: Município de Vila Nova De Famalicão
Project Year: 2004-2008
Photographs: Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

The installation of the building benefits from a large extension of land in the North-South direction, where a plan distributed over two floors has been developed with a ground floor and a partially buried basement.

The approach to public spaces in the area surrounding the building to the West and South site, aims to develop parking areas and its characterisation allows the placing of distinct use access in a hierarchy.

For whoever travels to the Swimming Pool Complex using the roads on the West and South sides, the building is settled within a large formal facility; marked by a strong sense of horizontality suggested by the morphology of the land.

The atrium is developed along the entire longitudinal extension of the building of the main area which encloses the 25 m pool, and on a raised level.

The separation of the two environments is made by a glass wall, which allows those who pass through the atrium to have permanent visual contact with the water´s surface.

The swimming pool building is basically a rectangular designed block, intercepted by two patios to the East and finished with another one dug into the ground at the South end.

The formal restriction, besides being what is desired, proposing doing some exploring and enjoying the surprise, ensures the control of the construction environment by the way it is organised.

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

Riberão Swimming Pools - Pitagoras Arquitectos © Luis Ferreira Alves

site plan site plan

basement floor plan basement floor plan

ground floor plan ground floor plan

east elevation east elevation

north elevation north elevation

west elevation west elevation

south elevation south elevation

section 01 section 01

section 02 section 02

section 03 section 03

details details


http://www.archdaily.com/71481/riberao-swimming-pools-pitagoras-arquitectos/