Archive for August 3rd, 2010

August 3, 2010

In Progress: Doha Office Tower, Qatar / Ateliers Jean Nouvel / Nelson Garrido

A year ago, we featured a set of Tim Harris’ early construction photos of Jean Nouvel’s Doha Office tower previously on AD, and now photographer Nelson Garrido has shared some new shots of the 45 story cylindrical structure.  The building’s dia-grid gives much character to the project, as it not only provides structural support but also gives the volume a textured appearance from far away that turns into a more delicate patterning in closer range.  The facade is layered with metal brise-soleil based on a traditional Islamic pattern.  The fairly standard geometry module becomes a complex visual as it is rotated and flipped to provide maximum shading for the interior of the building.   In this way, the arrangement of the panels is both functional and supplies the aesthetic touch that will define the tower.

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0000 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0001 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0002 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0003 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0004 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0005 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0006 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0007 © Nelson Garrido

JEAN_NOUVEL_HIGH_RISE_OFFICE_BUILDING_QATAR0008 © Nelson Garrido

http://www.archdaily.com/69449/in-progress-doha-office-tower-qatar-ateliers-jean-nouvel-nelson-garrido/

Tim Harris just shared with us some photos of the Doha Office Tower in Qatar, a 45-story tall tower by Jean Nouvel currently under construction, with an interesting skin.

Tim says: The Tower is in the West Bay area of Doha, close to the iconic pyrimidal Sheraton hotel, built in the 1980’s when it was alone and terminated the view of the prettiest corniche’s in the Middle East.

Now there is a frenzy of building and this area has become the financial and business hub of the city. Nouvel’s tower stands amid a mixed bag of buildings some dating back closer to the Sheraton but most built in the last few years.

The adjacent cylindrical building that expands at the bottom and top, is the ‘Tornado Tower’, and has just won the best tall building award in the Middle East and North Africa.

The ‘Tornado Tower’ lacks shading and becomes very dusty. Nouvel’s tower acheives the opposite with effortless ease, elegance and elán.

63 © Tim Harris

116 © Tim Harris

211 © Tim Harris

38 © Tim Harris

45 © Tim Harris

55 © Tim Harris

63 © Tim Harris

72 © Tim Harris

81 © Tim Harris

92 © Tim Harris

102 © Tim Harris

117 © Tim Harris

122 © Tim Harris

132 © Tim Harris

151 © Tim Harris

162 © Tim Harris

171 © Tim Harris

http://www.archdaily.com/28808/in-progress-doha-office-tower-qatar-ateliers-jean-nouvel/

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August 3, 2010

Marina Bay Sands / Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Architects: Safdie Architects
Location: Singapore, Singapore
Project Director: Moshe Safdie
Executive Architects: Aedas, Pte, Ltd.
Structural Engineering: Arup
Landscape Design: Peter Walker & Partners
Landscape Construction: Peridian International Inc
Site Area: 154,938 sqm
Project Area: 845,000 sqm
Budget: US $5.7 billion
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Program

1. Hotel – 2,560 luxury rooms in three hotel towers, totaling 265,683 square meters (2,860,000 square feet)

2. Sands SkyPark – the three hotel towers are connected at the top (200 meters/656 feet) by a 9,941 square meter (107,000 square foot) park that brings together a public observatory, jogging paths, gardens, restaurants, lounges, and an infinity swimming pool

  • This 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tropical oasis is longer than the Eiffel Tower is tall and large enough to park four-and-a-half A380 jumbo jets
  • It spans from tower to tower and cantilevers 65 meters (213 feet) beyond to form one of the world’s largest public cantilevers
  • It is 340 meters (1,115 feet) long from the northern tip to the south end
  • The park’s maximum width is 40 meters (131 feet)
  • The 1,396 square meter (15,026 square foot) swimming pool is the largest outdoor pool at its height and has a 145 meter (475 foot) vanishing edge
  • The entire park can host up to 3,900 people
  • Its lush gardens include 250 trees and 650 plants

3. Casino – the “atrium style” casino features four levels of gaming and entertainment in one space totaling 15,000 square meters (161,500 square feet) with the atrium ceiling holding a 7 ton chandelier with 132,000 Swarovski crystals and 66,000 LEDs

4. The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands – includes over 74,322 square meters (800,000 square feet) of retail and restaurant space

5. Sands Expo and Convention Center – consists of 121,000 square meters (1.3 million square feet) of flexible convention and exhibition space, including one of the largest ballrooms in Asia with area of 8,000 square meters (86,100 square feet) and the capacity to host 11,000 people

6. Museum of ArtScience – is 15,000 square meters (161,500 square feet square feet) with 6,000 meters (64,580 square feet) of gallery space, a 3,000 square meter (32,290 square foot) lily pond at grade and has a palm measuring 80 meters (260 feet) in diameter reaching 62 meters (203 feet) above grade and 11 meters (36 feet) below grade

7. Theaters – the two theaters are 21,980 square meters (236,600 square feet square feet) with a combined 4,000 seats

8. Crystal Pavilions – the 5,914 square meters (63,660 square feet) Crystal Pavilions house shops and nightclubs and are the first glass and steel structures to be set in Marina Bay

9. Event Plaza – is 5,000 square meters (54,000 square foot) and capable of hosting 10,000 people for a diverse range of local and international live performances

Public Art

Marina Bay Sands integrates seven site-specific works by artists handpicked by Moshe Safdie to enhance the visitor experience. The Art Path features large-scale public works by artists including:

  • James Carpenter, Blue Reflection Facade with Light Entry Passage
  • Antony Gormley, Drift
  • Ned Kahn, Wind Arbor, Rain Oculus and The Tipping Wall
  • Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #917, Arcs and Circles and Wall Drawing; #915, Arcs, Circle and Irregular Bands
  • Chongbin Zheng, Rising Forest

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

Singapore - Hotel - Marina Bay Sands - Safdie Architects © Courtesy of Safdie Architects

ground floor plan ground floor plan

roof plan roof plan

general elevation general elevation

east elevation east elevation

skypark hotel plan skypark hotel plan

skypark hotel section 01 skypark hotel section 01

skypark hotel section 02 skypark hotel section 02

west elevation day west elevation day

west elevation night west elevation night

http://www.archdaily.com/70186/marina-bay-sands-safdie-architects/

August 3, 2010

i’m back with an impresive tower by ZAHA HADID just finished after 5yrs in Marseille, France

CMA CGM HEADQUARTERS

Marseille, France
2005–2010


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet

PROGRAM:
Head offices and parking

CLIENT:
CMA CGM

SIZE:
Gross Floor Area: 64000 m²
Height: 33 Floors / 147 m

CONCEPT:
The new Headquarter tower for CMA CGM in Marseille, France rises in a metallic curving arc that slowly lifts from the ground and accelerates skywards into the dramatic vertical geometry of its revolutionary forms. The disparate volumes of the tower are generated from a number of gradual centripetal vectors that emerge from within the solid ground surface, gently converge towards each other, and then bend apart, towards its ultimate co-ordinate 142.8 metres above the ground. The tower’s structural columns define, and are enclosed within, a double façade system that reflect these centripetal vectors, generating a dynamic symbiosis between a fixed structural core of this Head Office and its peripheral array of columns.

Marseille, one of the largest cities in France, is an historic Provencal city centred around the centuries-old harbour, with a rich past of several cultural interventions from Phoenician, to Greek, to the Romans. This fortified city has grown into a cosmopolitan metropolis due to its development into one of the most important international ports in Europe. With the city’s distinguished naval history, and the unique sighting of the CMA CGM tower beside both the harbour and the major motorway interchange, there is an opportunity to provide a highly visible landmark building to act as a gateway to the city from both land and sea. This new tower would be an iconic vertical element that interacts with the other significant landmarks of Marseille: La Major; the Basilica Notre Dame de la Garde; the Fort St. Jean; and the Chateau d’If.

The key challenge for the design of the CMA CGM Headquarter tower is the integration of the building environment and the creation of a totally unique, iconic edifice. The current CMA CGM headquarters distinguishes itself with a prominent position within immediate vicinity of the Mirabeau site. Flowing past the site on both sides is an elevated motorway viaduct that bifurcates at the western edge of the new tower’s location. At ground level, a major new transport interchange will allow pedestrians to access the new public transport facilities for the this district of Marseille. Whilst the quai and its waterways are also adjacent to site of the new tower. Directly at the confluence of this dynamic urban movement, the new Tower would accentuate its verticality and create a signature feature that would set a commanding new presence.

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS, FEB 2009:


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet


Construction Photography © Hélène Binet

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS, JUNE 2008:


Construction Photography © Werner Huthmaher


Construction Photography © Werner Huthmaher


Construction Photography © Werner Huthmaher


Construction Photography © Werner Huthmaher


Construction Photography © Werner Huthmaher

CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS, MARCH 2008:


Construction Photography © Luke Hayes


Construction Photography © Luke Hayes


Construction Photography © Luke Hayes


Construction Photography © Luke Hayes

COMPUTER RENDERS:


Render © Zaha Hadid Architects


Render © Zaha Hadid Architects

VIDEO:

Video © Zaha Hadid Architects

ARCHITECT:
ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS
PROJECT DIRECTOR: Jim Heverin
PROJECT ARCHITECT: Stephane Vallotton
PROJECT TEAM: Karim Muallem, Simone Contasta, Leonie Heinrich, Alvin Triestanto, Muriel Boselli, Eugene Leung, Bhushan Mantri, Jerome Michel, Nerea Feliz, Prashanth Sridharan,Birgit Eistert, Evelyn Gono, Marian Ripoll
COMPETITION TEAM: Jim Heverin, Simon Kim, Michele Pasca Di Magliano, Viviana Muscettola

CONSULTANTS:
PARTNER ARCHITECTS: SRA (Paris) – RTA (Marseille)
STRUCTURAL/SERVICES: Ove Arup & Partners (London)
FAÇADE: Ove Arup & Partners (London),
Robert-Jan Van Santen Associates (Lille)
COST: R2M (Marseille)

http://www.zaha-hadid.com/offices-and-towers/cma-cgm-headquarters-tower

http://zahahadidblog.com/