Archive for ‘Atelier jean Nouvel AJN’

July 7, 2011

midi station in Brussels | Atelier jean Nouvel AJN


midi station by jean nouvel located in brussels, belgium
image © ateliers jean nouvel

french architect jean nouvel has unveiled the preliminary design for the midi station renovation project located in brussels, belgium.
the proposed buildings will transform the existing railway station into a symbolic destination for travelers while simultaneously
announcing their arrival to the capital city of both belgium and the european union.


view from the esplanade de l’europe
image © 
ateliers jean nouvel

a 550 meter long facade comprised of retail, offices and a conference center will border the heavily frequented avenue fonsny at ground level.
the exterior will be clad with orange hued panels while visible vegetation accent multiple staggered roof terraces. the distinctive v-shaped silhouette
emerges from the elongated base generating a prominent urban landmark. the extensive glass curtain wall will envelope the angled facades reflecting
the lively and continuous train activity into the surrounding landscape creating a dynamic urban mirror.


view from the avenue paul henri spaak day
image © ateliers jean nouvel


view from the docks
image © ateliers jean nouvel


view at the foot of building v
image © jean nouvel


view from the center of brussels
image © ateliers jean nouvel


view from the avenue paul henri spaak night
image © ateliers jean nouvel


ground plan
image © ateliers jean nouvel


elevation south on avenue fonsny
image © ateliers jean nouvel


partial elevation avenue fonsny
image © ateliers jean nouvel

 

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/15558/jean-nouvel-midi-station-in-brussels.html

March 12, 2011

Jean Nouvele’s 100 11th Ave in NY

IMG_0228-bw2 © Paul Clemence

cityview_insnow © Ateliers Jean Nouvel

IMG_0476-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0460-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0458-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0289-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0277-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0256-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0251-a © Paul Clemence

IMG_0241-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0215-bw © Paul Clemence

IMG_0214-bw1-b © Paul Clemence

Photographer Paul Clemence shared with us some photos of 100 11th Ave, a residential tower in Chelsea by Jean Nouvel.

This building is almost complete, and it has a strong presence from across the river, or when seen from the High Line. I remember that a month ago, I was looking at it from the High Line and a lady next to me said “how old is that building?”. Despite the fact of its high tech curtain wall, using 1647 different window panels, the building looks ancient, almost like a left over from the old waterfront.

The variation of the windows is not only on their size, but also the inclination and the glass tint, giving this building a unique facade.

http://www.archdaily.com/38137/jean-nouveles-100-11th-ave-in-ny/

 

 

March 12, 2011

City Shortens Nouvel’s 53rd Street Tower

1252621183-momaenlarge 1252621183-momaenlarge1252621156-buildingbig 1252621156-buildingbig

A few weeks ago, we shared ’s design for 53 West 53rd Street, a 1,250 foot project that would dominate the site.  Reactions to the project were different across the board as some felt the tower would push  forward in the architectural world, whereas others did not agree with the scale or aesthetic of the project.  As we previously mentioned, Nouvel’s project had a long way to go before construction, and this week, as Nicolai Ouroussoff reported for the New York Times,  it seems that the City Planning Department has decided to shorten the proposed tower by 200 feet.

Conceived as a giant spire, the tower’s sleek silhouette and proportions, “particularly the exaggerated relationship between its small footprint and enormous height” would have certainly left an impression on the Midtown skyline.  The top of the tower, with its three uneven peaks, seems to have caused most of the problem.  Ms. Amanda Burden, the city planning commissioner, said that the top did not meet the aesthetic standards of a building that would compete in height with the city’s most famous towers.  Ms. Burden explained,  ”Members of the commission had to make a decision based on what was in front of them,” she said. “The development team had to show us that they were creating something as great or even greater than the Empire State Building and the design they showed us was unresolved.”

The project was not fully developed, as the “three peaks were too symmetrical, which gave them a slightly static appearance.”  Nouvel would have needed to clearly address such design issues, yet some argue that the Pritzker winner is fully capable of doing so.  The new height restriction will also account for a loss of 150,000 square feet.  This loss of space could lead to “cuts in the design budget, which could mean cheaper materials and more cramped interiors.”

The project is still getting a lot of attention in , and across the architectural world as some are bitterly against the project whereas others are in support of it.  As Nicolai Ouroussoffconcluded, “…now, one of the most enchanting skyscraper designs of recent memory, may well be lost because some people worry that nothing in our current age can measure up to the past. It is a mentality that, once it takes hold, risks transforming a living city into an urban mausoleum.”

http://www.archdaily.com/34972/city-shortens-nouvels-53rd-street-tower/

 

March 3, 2011

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk | Ateliers Jean Nouvel

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Architects: Ateliers Jean Nouvel
Location: 
Collaborators: Pipiloti Rist, Alain Bony, Henri Labiole, Patrick Blanc
Photographs: Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Sofitel Vienna Stephansdom-Stilwerk / Ateliers Jean Nouvel © Julien Lanoo

Opening its doors to the public in December 2010, ’s latest project, Sofitel Stephansdom-Stilwerk is comprised of a variety of uses.  Featuring a 5 star hotel with 182 bedrooms and suites, the mixed-use project also includes conference rooms, a fitness club, a restaurant with panoramic views on the 18th floor, retail trade area of 4,900 sqm and a public parking lot.

Situated on the banks of the Danube river this new building of the insurance company UNIQA Versicherung was designed for a competition in 2005.

http://www.archdaily.com/116610/sofitel-vienna-stephansdom-stilwerk-ateliers-jean-nouvel/

 

February 5, 2011

53 West 53rd Street by Jean Nouvel

Architect Jean Nouvel has unveiled his design for a new 75-story tower on a site next to the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

The tower at 53rd West 53rd Street will contain a hotel, luxury apartments and three floors for use by MoMA to expand its exhibition space.

The restaurant and lounge are below ground level, so that pedestrians can peer in through the exterior, which is entirely sheathed in glass.

The following text is from developer Hines:

JEAN NOUVEL DESIGN UNVEILED FOR HINES PROJECT IN MANHATTAN (NEW YORK)

Hines, the international real estate firm, announced today the formal selection of Paris-based architect Jean Nouvel as the designer of a new building slated for a key parcel in midtown Manhattan, adjacent to The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). The preliminary architectural design was also released.

Nouvel’s bold design will rise 75 stories from the 17,000-square-foot-site between 53rd and 54th streets just west of MoMA. Currently, a mix of uses is contemplated for the building including: a 50,000-square-foot expansion of MoMA’s galleries (levels two to five); a 100-room, seven-star hotel and 120 highest-end residential condominiums on the upper floors. The project will likely commence pre-sales in late 2008.

Nouvel’s design maximizes the site while considering the city’s zoning envelope. The proposed building’s unique silhouette tapers as it rises to a distinctive spire. Its steel and glass façade reveals the diagrid structural design.

Gerald D. Hines, chairman of Hines, commented, “Nouvel’s exciting concept has the potential to become an international architectural design icon.”

The Hines firm has collaborated with Nouvel on both 40 Mercer in New York’s SoHo neighborhood and on the C1 Tower currently under development in Paris.

Jean Nouvel has headed his own architectural practice, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, since 1970. His honors include the Gold Medal of the French Academy of Architecture, the Royal Gold Medal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Aga Khan Prize, honorary fellowships from the American Institute of Architecture, and France’s National Grand Prize for Architecture. He was awarded Italy’s Borromini Prize and Japan’s Praemium Imperial Career Prize as well as the Wolf Prize, the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize in architecture, and the International Highrise Award.

Among Mr. Nouvel’s completed buildings are the Arab World Institute, Paris; Lyon Opera House; Cartier Foundation, Paris; Galeries Lafayette department store, Berlin; Lucerne Culture and Congress Center; Tours Conference Center; The Hotel in Lucerne; Andel office building, Prague; Nantes Justice Center; Dentsu Tower, Tokyo; museum of archaeology, Périgueux; the technology center in Wismar; Agbar office tower, Barcelona; extension to the Queen Sofia museum, Madrid; Quai Branly Museum, Paris; Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis; Brembo’s research and development centre; and the Richemont Corporation headquarters in Geneva.

Hines has been active in New York City since 1981, having developed six major buildings in midtown, including Philip Johnson’s “Lipstick Building” at 885 Third Avenue. In addition to the recently completed 40 Mercer, Hines has three other residential projects underway in New York City including One Jackson Square in Greenwich Village. Hines also acquired three major office buildings in New York since 2003, including I.M. Pei’s 499 Park, and currently manages more than 11.5 million square feet of office space in the area.

Posted by Rose Etherington

http://www.dezeen.com/2007/11/16/53-west-53rd-street-by-jean-nouvel/

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 173 other followers